[Title 3 CFR ]
[Code of Federal Regulations (annual edition) - January 1, 2003 Edition]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]




[[Page i]]


          3

          2002 Compilation
          and
          Parts 100-102

                         Revised as of January 1, 2003

The President





          Published by:
          Office of the Federal Register
          National Archives and Records Administration

          A Special Edition of the Federal Register



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                     U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
                            WASHINGTON : 2003



  For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing 
                                  Office
  Internet: bookstore.gpo.gov Phone: (202) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2250
                Mail: Stop SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-0001

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                            TABLE OF CONTENTS


                                                                    Page
List of Title 3 Compilations..........................................iv

Explanation of the Code of Federal Regulations.........................v
Explanation of This Title.............................................ix
How To Cite This Title................................................xi
Title 3.............................................................xiii
     2002 Compilation--Presidential Documents..........................1
     Chapter I--Executive Office of the President....................341
Title 3 Finding Aids.................................................351
     Tables..........................................................353
     List of CFR Sections Affected...................................369
     Index...........................................................371
CFR Finding Aids.....................................................379
     Table of CFR Titles and Chapters................................381
     Alphabetical List of Agencies Appearing in the CFR..............399


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                          TITLE 3 COMPILATIONS


------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Title 3 Compilations           Proclamations     Executive Orders
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1936-1938......................  2161-2286.........          7316-7905
 1938-1943......................  2287-2587.........          7906-9347
 1943-1948......................  2588-2823.........         9348-10025
 1949-1953......................  2824-3041.........        10026-10510
 1954-1958......................  3042-3265.........        10511-10797
 1959-1963......................  3266-3565.........        10798-11134
 1964-1965......................  3566-3694.........        11135-11263
 1966-1970......................  3695-4025.........        11264-11574
 1971-1975......................  4026-4411.........        11575-11893
 1976...........................  4412-4480.........        11894-11949
 1977...........................  4481-4543.........        11950-12032
 1978...........................  4544-4631.........        12033-12110
 1979...........................  4632-4709.........        12111-12187
 1980...........................  4710-4812.........        12188-12260
 1981...........................  4813-4889.........        12261-12336
 1982...........................  4890-5008.........        12337-12399
 1983...........................  5009-5142.........        12400-12456
 1984...........................  5143-5291.........        12457-12497
 1985...........................  5292-5424.........        12498-12542
 1986...........................  5425-5595.........        12543-12579
 1987...........................  5596-5759.........        12580-12622
 1988...........................  5760-5928.........        12623-12662
 1989...........................  5929-6084.........        12663-12698
 1990...........................  6085-6240.........        12699-12741
 1991...........................  6241-6398.........        12742-12787
 1992...........................  6399-6520.........        12788-12827
 1993...........................  6521-6643.........        12828-12890
 1994...........................  6644-6763.........        12891-12944
 1995...........................  6764-6859.........        12945-12987
 1996...........................  6860-6965.........        12988-13033
 1997...........................  6966-7061.........        13034-13071
 1998...........................  7062-7161.........        13072-13109
 1999...........................  7162-7262.........        13110-13144
 2000...........................  7263-7389.........        13145-13185
 2001...........................  7263-7516.........        13145-13251
 2002...........................  7517-7635.........        13252-13282
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Beginning with 1976, Title 3 Compilations also include regulations
  contained in Chapter I, Executive Office of the President.
Supplementary publications include: Presidential documents of the Hoover
  Administration (two volumes), Proclamations 1870-2037 and Executive
  Orders 5076-6070; Consolidated Indexes for 1936-1965; and Consolidated
  Tables for 1936-1965.


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                               EXPLANATION

    The Code of Federal Regulations is a codification of the general and 
permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the Executive 
departments and agencies of the Federal Government. The Code is divided 
into 50 titles which represent broad areas subject to Federal 
regulation. Each title is divided into chapters which usually bear the 
name of the issuing agency. Each chapter is further subdivided into 
parts covering specific regulatory areas.
    Each volume of the Code is revised at least once each calendar year 
and issued on a quarterly basis approximately as follows:

Title 1 through Title 16.................................as of January 1
Title 17 through Title 27..................................as of April 1
Title 28 through Title 41...................................as of July 1
Title 42 through Title 50................................as of October 1

    The appropriate revision date is printed on the cover of each 
volume.

LEGAL STATUS

    The contents of the Federal Register are required to be judicially 
noticed (44 U.S.C. 1507). The Code of Federal Regulations is prima facie 
evidence of the text of the original documents (44 U.S.C. 1510).

HOW TO USE THE CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS

    The Code of Federal Regulations is kept up to date by the individual 
issues of the Federal Register. These two publications must be used 
together to determine the latest version of any given rule.
    To determine whether a Code volume has been amended since its 
revision date (in this case, January 1, 2003), consult the ``List of CFR 
Sections Affected (LSA),'' which is issued monthly, and the ``Cumulative 
List of Parts Affected,'' which appears in the Reader Aids section of 
the daily Federal Register. These two lists will identify the Federal 
Register page number of the latest amendment of any given rule.

EFFECTIVE AND EXPIRATION DATES

    Each volume of the Code contains amendments published in the Federal 
Register since the last revision of that volume of the Code. Source 
citations for the regulations are referred to by volume number and page 
number of the Federal Register and date of publication. Publication 
dates and effective dates are usually not the same and care must be 
exercised by the user in determining the actual effective date. In 
instances where the effective date is beyond the cut-off date for the 
Code a note has been inserted to reflect the future effective date. In 
those instances where a regulation published in the Federal Register 
states a date certain for expiration, an appropriate note will be 
inserted following the text.

OMB CONTROL NUMBERS

    The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-511) requires 
Federal agencies to display an OMB control number with their information 
collection request. 


[[Page vi]]

Many agencies have begun publishing numerous OMB 
control numbers as amendments to existing regulations in the CFR. These 
OMB numbers are placed as close as possible to the applicable 
recordkeeping or reporting requirements.

OBSOLETE PROVISIONS

    Provisions that become obsolete before the revision date stated on 
the cover of each volume are not carried. Code users may find the text 
of provisions in effect on a given date in the past by using the 
appropriate numerical list of sections affected. For the period before 
January 1, 2001, consult either the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1949-
1963, 1964-1972, 1973-1985, or 1986-2000, published in 11 separate 
volumes. For the period beginning January 1, 2001, a ``List of CFR 
Sections Affected'' is published at the end of each CFR volume.

CFR INDEXES AND TABULAR GUIDES

    A subject index to the Code of Federal Regulations is contained in a 
separate volume, revised annually as of January 1, entitled CFR Index 
and Finding Aids. This volume contains the Parallel Table of Statutory 
Authorities and Agency Rules (Table I). A list of CFR titles, chapters, 
and parts and an alphabetical list of agencies publishing in the CFR are 
also included in this volume.
    An index to the text of ``Title 3--The President'' is carried within 
that volume.
    The Federal Register Index is issued monthly in cumulative form. 
This index is based on a consolidation of the ``Contents'' entries in 
the daily Federal Register.
    A List of CFR Sections Affected (LSA) is published monthly, keyed to 
the revision dates of the 50 CFR titles.

REPUBLICATION OF MATERIAL

    There are no restrictions on the republication of material appearing 
in the Code of Federal Regulations.

INQUIRIES

    For a legal interpretation or explanation of any regulation in this 
volume, contact the issuing agency. The issuing agency's name appears at 
the top of odd-numbered pages.
    For inquiries concerning CFR reference assistance, call 202-741-6000 
or write to the Director, Office of the Federal Register, National 
Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC 20408 or e-mail 
[email protected]

SALES

    The Government Printing Office (GPO) processes all sales and 
distribution of the CFR. For payment by credit card, call toll free, 
866-512-1800, or DC area, 202-512-1800, M-F 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. e.s.t. or 
fax your order to 202-512-2250, 24 hours a day. For payment by check, 
write to the Superintendent of Documents, Attn: New Orders, P.O. Box 
371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954. For GPO Customer Service call 202-
512-1803.

ELECTRONIC SERVICES

    The full text of the Code of Federal Regulations, the LSA (List of 
CFR Sections Affected), The United States Government Manual, the Federal 
Register, Public Laws, Public Papers, Weekly Compilation of Presidential 
Documents and the Privacy Act Compilation are available in electronic 
format at www.access.gpo.gov/nara (``GPO Access''). For more 
information, contact Electronic Information Dissemination Services, U.S. 
Government Printing Office. Phone 202-512-1530, or 888-293-6498 (toll-
free). E-mail, [email protected]


[[Page vii]]

    The Office of the Federal Register also offers a free service on the 
National Archives and Records Administration's (NARA) World Wide Web 
site for public law numbers, Federal Register finding aids, and related 
information. Connect to NARA's web site at www.archives.gov/federal--
register. The NARA site also contains links to GPO Access.

                              Raymond A. Mosley,
                                    Director,
                          Office of the Federal Register.

January 1, 2003.


[[Page ix]]

                        EXPLANATION OF THIS TITLE

    This volume of ``Title 3--The President'' contains a compilation of 
Presidential documents and a codification of regulations issued by the 
Executive Office of the President.

    The 2002 Compilation contains the full text of those documents 
signed by the President that were required to be published in the 
Federal Register. Signature date rather than publication date is the 
criterion for inclusion. With each annual volume, the Presidential 
documents signed in the previous year become the new compilation.

    Chapter I contains regulations issued by the Executive Office of the 
President. This section is a true codification like other CFR volumes, 
in that its contents are organized by subject or regulatory area and are 
updated by individual issues of the Federal Register.

    Presidential documents in this volume may be cited ``3 CFR, 2002 
Comp.'' Thus, the preferred abbreviated citation for Proclamation 7517 
appearing on page 1 of this book, is ``3 CFR, 2002 Comp., p. 1.'' 
Chapter I entries may be cited ``3 CFR.'' Thus, the preferred 
abbreviated citation for section 100.1, appearing in chapter I of this 
book, is ``3 CFR 100.1.''

   This book is one of the volumes in a series that began with 
Proclamation 2161 of March 19, 1936, and Executive Order 7316 of March 
13, 1936, and that has been continued by means of annual compilations 
and periodic cumulations. The entire Title 3 series, as of January 1, 
2003, is encompassed in the volumes listed on page iv.

    For readers interested in proclamations and Executive orders prior 
to 1936, there is a two-volume set entitled Proclamations and Executive 
Orders, Herbert Hoover (March 4, 1929, to March 4, 1933). Codified 
Presidential documents are published in the Codification of Presidential 
Proclamations and Executive Orders (April 13, 1945--January 20, 1989). 
Other public Presidential documents not required to be published in the 
Federal Register, such as speeches, messages to Congress, and 
statements, can be found in the Weekly Compilation of Presidential 
Documents and the Public Papers of the Presidents series. Each of these 
Office of the Federal Register publications is available for sale from 
the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, 
DC 20402.

   This book was prepared in the Presidential Documents and Legislative 
Division by Karen A. Thornton and Stephen J. Frattini, under the 
supervision of Gwendolyn J. Henderson. Karen L. Ashlin and John S. 
Ashlin were assistant editors.

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[[Page xi]]
________________________________________________________________________

               Cite Presidential documents in this volume
                            3 CFR, 2002 Comp.
                      thus: 3 CFR, 2002 Comp., p. 1
________________________________________________________________________

                  Cite chapter I entries in this volume
                                  3 CFR
                            thus: 3 CFR 100.1
________________________________________________________________________


[[Page xiii]]
                         TITLE 3--THE PRESIDENT


                                                                    Page

2002 Compilation--Presidential Documents:
     Proclamations.....................................................1
     Executive Orders................................................195
     Other Presidential Documents....................................275
Chapter I--Executive Office of the President:
    Part 100.........................................................342
    Part 101.........................................................342
    Part 102.........................................................342
Finding Aids:
    Table 1--Proclamations...........................................353
    Table 2--Executive Orders........................................357
    Table 3--Other Presidential Documents............................359
    Table 4--Presidential Documents Affected During 2001.............363
    Table 5--Statutes Cited as Authority for Presidential Documents..367
    List of CFR Sections Affected....................................369
    Index............................................................371
CFR Finding Aids:
    Table of CFR Titles and Chapters.................................379
    Alphabetical List of Agencies Appearing in the CFR...............399





Title 3--The President

Proclamations


2002 Compilation--Presidential Documents




                              PROCLAMATIONS




Proc. 7517

[[Page 1]]

Proclamation 7517 of January 15, 2002

Religious Freedom Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Religious freedom is a cornerstone of our Republic, a core 
          principle of our Constitution, and a fundamental human right. 
          Many of those who first settled in America, such as Pilgrims, 
          came for the freedom of worship and belief that this new land 
          promised. And when the British Colonies became the United 
          States, our Founders constitutionally limited our Federal 
          Government's capacity to interfere with religious belief by 
          prohibiting the Congress from passing any law ``respecting an 
          establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise 
          thereof.'' These constitutional limits have allowed the 
          flourishing of faith across our country, which greatly blesses 
          our land.
          George Washington forcefully expressed our collective 
          constitutional promise to protect the rights of people of all 
          faiths, in a historic letter he wrote to the Jewish community 
          at Touro Synagogue in Newport, Rhode Island: ``the Government 
          of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to 
          persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live 
          under its protection should demean themselves as good 
          citizens....'' Today, our cities are home to synagogues, 
          churches, temples, mosques, and other houses of worship that 
          peacefully welcome Americans of every belief. Preserving 
          religious freedom has helped America avoid the wars of 
          religion that have plagued so many cultures throughout 
          history, with deadly consequences.
          Today, as America wages war against terror, our resolve to 
          defend religious freedom remains as strong as ever. Many miles 
          from home, American service men and women have risked their 
          lives in our efforts to drive the Taliban regime from power, 
          ending an era of brutal oppression, including religious 
          oppression. At home, Americans demonstrated the vitality of 
          our

[[Page 2]]

          religious freedom in the enormous outreach by faith 
          communities to help those harmed by the terrorist attacks. In 
          quiet prayers offered to God in churches, synagogues, temples, 
          and mosques and in the helping hands of faith-based groups, 
          Americans have shown a deep love for others and genuine 
          spiritual unity that will sustain us through the difficult 
          days of recovery.
          Religious Freedom Day provides us an opportunity to celebrate 
          America's commitment to protect the freedom of religion. On 
          this special day, I encourage all Americans to renew their 
          commitment to protecting the liberties that make our country a 
          beacon of hope for people around the world who seek the free 
          exercise of religious beliefs and other freedoms.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim January 16, 2002, as Religious Freedom Day. I urge 
          all Americans to observe this day by asking for the blessing 
          and protection of Almighty God for our Nation, and to engage 
          in appropriate ceremonies and activities in their homes, 
          schools, and places of worship as a sign of our resolve to 
          protect and preserve our religious freedom.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth 
          day of January, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7518

Proclamation 7518 of January 17, 2002

Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          For too brief a time, our Nation was blessed by the life of 
          Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King was a modern American 
          hero whose leadership rallied people of all races to rise up 
          against injustice. His commitment to stand peacefully for the 
          conviction that all men are created equal brought about 
          changes in the laws of our Nation, and he paid the ultimate 
          price for the courage he demonstrated in attempting to ensure 
          that all men and women were treated equally in the eyes of the 
          law and by their fellow citizens. It is with a great sense of 
          pride and gratitude that we celebrate this 17th national 
          holiday in honor of Dr. King's life and work. Let us take this 
          opportunity to recall his vision and renew his call for equal 
          justice for all.
          We enter this new year and this annual celebration with a 
          revived national spirit. The events of September 11, 2001, 
          have drawn us closer as a Nation and increased our resolve to 
          protect the life and liberty we cherish. And while our 
          patriotism and neighborly affections run high, these 
          circumstances have given us renewed purpose in rededicating 
          ourselves to Dr. King's ``dream.'' As he said on the steps of 
          the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963: ``I have a dream my 
          four little children will one day live in a nation where they 
          will not be judged by the color of their skin but

[[Page 3]]

          by content of their character.'' Dr. King's words were not 
          just a call to change our laws, but they also served as a 
          challenge to all Americans to change their hearts by refusing 
          to judge people by their skin color or their national origin, 
          by their race or their religion. For while we have made 
          progress, there is much work to be done, both at home and 
          abroad.
          In the face of massive injustice, Dr. King's unwavering 
          commitment to nonviolent means of bringing the people of our 
          Nation together provided a foundation for healing and trust. 
          That trust brought us through our recent tragedy as we reached 
          out to each other without regard to race or religion. Dr. King 
          spent his life working for those who held the uncelebrated 
          jobs in our communities--people who simply performed their 
          work with dignity and pride. The words from his Nobel Peace 
          Prize acceptance speech of 1964, spoken about the workers in 
          the freedom movement, still ring true for those men and women 
          who unselfishly attempted to rescue innocent persons in the 
          World Trade Center buildings and at the Pentagon:
          Most of these people will never make the headlines and their 
          names will not appear in Who's Who. Yet when years have rolled 
          past and when the blazing light of truth is focused on this 
          marvelous age in which we live--men and women will know and 
          children will be taught that we have a finer land, a better 
          people, a more noble civilization--because these humble 
          children of God were willing to suffer for righteousness' 
          sake.
          We are so thankful for those ``humble children of God,'' and 
          we are thankful for the life and times of Dr. Martin Luther 
          King, Jr. His abiding faith in America has helped us become a 
          fairer and more colorblind society.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Monday, January 21, 2002, as the Martin Luther King, 
          Jr., Federal Holiday. I encourage Americans to observe this 
          day with appropriate community programs, gatherings, and civic 
          activities that honor the memory and the legacy of Dr. King.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7519

Proclamation 7519 of January 18, 2002

National Mentoring Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          National Mentoring Month allows us to recognize the important 
          contributions made by the millions of our fellow citizens who 
          choose to strengthen our Nation by giving their time, effort, 
          and heart to serve as a mentor and role model for a young 
          person. Through quality education programs, community 
          initiatives, and personal involvement, mentors help our 
          children become better citizens by showing them how to make 
          the right choices, to work hard, and to care for their 
          neighbors in need. Mentors play an impor

[[Page 4]]

          tant role in a child's life, particularly if a parent is 
          absent. A mentor's involvement in the life of a child can 
          brighten that child's future, help maintain healthy families, 
          and help promote more vibrant communities.
          Community mentoring programs have given millions of young 
          people, particularly those at high-risk for poor school 
          performance and behavior problems, a boost in life. Statistics 
          indicate that most children who have been mentored improve 
          their school attendance and performance, go to college, and 
          are less likely to use drugs or alcohol. By being a positive 
          role model, a mentor can demonstrate the blessings of living a 
          virtuous life by sharing their values and experiences and 
          motivating a child to learn and achieve. We must teach our 
          children the difference between right and wrong; and we must 
          seize every opportunity to help a young person find the right 
          path. We must also teach discipline and accountability.
          Many adults recall lessons they learned from childhood as a 
          result of observing and interacting with role models. They 
          recognize their childhood homes and schools as places where 
          love, encouragement, and instruction provided them with the 
          tools they needed to become contributing citizens. Today, the 
          role of families, schools, and communities remains crucial to 
          providing stability and direction to America's young people.
          My Administration strongly supports Federal, State, and local 
          programs that help families stay together, keep both parents 
          involved in their child's life, and utilize our education 
          system to stand by parents and reinforce the values that are 
          taught in the home. I am particularly pleased that the 
          Congress passed and I have signed into law legislation I 
          proposed to strengthen and expand successful mentoring 
          initiatives aimed at serving a vulnerable population: children 
          whose parents are incarcerated. This new initiative--
          ``Promoting Safe and Stable Families Amendments of 2001''--
          represents the first comprehensive Federal effort to improve 
          the lives of these children. This important legislation will 
          help surround vulnerable youth with positive, one-on-one role 
          models, and help them not just dream big dreams, but achieve 
          them.
          On the occasion of National Mentoring Month, we pay tribute to 
          the parents, teachers, community leaders, and citizens who 
          serve as mentors and role models for our children. We 
          encourage others to become involved in mentoring.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim January 2002 as National Mentoring Month. I call upon 
          the people of the United States to recognize the importance of 
          being role models for our youth, to look for mentoring 
          opportunities in their communities, and to celebrate this 
          month with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          eighteenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7520

[[Page 5]]

Proclamation 7520 of January 18, 2002

National Sanctity of Human Life Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          This Nation was founded upon the belief that every human being 
          is endowed by our Creator with certain ``unalienable rights.'' 
          Chief among them is the right to life itself. The Signers of 
          the Declaration of Independence pledged their own lives, 
          fortunes, and honor to guarantee inalienable rights for all of 
          the new country's citizens. These visionaries recognized that 
          an essential human dignity attached to all persons by virtue 
          of their very existence and not just to the strong, the 
          independent, or the healthy. That value should apply to every 
          American, including the elderly and the unprotected, the weak 
          and the infirm, and even to the unwanted.
          Thomas Jefferson wrote that, ``[t]he care of human life and 
          happiness and not their destruction is the first and only 
          legitimate object of good government.'' President Jefferson 
          was right. Life is an inalienable right, understood as given 
          to each of us by our Creator.
          President Jefferson's timeless principle obligates us to 
          pursue a civil society that will democratically embrace its 
          essential moral duties, including defending the elderly, 
          strengthening the weak, protecting the defenseless, feeding 
          the hungry, and caring for children--born and unborn. Mindful 
          of these and other obligations, we should join together in 
          pursuit of a more compassionate society, rejecting the notion 
          that some lives are less worthy of protection than others, 
          whether because of age or illness, social circumstance or 
          economic condition. Consistent with the core principles about 
          which Thomas Jefferson wrote, and to which the Founders 
          subscribed, we should peacefully commit ourselves to seeking a 
          society that values life--from its very beginnings to its 
          natural end. Unborn children should be welcomed in life and 
          protected in law.
          On September 11, we saw clearly that evil exists in this 
          world, and that it does not value life. The terrible events of 
          that fateful day have given us, as a Nation, a greater 
          understanding about the value and wonder of life. Every 
          innocent life taken that day was the most important person on 
          earth to somebody; and every death extinguished a world. Now 
          we are engaged in a fight against evil and tyranny to preserve 
          and protect life. In so doing, we are standing again for those 
          core principles upon which our Nation was founded.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Sunday, January 20, 2002, as National Sanctity of 
          Human Life Day. I call upon all Americans to reflect upon the 
          sanctity of human life. Let us recognize the day with 
          appropriate ceremonies in our homes and places of worship, 
          rededicate ourselves to compassionate service on behalf of the 
          weak and defenseless, and reaffirm our commitment to respect 
          the life and dignity of every human being.

[[Page 6]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          eighteenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7521

Proclamation 7521 of February 1, 2002

American Heart Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          A new era in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular 
          diseases has created renewed hope for those suffering from 
          heart-related disorders. Anticoagulant drugs and other 
          technologically innovative artery-opening treatments, like 
          angioplasty, are enabling doctors to better treat 
          cardiovascular problems in their early stages. Armed with the 
          knowledge that lifestyle plays a significant role in the 
          prevention of heart disease, more and more Americans have 
          recognized the importance of not smoking, getting regular 
          exercise, and maintaining a healthy diet.
          Despite these advances, cardiovascular disease, including 
          heart disease and stroke, remains the leading cause of death 
          in the United States and greatly increases disability among 
          Americans. This year, cardiovascular disease will be the 
          primary or contributing cause in about 60 percent of all 
          deaths and will cost our Nation more than $330 billion in lost 
          wages, diminished productivity, and medical expenses. It is a 
          little known fact that heart disease is the leading cause of 
          death among women, with over 370,000 deaths every year.
          According to the Archives of Internal Medicine, most heart 
          attack patients wait more than 2 hours before seeking 
          emergency care, primarily because they do not recognize the 
          symptoms of a heart attack. Delayed awareness of the onset of 
          a heart attack means that only one in five heart attack 
          victims gets to the hospital quickly enough to benefit from 
          life-saving medical treatments.
          Fortunately, many new public-private partnerships are working 
          to educate Americans about the warning signs of a heart attack 
          and the need for rapid response. The National Heart, Lung, and 
          Blood Institute and the American Heart Association have 
          recently joined with other national organizations to sponsor a 
          campaign called ``Act in Time to Heart Attack Signs.'' This 
          public awareness initiative emphasizes preventing heart 
          attacks, recognizing sometimes subtle heart attack symptoms, 
          and immediately calling 911 when those symptoms first appear.
          The AHA has developed an educational campaign, ``Operation 
          Heartbeat,'' that focuses on reducing sudden deaths from 
          cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest, an abnormal heart rhythm that 
          stops the heart from effectively pumping blood through the 
          body, usually results in death within 10 to 14 minutes. 
          Currently, only about five percent of those who experience 
          sudden cardiac arrest survive. Operation Heartbeat is 
          educating the public about the signs of cardiac arrest, 
          reinforcing the importance of calling 911 immediately and

[[Page 7]]

          promoting the benefits of knowing and administering 
          cardiopulmonary resuscitation, until advanced care can be 
          given to restore a normal heartbeat.
          At this observance of American Heart Month, we pay tribute to 
          the researchers, physicians, and other health professionals, 
          public education professionals, and volunteers for their 
          tireless efforts in preventing, treating, and researching 
          heart disease. We recognize the critical importance of 
          developing tools that will increase survival rates from heart 
          attacks and cardiac arrest. By incorporating these new tools 
          into aggressive education programs and partnerships, we can 
          save tens of thousands of lives annually.
          In recognition of the important needs in the ongoing fight 
          against cardiovascular disease, the Congress, by Joint 
          Resolution approved December 30, 1963, as amended (77 Stat. 
          843; 36 U.S.C. 101), has requested that the President issue an 
          annual proclamation designating February as ``American Heart 
          Month.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim February 2002 as American Heart Month. I invite the 
          Governors of the States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, 
          officials of other areas subject to the jurisdiction of the 
          United States, and the American people to join me in 
          reaffirming our commitment to combating cardiovascular disease 
          and stroke.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7522

Proclamation 7522 of February 1, 2002

National African American History Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          During these extraordinary times, America looks forward to new 
          challenges and opportunities with a reinvigorated sense of 
          unity and common purpose. We are a strong and vibrant Nation, 
          thanks to the creativity, fortitude, and resilience of people 
          of every race and background. During National African American 
          History Month, we celebrate the many achievements and 
          contributions made by African Americans to our economic, 
          cultural, spiritual, and political development.
          In 1915, Dr. Carter Godwin Woodson founded The Association for 
          the Study of Negro Life and History. Through that Association, 
          he began pressing for the establishment of Negro History Week 
          as a way to bring national attention to the accomplishments of 
          African Americans. He hoped to neutralize the apparent 
          distortions in Black history and to provide a more objective 
          and scholarly balance to American and World history.
          Dr. Woodson's dream became a reality in 1926. He chose the 
          second week of February for the observance because of its 
          proximity to the birthdays of

[[Page 8]]

          Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, two individuals whom 
          Dr. Woodson felt had dramatically affected the lives of 
          African Americans. And in 1976, the Association succeeded in 
          expanding the observance, which then became Black History 
          Month.
          The theme of National African American History Month for 2002 
          is ``The Color Line Revisited: Is Racism Dead?'' The 
          observance calls our Nation's attention to the continued need 
          to battle racism and to build a society that fully lives up to 
          its democratic ideals. This commitment includes ensuring a 
          high-quality education for all Americans, so that no child is 
          left behind, and challenges us to continue to rebuild and 
          restore our communities, to fight crime and violence, and to 
          pursue equal opportunity and equal justice in every part of 
          our society. At the same time, the United States must look 
          beyond its borders and take an active role in helping to 
          alleviate poverty, stimulate economic growth and trade, 
          enhance democracy, and combat HIV/AIDS in Africa.
          This annual event gives all Americans a chance to recognize 
          and commemorate the global history of people of African 
          descent. As we celebrate National African American History 
          Month, I join with all Americans in celebrating our diverse 
          heritage and culture and continuing our efforts to create a 
          world that is more just, peaceful, and prosperous for all.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim February 2002 as National African American History 
          Month. I call upon public officials, educators, librarians, 
          and all of the people of the United States to observe this 
          month with appropriate programs and activities that highlight 
          and honor the myriad contributions of African Americans.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7523

Proclamation 7523 of February 4, 2002

National Consumer Protection Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Each year, we recognize the important role played by public 
          and private organizations in ensuring that the American 
          consumer is protected from unfair practices. The theme of this 
          year's National Consumer Protection Week is ``Consumer 
          Confidential: The Privacy Story.'' By focusing on consumer 
          privacy and the protection of personal information, this week 
          will help Americans learn more about securing their personal 
          information and preserving privacy.
          Advances in computer technology have enabled the more 
          efficient use of information, which has benefitted society as 
          a whole and individual consumers in particular. Americans now 
          enjoy better access to credit and fi

[[Page 9]]

          nancial services, shopping choices, and educational resources. 
          However, as personal information becomes more accessible, 
          consumers, corporations, and government agencies must take 
          precautions against the misuse of that information.
          One of the most harmful abuses of personal information is 
          identity theft. This occurs when someone steals a Social 
          Security number, a birth date, or some other important piece 
          of personal information to open new, fraudulent charge 
          accounts, to order merchandise, or to borrow money. Victims 
          usually find out about such frauds when collection agencies 
          pursue them for payment on these illegally created accounts, 
          or they are denied credit because of unpaid debts accrued by 
          identity thieves.
          While vigorous law enforcement is vital to preventing the 
          misuse of personal information, consumer education is the 
          first line of defense against this kind of fraud and 
          deception. An educated consumer is a confident consumer; and 
          it is confident consumers who drive the economy of our Nation.
          A number of public and private entities are joining forces 
          this year to highlight consumer education efforts throughout 
          the Nation. These efforts will help consumers learn more about 
          securing personal information and privacy issues. The entities 
          involved include the following: the Federal Trade Commission, 
          the National Association of Consumer Agency Administrators, 
          the National Consumers League, the American Association of 
          Retired Persons, the Better Business Bureau, the Consumer 
          Federation of America, the U.S. Postal Service, the U.S. 
          Postal Inspection Service, the National Association of 
          Attorneys General, and the Federal Consumer Information 
          Center. These groups will help consumers understand how 
          information and privacy issues affect their lives and the 
          decisions they make in the marketplace.
          During National Consumer Protection Week, I encourage all 
          Americans to learn more about ways to safeguard their personal 
          information, recognize fraudulent telemarketers, and identify 
          fraudulent e-mail. Through these measures, individuals can 
          better protect their financial security and ultimately 
          contribute to the long-term strength of our economy.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim February 3 through 9, 2002, as National Consumer 
          Protection Week. I call upon Government officials, industry 
          leaders, and consumer advocates to provide consumers 
          information about the use and misuse of personal information. 
          This will help safeguard the economic future of all Americans.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7524

[[Page 10]]

Proclamation 7524 of February 22, 2002

Suspension of Entry as Immigrants and Nonimmigrants of Persons Responsible 
for Actions That Threaten Zimbabwe's Democratic Institutions and Transition 
to a Multi-Party Democracy

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          In light of the political and humanitarian crisis in Zimbabwe 
          and the continued failure of President Robert Mugabe, 
          Zimbabwean government officials, and others to support the 
          rule of law, and given the importance to the United States of 
          fostering democratic institutions in Zimbabwe, I have 
          determined that it is in the interest of the United States to 
          take all available measures to restrict the international 
          travel and to suspend the entry into the United States, as 
          immigrants or nonimmigrants, of senior members of the 
          government of Robert Mugabe and others detailed below who 
          formulate, implement, or benefit from policies that undermine 
          or injure Zimbabwe's democratic institutions or impede the 
          transition to a multi-party democracy.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by the 
          Constitution and laws of the United States, including section 
          212(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, 8 
          U.S.C. 1182(f), and section 301 of title 3, United States 
          Code, hereby find that the unrestricted immigrant and 
          nonimmigrant entry into the United States of persons described 
          in section 1 of this proclamation would, except as provided 
          for in sections 2 and 3 of this proclamation, be detrimental 
          to the interests of the United States.
          I therefore hereby proclaim that:
          etion 1. The entry into the United 
          States, as immigrants or nonimmigrants, of the following 
          persons is hereby suspended:
          (a) Senior members of the government of Robert Mugabe and 
          other Zimbabwe nationals who formulate, implement, or benefit 
          from policies that undermine or injure Zimbabwe's democratic 
          institutions or impede the transition to a multi-party 
          democracy;
          (b) Persons who through their business dealings with Zimbabwe 
          government officials derive significant financial benefit from 
          policies that undermine or injure Zimbabwe's democratic 
          institutions or impede the transition to a multi-party 
          democracy; and
          (c) The spouses of persons described in paragraphs (a) and 
          (b), above.
          e. 2. Section 1 of this proclamation 
          shall not apply with respect to any person otherwise covered 
          by section 1 where entry of such person would not be contrary 
          to the interest of the United States.
          e. 3. Persons covered by sections 1 and 2 
          of this proclamation shall be identified by the Secretary of 
          State or the Secretary's designee, in his or her sole 
          discretion, pursuant to such procedures as the Secretary may 
          establish under section 5 of this proclamation.

[[Page 11]]

          e. 4. Nothing in this proclamation shall 
          be construed to derogate from United States Government 
          obligations under applicable international agreements.
          e. 5. The Secretary of State shall have 
          responsibility for implementing this proclamation pursuant to 
          such procedures as the Secretary may establish.
          e. 6. This proclamation is effective 
          immediately and shall remain in effect until such time as the 
          Secretary of State determines that it is no longer necessary 
          and should be terminated, either in whole or in part. Any such 
          termination shall become effective upon publication in the 
          Federal eister.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          second day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7525

Proclamation 7525 of March 2, 2002

American Red Cross Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The American Red Cross is one of our Nation's oldest and most 
          renowned charitable organizations. It provides help, hope, and 
          healing when disasters or other crises strike countries, 
          communities, or families around the world.
          Founded in 1881 by Clara Barton, the American Red Cross was 
          chartered by the Congress in 1905 to provide aid in times of 
          need. Each year, the Red Cross responds to more than 67,000 
          disasters nationwide. These include natural disasters, 
          thousands of home fires, and catastrophic emergencies--such as 
          the brutal terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The Red 
          Cross was among the first to respond to this unprecedented 
          national crisis, providing direct assistance to more than 
          50,000 families, shelter for thousands of displaced persons, 
          millions of meals for the hungry, and grief counseling for 
          more than 200,000 individuals affected by the trauma. The Red 
          Cross also provides assistance during international 
          emergencies. Responding to my request, it helped create and 
          now administers America's Fund for Afghan Children. American 
          children were asked to donate one dollar to aid Afghani 
          children, and this effort has already provided $2.4 million in 
          medicine and other supplies to Afghanistan. Last year, the Red 
          Cross rushed immediate medical aid and other needed items to 
          countries devastated by natural disasters, and it helped 
          millions of people around the world to battle malnutrition and 
          life-threatening diseases and gain access to safe drinking 
          water.
          Other Red Cross services include recruiting millions of people 
          annually to donate blood and thereby provide hospitals with 
          half of the Nation's supply of blood and blood products. Red 
          Cross personnel are now with our troops who are fighting 
          terrorism in Afghanistan. They live alongside our

[[Page 12]]

          soldiers in harsh conditions and work around the clock to 
          fulfill an historic role. They help to keep service members 
          and their families in touch with each other, and offer other 
          small comforts to ease the strain of those who are serving the 
          cause of freedom.
          At home, the Red Cross' courses in lifesaving skills, first 
          aid, CPR, and water safety, provide Americans with information 
          they need to help maintain safe and healthy lives. Our 
          communities also benefit from Red Cross programs that provide 
          hot meals and transportation for the homebound, as well as 
          housing and job training for the homeless.
          Over one million Red Cross volunteers help make our country 
          stronger and more compassionate by relieving suffering and 
          saving lives every year. The USA Freedom Corps initiative will 
          provide the Red Cross with even more volunteers to help 
          further its important mission. As we celebrate American Red 
          Cross Month, I call on all our citizens to recommit to serving 
          others in need. Collective acts of kindness and compassion 
          point the way to a brighter future for our Nation and the 
          world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America and Honorary Chairman of the American Red 
          Cross, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the 
          Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim 
          March 2002 as American Red Cross Month. Especially during this 
          extraordinary time for our country, I encourage all Americans 
          to support this organization's noble humanitarian mission.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second 
          day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7526

Proclamation 7526 of March 2, 2002

Irish-American Heritage Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America has been shaped by the principles of liberty and 
          freedom, guided by the pursuit of justice, and enriched by the 
          diversity of its people. Irish Americans have been an 
          essential part of this development, greatly contributing to 
          our Nation's progress and prosperity.
          Our country's citizens come from diverse backgrounds and 
          cultures, which has enabled us to realize the vision embodied 
          in our first national motto: ``E Pluribus Unum,'' meaning 
          ``Out of many, one.'' Our forbears discovered the value 
          inherent in this ideal, building a Nation where all people can 
          live free, be equal under the law, and find opportunity for 
          success in our free-enterprise system. From all points on 
          earth, people of different races, faiths, and ethnicities came 
          to this land to become Americans and thus heirs and stewards 
          of the Founders' vision. This convergence of cultures 
          contributed to the rich fabric of our Nation, uniquely 
          threading together many divergent ideas, tastes, and 
          traditions. Today, we enjoy a society shaped by this history, 
          one Nation under one flag. Our Nation's response to the 
          terrible

[[Page 13]]

          events of September 11 demonstrated vividly the reality of the 
          unity and resolve of our diverse people.
          Since our Nation's founding, millions of Irish have emigrated 
          to this country to embrace the vibrant promise of new 
          opportunity that America offers. Some came to America seeking 
          the freedom to worship as they pleased. Others came in the 
          wake of the devastating Irish potato famine of 1845-1849, 
          which caused 1 million deaths in Ireland and led nearly 1.5 
          million Irish to emigrate. And the many successes of the Irish 
          immigrants in America proved to be a continuing draw to their 
          friends and family who remained in Ireland. The Irish brought 
          with them a spirit of life and an ethic of work that helped to 
          enliven our culture and enabled them to prosper in their new 
          land.
          George Washington's Continental Army had over 20 generals of 
          Irish descent. Americans proudly claiming Irish heritage have 
          held positions of national leadership, including Presidents 
          George Washington, Andrew Jackson, John F. Kennedy, and Ronald 
          Reagan and Supreme Court Justices William J. Brennan, Jr., and 
          Sandra Day O'Connor. And numerous Irish Americans have enjoyed 
          great success in the arts and entertainment field, including 
          Buster Keaton, Stephen Foster, and F. Scott Fitzgerald.
          Throughout our history, America has been greatly blessed by 
          the innumerable contributions of Irish Americans. This month 
          we celebrate these great people and the heritage of their 
          beautiful ancestral homeland, Ireland.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 2002 as Irish-American Heritage Month. I call 
          upon all Americans to observe this month by learning about and 
          commemorating the contributions of Irish Americans.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second 
          day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7527

Proclamation 7527 of March 2, 2002

National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          This year, more than 148,000 people will be diagnosed with 
          colorectal cancer, and more than 56,000 people will die from 
          this disease. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of 
          cancer-related death in the United States, yet it is one of 
          the most highly preventable forms of cancer. Early diagnosis 
          is critical to survival. Research shows that 91 percent of 
          patients with localized colorectal cancer survive for 5 years 
          after diagnosis, yet only 37 percent of all diagnoses occur at 
          this stage. The remaining 63 percent of cases are not 
          discovered until the disease has spread throughout the body.

[[Page 14]]

          Because 75 percent of new cases occur in persons with no known 
          risk factors, regular colorectal cancer screenings are crucial 
          to prevention. Even for an individual without symptoms, 
          screenings are extremely important. For those over 50 and for 
          individuals with a family history of cancer, screenings should 
          be scheduled on a regular basis. I am pleased to note that 
          Medicare coverage for colonoscopies was expanded in 2001 to 
          provide this screening to more beneficiaries, and many 
          commercial health plans now cover this cost.
          Many people avoid colorectal cancer screening due to fear or 
          anxiety, however, it is important for all Americans to 
          understand the importance of this routine procedure. During 
          National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, I encourage all 
          Americans to learn more about this disease, to assist 
          prevention efforts, and to recognize the importance of 
          colorectal screenings.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 2002 as National Colorectal Cancer Awareness 
          Month. I call upon all Americans to take appropriate measures 
          to protect themselves and their loved ones from this disease.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this Second 
          day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7528

Proclamation 7528 of March 2, 2002

Save Your Vision Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Healthy vision is a precious gift that allows us to enjoy the 
          beauty of nature, the smile of a loved one, and the many 
          wonders in the world around us. Unfortunately for 14 million 
          Americans, eye problems can interfere with daily activities 
          and inhibit the enjoyment of life.
          Health officials have identified the most significant and 
          preventable threats to vision. According to the Department of 
          Health and Human Service's Healthy People 2010 report, visual 
          impairment represents one of our country's 10 most frequent 
          causes of disability.
          To help avoid or remedy vision problems, we must remain 
          dedicated to the prevention of eye injuries, emphasize early 
          detection of eye disease, work to research and develop new 
          treatments and rehabilitation therapies, and promote vision 
          health awareness. All Americans should take steps to ensure 
          that eye health becomes a priority in our homes, businesses, 
          and communities. We should commit to receiving regular dilated 
          eye examinations; we should wear protective eyewear when 
          necessary, both recreationally and on the job; and we must 
          make every effort to ensure children age 5 and under receive 
          vision screening.

[[Page 15]]

          The Congress, by joint resolution approved December 30, 1963, 
          as amended (77 Stat. 629; 36 U.S.C. 138), has authorized and 
          requested the President to proclaim the first week in March of 
          each year as ``Save Your Vision Week.'' During this year's 
          observance, let us renew our commitment to fighting the causes 
          of visual impairment and to supporting good eye health. I 
          encourage all Americans to learn more about ways to prevent 
          eye problems and to help others maintain the invaluable asset 
          of eyesight.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim March 3 through March 9, 
          2002, as Save Your Vision Week. I urge all Americans to make 
          eye care and eye safety an important part of their lives and 
          to include dilated eye examinations in their regular health 
          maintenance programs. I invite eye care professionals, the 
          media, and all public and private organizations dedicated to 
          preserving eyesight to join in activities that will raise 
          awareness of measures we can take to protect and sustain our 
          vision.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second 
          day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7529

Proclamation 7529 of March 5, 2002

To Facilitate Positive Adjustment to Competition From Imports of Certain 
Steel Products

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. On December 19, 2001, the United States International Trade 
          Commission (ITC) transmitted to the President a report on its 
          investigation under section 202 of the Trade Act of 1974, as 
          amended (the ``Trade Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2252), with respect to 
          imports of certain steel products.
          2. The ITC reached affirmative determinations under section 
          202(b) of the Trade Act that the following products are being 
          imported into the United States in such increased quantities 
          as to be a substantial cause of serious injury, or threat of 
          serious injury, to the domestic industries producing like or 
          directly competitive articles: (a) certain carbon flat- rolled 
          steel, including carbon and alloy steel slabs (``slabs''); 
          plate (including cut-to-length plate and clad plate) 
          (``plate''); hot-rolled steel (including plate in coils) 
          (``hot-rolled steel''); cold-rolled steel (other than grain-
          oriented electrical steel) (``cold-rolled steel''); and 
          corrosion-resistant and other coated steel (``coated steel'') 
          (collectively, ``certain flat steel''); (b) carbon and alloy 
          hot-rolled bar and light shapes (``hot-rolled bar''); (c) 
          carbon and alloy cold-finished bar (``cold-finished bar''); 
          (d) carbon and alloy rebar (``rebar''); (e) carbon and alloy 
          welded tubular products (other than oil country tubular goods) 
          (``certain tubular products''); (f) carbon and alloy flanges, 
          fittings, and tool joints (``carbon and alloy fittings''); (g) 
          stainless steel bar and light shapes (``stainless steel 
          bar''); and (h) stainless steel rod. The ITC commissioners 
          were equally divided with respect to the determination 
          required

[[Page 16]]

          under section 202(b) regarding whether (i) carbon and alloy 
          tin mill products (``tin mill products'') and (j) stainless 
          steel wire.
          3. The ITC provided detailed definitions of the products 
          included in categories (a) through (j) of paragraph 2, and 
          their corresponding subheadings, under the Harmonized Tariff 
          Schedule of the United States (HTS) in Appendix A to its 
          determination, set out at 66 Fed. Reg. 67304, 67308-67311 
          (December 28, 2001). By February 4, 2002, the ITC provided 
          additional information in response to a request by the United 
          States Trade Representative (USTR) under section 203(a)(5) of 
          the Trade Act (19 U.S. 2253(a)(5)) (the ``supplemental 
          report'').
          4. Section 330(d)(1) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 
          U.S.C. 1330(d)(1)), provides that, when the ITC is required to 
          determine under section 202(b) of the Trade Act whether 
          increased imports of an article are a substantial cause of 
          serious injury, or the threat thereof, and the commissioners 
          voting are equally divided with respect to such determination, 
          then the determination agreed upon by either group of 
          commissioners may be considered by the President as the 
          determination of the ITC. Having considered the determinations 
          of the commissioners with regard to tin mill products and 
          stainless steel wire, I have decided to consider the 
          determinations of the groups of commissioners voting in the 
          affirmative with regard to each of these products to be the 
          determination of the ITC.
          5. Pursuant to section 311(a) of the North American Free Trade 
          Agreement Implementation Act (the ``NAFTA Implementation 
          Act'') (19 U.S.C. 3371(a)), the ITC made findings as to 
          whether imports from Canada and Mexico, considered 
          individually, account for a substantial share of total imports 
          and contribute importantly to the serious injury, or threat 
          thereof, caused by imports. The ITC made negative findings 
          with respect to imports from Canada of certain flat steel, tin 
          mill products, rebar, stainless steel rod, and stainless steel 
          wire; and the ITC also made negative findings with respect to 
          imports from Mexico of tin mill products, hot-rolled bar, 
          cold-finished bar, rebar, certain tubular products, stainless 
          steel bar, stainless steel rod, and stainless steel wire. The 
          ITC made affirmative findings with respect to imports from 
          Canada of hot-rolled bar, cold-finished bar, carbon and alloy 
          fittings, and stainless steel bar; and the ITC also made 
          affirmative findings with respect to imports from Mexico of 
          certain flat steel, and carbon and alloy steel fittings. The 
          ITC commissioners were equally divided with respect to imports 
          from Canada of certain tubular products.
          6. The ITC commissioners voting in the affirmative under 
          section 202(b) of the Trade Act also transmitted to the 
          President their recommendations made pursuant to section 
          202(e) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2252(e)) with respect to 
          the actions that, in their view, would address the serious 
          injury, or threat thereof, to the domestic industries and be 
          most effective in facilitating the efforts of those industries 
          to make a positive adjustment to import competition.
          7. Pursuant to section 203 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253), 
          and after taking into account the considerations specified in 
          section 203(a)(2) of the Trade Act and the ITC supplemental 
          report, I have determined to implement action of a type 
          described in section 203(a)(3) (a ``safeguard measure'') with 
          regard to the following steel products:
          (a) certain flat steel, consisting of: slabs provided for in 
          the superior text to subheadings 9903.72.30 through 9903.72.48 
          in the Annex to this procla

[[Page 17]]

          mation; plate provided for in the superior text to subheadings 
          9903.72.50 through 9903.72.62 in the Annex to this 
          proclamation; hot-rolled steel provided for in the superior 
          text to subheadings 9903.72.65 through 9903.72.82 in the Annex 
          to this proclamation; cold-rolled steel provided for in the 
          superior text to subheadings 9903.72.85 through 9903.73.04 in 
          the Annex to this proclamation; and coated steel provided for 
          in the superior text to subheadings 9903.73.07 through 
          9903.73.23 in the Annex to this proclamation;
          (b) hot-rolled bar provided for in the superior text to 
          subheadings 9903.73.42 through 9903.73.52 in the Annex to this 
          proclamation;
          (c) cold-finished bar provided for in the superior text to 
          subheadings 9903.73.55 through 9903.73.62 in the Annex to this 
          proclamation;
          (d) rebar provided for in the superior text to subheadings 
          9903.73.65 through 9903.73.71 in the Annex to this 
          proclamation;
          (e) certain tubular products provided for in the superior text 
          to subheadings 9903.73.74 through 9903.73.86 in the Annex to 
          this proclamation;
          (f) carbon and alloy fittings provided for in the superior 
          text to subheadings 9903.73.88 through 9903.73.95 in the Annex 
          to this proclamation;
          (g) stainless steel bar provided for in the superior text to 
          subheadings 9903.73.97 through 9903.74.06 in the Annex to this 
          proclamation;
          (h) stainless steel rod provided for in the superior text to 
          subheadings 9903.74.08 through 9903.74.16 in the Annex to this 
          proclamation;
          (i) tin mill products provided for in the superior text to 
          subheadings 9903.73.26 through 9903.73.39 in the Annex to this 
          proclamation; and
          (j) stainless steel wire provided for in the superior text to 
          subheadings 9903.74.18 through 9903.74.24 in the Annex to this 
          proclamation. The steel products listed in clauses (i) through 
          (ix) of subdivision (b) of U.S. Note 11 to subchapter III of 
          chapter 99 of the HTS (``Note 11'') in the Annex to this 
          proclamation were excluded from the determinations of the ITC 
          described in paragraph 2, and are excluded from these 
          safeguard measures. I have also determined to exclude from 
          these safeguard measures the steel products listed in the 
          subsequent clauses of subdivision (b) of Note 11 in the Annex 
          to this proclamation.
          8. Pursuant to section 312(a) of the NAFTA Implementation Act 
          (19 U.S.C. 3372(a)), I have determined after considering the 
          report and supplemental report of the ITC that imports from 
          each of Canada and Mexico of certain flat steel, tin mill 
          products, hot-rolled bar, cold-finished bar, rebar, certain 
          tubular products, carbon and alloy fittings, stainless steel 
          bar, stainless steel rod, and stainless steel wire, considered 
          individually, do not account for a substantial share of total 
          imports or do not contribute importantly to the serious injury 
          or threat of serious injury found by the ITC. Accordingly, 
          pursuant to section 312(b) of the NAFTA Implementation Act (19 
          U.S.C. 3372(b)), I have excluded certain flat steel, tin mill 
          products, hot-rolled bar, cold-finished bar, rebar, certain 
          tubular products, carbon and alloy fittings, stainless steel 
          bar, stainless steel rod, and stainless steel wire the product 
          of Mexico or Canada from the actions I am taking under section 
          203 of the Trade Act.
          9. Pursuant to section 203 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253), 
          the actions I have determined to take shall be safeguard 
          measures in the form of:

[[Page 18]]

          (a) a tariff rate quota on imports of slabs described in 
          paragraph 7, imposed for a period of 3 years plus 1 day, with 
          annual increases in the within-quota quantities and annual 
          reductions in the rates of duty applicable to goods entered in 
          excess of those quantities in the second and third years; and
          (b) an increase in duties on imports of certain flat steel, 
          other than slabs (including plate, hot-rolled steel, cold-
          rolled steel and coated steel), hot-rolled bar, cold-finished 
          bar, rebar, certain welded tubular products, carbon and alloy 
          fittings, stainless steel bar, stainless steel rod, tin mill 
          products, and stainless steel wire, as described in paragraph 
          7, imposed for a period of 3 years plus 1 day, with annual 
          reductions in the rates of duty in the second and third years, 
          as provided in the Annex to this proclamation.
          10. The safeguard measures described in paragraph 9 shall not 
          apply to the products listed in clauses following clause (ix) 
          in subdivision (b) of Note 11 in the Annex to this 
          proclamation.
          11. These safeguard measures shall apply to imports from all 
          countries, except for products of Canada, Israel, Jordan, and 
          Mexico.
          12. These safeguard measures shall not apply to imports of any 
          product described in paragraph 7 of a developing country that 
          is a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), as long as 
          that country's share of total imports of the product, based on 
          imports during a recent representative period, does not exceed 
          3 percent, provided that imports that are the product of all 
          such countries with less than 3 percent import share 
          collectively account for not more than 9 percent of total 
          imports of the product. If I determine that a surge in imports 
          of a product described in paragraph 7 of a developing country 
          WTO member undermines the effectiveness of the pertinent 
          safeguard measure, the safeguard measure shall be modified to 
          apply to such product from such country.
          13. The in-quota quantity in each year under the tariff rate 
          quota described in paragraph 9 shall be allocated among all 
          countries except those countries the products of which are 
          excluded from such tariff rate quota pursuant to paragraphs 11 
          and 12.
          14. Pursuant to section 203(a)(1)(A) of the Trade Act (19 
          U.S.C. 2253(a)(1)(A)), I have further determined that these 
          safeguard measures will facilitate efforts by the domestic 
          industry to make a positive adjustment to import competition 
          and provide greater economic and social benefits than costs. 
          If I determine that further action is appropriate and feasible 
          to facilitate efforts by the pertinent domestic industry to 
          make a positive adjustment to import competition and to 
          provide greater economic and social benefits than costs, or if 
          I determine that the conditions under section 204(b)(1) of the 
          Trade Act are met, I shall reduce, modify, or terminate the 
          action established in this proclamation accordingly. In 
          addition, if I determine within 30 days of the date of this 
          proclamation, as a result of consultations between the United 
          States and other WTO members pursuant to Article 12.3 of the 
          WTO Agreement on Safeguards that it is necessary to reduce, 
          modify, or terminate a safeguard measure, I shall proclaim the 
          corresponding reduction, modification, or termination of the 
          safeguard measure within 40 days.
          15. Section 604 of the Trade Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2483), 
          authorizes the President to embody in the HTS the substance of 
          the relevant provi

[[Page 19]]

          sions of that Act, and of other acts affecting import 
          treatment, and actions thereunder, including the removal, 
          modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty 
          or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          but not limited to sections 203 and 604 of the Trade Act, and 
          section 301 of title 3, United States Code, do proclaim that:
          (1) In order to establish increases in duty and a tariff rate 
          quota on imports of the certain steel products described in 
          paragraph 7 (other than excluded products), subchapter III of 
          chapter 99 of the HTS is modified as provided in the Annex to 
          this proclamation. Any merchandise subject to a safeguard 
          measure that is admitted into U.S. foreign trade zones on or 
          after March 20, 2002, must be admitted as ``privileged foreign 
          status'' as defined in 19 CFR 146.41, and will be subject upon 
          entry to any quantitative restrictions or tariffs related to 
          the classification under the applicable HTS subheading.
          (2) Such imports of certain steel that are the product of 
          Canada, Israel, Jordan, or Mexico shall be excluded from the 
          safeguard measures established by this proclamation, and such 
          imports shall not be counted toward the tariff rate quota 
          limits that trigger the over-quota rates of duty.
          (3) Except as provided in clause (4) below, imports of certain 
          steel that are the product of WTO member developing countries, 
          as provided in subdivision (d)(i) of Note 11 in the Annex to 
          this proclamation, shall be excluded from the safeguard 
          measures established by this proclamation, and such imports 
          shall not be counted toward the tariff rate quota limits that 
          trigger the over-quota rates of duties.
          (4) Clause (3) above shall not apply to imports of a product 
          that is the product of a country listed in subdivision (d)(i) 
          of Note 11 in the Annex to this proclamation if subdivision 
          (d)(ii) of such Note indicates that such country's share of 
          total imports of the product exceeds 3 percent, or that 
          imports of the product from all listed countries with less 
          than 3 percent import share collectively account for more than 
          9 percent of total imports of the product. The USTR is 
          authorized to determine whether a surge in imports of a 
          product that is the product of a country listed in subdivision 
          (d)(i) undermines the effectiveness of the pertinent safeguard 
          measure and, if so, upon publication of a notice in the 
          Federal eister, to revise subdivision (d) of 
          Note 11 in the Annex to this proclamation to indicate that 
          such product from such country is not excluded from such 
          safeguard measure.
          (5) Within 120 days after the date of this proclamation, the 
          USTR is authorized to further consider any request for 
          exclusion of a particular product submitted in accordance with 
          the procedures set out in 66 Fed. Reg. 54321, 54322-54323 
          (October 26, 2001) and, upon publication in the Federal 
          eister of a notice of his finding that a 
          particular product should be excluded, to modify the HTS 
          provisions created by the Annex to this proclamation to 
          exclude such particular product from the pertinent safeguard 
          measure established by this proclamation.
          (6) In March of each year in which any safeguard measure 
          established by this proclamation remains in effect, the USTR 
          is authorized, upon publi

[[Page 20]]

          cation in the Federal eister of a notice of 
          his finding that a particular product should be excluded, to 
          modify the HTS provisions created by the Annex to this 
          proclamation to exclude such particular product from the 
          pertinent safeguard measure established by this proclamation.
          (7) Any provision of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that is inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation is superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (8) The modifications to the HTS made by this proclamation, 
          including the Annex hereto, shall be effective with respect to 
          goods entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on 
          or after 12:01 a.m., EST, on March 20, 2002, and shall 
          continue in effect as provided in the Annex to this 
          proclamation, unless such actions are earlier expressly 
          reduced, modified, or terminated. Effective at the close of 
          March 21, 2006, or such other date that is 1 year from the 
          close of the safeguard measures established in this 
          proclamation, the U.S. note and tariff provisions established 
          in the Annex to this proclamation shall be deleted from the 
          HTS.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Proc. 7530

[[Page 56]]

Proclamation 7530 of March 6, 2002

Women's History Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Women's History Month provides our country the privilege of 
          honoring the countless contributions that American women have 
          made throughout our history. These contributions have enriched 
          our culture, strengthened our Nation, and furthered the 
          Founders' vision for a free and just Republic that provides 
          opportunity and safety at home and is an influence for peace 
          around the world.
          Since its beginnings, our land has been blessed by noteworthy 
          women who played defining roles in shaping our Nation. 
          Sakajawea was a Native American woman who befriended the 
          explorers, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, 150 years ago 
          as they crossed the great Northwest. She helped Lewis and 
          Clark's expedition complete the first successful overland 
          transcontinental journey. Lucretia Mott courageously wrote and 
          spoke against slavery and the lack of equal rights for women, 
          helping America recognize the inherent wrong in the 
          institutional subjugation of others and the need to strive for 
          equality, freedom, and justice for all. Elizabeth Blackwell 
          was the first woman in America awarded a medical degree, and 
          she dedicated her pioneering efforts as a physician to helping 
          others.
          Helen Keller overcame debilitating physical disabilities, 
          showing us the power of a determined human spirit. And Clara 
          Barton developed a vision for helping others through her 
          service to the wounded during the Civil War; and she realized 
          that vision by founding the American Red Cross after the war, 
          an organization that has since become renowned for its 
          effectiveness in helping those who suffer or are in need. 
          Recently, the Red Cross reached out to aid Afghan women 
          traumatized by the repressive rule of the intolerant Taliban 
          regime, which for years had mercilessly oppressed Afghanistan 
          and Afghan women in particular. Today, thousands of American 
          women are furthering the cause of freedom through service in 
          government, the military, and other organizations, as we seek 
          to defeat terrorism and bring justice to those responsible for 
          the September 11 attacks.
          The history of American women is an expansive story of 
          outstanding individuals who sacrificed much and worked hard in 
          pursuit of a better world, where peace, dignity, and 
          opportunity can reign. The spirit of loving determination that 
          shaped these pursuits continues to serve as an example to 
          those who seek to better our Nation. American women of 
          strength, vision, and character have long influenced our 
          country by contributing their time, efforts, and wisdom in 
          vastly diverse ways to improve and enhance our government and 
          communities, our schools and religious institutions, our 
          businesses and the military, and the arts and sciences. Women 
          also have fundamentally shaped our civilization in the care 
          and nurturing of families. Today, women in contemporary 
          America are furthering the Founders' vision by working to 
          advance freedom, increase equality, and administer justice in 
          every corner of our land, through their everyday work in 
          schoolrooms, boardrooms, courtrooms, homes, and communities.

[[Page 57]]

          As President, I am proud to recognize the many contributions 
          American women have made to help make our Nation free, strong, 
          and a force for peace and justice around the world. On this 
          observance of Women's History Month, I encourage every 
          American to learn more about these important contributions, 
          and to celebrate their noble legacies as we work to build a 
          brighter future for our Nation and for all of the world's 
          people.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 2002 as Women's History Month. I call upon all 
          the people of the United States to observe this month with 
          appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day 
          of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7531

Proclamation 7531 of March 11, 2002

Bicentennial Day of the United States Military Academy at West Point, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          For two centuries, the United States Military Academy at West 
          Point, New York, has trained, educated, and inspired thousands 
          of cadets to serve our Nation with integrity, skill, and 
          fortitude as members of our military's officer corps. West 
          Point emphasizes the very highest standards of personal honor, 
          academic achievement, and public duty, preparing its graduates 
          for lives of patriotic commitment and distinguished service. 
          Since the school's beginnings, West Point alumni have played 
          an immensely important role in protecting our national 
          security and preserving democracy around the world.
          Upon this 200th anniversary of the Academy's founding, we 
          celebrate West Point's great contributions to the success and 
          strength of America. We pay tribute to the Academy's 
          extraordinary tradition of valor, victory, and sacrifice. This 
          hallowed history is filled with the names of soldiers who 
          fought and sometimes died to preserve and protect the founding 
          principles of our country, ensuring that we can live today in 
          a free and democratic Republic.
          On March 16, 1802, President Thomas Jefferson signed an Act of 
          Congress establishing the United States Military Academy at 
          West Point, New York. Since its inception, the institution has 
          played a central role in the training of America's future 
          military leaders. And West Point graduates have marked our 
          history with courage beyond the call of duty; integrity that 
          brought honor to themselves, their school, and their Nation; 
          and military skills that achieved victory after victory.
          Academy graduates have long fulfilled West Point's noble 
          tradition of selfless service to country. General John J. 
          Pershing led the American Expedi

[[Page 58]]

          tionary Force to victory in World War I. And in World War II, 
          Generals Dwight Eisenhower, Omar Bradley, Douglas MacArthur, 
          and George Patton proved again the resourcefulness, bravery, 
          and skill of West Point's graduates, helping to lead the 
          Allies to victory over tyranny. In Korea and Vietnam, during 
          Operation Desert Storm, and now in Operation Enduring Freedom, 
          West Point graduates, like Generals Brent Scowcroft, Roscoe 
          Robinson, H. Norman Schwarzkopf, and Franklin ``Buster'' 
          Hagenbeck, have continued to make significant contributions 
          and great sacrifices for America and her people. And the 
          graduates of West Point continue to be prepared to make the 
          greatest sacrifice. We remember with deep respect and honor, 
          the sacrifice made by Academy graduate, Major Curtis Feistner, 
          who recently gave his life in the fight against terror.
          As part of the 200th anniversary of the United States Military 
          Academy, I encourage all Americans to reflect on the Academy's 
          incomparable history of contribution to our country's national 
          security and to remember the West Point graduates who made the 
          ultimate sacrifice in the defense of freedom. The Academy's 
          role in protecting our homeland and in shaping our next 
          generation of battlefield leaders deserves the gratitude and 
          respect of every American. I am pleased to pay tribute to this 
          noble school upon the occasion of its historic anniversary; 
          and I am honored to be serving today as Commander in Chief of 
          so many of its fine graduates.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 16, 2002, as West Point Bicentennial Day. I 
          encourage Federal, State, and local officials, as well as 
          leaders of civil, social, educational, and military 
          organizations, to conduct ceremonies and programs that 
          celebrate the United States Military Academy and the values it 
          represents and upholds.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh 
          day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7532

Proclamation 7532 of March 14, 2002

National Poison Prevention Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          In 1961, the Congress established the annual observance of 
          National Poison Prevention Week. Forty-one years later, this 
          event continues to educate Americans about the dangers of 
          childhood poisonings and to promote measures that help prevent 
          such poisonings. These measures and other poison awareness 
          efforts have helped reduce deaths from childhood poisonings by 
          more than 90 percent since 1962.
          According to the American Association of Poison Control 
          Centers, more than 1 million children each year are exposed to 
          potentially poisonous medicines and household chemicals. In an 
          effort to put an end to tragic ac

[[Page 59]]

          cidents, the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission 
          requires child-resistant packaging for many medicines and 
          household chemicals. But this special packaging is ``child-
          resistant,'' not ``child-proof.'' For this reason, it is 
          essential to keep potential poisons locked up and away from 
          children.
          Members of the Poison Prevention Week Council, representing 36 
          national organizations, work every year to organize events 
          during this special week to raise awareness of unintentional 
          poisonings, as well as to illustrate the steps that can be 
          taken to prevent them. Coalition members believe every 
          poisoning is preventable. Group members encourage Americans to 
          use and properly reclose child-resistant packaging, keep 
          poisonous substances secured and out of the reach of children, 
          and keep the poison center telephone number, 1-800-222-1222, 
          nearby in case of an emergency. This new nationwide number 
          connects callers to medical experts that provide immediate 
          treatment advice for poison emergencies. These centers are 
          open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
          To encourage Americans to learn more about the dangers of 
          unintentional poisonings and to take more preventive measures, 
          the Congress, by joint resolution approved September 26, 1961, 
          as amended (75 Stat. 681), has authorized and requested the 
          President to issue a proclamation designating the third week 
          of March each year as ``National Poison Prevention Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim March 17 through 23, 
          2002, as National Poison Prevention Week. I call upon all 
          Americans to observe this week by participating in appropriate 
          ceremonies and activities and by learning how to prevent 
          poisonings among children.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          fourteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7533

Proclamation 7533 of March 21, 2002

National Bone and Joint Decade, 2002-2011

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Living a life free from daily bone pain or joint discomfort is 
          something most people take for granted. Our bones, joints, and 
          connective tissues are the structure upon which all other 
          systems of the body depend. They give us strength, mobility, 
          protection, and stability. And they permit us to perform a 
          great variety of physical activities that shape our daily 
          lives.
          Our musculoskeletal structure is a complex system of tissue 
          and bone that is regularly subjected to trauma, metabolic and 
          genetic processes, and the gradual wear and tear of an active 
          life. When these bones and tissues become damaged or diseased, 
          they can create chronic conditions that may seriously impede 
          and sometimes permanently affect one's health and well-being.

[[Page 60]]

          In the United States, musculoskeletal disorders are a leading 
          cause of physical disability. Conditions such as osteoporosis, 
          osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, back pain, spinal 
          disorders, and fractures, also affect hundreds of millions of 
          people around the world. And many children suffer from 
          crippling bone and joint diseases and deformities, impeding 
          normal development and preventing them from experiencing a 
          full and healthy life.
          The incidence of musculoskeletal conditions will increase as 
          the average age of our population increases. And our culture's 
          increasing emphasis on physical activity, while important to 
          society's overall well-being, will also increase the stress 
          factors on bones and joints. Ensuing disorders, if left 
          untreated, could result in significant pain and suffering that 
          would affect employment, well-being, and healthcare costs.
          National Bone and Joint Decade, 2002-2011, envisions a series 
          of international initiatives among physicians, health 
          professionals, patients, and communities, working together to 
          raise awareness about musculoskeletal disorders and promoting 
          research and development into therapies, preventative 
          measures, and cures for these disorders. Advances in the 
          prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and research of 
          musculoskeletal conditions will greatly enhance the quality of 
          life of our aging population.
          The National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of 
          Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, and other 
          Federal agencies support many bone and joint studies. Industry 
          and private professional and voluntary agencies support other 
          initiatives. This work involves scientists examining the 
          possible genetic causes of bone and joint diseases and 
          studying how hormones, growth factors, and drugs regulate the 
          skeleton. Other researchers are studying bone density, 
          quality, and metabolism, and other ways to increase the 
          longevity of joint replacements for those whose daily 
          activities have become painful, difficult, or even impossible. 
          These research efforts can help relieve pain and suffering and 
          give countless children and adults the opportunity for a 
          better life.
          Thanks to the hard work of these dedicated researchers, we 
          have made great progress in understanding and treating 
          musculoskeletal disorders. I commend their efforts and 
          encourage them to pursue diligently further research that will 
          help those suffering from these disorders. And I hope that all 
          Americans will learn more about musculoskeletal problems, 
          their long- and short-term effects, and the therapies and 
          treatments available to help them.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim the years 2002-2011, as National Bone and Joint 
          Decade. I call upon the people of the United States to observe 
          the decade with appropriate programs and activities; and I 
          call upon the medical community to pursue research in this 
          important area.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          first day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7534

[[Page 61]]

Proclamation 7534 of March 21, 2002

Education and Sharing Day, U.S.A., 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America's future depends in part on ensuring that every child 
          in America receives a quality education. And by teaching our 
          children the importance of serving those in need, we will help 
          fulfill an important part of their education, showing them the 
          rewards that come from compassionate outreach.
          Education has always played a vital role in the success of our 
          Nation. It has provided hope through the principle that any 
          citizen can realize the American dream, regardless of 
          background, ethnicity, or faith. By challenging young people 
          to set high goals and to work hard to achieve them, we prepare 
          our youth to carry on the success of the American story and to 
          become leaders of this great Nation. A core foundation of 
          knowledge and values is essential for students to excel and 
          contribute to the well-being of our communities, our country, 
          and the world.
          Parents are a child's first and most important teachers, and 
          they provide the cornerstone of a child's early education. 
          Quality teachers, however, also play an important role in a 
          child's personal and intellectual development. The No Child 
          Left Behind Act of 2001, which I signed into law in January 
          2002, requires that, by the end of the 2005-06 school year, 
          there must be a ``highly qualified'' teacher in every 
          classroom. Through this new law, States and school districts 
          will have multiple tools to help them meet the new teacher 
          quality requirements. Key elements of this effort include 
          providing State grants to recruit and train teachers, and 
          recruiting high-quality individuals to become teachers, 
          offering expanded student loan forgiveness for teachers. And 
          we must encourage Americans to volunteer their time to serve 
          as mentors to our young people.
          Great teachers are also found outside the classroom, making a 
          positive impact on children and on local families. For 
          example, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the Lubavitcher 
          Rebbe, demonstrated the power of teaching others to pursue 
          both intellectual and moral excellence. For this purpose, he 
          established education and outreach centers that offered social 
          services and humanitarian aid. Today, more than 1,400 of these 
          centers operate in 35 countries, meeting the spiritual and 
          material needs of local communities. These beacons of hope 
          communicate the Rebbe's ideal of living a meaningful life 
          through personal responsibility and dedication to those in 
          need. On the 100th anniversary of the Rebbe's birth, I 
          encourage Americans to help teach our young people. In 
          classrooms, homes, and places of worship, we can all make a 
          lasting impact on individual children and thus invest in our 
          country as a whole.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 24, 2002, as Education and Sharing Day, U.S.A., 
          2002. I call on all Americans to help our young people better 
          understand the importance of character and develop a true love 
          of learning. By doing so, we invest in the future of our 
          country.

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          first day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7535

Proclamation 7535 of March 25, 2002

Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American 
Democracy, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Ancient Greece was the birthplace of the democratic principles 
          and thought that fundamentally shaped the growth of democracy 
          in world history. Societies aspiring toward more democratic 
          forms of government have found inspiration in the Greek 
          tradition of representative government and free political 
          discourse. As modern Greece celebrates the anniversary of its 
          independence, won 181 years ago, Greeks can be proud that its 
          vibrant democracy continues and that it is based upon the 
          beliefs in freedom and self-rule first forged in classical 
          Greece over 2500 years ago.
          These ideals have been embraced by peoples of the world who 
          aspire towards democracy, including the Founders of the United 
          States; and they were tested by the attacks of September 11, 
          2001. The terrorists sought to destroy a political and 
          economic system that promotes individual freedoms and 
          tolerance, defends national liberty, and supports the full 
          participation of its citizens in the democratic process. The 
          terrorists failed; but rather than destroying us, their 
          attacks strengthen our resolve to stand up to this evil. Along 
          with the members of our worldwide coalition, including Greece, 
          we are committed to defeating terrorism and protecting 
          liberty.
          The friendship between the United States and Greece continues 
          to thrive and is based upon our common cultural bonds and our 
          shared national values. Today, more than 3 million Americans 
          proudly claim Greek heritage, representing a continuing link 
          between our countries. From the arts and education to industry 
          and science, Greek Americans have made significant 
          contributions to the cultural, civic, and economic vitality of 
          our land.
          As we celebrate Greek independence, we remember the history of 
          those who sacrificed their lives to preserve freedom and 
          democracy. We value our friendship and continuing partnership 
          with the government and people of Greece, and we commit to 
          work together to provide greater opportunity and more freedoms 
          for the citizens of the world. And we join the world in 
          anticipating the momentous 2004 Summer Olympic Games, which 
          will be held in Athens, the birthplace of Olympic competition.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 25, 2002, as ``Greek Independence Day: A 
          National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy.'' 
          I encourage all Americans to take special note of Greece's 
          rich history of democracy, the strong bonds of friendship and 
          culture between

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          our countries, and the important role that Greek Americans 
          play in our Nation.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          fifth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7536

Proclamation 7536 of April 1, 2002

Cancer Control Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation is making important progress in the fight against 
          cancer. Today, 8.9 million Americans have survived this 
          disease, and new studies indicate that both cancer incidence 
          and death rates have declined in recent years. Research and 
          new technology have helped improve our ability to prevent, 
          detect, and treat cancer. We understand better and are 
          communicating more effectively the preventative power of 
          regular exercise, a balanced diet, not smoking, and greater 
          health awareness. Despite this progress, cancer remains a 
          major public health problem that affects millions of lives.
          Each day, more than 1,500 Americans die from cancer and 3,500 
          are diagnosed with some form of the disease. But we are 
          closing in on major breakthroughs that will lead to new cancer 
          therapies and life-saving cures.
          The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is leading the way as it 
          explores hundreds of methods to combat and prevent cancer. 
          Recognizing that early detection of cancer often makes a 
          difference between life and death, the NCI is utilizing 
          revolutionary genetic and biochemical processes to develop 
          tests that more effectively detect cancer at its earliest 
          stage.
          Scientists are discovering that the use of ultraviolet light 
          fluorescence to examine the lungs is more likely to identify 
          precancerous lesions than current techniques. Other NCI 
          researchers are investigating drugs that may stop cancerous 
          growths by preventing new blood vessels from reaching the 
          tissues. And a new class of drugs, known as bisphosphonates, 
          shows great promise against cancer that has spread to the 
          bone. The NCI's important work, in coordination with other 
          public and private health agencies, is helping to reduce the 
          incidence of cancer and is assisting cancer survivors to lead 
          richer, fuller, and longer lives.
          The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Initiative, 
          sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 
          is a valuable resource to support and coordinate cancer 
          control efforts at the Federal, State, and local levels. This 
          project helps ensure that cancer prevention, detection, and 
          treatment programs across the country work effectively with 
          each other by reducing duplicated efforts and missed 
          opportunities. My Administration is strongly committed to the 
          fight against cancer and will continue to support Federal 
          cancer control programs.

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          As we observe Cancer Control Month, I applaud the scientists, 
          healthcare providers, and public health professionals who work 
          tirelessly to find cures for this disease and to aid and 
          assist the patients who suffer from it. I call on all our 
          citizens to learn more about cancer by contacting the NCI's 
          Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER or visiting its 
          Internet address at http://www.cancer.gov. I also encourage 
          all Americans to protect their health by promoting cancer 
          awareness in their families and communities. Individuals 
          should pursue a lifestyle that includes regular exercise, 
          sufficient consumption of fruits and vegetables, avoidance of 
          tobacco products, and regular age-appropriate cancer 
          screenings. By working together to raise awareness about the 
          risks of cancer and the importance of medical research, we can 
          improve the quality of life for millions of Americans and 
          ultimately defeat this terrible disease.
          In 1938, the Congress of the United States passed a joint 
          resolution (52 Stat. 148; 36 U.S.C. 103) as amended, 
          requesting the President to issue an annual proclamation 
          declaring April as ``Cancer Control Month.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 2002 as Cancer Control Month. I call on 
          concerned citizens, government agencies, private industry, 
          nonprofit organizations, and other interested groups to 
          reaffirm our Nation's commitment to preventing and curing 
          cancer.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7537

Proclamation 7537 of April 1, 2002

National Child Abuse Prevention Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Every child deserves to be cared for by parents who provide 
          love, protection, and nurturing. Safe and healthy childhoods 
          help produce confident and successful adults. When parents are 
          unable to meet their responsibilities, the consequences are 
          tragic for their children and for society. Nationwide, reports 
          show that more than 879,000 children are victims of child 
          abuse and neglect and approximately 1,200 children die from 
          maltreatment, many at the hands of those who are supposed to 
          protect them.
          Children who are abused and neglected often carry the effects 
          of their experiences into adulthood. They are much more likely 
          to experience problems with substance abuse, depression, 
          learning disabilities, and to engage in criminal activities 
          and violence against others, including abuse of their own 
          children. The societal effects of child abuse include the need 
          for increased child welfare services, special education 
          resources, physical and emotional health care services, and 
          juvenile justice facilities.

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          My Administration is committed to promoting effective policies 
          that protect children from harm while strengthening and 
          supporting families. Promoting healthy marriages, and teaching 
          responsible fatherhood and motherhood, are key priorities of 
          my Administration. Last year, I worked with the Congress to 
          provide an additional $70 million for the Promoting Safe and 
          Stable Families Program, which is helping States ensure 
          children's safety, permanency, and well-being. This program is 
          designed to strengthen families at risk and prevent abuse and 
          neglect. My 2003 budget includes a substantial increase of 
          $130 million for this essential program.
          The problem of child abuse requires a continuing national 
          commitment, and we must remain vigilant in working to provide 
          safety and security to each young person in our society.
          Government alone cannot prevent child abuse. Child abuse 
          prevention requires partnerships among Federal, State, and 
          local governments, faith-based and community-based 
          organizations, schools, law enforcement, and social service 
          agencies. All of these organizations must work together with 
          parents to protect children and help build healthy families 
          and communities where children can reach their potential.
          Every April, communities across the country join to raise 
          public awareness about child abuse, to provide information 
          about how to prevent it, and to assist families in need of 
          support, recovery, and encouragement. During National Child 
          Abuse Prevention Month, and throughout the year, I encourage 
          all Americans to find ways to cherish our children, and 
          strengthen our families.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 2002 as National Child Abuse Prevention Month. 
          I call upon all Americans to observe this month by supporting 
          the hard work of those who ensure our children's safety, and 
          by playing an active role in creating a safer, healthier 
          environment for our children's growth.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7538

Proclamation 7538 of April 4, 2002

National Former Prisoner of War Recognition Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Throughout our Nation's history, patriotic Americans have 
          responded to the call to defend our freedoms. During war and 
          peace, American soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines have 
          stood vigilant, prepared, and willing to put themselves in 
          harm's way to protect our Nation. We owe the liberties we have 
          today to their brave service.

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          Americans who bear the title ``Former Prisoner of War'' are 
          national heroes. Their service to our country placed them in 
          dire circumstances, causing their capture and imprisonment by 
          our country's enemies. These heroes suffered great adversity 
          and sacrificed much for freedom and for the future of America.
          This year, as we remember our former prisoners of war (POWs), 
          we also mark the 60th anniversary of the Bataan Death March. 
          Many of the American soldiers who defended Corregidor, until 
          they were overwhelmed by enemy forces, never made it to prison 
          camp. Many were killed outright, and many died after enduring 
          unspeakable horrors. For those who survived the march, the war 
          entered a new phase: the struggle against their captors. By 
          enduring tremendous hardships and humiliations, and in 
          gallantly supporting their fellow prisoners, these Americans 
          exemplified the best of our Nation's spirit.
          The families of POWs also spent long, lonely years without 
          knowing whether they would ever see their loved ones again. As 
          we remember our former POWs, we must also remember their 
          families and friends who suffered along with them. Our Nation 
          must never forget their courage.
          Today, former POWs from across America work to assist their 
          former comrades and their families to cope with the painful 
          memories of the suffering that life as a POW inflicted. These 
          courageous heroes have important and powerful stories to 
          share, which can and should serve as an inspiration to 
          succeeding generations. Through these efforts, former POWs 
          have established a simple but enduring legacy, which ensures 
          that their heroism and that of their fallen or missing 
          comrades will not be forgotten.
          On National Former Prisoner of War Recognition Day, we 
          recognize the sacrifice of our former POWs and remember with 
          honor their heroism. We also pledge that we will work to 
          ensure that future generations will understand and appreciate 
          the courage and contributions of these selfless heroes.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 9, 2002, as National Former Prisoner of War 
          Recognition Day. I call upon all the people of the United 
          States to join me in remembering former American prisoners of 
          war by honoring the memory of their sacrifices. I also call 
          upon Federal, State, and local government officials and 
          private organizations to observe this day with appropriate 
          ceremonies and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7539

[[Page 67]]

Proclamation 7539 of April 10, 2002

National D.A.R.E. Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Illegal drugs are the enemy of ambition and hope, destroying 
          individual lives and undermining the health of our 
          communities. In addition to the tragic consequences of drug 
          use for Americans and their families, the drug trade supports 
          terrorist networks that threaten our country and our allies 
          around the world. When we fight the war on drugs, we also 
          fight the war on terror.
          The Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E) curriculum plays 
          an important role in helping our young people understand the 
          many reasons to avoid drugs. D.A.R.E. is a series of lessons, 
          taught by specially-trained police officers, that encourages 
          students to live healthy, drug-free lives. According to the 
          University of Akron Institute for Health and Social Policy, 
          the program operates in 80 percent of our school districts, 
          reaching 26 million young people in America each year. In 
          addition to promoting the right decisions about drugs, 
          D.A.R.E. helps build relationships among parents, teachers, 
          law enforcement officers, and others interested in preventing 
          drug use in their communities.
          My Administration is committed to keeping the fight against 
          drugs among our Nation's top priorities. I have proposed new 
          goals for our country, including a 10 percent reduction in 
          teenage and adult drug use over the next 2 years, and a 25 
          percent reduction over 5 years. My National Drug Control 
          Strategy is a community-based approach, incorporating three 
          core principles: (1) stopping drug use before it starts; (2) 
          healing America's drug users; and (3) disrupting the market 
          for drugs in our country. In addition, my 2003 budget proposes 
          $19.2 billion for drug control. This includes $3.8 billion for 
          drug treatment and research, an increase of more than 6 
          percent over 2002.
          Drugs attack everything that is best about our country, 
          robbing Americans, young and old, and their families of 
          dignity and character. Today, we recognize D.A.R.E. as a 
          critical part in our effort to teach young people how to avoid 
          drug use and the devastating effects that drugs can inflict 
          upon their health and on their future.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 11, 2002, as National D.A.R.E. Day. I call upon 
          youth, parents, educators, and all Americans to observe this 
          day by joining the fight against drugs in your communities. I 
          also encourage our citizens to express appreciation for the 
          law enforcement officers, volunteers, and others who work to 
          help young people avoid the dangers of drug use.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day 
          of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7540

[[Page 68]]

Proclamation 7540 of April 12, 2002

Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Pan America comprises a set of regional relationships that 
          connects the nations of the Western Hemisphere in an 
          increasingly interdependent network of commercial and cultural 
          communities. Every nation in Pan America, with one notable 
          exception, is committed to promoting freedom, democracy, and 
          the rule of law. Over the past year, the Pan American nations 
          have become increasingly united in purpose, seeking to ensure 
          the preservation of the freedoms inherent in democracy, to 
          promote good governance, to enhance economic development 
          across the hemisphere, to protect human rights, and to combat 
          terrorism, transnational crime, and narcotics trafficking. 
          Continued progress in achieving these goals will greatly 
          improve the future of the Americas.
          As a testament to the enduring spirit of cooperation that 
          binds us together as citizens of North, Central, and South 
          America, the Pan American nations have built a common front 
          against the threat of terrorism. Meeting in consultation on 
          September 19, 2001, the Organization of American States (OAS) 
          Permanent Council invoked the Rio Treaty, declaring that the 
          terrorist attacks of September 11, were attacks against all of 
          the Americas. Later that same month, the OAS Foreign Ministers 
          called for measures to strengthen hemispheric cooperation and 
          adopted binding commitments, demonstrating that this 
          hemisphere is prepared to guard the freedoms that form the 
          foundation of democracy.
          This firm response to the terrorist acts followed another 
          milestone for the region, namely, the adoption of the Inter-
          American Democratic Charter. In approving this document by 
          acclamation, the nations of the Western Hemisphere established 
          democracy as the birthright of every person in the Americas. 
          The words of this charter affirm that governments cannot be 
          democracies in name only, but must build upon the guiding 
          principles of our time and struggle to ensure the preservation 
          of essential civil liberties.
          Pan America's unprecedented spirit of cooperation bodes well 
          for the 2004 Summit of the Americas, when we will have the 
          opportunity to review our progress and renew commitments to 
          enhancing hemispheric relationships. Communication, trade, 
          travel, and advances in technology have all combined to 
          produce unprecedented levels of integration and 
          interdependence in the Western Hemisphere. And our continued 
          efforts toward a Free Trade Area of the Americas exemplify our 
          commitment to building a legal framework that opens the way to 
          self-sustaining and wide-ranging prosperity. The free exchange 
          of ideas and goods brings a unique vitality to our region, and 
          serves as a catalyst for continuing economic development at 
          the local and national levels.
          This past year provided sobering evidence that our freedoms 
          are not free. We must continue to work together as a unified 
          community to support and defend all peoples that are denied 
          their rights and privileges by governments that fail to 
          respect the essential elements of democracy and human rights. 
          In countering the threats of tyranny, poverty, and 
          lawlessness, our

[[Page 69]]

          collective goal must be to further the partnership we share as 
          standard bearers of a bold vision. By working together to 
          promote democracy, free trade, economic prosperity, effective 
          governance, and human rights, we will keep the new Pan 
          American spirit of freedom and cooperation alive and well for 
          generations to come.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 14, 2002, as Pan American Day and April 14 
          through April 20, 2002, as Pan American Week. I urge the 
          Governors of the 50 States, the Governor of the Commonwealth 
          of Puerto Rico, and the officials of other areas under the 
          flag of the United States of America to honor these 
          observances with appropriate ceremonies and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7541

Proclamation 7541 of April 12, 2002

Jewish Heritage Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Throughout our Nation's history, America has benefited from a 
          greatly diverse population, comprising a vibrant mix of ideas, 
          religions, national origins, and ethnic backgrounds. And from 
          this mix, we have inherited a Nation based on democratic 
          principles, free enterprise, and the freedom to pursue a 
          better way of life.
          Jewish Americans have played an important part in the success 
          of the American experience. They have dedicated themselves to 
          the challenges of building a better America; and their 
          patriotism, hard work, and faithful commitment to community 
          and family have enriched our culture and improved our country.
          Since our Nation's founding, millions of Jews have immigrated 
          to America, embracing the promise of opportunity and tolerance 
          that forms the heart of the American dream. Jews fled 
          persecution, pogroms, and the horrors of deadly prejudice to 
          begin new lives where they could worship in freedom, prosper 
          in society, and realize their dreams in peace. They also 
          brought with them a spirit of faith and a strong work ethic 
          that enhanced our culture and promoted national prosperity.
          The Jewish community in America has helped shape our Nation's 
          heritage and further our efforts toward building a land where 
          all people can live free and be treated equally under the law. 
          As entrepreneurs and public servants, scholars and 
          philanthropists, and countless other callings, Jewish 
          Americans have provided wisdom, energy, and leadership 
          wherever they settled and in whatever calling they followed.

[[Page 70]]

          During the early days of our Republic, President George 
          Washington wrote to the Hebrew congregations of Philadelphia, 
          New York, Charleston, and Richmond, to say that ``The power 
          and goodness of the Almighty were strongly manifested in the 
          events of the late glorious revolution: and His kind 
          interposition in our behalf, has been no less visible in the 
          establishment of our present equal government. In war He 
          directed the sword, and in peace He has ruled in our 
          councils.'' President Washington's message is equally 
          applicable today, as we engage in our war against terrorism 
          and work to establish a lasting peace in the Middle East.
          In celebrating Jewish Heritage Week, we reflect with joy upon 
          the many contributions Jewish Americans have made to the arts, 
          education, industry, science, and our very way of life. The 
          values and traditions of Judaism have contributed greatly to 
          our culture and history; and they have played a major role in 
          the success of our great Nation.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 14 through 21, 2002, as Jewish Heritage Week. I 
          urge all Americans to learn about the history of Jewish 
          Americans and to participate in activities that highlight the 
          accomplishments of these citizens.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7542

Proclamation 7542 of April 17, 2002

Death of Byron R. White

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          As a mark of respect for the memory of Byron R. White, retired 
          Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, I 
          hereby order, by the authority vested in me as President by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
          that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-
          staff on the day of his interment. On such day the flag shall 
          be flown at half-staff until sunset upon all public buildings 
          and grounds, at all military posts and naval stations, and on 
          all naval vessels of the Federal Government in the District of 
          Columbia and throughout the United States and its Territories 
          and possessions; and at all U.S. embassies, legations, 
          consular offices, and other facilities abroad, including all 
          military facilities and naval vessels and stations.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7543

[[Page 71]]

Proclamation 7543 of April 18, 2002

National Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Thirty years ago, advocates from some of the most crime-ridden 
          neighborhoods of St. Louis, San Francisco, and Washington, 
          D.C., founded the Nation's first assistance programs for crime 
          victims. These centers were established in communities where 
          violence was common, and they were clear about their mission: 
          to bring help, hope, and healing to those who had suffered the 
          effects of crime. The creation of these victim-assistance 
          programs launched a movement that brought domestic violence 
          shelters, homicide victim support groups, and rape crisis 
          centers to help victims in cities and towns throughout the 
          United States.
          The crime victims' rights movement also brought changes in the 
          way the criminal justice system treats and interacts with 
          crime victims. In many cases, crime victims began to be 
          treated with greater respect and to play an important role in 
          criminal justice proceedings.
          In 1982, President Ronald Reagan assembled a task force of 
          nine national leaders to travel the country and listen to 
          service providers, criminal justice professionals, and 
          victims. The Task Force's Final Report listed 68 
          recommendations for meeting victims' needs, including the need 
          for a Federal constitutional amendment. The momentum generated 
          by this report helped spur passage of the Victims of Crime Act 
          of 1984, which now supports thousands of assistance programs 
          throughout the Nation. The Victim and Witness Protection Act 
          of 1982 and other laws have given victims of Federal crimes 
          many important rights.
          All 50 States have now passed victims' rights laws, and more 
          than half the States have amended their constitutions to 
          guarantee rights for crime victims. However, more remains to 
          be done to secure victims' rights. I support a Federal 
          Constitutional Amendment to protect the rights of victims of 
          violent crime.
          Our Nation has come to realize the tragic toll that crime 
          takes, and we have developed the resources to ease crime's 
          physical, emotional, and financial impact. This support 
          network, which was already in place on September 11, made us 
          better prepared to deal with the unspeakable pain and tragedy 
          inflicted by the terrorist attacks. Along with the many 
          firefighters, law enforcement officers, paramedics, and rescue 
          workers who responded in New York, Washington, D.C., and 
          Pennsylvania, hundreds of counselors, chaplains, social 
          workers, volunteers, and victim service providers came 
          together for the common purpose of helping the victims, the 
          families, and our Nation.
          My Administration has made the fight against crime a top 
          priority. But when a crime does occur, I am dedicated to 
          providing assistance and comfort to victims and to ensuring 
          that the rights of victims are protected. At the time of their 
          great trauma, crime victims deserve nothing less than our 
          complete support.

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          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 21 through April 27, 2002, as National Crime 
          Victims' Rights Week. I encourage every community to embrace 
          the cause of victims' rights and services and to advance them 
          in all sectors of our society.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          eighteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7544

Proclamation 7544 of April 19, 2002

National Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation's organ and tissue donor program is an important 
          part of our healthcare system. Through the organ donor 
          program, Americans can provide hope to those who face 
          difficult and often life-threatening conditions caused by the 
          failure of vital organs. The selfless generosity of organ and 
          tissue donors helps meet a significant and growing need in our 
          country.
          Statistics show that approximately 60 Americans receive a 
          transplant every day. However, at the same time, another 15 
          people die because not enough organs are available. There are 
          more than 79,500 patients waiting for an organ transplant, and 
          another person joins the waiting list every 13 minutes.
          My Administration is committed to expanding the organ and 
          tissue program to close this gap. Last year, Secretary of 
          Health and Human Services (HHS) Tommy Thompson assumed 
          leadership of this effort through the ``Gift of Life Donation 
          Initiative.'' This Initiative involves collaboration among 
          businesses and employees to make organ donation information 
          more available. It also includes the development of a national 
          forum on donor registries, a new model donor card, and 
          increased cooperation between HHS, other Federal agencies, and 
          State governments to promote donor awareness.
          Every day, Americans across our Nation provide help for those 
          in need in countless ways. During this week, we renew our 
          efforts to foster this compassion and to help save lives by 
          promoting organ and tissue donation.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 21 through April 27, 2002, as National Organ 
          and Tissue Donor Awareness Week. I call upon all medical 
          professionals, educators, volunteers, government agencies, and 
          private organizations to join me in raising awareness of the 
          need for organ donors in communities throughout our Nation.

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          nineteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7545

Proclamation 7545 of April 19, 2002

National Volunteer Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Citizen service has always been a cornerstone of our 
          democracy. Since our founding, Americans have stepped forward 
          to serve the needs of others, strengthen our communities, and 
          defend the freedoms we treasure.
          Our country and the world continue to see the compassion, 
          strength, and generosity of Americans in the aftermath of the 
          attacks of September 11, 2001. Volunteers from across the 
          Nation united to help meet the needs of those harmed by the 
          tragic attacks, volunteering their time, their financial 
          resources, and their kindness.
          The spirit that guided our response to the attacks is still 
          evident in Americans of every age group and background who 
          volunteer their time to enhance the lives of others. These 
          compassionate people work through a broad range of 
          organizations that reflect the diversity of our country, 
          including private charities, faith-based organizations, 
          schools, neighborhood groups, volunteer centers, service 
          clubs, and Federal service programs. The efforts of millions 
          of Americans help solve some of our most pressing problems and 
          build bonds of trust among people.
          To tap further into our Nation's vast resources of compassion 
          and strength, I recently created the USA Freedom Corps 
          (USAFC). And I have called on all Americans to give at least 2 
          years--or 4,000 hours--during their lives in service to 
          others. This service is essential to forging a united response 
          to overcoming the challenges that face our Nation.
          The USAFC will help unleash our armies of compassion, enhance 
          homeland security, provide additional service and volunteer 
          opportunities in our communities, and help people in America 
          and around the world to meet important needs. Many Americans 
          are already answering the call, volunteering a few hours each 
          week or a few days each month to aid a local school, by 
          mentoring or tutoring a child. Citizens are also donating 
          their time to support a place of worship, to offer their 
          expertise to a neighborhood association, or to strengthen a 
          local service organization. Others are serving our country 
          full time in the military or in programs such as AmeriCorps, 
          Senior Corps, and the Peace Corps. I urge citizens to keep a 
          record of their service experiences in a journal that will 
          enable them to share them with their children and grand 
          children, inspiring new generations to engage in community 
          service.
          The spirit exemplified by America's volunteers will help 
          create a culture of responsibility and caring that will 
          inspire us to achieve greatness as a Nation. During National 
          Volunteer Week, I encourage all Americans to

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          learn more about how they can serve, to volunteer to help 
          those in need, and to encourage the volunteers across the 
          country who are answering the call to service. Americans 
          looking for a way to serve can contact the USA Freedom Corps 
          web site at www.usafreedomcorps.gov or call, toll-free, 1-877-
          USA-CORPS (872-2677).
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 21 through April 27, 2002, as National 
          Volunteer Week. I call on all Americans to join together to 
          celebrate the vital work that volunteers perform every day 
          across our country.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          nineteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7546

Proclamation 7546 of April 23, 2002

National Park Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our national park system helps preserve our history, heritage, 
          and the natural beauty of our Nation for the enjoyment of all 
          our citizens and many international visitors. Thanks to our 
          park system, many of these treasures retain their original 
          beauty and grandeur. The parks are places for recreation, 
          education, and reflection, and we must take care of them in a 
          way that preserves them for posterity.
          In 1872, the Congress established in the Territories of 
          Montana and Wyoming what we all know now as Yellowstone 
          National Park. This beautiful area later became the first to 
          be designated as a national park. Our national park system was 
          established in 1916 to protect and maintain our natural 
          resources and historic sites. Today, there are 385 national 
          parks on 84 million acres, visited annually by 280 million 
          people from around the world.
          My Administration's ``National Parks Legacy Project'' was 
          initiated to ensure proper care for our national park system. 
          Through thoughtful and diligent efforts, the National Parks 
          Legacy Project will enhance the parks' ecosystems, improve 
          outdoor opportunities, address infrastructure needs, and 
          establish accountability through performance goals. The 
          National Parks Legacy Project and other actions such as our 
          support for the Everglades Restoration Plan and our request to 
          fully fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund are important 
          steps to support existing and future parks, vital habitats, 
          and threatened ecosystems. I have asked the Secretary of the 
          Interior to prepare an annual report on the conditions of our 
          national parks and to offer specific recommendations for 
          improvements.
          We must also pay tribute to the role that the dedicated 20,000 
          men and women of the National Park Service play in preserving 
          our parks. Each day these professionals and more than 120,000 
          volunteers work to make na

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          tional parks accessible, safe, educational, and well 
          maintained. Their job is critical to the future of our parks 
          and national treasures, and America is grateful.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 22 through April 28, 2002, as National Park 
          Week. I call upon all the people of the United States to join 
          me in recognizing the importance of national parks and to 
          learn more about these areas of beauty and their historical 
          importance.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          third day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7547

Proclamation 7547 of April 26, 2002

National Day of Prayer, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Since our Nation's founding, Americans have turned to prayer 
          for inspiration, strength, and guidance. In times of trial, we 
          ask God for wisdom, courage, direction, and comfort. We offer 
          thanks for the countless blessings God has provided. And we 
          thank God for sanctifying every human life by creating each of 
          us in His image. As we observe this National Day of Prayer, we 
          call upon the Almighty to continue to bless America and her 
          people.
          Especially since September 11, millions of Americans have been 
          led to prayer. They have prayed for comfort in a time of 
          grief, for understanding in a time of anger, and for 
          protection in a time of uncertainty. We have all seen God's 
          great faithfulness to our country. America's enemies sought to 
          weaken and destroy us through acts of terror. None of us would 
          ever wish on anyone what happened on September 11th. Yet 
          tragedy and sorrow none of us would choose have brought forth 
          wisdom, courage, and generosity. In the face of terrorist 
          attacks, prayer provided Americans with hope and strength for 
          the journey ahead.
          God has blessed our Nation beyond measure. We give thanks for 
          our families and loved ones, for the abundance of our land and 
          the fruits of labor, for our inalienable rights and liberties, 
          and for a great Nation that leads the world in efforts to 
          preserve those rights and liberties. We give thanks for all 
          those across the world who have joined with America in the 
          fight against terrorism. We give thanks for the men and women 
          of our military, who are fighting to defend our Nation and the 
          future of civilization.
          We continue to remember those who are suffering and face 
          hardships. We pray for peace throughout the world.
          On this National Day of Prayer, I encourage Americans to 
          remember the words of St. Paul: ``Do not be anxious about 
          anything, but in everything,

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          by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your 
          requests to God.'' The Congress, by Public Law 100-307, as 
          amended, has called on our citizens to reaffirm the role of 
          prayer in our society and to honor the religious diversity our 
          freedom permits by recognizing annually a ``National Day of 
          Prayer.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 2, 2002, as a National Day of Prayer. I ask 
          Americans to pray for God's protection, to express gratitude 
          for our blessings, and to seek moral and spiritual renewal. I 
          urge all our citizens to join in observing this day with 
          appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          sixth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7548

Proclamation 7548 of April 30, 2002

Law Day, U.S.A., 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          One of our Nation's greatest strengths is its commitment to a 
          just, fair legal system and the protection it affords to the 
          rights and freedoms we cherish. On May 1, we observe Law Day 
          to draw attention to the principles of justice and the 
          practice of law. The theme of this year's Law Day, ``Celebrate 
          Your Freedom: Assuring Equal Justice for All,'' acknowledges 
          the essential task of protecting the rights of every American.
          When disputes or conflicts arise, or when persons are charged 
          with violating the law, resolution often occurs within the 
          legal system. Consultation with an attorney is a common first 
          step in this process. Attorneys advise clients of their rights 
          and obligations, suggest possible courses of action, and help 
          their clients to understand legal procedures. Attorneys are 
          zealous advocates on behalf of their clients, helping to 
          ensure that each one receives full and fair representation 
          before the courts. Bar associations and other attorney groups 
          play an important role in maintaining the integrity of our 
          legal system by overseeing admission to the bar and setting 
          standards of discipline for those who practice law.
          Our Founding Fathers believed that a strong and independent 
          judiciary was a cornerstone of democracy. Judges must be men 
          and women of skill, discernment, experience, and character who 
          meet the highest standards of training, temperament, and 
          impartiality. They must understand and honor the powers 
          granted to them under the Constitution, as well as the limits 
          on those powers. In criminal matters, judges help to ensure 
          that the innocent remain free and the guilty are appropriately 
          punished. In civil disputes, judges' decisions help to 
          safeguard the stability of the commercial

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          marketplace and address the grievances of wronged parties. 
          Judges are called upon daily to render decisions that are 
          based upon the law and facts of each case, without regard for 
          popular opinion or political or other extraneous pressures.
          Our forefathers imagined a well-qualified judiciary put in 
          place through a dynamic and constructive interaction between 
          the executive and legislative branches of Government. Under 
          our Constitution, the President selects individuals for 
          nomination to the Federal judiciary and the Senate provides 
          its advice and consent. In all cases, both branches of 
          Government strive to make certain that only men and women of 
          the highest intellect, character, integrity, judgment, and 
          experience are appointed to serve our Nation and its citizens 
          in these critical positions.
          This Law Day, I encourage all Americans to reflect on the 
          vital work performed by our Federal judiciary in upholding the 
          rule of law and on the importance of a robust and independent 
          judiciary in our system of Government.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, in accordance with Public Law 87-20, as 
          amended, do hereby proclaim May 1, 2002, as Law Day, U.S.A. I 
          call upon all the people of the United States to observe this 
          day with appropriate ceremonies and activities. I also call 
          upon Government officials to display the flag of the United 
          States in support of this national observance.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7549

Proclamation 7549 of April 30, 2002

Loyalty Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Ours is a Nation of people who demonstrate their patriotic 
          loyalty through service to our country. Whether born on 
          American soil or abroad, Americans appreciate patriotism and 
          loyalty to our country. President Woodrow Wilson said, 
          ``Loyalty means nothing unless it has at its heart the 
          absolute principle of self-sacrifice.'' Americans affirmed 
          this sense of loyalty for their homeland during and following 
          the attacks of September 11, 2001. Brave rescuers died while 
          saving others. Passengers on a hijacked airplane gave their 
          lives to prevent the deaths of fellow Americans. Americans 
          pledged to fight terrorism, both here and across the globe.
          Since that tragic day, citizens across our country 
          overwhelmingly gave their time and resources to help those in 
          need. These countless expressions of patriotism reflect an 
          inspiring devotion to our fellow citizens and our Nation.

[[Page 78]]

          For our military personnel, loyalty and dedication is a way of 
          life. The men and women of our Armed Forces embody loyalty as 
          they work to protect our ideals. Throughout our history, 
          America's military has heroically defended our country and its 
          founding principles of freedom and democracy. Today, our 
          military is again responding to the call of duty with courage 
          and pride. These brave individuals who risk their lives 
          fighting terror honor those who have made the ultimate 
          sacrifice on behalf of the American people.
          Our Constitution speaks of forming ``a more perfect Union,'' 
          and Americans have always responded to this call with 
          commitment and character. Brave citizens have fought to 
          abolish slavery, to extend voting rights to all our citizens, 
          and to uphold civil rights. The struggle to improve our Nation 
          also takes place on an individual level, one person at a time. 
          Men and women of all ages and from all over the country work 
          every day to help others in need. Through families, community 
          groups, and places of worship, Americans give of themselves to 
          help others realize a brighter future.
          Our loyalty to American democracy and freedom is born of 
          pride, appreciation, and understanding of our country. We are 
          loyal to America, our fellow citizens, and these ideals. 
          Loyalty Day provides an opportunity to recognize those who 
          demonstrate their commitment to our country through service 
          and sacrifice. These individuals serve as a model for all 
          Americans.
          The Congress, by Public Law 85-529, as amended, has designated 
          May 1 of each year as ``Loyalty Day.'' On this special 
          occasion, I encourage all Americans to join me in reaffirming 
          our allegiance to our blessed Nation.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 1, 2002, as Loyalty Day. I call upon all 
          Americans to take part in celebrating this national 
          observance.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7550

Proclamation 7550 of May 1, 2002

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation's rich cultural diversity reflects our 
          Constitution's core vision of freedom and justice for all. 
          Throughout our history, Asian/Pacific Americans have made 
          great contributions to America's heritage and prosperity. 
          During this month, we proudly celebrate Asian/Pacific 
          Americans, one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in the 
          United States, for their remarkable role in our Nation's 
          development.

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          Through the years, Asian immigrants and Pacific Islanders have 
          enriched the American way of life. Nobel Prize winner Dr. 
          Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar's groundbreaking theories on the 
          evolution of stars helped lay the foundation for modern 
          astrophysics. Actress Anna May Wong was one of the first Asian 
          Americans to achieve great fame in American film. And the men 
          of the 100th Infantry Battalion and the 442nd Regimental 
          Combat Team, composed primarily of Asian/Pacific Americans, 
          valiantly served our Nation during World War II. These units 
          are remembered as some of the most highly decorated in U.S. 
          military history.
          During the observance of Asian/Pacific American Heritage 
          Month, we celebrate the cultural traditions, ancestry, native 
          languages, and unique experiences represented among the more 
          than 30 ethnic groups from Asia and the Pacific found here in 
          the United States. We also recognize millions of Asian/Pacific 
          Americans whose love of family, hard work, and community has 
          helped unite us as a people and sustain us as a Nation.
          To honor the achievements of Asian/Pacific Americans, the 
          Congress, by Public Law 102-450, as amended, has designated 
          the month of May each year as ``Asian/Pacific American 
          Heritage Month.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim May 2002 as Asian/
          Pacific American Heritage Month. I call upon our citizens to 
          learn more about the history of Asian/Pacific Americans and 
          how they have contributed so much to our national heritage and 
          culture.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7551

Proclamation 7551 of May 1, 2002

Older Americans Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation's strength and vitality reside in our citizens. 
          Each year in May, we honor and recognize older Americans for 
          their important sacrifices and contributions to our society. 
          Our seniors have cared for their families and communities, 
          enhanced our economic prosperity, defended our Nation, and 
          preserved and protected the Founders' vision. Their commitment 
          to our future sets an inspiring example for all. And their 
          resilience, fortitude, and experience provide us with 
          important perspectives and insights as we face the challenges 
          of a new era.
          The theme of this year's observance, ``America: A Community 
          for All Ages,'' reminds us that all citizens, regardless of 
          age, are essential to successful and safe communities. The 
          celebration also recognizes the extended role seniors play in 
          our families, communities, and workplaces, as they live 
          longer, healthier, and more productive lives. Drawing on their 
          considerable knowledge and experience, older Americans mentor 
          at-risk children, de

[[Page 80]]

          liver meals to homebound seniors, and care for frail or 
          chronically ill family members. Others embark on exciting new 
          careers or engage in challenging themselves in athletic 
          competitions. In addition, many seniors have answered my call 
          to service by becoming involved in the Senior Corps domestic 
          service program, which is administered by the Corporation for 
          National and Community Service.
          As we celebrate the lives of older Americans, we also renew 
          our dedication to their well-being. My Administration strongly 
          supports measures that protect the promise of retirement and 
          healthcare security for seniors. We must modernize our 
          Medicare and Medicaid programs so that seniors can access the 
          best medicines and treatments. We must secure a good 
          prescription drug benefit program for all our seniors. We must 
          also continue to support medical research that is specifically 
          targeted to the health problems of older Americans. By 
          supporting flexible and innovative forms of long-term care, we 
          can reduce the demands of caring for an elderly or disabled 
          loved one. And we must strengthen financial security by 
          protecting Social Security for today's retirees by encouraging 
          private saving among all Americans, giving individuals more 
          control over their investments.
          This year's observance of Older Americans Month also marks the 
          30th anniversary of the Older Americans Act Nutrition Program, 
          one of our most vital, community-based programs for seniors. 
          Managed by the Administration on Aging and supported by the 
          private sector and countless nonprofit organizations, the 
          program has provided nearly 6 billion meals to senior centers 
          and other group settings and to those who are homebound. It 
          has also provided nutrition counseling and opportunities for 
          health screening. For many elderly, this program has made a 
          tremendous impact on their quality of life.
          By maintaining and improving programs that assist older 
          Americans, we help these important citizens enjoy longer, 
          healthier, and more productive lives. During this month, I 
          join all Americans in paying tribute to the achievements and 
          contributions of our greatest generation and reaffirming our 
          commitment to their well-being.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 2002 as Older Americans Month. I commend the 
          national aging network of State, local, and tribal 
          organizations, service and healthcare providers, caregivers, 
          and millions of dedicated volunteers for your daily efforts on 
          behalf of our senior citizens. I encourage all Americans to 
          honor their elders, to seek opportunities to address their 
          needs, and to work together to reinforce the bonds that unite 
          families and communities. I also call upon all our citizens to 
          publicly reaffirm our Nation's commitment to older Americans 
          this month and throughout the year.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7552

[[Page 81]]

Proclamation 7552 of May 2, 2002

National Charter Schools Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Over a decade ago in Minnesota, a handful of educators 
          envisioned a new kind of educational institution that would 
          provide an alternative for children trapped in under-
          performing public schools. Their philosophy for a ``charter 
          school'' was straightforward and powerful: provide parents the 
          option to send their children to innovative public schools 
          that combine flexibility and autonomy with a guarantee to 
          raise student achievement.
          Today, we recognize the important successes of the charter 
          school experiment. Nearly 2,400 charter schools now exist 
          across our Nation. Thanks to bipartisan support at the local, 
          State, and Federal level, more than a half-million children 
          have attended these public schools and obtained a better 
          education.
          In reading, math, science, special education, early childhood 
          education, and other areas, charter schools have implemented 
          innovative programs that produce results. Charter school 
          principals and teachers have the freedom to develop classroom 
          techniques that meet their students' unique needs, and parents 
          appreciate the ability to have direct input into their 
          children's educational progress. Charter school administrators 
          are accountable to students, parents, and community leaders, 
          and they know that if their school fails to meet expectations, 
          it must either improve or close.
          The effects of charter schools extend beyond the schoolhouse 
          walls. Wherever charter schools are clustered together, we see 
          traditional schools reevaluate their methods and programs. At 
          this basic level, charter schools help stimulate community 
          debate and inspire educational excellence.
          Accountability, flexibility, expanded choices, and a focus on 
          methods that work are all important elements in the landmark, 
          bipartisan, No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which I signed 
          into law in January. This legislation authorizes a new 
          program, the Charter School Facility Demonstration Project, 
          which provides important seed funding for charter school 
          infrastructure and construction needs. It also continues the 
          Charter School Grants program that supports planning and 
          development of new public charter schools. Together these 
          programs provide valuable tools to American education. Now we 
          must work together to implement this new legislation in all 
          our communities so no child is left behind.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 28 through May 4, 2002, as National Charter 
          Schools Week. I call on parents of charter school children to 
          share their success stories with others so that all Americans 
          may learn more about charter schools and their important work. 
          I commend the States with charter schools.

[[Page 82]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7553

Proclamation 7553 of May 3, 2002

To Restore Nondiscriminatory Trade Treatment (Normal Trade Relations 
Treatment) to the Products of Afghanistan

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. Section 118(a)(1) of Public Law 99-190, 99 Stat. 1319, 
          authorized the President to deny nondiscriminatory trade 
          treatment to the products of Afghanistan and thereby cause 
          such products to be subject to the rate of duty in column 2 of 
          the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS).
          2. Presidential Proclamation 5437 of January 31, 1986, 
          modified the HTS so as to deny nondiscriminatory trade 
          treatment to the products of Afghanistan.
          3. Restoration of nondiscriminatory trade treatment will 
          support U.S. efforts to normalize relations with Afghanistan 
          and facilitate increased trade with the United States, which 
          could contribute to economic growth and assist Afghanistan in 
          rebuilding its economy.
          4. Pursuant to section 118(c)(1) of Public Law 99-190, I have 
          determined that it is appropriate to restore nondiscriminatory 
          trade treatment to the products of Afghanistan and thereby 
          cause such products to be subject to the applicable rate of 
          duty in column 1 of the HTS.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          section 118 of Public Law 99-190, and section 604 of the Trade 
          Act of 1974, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2483), do hereby proclaim 
          that:
          (1) Nondiscriminatory trade treatment (normal trade relations 
          treatment) shall be restored to the products of Afghanistan;
          (2) General note 3(b) of the HTS is modified to exclude 
          Afghanistan; and
          (3) The restoration of nondiscriminatory trade treatment and 
          the modification to general note 3(b) of the HTS shall be 
          effective with respect to goods entered, or withdrawn from 
          warehouse for consumption, on or after the thirtieth day after 
          the date of publication of this proclamation in the Federal 
          eister.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this third day 
          of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7554

[[Page 83]]

Proclamation 7554 of May 3, 2002

To Extend Duty-Free Treatment for Certain Agricultural Products of Israel

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. On April 22, 1985, the United States entered into the 
          Agreement on the Establishment of a Free Trade Area between 
          the Government of the United States of America and the 
          Government of Israel (the ``FTA''), which the Congress 
          approved in the United States-Israel Free Trade Area 
          Implementation Act of 1985 (the ``FTA Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2112 
          Note).
          2. On November 4, 1996, the United States entered into an 
          agreement with Israel concerning certain aspects of trade in 
          agricultural products, effective from December 4, 1996, 
          through December 31, 2001 (the ``1996 Agreement''), in order 
          to maintain the general level of reciprocal and mutually 
          advantageous concessions with respect to agricultural trade 
          with Israel while acknowledging differing interpretations 
          regarding the meaning of certain rights and obligations in the 
          FTA as to such trade.
          3. Section 4(b) of the FTA Act provides that, whenever the 
          President determines that it is necessary to maintain the 
          general level of reciprocal and mutually advantageous 
          concessions with respect to Israel provided for by the FTA, 
          the President may proclaim such withdrawal, suspension, 
          modification, or continuance of any duty, or such continuance 
          of existing duty-free or excise treatment, or such additional 
          duties as the President determines to be required or 
          appropriate to carry out the FTA.
          4. Pursuant to section 4(b) of the FTA Act, President Clinton 
          issued Proclamation 6962 of December 2, 1996, to provide 
          through the close of December 31, 2001, access into the United 
          States customs territory for specified quantities of certain 
          agricultural products of Israel free of duty or certain fees 
          or other import charges, consistent with the 1996 Agreement.
          5. On December 31, 2001, the United States entered into an 
          agreement with Israel to extend the 1996 Agreement through 
          December 31, 2002, in order to allow for additional time to 
          negotiate a successor arrangement to the 1996 Agreement.
          6. Pursuant to section 4(b) of the FTA Act, I have determined 
          that it is necessary, in order to maintain the general level 
          of reciprocal and mutually advantageous concessions with 
          respect to Israel provided for by the FTA, to provide through 
          the close of December 31, 2002, duty-free treatment for 
          specified quantities of certain agricultural products of 
          Israel.
          7. Section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2483) (the 
          ``Trade Act'') authorizes the President to embody in the 
          Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS) the 
          substance of the relevant provisions of that act, and of other 
          acts affecting import treatment, and actions thereunder, 
          including removal, modification, continuance, or imposition of 
          any rate of duty or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution

[[Page 84]]

          and the laws of the United States, including section 4 of the 
          FTA Act and section 604 of the Trade Act, do hereby proclaim:
          (1) In order to implement U.S. commitments under the 1996 
          Agreement as extended through December 31, 2002, and, in 
          particular, to provide duty-free treatment for specified 
          quantities of certain agricultural products of Israel, 
          subchapter VIII of chapter 99 of the HTS is modified as 
          provided in the Annex to this proclamation.
          (2) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (3)(a) The modifications to the HTS made by the Annex to this 
          proclamation shall be effective with respect to goods that are 
          the product of Israel and are entered, or withdrawn from 
          warehouse for consumption, on or after January 1, 2002, 
          including entries for which the liquidation of duties has not 
          become final under section 514 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as 
          amended (19 U.S.C. 1514).
          (b) The provisions of subchapter VIII of chapter 99 of the 
          HTS, as modified by the Annex to this proclamation, shall 
          continue in effect through the close of December 31, 2002.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this third day 
          of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Modifications to Subchapter VIII of Chapter 99 of the Harmonized Tariff 
Schedule of the United States

          Effective with respect to goods that are the product of Israel 
          and are entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, 
          on or after January 1, 2002, and through the close of December 
          31, 2002, subchapter VIII of chapter 99 of the HTS is modified 
          as provided herein:
          1. U.S. note 1 to such subchapter is modified by striking 
          ``December 31, 2001,'' and by inserting in lieu thereof 
          ``December 31, 2002,''.
          2. U.S. note 3 is modified by inserting at the end of the 
          table therein the following additional applicable time period 
          and quantity: ``Calendar year 2002 . . . . . 383,000''.
          3. U.S. note 4 is modified by inserting at the end of the 
          table therein the following additional applicable time period 
          and quantity: ``Calendar year 2002 . . . . . 1,160,000''.
          4. U.S. note 5 is modified by inserting at the end of the 
          table therein the following additional applicable time period 
          and quantity: ``Calendar year 2002 . . . . . 1,279,000''.
          5. U.S. note 6 is modified by inserting at the end of the 
          table therein the following additional applicable time period 
          and quantity: ``Calendar year 2002 . . . . . 116,000''.

[[Page 85]]

          6. U.S. note 7 is modified by inserting at the end of the 
          table therein the following additional applicable time period 
          and quantity: ``Calendar year 2002 . . . . . 405,317''.

Proc. 7555

Proclamation 7555 of May 3, 2002

Small Business Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The strength of our economy is built on the creativity and 
          entrepreneurship of our people. Those who own and operate our 
          Nation's 25 million small businesses make a vital contribution 
          to our prosperity through their ongoing work to create new 
          technologies, products, and services. These hardworking men 
          and women and their employees define the American spirit 
          through their innovation, dedication, and determination.
          The tragedy of September 11, 2001, greatly affected our Nation 
          and our economy; but our economy is recovering and remains 
          fundamentally sound. In the aftermath of the terrorist 
          attacks, the business community rose to this challenge by 
          volunteering their time and services to help with the relief 
          and rebuilding efforts in New York City and Washington, D.C. 
          This compassionate spirit demonstrated America's true 
          character.
          To help businesses recover from September 11, my 
          Administration has made more than $520 million in disaster 
          loans available to business owners nationwide. I also remain 
          committed to a domestic policy that stimulates economic 
          growth, boosts consumer purchasing power, and creates a level 
          playing field. Our efforts to lower taxes, enact reasonable 
          regulations, and reduce tariffs and other barriers to free 
          trade will increase the competitive position of our small 
          businesses. To further encourage economic growth, I recently 
          signed into law the Job Creation and Worker Assistance Act of 
          2002. The Act helps to create more jobs across our country by 
          providing tax incentives for companies to expand and create 
          jobs by investing in facilities and equipment. This action 
          will lead to more opportunities in manufacturing, high-tech 
          sectors, and our small businesses. I am also committed to 
          achieve a permanent repeal of the death tax and the permanent 
          extension of tax relief to help ensure the strength and 
          survival of small businesses.
          America's small business owners represent more than 99 percent 
          of all employers and their businesses employ more than half of 
          the private work force. These entrepreneurs who create more 
          than 66 percent of the new jobs nationwide and generate more 
          than 50 percent of the Nation's gross domestic product growth 
          are critical to our country's prosperity and the well-being of 
          our communities. We salute these employers by celebrating 
          Small Business Week and recognizing their contributions to all 
          Americans.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 5 through May 11, 2002, as Small Business Week. I 
          call on all Americans to observe this week with appropriate 
          ceremonies, activities, and programs that celebrate the 
          achieve

[[Page 86]]

          ments of small business owners and encourage and foster the 
          development of new enterprises.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this third day 
          of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7556

Proclamation 7556 of May 6, 2002

National Tourism Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          For hundreds of years, people across our Nation and around the 
          world have enjoyed traveling across America to visit our 
          magnificent cities, parks, museums, and countless other 
          natural, historic, and cultural sites. Our land provides 
          endless opportunities to learn as well as to enjoy our 
          Nation's immense variety of attractions.
          The travel and tourism industry represents a vital part of the 
          American economy. The Department of Commerce estimates that in 
          2001 the travel and tourism industry generated more than $90 
          billion in export revenue and provided a $7.7 billion balance 
          of trade surplus. Preliminary numbers show that last year, the 
          industry created approximately $545 billion in total travel 
          expenditures and provided $94 billion in tax revenue to local, 
          State, and Federal governments. As one of our Nation's largest 
          employers, travel and tourism supports more than 7 million 
          jobs.
          During National Tourism Week 2002, we recognize the 
          significance of this important industry to our economy and for 
          the lives of all Americans. In the aftermath of the tragic 
          attacks of September 11, 2001, the travel and tourism industry 
          contributed to our country's efforts to persevere through this 
          challenging time. As we have encouraged people to resume the 
          regular course of their lives, Americans and visitors from 
          around the world have responded by traveling to and enjoying 
          the beauty of our Nation.
          During this observance, I urge all Americans and people around 
          the globe to travel to and within our country to experience 
          the hospitality and quality of our Nation's great 
          destinations.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 5-11, 2002, as National Tourism Week. In 
          recognition of the significance of the travel and tourism 
          industry in the lives of citizens of our Nation and to 
          visitors from abroad, I call upon all Americans to mark this 
          observance with activities that highlight this important 
          industry.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day 
          of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7557

[[Page 87]]

Proclamation 7557 of May 9, 2002

Mother's Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Mothers are central to the success of the American family. 
          Their love, dedication, and wisdom touch countless lives every 
          day in every community throughout our land. And their love and 
          guidance of children help to develop healthy and spiritually 
          sound families.
          President John Quincy Adams once said, ``All that I am my 
          mother made me.'' President Abraham Lincoln believed, ``All 
          that I am or hope to be I owe to my angel mother. I remember 
          my mother's prayers and they have always followed me. They 
          have clung to me all my life.'' These statements are just as 
          true for the millions of Americans who credit their mothers 
          for helping to successfully shape their lives.
          Millions of American mothers are at work in communities across 
          the United States, improving the lives of their families and 
          their neighbors through countless acts of thoughtful kindness. 
          They energize, inspire, and effect change in homes, schools, 
          governments, and businesses throughout our country. By their 
          example, mothers teach their children that serving others is 
          the greatest gift they can give.
          Nearly 100 years ago, Anna Jarvis of Philadelphia helped 
          establish the first official Mother's Day observance. Her 
          campaign to organize such a holiday began as a remembrance of 
          her late mother, who, in the aftermath of the Civil War, had 
          tried to establish ``Mother's Friendship Days'' as a way to 
          bring unity and reconciliation to our Nation. In 1910, West 
          Virginia became the first State officially to observe Mother's 
          Day. The idea caught on quickly; for just over a year later, 
          nearly every State in the Union had officially recognized the 
          day. In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first 
          Mother's Day proclamation, stating that the observance serves 
          as a ``public expression of our love and reverence for the 
          mothers of our country.''
          On this special day and throughout the year, our mothers 
          deserve our greatest respect and deepest appreciation for 
          their love and sacrifice. I especially commend foster mothers 
          for answering my call to service, volunteering their time and 
          their hearts to aid children in need of a mother's love. To 
          honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved 
          May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the 
          second Sunday in May as ``Mother's Day'' and has requested the 
          President to call for its appropriate observance, which, as 
          the son of a fabulous mother, I am pleased and honored to do 
          again this year.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim May 12, 2002, as 
          Mother's Day. I encourage all Americans to express their love, 
          respect, and gratitude to mothers everywhere for their 
          remarkable contributions to their children, families, 
          communities, and our Nation.

[[Page 88]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7558

Proclamation 7558 of May 10, 2002

Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          In the face of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, 
          our Nation witnessed the remarkable heroism of America's peace 
          officers as they selflessly aided those in need. As the World 
          Trade Center towers burned, dedicated officers rushed into the 
          severely damaged buildings to rescue the injured. Seventy-two 
          peace officers died that day, trying to save others. These 
          supreme sacrifices remind us of the remarkable commitment that 
          our Nation's peace officers have made to preserve our safety 
          and our country's well-being.
          In all, 230 law enforcement officers gave their lives in the 
          line of duty last year. The name of each fallen officer has a 
          place of honor on the National Law Enforcement Officers 
          Memorial wall in Washington, D.C. This monument ensures that 
          the valor of the more than 15,000 law enforcement officers 
          lost since 1794 will never be forgotten.
          Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week pay tribute to the 
          local, State, and Federal law enforcement officers who serve 
          and protect us with courage and dedication. These observances 
          also remind us of the ongoing need to be vigilant against all 
          forms of crime, especially to acts of extreme violence and 
          terrorism.
          Effective law enforcement is a crucial element to maintaining 
          our quality of life; and we must continue to ensure that our 
          police have the financial, technical, and civil support 
          necessary to carry out their responsibilities. The more than 
          740,000 sworn law enforcement officers who are our first 
          responders play a critical role in our Nation's safety and 
          security.
          Every American should also play a role in making our 
          communities safer. Programs operated through the Citizen 
          Corps, including Neighborhood Watch, Volunteers in Police 
          Service, and the Terrorism Information and Prevention System, 
          offer citizens the opportunity to take a stand against crime. 
          As we observe Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week, I 
          encourage all Americans to learn more about ways to fight 
          crime in their communities and to honor the brave individuals 
          who protect our lives and property.
          By a joint resolution approved October 1, 1962, as amended, 
          (76 Stat. 676), the Congress has authorized and requested the 
          President to designate May 15 of each year as ``Peace Officers 
          Memorial Day'' and the week in which it falls as ``Police 
          Week,'' and, by Public Law 103-322, as amended, (36 U.S.C. 
          136), has directed that the flag be flown at half-staff on 
          Peace Officers Memorial Day.

[[Page 89]]

          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim May 15, 2002, as Peace 
          Officers Memorial Day and May 12 through May 18, 2002, as 
          Police Week. I call on Americans to observe these events with 
          appropriate ceremonies and activities. I also call on 
          Governors of the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto 
          Rico, as well as appropriate officials of all units of 
          government, to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on 
          Peace Officers Memorial Day. I further encourage all Americans 
          to display the flag at half-staff from their homes on that 
          day.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day 
          of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7559

Proclamation 7559 of May 10, 2002

National Defense Transportation Day and National Transportation Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The importance of America's transportation system became 
          evident to all Americans on September 11, 2001. Airliners were 
          diverted, airports closed, and travelers were stranded for 
          days as transportation systems across the country were 
          disrupted. In the aftermath of September 11, the men and women 
          in the transportation industry have helped restore function 
          and trust to a system that was traumatized. Today, Americans 
          and America's goods and services are being more safely moved 
          to their destinations, as our communities continue the process 
          of important restructuring.
          We have helped secure our transportation system with the 
          passage of the Aviation and Transportation Security Act, which 
          greatly enhanced the protections for America's passengers and 
          goods. And we are determined to ensure that Americans have the 
          transportation system and mobility that is necessary for a 
          vibrant economy and meaningful quality of life.
          We live in a time of unprecedented travel, when goods and 
          services, regardless of origin, can be available in a short 
          amount of time. Thanks to imagination, innovation, and 
          investment in transportation, we can safely commute to work, 
          receive overnight mail, buy fresh fruit and vegetables, and 
          travel with relative ease to destinations around the world. We 
          also continue to make progress in developing a transportation 
          system that offers choices and protects the environment 
          through cleaner, more fuel-efficient vehicles and new, 
          environmentally sound infrastructure.
          To recognize Americans who work in transportation and who 
          contribute to our Nation's prosperity, defense, and progress, 
          the United States Congress, by joint resolution approved May 
          16, 1957, as amended, (36 U.S.C. 120), has designated the 
          third Friday in May of each year as ``National Defense 
          Transportation Day,'' and, by joint resolution approved May 
          14, 1962, as

[[Page 90]]

          amended, (36 U.S.C. 133), declared that the week during which 
          that Friday falls be designated as ``National Transportation 
          Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim Friday, May 17, 2002, as 
          National Defense Transportation Day and May 12 through May 18, 
          2002, as National Transportation Week. I encourage all 
          Americans to recognize how our modern transportation system 
          has enhanced our economy and contributed to our freedom.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day 
          of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7560

Proclamation 7560 of May 13, 2002

National Hurricane Awareness Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Hurricanes can devastate our communities, endangering 
          thousands of human lives and causing billions of dollars in 
          property damage. Stemming from the ocean, the atmosphere, and 
          heat from the sea, hurricanes bring with them the potential 
          for high winds, tornadoes, torrential rains, flooding, and 
          ocean water storm surges. Their fierce and destructive power 
          requires that we all take steps to reduce our vulnerability to 
          this natural hazard.
          According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 
          and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, an 
          average of ten tropical storms develop annually over the 
          Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico. Every year, 
          an average of six of these storms grow strong enough to become 
          hurricanes. Approximately five hurricanes strike the United 
          States coastline every 3 years. Out of these, two will have 
          winds above 111 miles per hour, qualifying them as major 
          hurricanes. The resulting high winds and high waves can 
          seriously damage homes, businesses, public buildings, and 
          critical infrastructure, and ultimately have the potential to 
          injure people and claim lives.
          To help avoid damage and help ensure the public's safety from 
          hurricane hazards, FEMA recommends a variety of preventative 
          steps for both individuals and communities. For example, 
          construction measures can help minimize property destruction. 
          These include installing storm shutters over exposed glass and 
          adding hurricane straps to hold the roof of a structure to its 
          walls and foundation. More complex measures, such as elevating 
          coastal homes and businesses, can further reduce a property's 
          susceptibility. In addition, communities can reduce their 
          vulnerability by adopting wind- and flood-resistant building 
          codes and by implementing sound land-use planning.
          More than 50 million people live along hurricane-prone 
          coastlines in the United States, with millions of tourists 
          visiting these areas annually. Dur

[[Page 91]]

          ing National Hurricane Awareness Week, I encourage those who 
          live in coastal areas, as well as all concerned Americans, to 
          be more vigilant in preparing for hurricanes and other natural 
          disasters before they occur. By promoting awareness of 
          hurricane hazards and helping with relief efforts when these 
          powerful storms strike, we can reduce the risks of hurricane 
          damage and help our neighbors recover more quickly from their 
          devastating effects. With preparation, forecasting, and 
          coordination, we can save lives and improve our Nation's 
          ability to withstand the impact of hurricanes.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 19 through May 25, 2002, as National Hurricane 
          Awareness Week. I call on government agencies, private 
          organizations, schools, news media, and residents in 
          hurricane-prone areas to share information about hurricane 
          preparedness and response in order to help prevent storm 
          damage and save lives.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          thirteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7561

Proclamation 7561 of May 16, 2002

To Designate the Republic of C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire as a Beneficiary Sub-
Saharan African Country

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Section 506A(a)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the 
          ``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2466a(a)(1)), as added by section 
          111(a) of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (title I of 
          Public Law 106-200) (AGOA), authorizes the President to 
          designate a country listed in section 107 of the AGOA (19 
          U.S.C. 3706) as a ``beneficiary sub-Saharan African country.''
          Section 112(b)(3)(B) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3721(b)(3)(B)) 
          provides special rules for certain apparel articles imported 
          from ``lesser developed beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
          countries.''
          Proclamation 7350 of October 2, 2000, and Proclamation 7400 of 
          January 17, 2001, designated certain countries listed in 
          section 107 of the AGOA as beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
          countries and identified which designated beneficiary sub-
          Saharan African countries would be considered lesser developed 
          beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries under section 
          112(b)(3)(B) of the AGOA.
          Pursuant to section 506A(a)(1) of the 1974 Act, and having due 
          regard for the eligibility criteria set forth therein, I have 
          determined that it is appropriate to designate the Republic of 
          C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire (C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire) as a beneficiary 
          sub-Saharan African country.

[[Page 92]]

          C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire satisfies the criteria for treatment as a 
          ``lesser developed beneficiary sub-Saharan country'' under 
          section 112(b)(3)(B) of the AGOA.
          Section 604 of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes the 
          President to embody in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the 
          United States (HTS) the substance of the relevant provisions 
          of that Act, and of other acts affecting import treatment, and 
          actions thereunder, including the removal, modification, 
          continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty or other import 
          restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          sections 506A and 604 of the 1974 Act, and section 111 of the 
          AGOA, do proclaim that:
          (1) C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire is designated as a beneficiary sub-
          Saharan African country.
          (2) In order to reflect this designation in the HTS, general 
          note 16(a) to the HTS is modified by inserting in alphabetical 
          sequence in the list of beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
          countries ``Republic of C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire.''
          (3) For purposes of section 112(b)(3)(B) of the AGOA, 
          C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire shall be considered a lesser developed 
          beneficiary sub-Saharan African country.
          (4) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with this proclamation are 
          superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
          (5) The modifications of the HTS made by this proclamation 
          shall be effective with respect to articles entered, or 
          withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after the date 
          of publication of this proclamation in the Federal 
          eister.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7562

Proclamation 7562 of May 16, 2002

Armed Forces Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The words of President Dwight D. Eisenhower written in 1953 
          remain true today: ``It is fitting and proper that we devote 
          one day each year to paying special tribute to those whose 
          constancy and courage constitute one of the bulwarks guarding 
          the freedom of this nation and the peace of the free world.'' 
          On Armed Forces Day, our grateful Nation salutes the brave men 
          and women who protect our country, defend freedom, and help 
          make our world a better place.
          During these extraordinary times, we are reminded that our 
          achievements in peace and war stand upon the service and 
          sacrifice of those in uniform.

[[Page 93]]

          Today, we have troops fighting overseas to defeat terrorism. 
          These brave men and women follow in the footsteps of previous 
          generations who, since our Nation's founding, have stepped 
          forward to defend our homeland and secure liberty for our 
          country and our friends and allies. The members of our 
          military exemplify the true spirit of patriotism--a love of 
          country expressed through a commitment to serve our Nation and 
          defend our freedom. Their selfless dedication and 
          determination are an inspiration to every American.
          In difficult times, America has called on members of our Armed 
          Forces to protect the democratic ideals on which our country 
          was founded, and they have never let our country down. As we 
          confront the challenges of this new era, we will continue to 
          rely on our military's extraordinary skill, sense of honor, 
          devotion to duty, and courageous commitment to service.
          More than 50 years ago, President Harry S. Truman helped 
          establish a day for Americans to join together and thank our 
          military members for their service to our country. In 1949, 
          Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson announced the establishment 
          of Armed Forces Day to replace separate Army, Navy, Marine 
          Corps, and Air Force Days. A year later, President Truman 
          issued a Presidential Proclamation, observing that the day 
          ``marks the first combined demonstration by America's defense 
          team of its progress, under the National Security Act, towards 
          the goal of readiness for any eventuality. It is the first 
          parade of preparedness by the unified forces of our land, sea, 
          and air defense.''
          The theme of this year's celebration is ``United For 
          Freedom.'' During this celebration, I encourage Americans to 
          show the world that we are unified as a people and ready to 
          defend our way of life, our freedoms, and our homeland. As 
          President and Commander in Chief, I urge all our citizens to 
          join me in expressing appreciation for the dedication and 
          selfless service of the members of our extraordinary Armed 
          Forces.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America and Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces 
          of the United States, continuing the precedent of my ten 
          immediate predecessors in this Office, do hereby proclaim the 
          third Saturday of each May as Armed Forces Day.
          I direct the Secretary of Defense on behalf of the Army, Navy, 
          Marine Corps, and Air Force, and the Secretary of 
          Transportation on behalf of the Coast Guard, to plan for 
          appropriate observances each year, with the Secretary of 
          Defense responsible for soliciting the participation and 
          cooperation of civil authorities and private citizens.
          I invite the Governors of the States, the Commonwealth of 
          Puerto Rico, and other areas subject to the jurisdiction of 
          the United States, to provide for the observance of Armed 
          Forces Day within their jurisdiction each year in an 
          appropriate manner designed to increase public understanding 
          and appreciation of the Armed Forces of the United States.
          I also invite national and local veterans, civic, and 
          community service organizations to join in the observance of 
          Armed Forces Day each year.
          I call upon all Americans not only to display the flag of the 
          United States at their homes on Armed Forces Day, but also to 
          learn about our system of defense and about the men and women 
          who sustain it by attending and participating in the local 
          observances of the day.

[[Page 94]]

          Proclamation 6693 of May 21, 1994, is hereby superseded.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7563

Proclamation 7563 of May 17, 2002

National Safe Boating Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America is blessed with beautiful coastlines, lakes, and 
          waters that offer ample opportunities for boating recreation. 
          More than 70 million recreational boaters use our waters every 
          year and boat registrations continue to increase. Although the 
          number of recreational boats and boaters is growing, the 
          incidence of boating deaths continues to drop, thanks to an 
          increasing emphasis on safety.
          Despite this positive trend, much work remains to further 
          reduce boating accidents and fatalities. National Safe Boating 
          Week and the North American Safe Boating Campaign remind us 
          that safety must always remain a top priority when boating on 
          our Nation's waterways.
          To further reduce boating deaths, it is vital that both 
          children and adults wear life jackets while boating. Nearly 70 
          percent of recreational boating deaths are by drowning, and 
          nearly 90 percent of these victims were not wearing life 
          jackets. Many of these fatalities could have been avoided had 
          a Coast Guard-approved life jacket or personal flotation 
          device been worn. Thanks to new technology and designs, life 
          jackets are now less burdensome to wear.
          Another major cause of boating accidents is the operation of 
          boats while drunk or otherwise impaired. Boating under the 
          influence of alcohol or drugs is illegal in every State and is 
          a violation of Federal law. According to the United States 
          Coast Guard, the dangerous effects of alcohol on persons 
          operating boats are even greater than for individuals 
          operating land vehicles. The additional factors that can 
          further impair judgment and coordination include motion, 
          vibration, engine noise, wind, sun, and any spray. Boat 
          operators with a blood alcohol concentration above .10 percent 
          are ten times more likely to be killed in a boating accident 
          than boat operators who have not been drinking. During 
          National Safe Boating Week, we must underscore again that to 
          operate a boat or any vehicle while under the influence is 
          never safe.
          A less recognized boating hazard involves a silent killer: 
          carbon monoxide. Dangerous or deadly fumes can accumulate in 
          confined spaces on boats, near stern ladders, and under 
          swimming platforms. Swimmers and water-skiers behind running 
          boat engines face the greatest risk of exposure to exhaust 
          fumes, which can build up to deadly levels. Boaters should be 
          aware of the threats posed by carbon monoxide and take steps 
          to avoid them. Individuals may learn more about carbon 
          monoxide and other ways to stay

[[Page 95]]

          safe while boating by visiting the U.S. Coast Guard's website 
          at www.uscgboating.org.
          In recognition of the importance of safe boating practices, 
          the Congress, by joint resolution approved June 4, 1958 (36 
          U.S.C. 131), as amended, has authorized and requested the 
          President to proclaim annually the 7-day period prior to 
          Memorial Day weekend as ``National Safe Boating Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim May 18 through May 24, 
          2002, as National Safe Boating Week. I encourage the Governors 
          of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth 
          of Puerto Rico, and the officials of other areas subject to 
          the jurisdiction of the United States, to join in observing 
          this occasion. I also urge boaters to learn about proper 
          boating practices and to take advantage of programs offered by 
          the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. By taking sensible precautions 
          on the water and learning more about potential dangers, 
          boaters can enjoy boating recreation and help ensure the 
          safety of others.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7564

Proclamation 7564 of May 17, 2002

World Trade Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Trade plays a vital role in encouraging prosperity and 
          improving the lives of people around the world. It fosters 
          economic growth, ingenuity, and innovation. And it builds 
          high-quality jobs and promotes economic and political 
          stability around the world. During World Trade Week, we 
          recognize the importance of trade to building a brighter 
          future for our Nation and for countries throughout the world.
          Over the last decade, U.S. exports have accounted for as much 
          as a quarter of our Nation's economic growth. Most of our 
          exporters are small- and medium-sized firms that have fewer 
          than 100 employees. An estimated 12 million U.S. jobs are 
          supported by our export of manufactured products, agricultural 
          goods, technology, and other goods and services. These jobs 
          are high-quality, high-paying positions that provide good 
          wages.
          As the world's largest exporter, the United States is a leader 
          in promoting free trade. Free trade and open markets benefit 
          businesses, employees, and consumers by creating a competitive 
          environment with greater choice and lower prices. We must 
          continue to promote an aggressive trade agenda that opens 
          markets and builds economic opportunity. In support of this 
          goal, my Administration has worked to help secure the entry of 
          China and Taiwan into the World Trade Organization. We also 
          completed trade agreements with Vietnam and Jordan and 
          launched new global trade negotiations in Doha, Qatar. But 
          more remains to be done.

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          At present, there are about 150 free trade agreements in 
          effect worldwide, nearly 25 percent of which involve countries 
          in the Western Hemisphere. The United States is a party to 
          only three of these pacts. To give U.S. exporters much broader 
          access to markets throughout the hemisphere, our Nation 
          envisions a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), an area 
          that would be the world's largest open market. The FTAA would 
          include more than 800 million consumers in countries with a 
          combined Gross Domestic Product of around $13 trillion. Our 
          Nation would also benefit from renewal of the Andean Trade 
          Preference Act, which would continue to help create economic 
          alternatives to drug production in Andean region countries.
          Economists have calculated that lowering trade barriers by 
          just one-third will strengthen the world's economic welfare by 
          up to $613 billion and that of the United States by $177 
          billion. For the average American family of four, that amounts 
          to $2500 of annual savings.
          Another critical step for U.S. economic growth is successful 
          passage of Trade Promotion Authority. Under this legislation, 
          the Congress grants the President the authority to negotiate 
          trade agreements. Trade Promotion Authority demonstrates to 
          our trading partners the alliance that exists between the 
          executive and legislative branches to help raise living 
          standards through out the world. This is vital to securing new 
          free trade agreements with potential negotiating partners.
          Fundamental to free trade is competitive fairness. America's 
          support of an aggressive, forward-looking trade agenda 
          requires that government assist industries' interests when 
          they are challenged by unfair trading practices or subsidies. 
          We must insist that our trading partners honor their 
          commitments. As we open markets for American companies 
          competing internationally, we need tools to secure a level 
          playing field for American businesses. And we will remain 
          committed to improving both the environment and worldwide 
          labor standards.
          In the future, trade will continue to play a crucial role in 
          creating economic and political stability, building 
          democracies, reducing poverty, and contributing to an 
          increased standard of living around the world. Open trade will 
          help ensure a more peaceful and prosperous tomorrow for all 
          people.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 19 through May 25, 2002, as World Trade Week. I 
          encourage all Americans to observe this week with events, 
          trade shows, and educational programs that celebrate the 
          benefits of trade to our economy and the global economy.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7565

[[Page 97]]

Proclamation 7565 of May 21, 2002

National Maritime Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our commercial maritime tradition dates back to the founding 
          of our Nation; and it continues to play an important role 
          today, moving passengers and freight, protecting our freedom, 
          and linking our citizens to the world.
          Merchant mariners have served America with distinction 
          throughout our history, but especially at critical moments. 
          Before World War II, they made dangerous and difficult voyages 
          carrying vital supplies to Europe. During that war, more than 
          700 United States merchant ships were lost to attack, and more 
          than 6,000 merchant mariners lost their lives. Merchant 
          mariners played a vital role in the Korean Conflict, 
          especially in the rescue of 14,000 Korean civilians by the SS 
          MEREDITH VICTORY. During the Vietnam War, ships crewed by 
          civilian seamen carried 95 percent of the supplies used by our 
          Armed Forces. Many of these ships sailed into combat zones 
          under fire. In fact, the SS MAYAGUEZ incident involved the 
          capture of mariners from the American merchant ship SS 
          MAYAGUEZ.
          More recently, during the Persian Gulf War merchant mariners 
          were vital to the largest sealift operation since D-Day. And 
          after the tragic attacks of September 11th, professional 
          merchant mariners and midshipmen from the United States 
          Merchant Marine Academy transported personnel and equipment 
          and moved food and supplies to lower Manhattan. Their efforts 
          enhanced rescue operations and helped save many lives.
          Today, the men and women of the United States Merchant Marine 
          and thousands of other workers in our Nation's maritime 
          industry continue to make immeasurable contributions to our 
          economic strength and our ongoing efforts to build a more 
          peaceful world. We must ensure our maritime system can meet 
          the challenges of the 21st century. As cargo volume is 
          expected to double within the next 20 years, a viable maritime 
          network will help our country compete in our global economy.
          Accordingly, my Administration is working with government 
          agencies, the shipping industry, labor, and environmental 
          groups to ensure that our waterways remain a sound 
          transportation option that complements our overland 
          transportation network.
          In recognition of the importance of the U.S. Merchant Marine, 
          the Congress, by joint resolution approved on May 20, 1933, as 
          amended, has designated May 22 of each year as ``National 
          Maritime Day,'' and has authorized and requested that the 
          President issue an annual proclamation calling for its 
          appropriate observance.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim May 22, 2002, as 
          National Maritime Day. I call upon the people of the United 
          States to celebrate this observance and to display the flag of 
          the United States at their homes and in their communities. I 
          also request that all ships sailing under the American flag 
          dress ship on that day.

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          first day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7566

Proclamation 7566 of May 21, 2002

National Missing Children's Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On May 25, 1979, 6-year old Etan Patz disappeared on his way 
          to school in New York City. The ensuing search focused 
          national attention on the tragedy of missing children, as well 
          as the lack of resources and information available to help 
          locate and recover missing children. Since that time, many 
          high-profile cases and the dedicated efforts of parents, the 
          law enforcement community, and others concerned with 
          children's well-being have generated even greater awareness 
          about the need to protect children from criminals and other 
          predators.
          During this year, we mark the 20th anniversary of the passage 
          of the Missing Children Act, originally signed into law by 
          President Reagan. Over the past two decades, the Department of 
          Justice, along with many important community and faith-based 
          partners, have made great progress in raising public 
          awareness, improving public safety, locating and recovering 
          missing children, and protecting children from exploitation on 
          the Internet.
          Americans must continue to work together to ensure the safety 
          of our children. The Department of Justice will commemorate 
          National Missing Children's Day by presenting six awards that 
          recognize outstanding efforts to safeguard our youngest 
          citizens. The recipients deserve our heartfelt thanks and 
          appreciation for their dedicated work. As they are honored for 
          their contributions, I urge all Americans to take an active 
          role in upholding the safety of our communities and in 
          defending the well-being of our children.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 25, 2002, as National Missing Children's Day. I 
          call upon Americans to join me in commemorating this 
          observance and to remember those young people who are missing. 
          I also call on our citizens to recognize and thank those who 
          work on behalf of missing children and their families. By 
          renewing our commitment to protect our children from harm, we 
          can save lives and prevent untold suffering and grief among 
          the most vulnerable of our society.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          first day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7567

[[Page 99]]

Proclamation 7567 of May 21, 2002

Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Every Memorial Day, Americans remember the debt of gratitude 
          we owe to our veterans who gave their lives for our country. 
          On this important day, communities across our Nation stop to 
          remember and to honor the great sacrifices made by our men and 
          women in uniform.
          Since its beginnings, our country has faced many threats that 
          have tested its courage. From war-torn battlefields and jungle 
          skirmishes to conflicts at sea and air attacks, generations of 
          brave men and women have fought and died to defeat tyranny and 
          protect our democracy. Their sacrifices have made this Nation 
          strong and our world a better place.
          Upwards of 48 million Americans have served the cause of 
          freedom and more than a million have died to preserve our 
          liberty. We also remember the more than 140,000 who were taken 
          prisoner-of-war and the many others who were never accounted 
          for. These memories remind us that the cost of war and the 
          price of peace are great.
          The tradition of Memorial Day reinforces our Nation's resolve 
          to never forget those who gave their last full measure for 
          America. As we engage in the war against terrorism, we also 
          pray for peace. When America emerged from the Civil War, 
          President Abraham Lincoln called on all Americans to ``cherish 
          a just and lasting peace.'' In these extraordinary times, our 
          Nation has once again been challenged, and Lincoln's words 
          remain our guiding prayer.
          We continue to rely on our brave and steadfast men and women 
          in uniform to defend our freedom. United as a people, we pray 
          for peace throughout the world. We also pray for the safety of 
          our troops. This new generation follows an unbroken line of 
          good, courageous, and unfaltering heroes who have never let 
          our country down.
          As we commemorate this noble American holiday, we honor those 
          who fell in defense of freedom. We honor them in our memory 
          through solemn observances, with the love of a grateful 
          Nation.
          In respect for their devotion to America, the Congress, by a 
          joint resolution approved on May 11, 1950 (64 Stat. 158), has 
          requested the President to issue a proclamation calling on the 
          people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day as a 
          day of prayer for permanent peace and designating a period on 
          that day when the people of the United States might unite in 
          prayer. The Congress, by Public Law 106-579, has also 
          designated the minute beginning at 3:00 p.m. local time on 
          that day as a time for all Americans to observe the National 
          Moment of Remembrance.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          designate Memorial Day, May 27, 2002, as a day of prayer for 
          permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each 
          locality at 11:00 a.m. of that day as a time to unite in 
          prayer. I also ask all Americans to observe the National 
          Moment of Remem

[[Page 100]]

          brance beginning at 3:00 p.m. local time on Memorial Day. I 
          urge the press, radio, television, and all other media to 
          participate in these observances.
          I also request the Governors of the United States and the 
          Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the appropriate officials of 
          all units of government, to direct that the flag be flown at 
          half-staff until noon on this Memorial Day on all buildings, 
          grounds, and naval vessels throughout the United States and in 
          all areas under its jurisdiction and control. I also request 
          the people of the United States to display the flag at half-
          staff from their homes for the customary forenoon period.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          first day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7568

Proclamation 7568 of May 31, 2002

Black Music Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America's diverse and extraordinary musical heritage reflects 
          the remarkable cultural and artistic history of our Nation. 
          From gospel, blues, and jazz to rock and roll, rap, and hip-
          hop, our Nation's musical landscape offers an astounding array 
          of uniquely American styles. During Black Music Month, we 
          celebrate a critically important part of this heritage by 
          highlighting the enduring legacy of African American 
          musicians, singers, and composers, and urging every American 
          to appreciate and enjoy the fabulous achievements of this 
          highly creative community.
          Early forms of black American music developed out of the work 
          song, which had its roots in African tribal chants. Through 
          this music, slaves shared stories, preserved history, and 
          established a sense of community. As many African slaves in 
          early America became Christians, they adapted their music into 
          the songs and life of the church. These spirituals eventually 
          evolved into a genre that remains vibrant and very meaningful 
          today--gospel music. This great musical tradition developed 
          under the leadership of people like Thomas Dorsey, who was 
          known as the Father of Gospel Music. He composed many great 
          gospel songs that have become standards, and he established 
          the tradition of the gospel music concert.
          Following emancipation, African Americans enjoyed 
          unprecedented opportunities but also faced many new and 
          frequently oppressive challenges. Frustrations from these 
          struggles for freedom and equality found expression in a style 
          of music that came to be known as the blues. Innovative 
          musical geniuses like W.C. Handy, Robert Johnson, the Reverend 
          Gary Davis, and Mamie Smith were among the legendary pioneers 
          of blues music.
          As blacks migrated throughout the United States in the early 
          1900s, they tapped into their collective experience and 
          creativity to develop new expressions of music. New Orleans 
          became the center for a particularly American form of music--
          jazz. This novel genre combined unique rhythms and

[[Page 101]]

          melodies with the sounds of stringed, brass, and woodwind 
          instruments. Jazz captured the interest of 20th century 
          America, making household names of great African American 
          artists like Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker, Ella Fitzgerald, 
          and Miles Davis. The unparalleled brilliance of these and 
          other great jazz musicians had an extraordinary effect upon 
          the American musical tradition, while bringing great pleasure 
          to millions of fans.
          In the 1940s, rhythm and blues emerged, synthesizing elements 
          from gospel, blues, and jazz; and from these styles came the 
          birth of rock and roll. A fabulous array of artists helped to 
          pioneer this modern musical transformation, including Chuck 
          Berry, Ray Charles, Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, and Stevie 
          Wonder.
          As we reflect on the rich and distinctive history of so many 
          talented artists, we celebrate the incredible contributions 
          that black musicians have made to the history of American 
          music and their influence on countless forms of music around 
          the world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim June 2002 as Black Music Month. I call on Americans 
          of all backgrounds to learn more about the rich heritage of 
          black music and how it has shaped our culture and our way of 
          life, and urge them to take the opportunity to enjoy the great 
          musical experiences available through the contributions of 
          African American music.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-
          first day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7569

Proclamation 7569 of May 31, 2002

National Fishing and Boating Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation's landscape contains thousands of bodies of water 
          that offer endless opportunities for recreational boating and 
          fishing. Every year, millions of Americans, including me, look 
          forward to enjoying these popular pastimes.
          In addition to providing opportunities for recreation, fishing 
          and boating play important roles in our Nation's economy. They 
          support thousands of American jobs and generate millions of 
          dollars that go directly back to protecting and conserving 
          resources at the local level. Since 1950, State fish and 
          wildlife agencies have received nearly $4 billion through the 
          Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Act. These funds have 
          helped to purchase over 322,000 acres for boating, fishing and 
          fish production, and research. In addition, funding has been 
          used to help educate the public about fish and their habitats. 
          These measures enhance the quality of life for people of all 
          ages and continue a vital legacy of environmental stewardship.

[[Page 102]]

          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim June 2 through June 8, 2002, as National Fishing and 
          Boating Week. During this week, I encourage people of the 
          United States to participate in the thousands of local events 
          scheduled in communities throughout the United States, 
          offering hands-on opportunities for families and friends to 
          share in these recreational activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-
          first day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7570

Proclamation 7570 of June 4, 2002

National Homeownership Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Homeownership is an important part of the American Dream. As 
          President, I am committed to helping many more Americans 
          achieve that dream. A home provides shelter and a safe place 
          where families can prosper and children can thrive. For many 
          Americans, their home is an important financial investment, 
          and it can be a source of great personal pride and an 
          important part of community stability.
          Homeownership encourages personal responsibility and the 
          values necessary for strong families. Where homeownership 
          flourishes, neighborhoods are more stable, residents are more 
          civic-minded, schools are better, and crime rates decline. 
          Thanks to the resources available in our Nation, more 
          Americans own homes today than at any time in our history. 
          However, among African American and Hispanic families, fewer 
          than half are home owners. My Administration is working to 
          provide all families with the tools and information they need 
          to accumulate wealth and overcome barriers to homeownership.
          The Department of Housing and Urban Development is partnering 
          with State and local governments, community groups, and the 
          private sector to make the most effective use of Federal 
          funds. Through a combination of down payment assistance, tax 
          incentives, and education about the process and 
          responsibilities of homeownership, we are helping thousands of 
          Americans buy homes and pursue a better quality of life.
          During National Homeownership Month, I encourage all Americans 
          to learn more about financial management and to explore 
          homeownership opportunities in their communities. By taking 
          this important step, individuals and families help safeguard 
          their financial futures and contribute to the strength of our 
          Nation.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim June 2002 as National Home

[[Page 103]]

          ownership Month. I call upon the people of the United States 
          to join me in recognizing the importance of providing all our 
          citizens a chance to achieve the American Dream.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7571

Proclamation 7571 of June 5, 2002

National Child's Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Children bring joy and challenge to the lives they touch. And 
          as our next generation of leaders, they carry with them the 
          hope of our Nation. From the excitement of watching a toddler 
          take a first step to the satisfaction of seeing them mature 
          into adulthood, we are blessed to share our lives and 
          experiences with children. Their thoughts, ideas, and unique 
          perspectives renew our appreciation for life.
          National Child's Day is a time to affirm our commitment as 
          parents, teachers, and citizens to the health, well-being, and 
          success of our children. Our goal must be to make sure that 
          all children have the opportunity to learn and succeed. To 
          achieve this, we must use the resources of our families, 
          communities, schools, and government to ensure that no child 
          is left behind.
          My Administration is strongly committed to helping boys and 
          girls grow up in secure families that help them reach their 
          full potential. Families forge values where children can find 
          fulfillment and love. And children who are surrounded by love, 
          support, and encouragement can develop self-esteem and have a 
          strong foundation for life.
          We are working to implement programs and initiatives that help 
          families stay strong and intact; that support adoption efforts 
          and mentoring programs; that protect children from abuse and 
          neglect; and that encourage alcohol, drug, and sexual 
          abstinence. We also are making great progress in helping all 
          schools become places where every student is able and expected 
          to learn.
          While government can provide much to support children, it 
          cannot provide the love a child needs. I encourage all 
          community leaders, educators, faith-based organizations, and 
          citizens to seek opportunities to mentor, encourage, and 
          listen to our children. As we observe National Child's Day, we 
          should also communicate to young people that their dreams, 
          aspirations, happiness, and well-being are important to us and 
          to our future.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim June 9, 2002, as National Child's Day. I urge all 
          Americans to work within their communities to ap

[[Page 104]]

          preciate, love, and protect all of America's children. I also 
          call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate 
          programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7572

Proclamation 7572 of June 7, 2002

Great Outdoors Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          During Great Outdoors Week, our Nation celebrates the 
          wonderful legacy of our parks, forests, wildlife refuges, 
          recreation areas, and other public lands and waters. 
          Protection of many of these special places started with 
          initiatives begun by President Theodore Roosevelt. He 
          established a commitment to conservation that we continue 
          today. President Roosevelt believed that, ``The nation behaves 
          well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it 
          must turn over to the next generation increased; and not 
          impaired in value.'' As we enjoy the many benefits of our 
          great outdoors, we also must renew our individual and 
          collective dedication to natural resource conservation.
          Across our Nation, federally managed lands comprise nearly one 
          out of every three acres. Thousands of recreation sites 
          nationwide are managed by Federal agencies. These agencies 
          work to make it easier for all people to enjoy our natural 
          resources. ``Recreation One-Stop'' provides information on the 
          Internet to help Americans find and experience the land we 
          love. In addition, through increases in appropriations, fees 
          paid by visitors, and partnerships with non-profits, 
          communities, and businesses, we are addressing and reversing 
          years of neglect.
          Americans have a special appreciation for the great outdoors. 
          Each year, thousands of hard-working volunteers contribute 
          millions of hours to our parks and other sites. They build 
          trails, act as campground hosts, staff visitor centers, serve 
          as interpreters, clean shorelines, and introduce children to 
          safe and healthful outdoor fun. Their efforts enhance the 
          enjoyment of those who visit our parks each year. My call to 
          service through the USA Freedom Corps will help energize 
          volunteerism on these Federal lands. In addition, my 
          Administration's new Cooperative Conservation Initiative will 
          provide millions of dollars to help citizens undertake 
          conservation projects on public lands.
          The events of September 11 have reminded us of our deep and 
          abiding love for our homeland. And our natural, historic, and 
          cultural sites have played an important role since that tragic 
          day, serving as places for many Americans to reflect upon life 
          and renew their hope. During Great Outdoors Week, I encourage 
          all Americans to experience and celebrate our wonderful 
          natural heritage.

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          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim June 9 through June 15, 2002, as Great Outdoors Week. 
          I call on all Americans to observe this week with safe and 
          wholesome outdoor recreational activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh 
          day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7573

Proclamation 7573 of June 7, 2002

Flag Day and National Flag Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The American flag is a beacon of hope, a symbol of enduring 
          freedom, and an emblem of unity. Many have given their lives 
          in its defense, and countless men and women have worked to 
          ensure that Old Glory continues to stand for the ideals of 
          freedom, justice, and equal opportunity for all. Our flag 
          symbolizes the purpose and resolve of our Nation, first 
          expressed by our Founders who triumphed against great odds to 
          establish this country.
          Today, as we face the challenges of a new era, our flag 
          reminds us that freedom will prevail over oppression and that 
          good will overcome evil. Following the attacks of September 
          11, Americans embraced a renewed sense of the meaning and 
          purpose of our flag. The unforgettable images of our Nation's 
          colors flying defiantly over the debris of the World Trade 
          Center inspired our country with a healing hope, uniting our 
          people in purpose and consoling those who had suffered great 
          loss. At the Pentagon, an American flag was hung from the 
          building's damaged walls, expressing our collective resolve to 
          rebuild and move forward. And earlier this year, during the 
          Opening Ceremonies of the Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake 
          City, Americans, joined by peace-loving people from around the 
          world, paid tribute to the tattered flag that had been 
          recovered from the ruins of the World Trade Center.
          As we reflect on what our flag represents, we recall the words 
          of President Woodrow Wilson, who said just weeks before the 
          onset of World War I: ``My dream is that, as the years go on 
          and the world knows more and more of America, it . . . will 
          turn to America for those moral inspirations which lie at the 
          basis of all freedom . . . that America will come into the 
          full light of the day when all shall know that she puts human 
          rights above all other rights, and that her flag is the flag, 
          not only of America, but of humanity.''
          The flag that inspired Francis Scott Key to write our National 
          Anthem 188 years ago still energizes and inspires the American 
          spirit. Since September 11, we have seen our Nation's flag 
          appear everywhere--on cars and clothing, houses and hard 
          hats--showing our country's commitment to always remember 
          those who lost their lives and to remain unremitting in the 
          pursuit of justice.

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          Today, in Afghanistan and around the world, brave men and 
          women are serving under our flag, fighting to preserve freedom 
          and win the war against terrorism. All Americans are 
          profoundly grateful for their service and their sacrifice. We 
          also recognize and commend the contributions of our veterans 
          who have bravely defended our Nation's founding principles 
          throughout our history. The image of six marines raising the 
          flag on the top of Mount Suribachi at Iwo Jima will always 
          remind us that the struggle for liberty is a story of courage, 
          sacrifice, and commitment to the unshakeable belief in 
          freedom's promise.
          On Flag Day, we remember the struggles and successes for which 
          our flag stands. And we look to the flag as an everlasting 
          symbol of our commitment to a world of peace, a Nation of 
          principle, and a people of unity.
          To commemorate the adoption of our flag, the Congress, by 
          joint resolution approved August 3, 1949, as amended (63 Stat. 
          492), designated June 14 of each year as ``Flag Day'' and 
          requested that the President issue an annual proclamation 
          calling for its observance and for the display of the Flag of 
          the United States on all Federal Government buildings. The 
          Congress also requested, by joint resolution approved June 9, 
          1966, as amended (80 Stat. 194), that the President annually 
          issue a proclamation designating the week in which June 14 
          occurs as ``National Flag Week'' and calling upon all citizens 
          of the United States to display the flag during that week.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim June 14, 2002, as Flag Day and the week beginning 
          June 9, 2002, as National Flag Week. I direct the appropriate 
          officials to display the flag on all Federal Government 
          buildings during that week, and I urge all Americans to 
          observe Flag Day and National Flag Week by flying the Stars 
          and Stripes from their homes and other suitable places. I also 
          call upon the people of the United States to observe with 
          pride and all due ceremony those days from Flag Day through 
          Independence Day, also set aside by the Congress (89 Stat. 
          211), as a time to honor America, to celebrate our heritage in 
          public gatherings and activities, and to publicly recite the 
          Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of 
          America.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh 
          day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7574

Proclamation 7574 of June 14, 2002

Father's Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Fathers play a unique and important role in the lives of their 
          children. As mentor, protector, and provider, a father 
          fundamentally influences the

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          shape and direction of his or her child's character by giving 
          love, care, discipline, and guidance.
          As we observe Father's Day, our Nation honors fatherhood and 
          urges fathers to commit themselves selflessly to the success 
          and well-being of their children. And we reaffirm the 
          importance of fathers in the lives of their children.
          Raising a child requires significant time, effort, and 
          sacrifice; and it is one of the most hopeful and fulfilling 
          experiences a man can ever know. A father can derive great joy 
          from seeing his child grow from infancy to adulthood. As a 
          child matures into independence and self reliance, the value 
          of a parent's hard work, love, and commitment comes to 
          fruition.
          Responsible fatherhood is important to a healthy and civil 
          society. Numerous studies confirm that children whose fathers 
          are present and involved in their lives are more likely to 
          develop into prosperous and healthy adults. Children learn by 
          example; and they need their father's presence as examples of 
          virtue in their daily lives. A child's sense of security can 
          be greatly enhanced by seeing his parents in a loving and 
          faithful marriage.
          My Administration strongly supports initiatives to strengthen 
          fatherhood, promote stable families, and increase the ease of 
          adoptions. We must also continue to enlist the help of 
          citizens and community groups who reach out to father less or 
          neglected children through mentoring and other acts of 
          compassion.
          On this Father's Day, we acknowledge and honor the love of our 
          own fathers. I encourage all fathers to commit themselves to 
          the continuing love and care of their children and their 
          families.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, in accordance with a joint resolution of 
          the Congress approved April 24, 1972, as amended (36 U.S.C. 
          109), do hereby proclaim June 16, 2002, as Father's Day. I 
          encourage all Americans to express love, admiration, and 
          thanks to their fathers for their contributions to our lives 
          and to society. I direct the appropriate officials of the 
          Government to display the flag of the United States on all 
          Government buildings on this day. I also call upon State and 
          local governments and citizens to observe this day with 
          appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          fourteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7575

Proclamation 7575 of June 28, 2002

Lewis and Clark Bicentennial

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Nearly 200 years ago, President Thomas Jefferson sent an 
          expedition westward to find and map a transcontinental water 
          route to the Pacific Ocean.

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          With approval from the Congress, Captains Meriwether Lewis and 
          William Clark embarked on their legendary 3-year journey to 
          explore the uncharted West. The expedition included 33 
          permanent party members, known as the Corps of Discovery.
          Their effort to chart the area between the Missouri River and 
          the Pacific Coast set these courageous Americans on a 
          remarkable scientific voyage that changed our Nation. In 
          successfully completing the overland journey between the 
          Missouri and Columbia River systems, they opened the unknown 
          West for future development. During their exploration, Lewis 
          and Clark collected plant and animal specimens, studied Indian 
          cultures, conducted diplomatic councils, established trading 
          relationships with tribes, and recorded weather data. To 
          accomplish their goals, the Corps of Discovery relied on the 
          assistance and guidance of Sakajawea, a Shoshone Indian woman.
          As we approach the 200th anniversary of Lewis and Clark's 
          expedition, we commend their resourcefulness, determination, 
          and bravery. This Bicentennial should also serve to remind us 
          of our Nation's outstanding natural resources. Many of these 
          treasures first detailed by Lewis and Clark are available 
          today for people to visit, study, and enjoy. As the 
          commemoration of this journey begins in 2003, I encourage all 
          Americans to celebrate the accomplishments of Lewis and Clark 
          and to recognize their contributions to our history.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          designate 2003 through 2006 as the Lewis and Clark 
          Bicentennial. I ask all Americans to observe this event with 
          appropriate activities that honor the achievements of the 
          Lewis and Clark Expedition. I also direct Federal agencies to 
          work in cooperation with each other, States, tribes, 
          communities, and the National Council of the Lewis and Clark 
          Bicentennial to promote educational, cultural, and 
          interpretive opportunities for citizens and visitors to learn 
          more about the natural, historical, and cultural resources 
          that are significant components of the Lewis and Clark story.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          eighth day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7576

Proclamation 7576 of July 3, 2002

To Provide for the Efficient and Fair Administration of Safeguard Measures 
on Imports of Certain Steel Products

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. On March 5, 2002, pursuant to section 203 of the Trade Act 
          of 1974, as amended (the ``Trade Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2253), I 
          issued Proclamation 7529,

[[Page 109]]

          which imposed tariffs and a tariff-rate quota on certain steel 
          products under subheadings 9903.72.30 through 9903.74.24 of 
          the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS) (the 
          ``safeguard measures'') for a period of 3 years plus 1 day.
          2. In clause (3) of Proclamation 7529, I excluded imports of 
          certain steel that are the product of World Trade Organization 
          (WTO) member developing countries, as provided in subdivision 
          (d)(i) of U.S. Note 11 to subchapter III of chapter 99 of the 
          HTS (Note 11), from the safeguard measures.
          3. In clause (5) of Proclamation 7529, I authorized the United 
          States Trade Representative (USTR), within 120 days after 
          March 5, 2002, to further consider any request for exclusion 
          of a particular product submitted in accordance with the 
          procedures set out in 66 Fed. Reg. 54321, 54322-54323 (October 
          26, 2001) and, upon publication in the Federal 
          eister of a notice of his finding that a 
          particular product should be excluded, to modify the HTS 
          provisions created by the Annex to Proclamation 7529 to 
          exclude such particular product from the pertinent safeguard 
          measure.
          4. Pursuant to section 203(g) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2253(g)), in order to provide for the efficient and fair 
          administration of the safeguard measures, I have determined 
          that:
          (a) the USTR should have authority, as appropriate, to add WTO 
          member developing countries to the list of countries in 
          subdivision (d)(i) of Note 11;
          (b) the period provided in clause (5) of Proclamation 7529 
          should be extended until August 31, 2002; and
          (c) requests for exclusion submitted in accordance with the 
          procedures set out in 67 Fed. Reg. 19307, 19308 (April 18, 
          2002); 67 Fed. Reg. 35842, 35842-35843 (May 21, 2002); 67 Fed. 
          Reg. 38693, 38694 (June 5, 2002) should be treated as having 
          been submitted in accordance with the procedures set out in 66 
          Fed. Reg. 54321, 54322-54323 (October 26, 2001).
          5. Section 604 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes 
          the President to embody in the HTS the substance of the 
          relevant provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting 
          import treatment, and actions thereunder, including the 
          removal, modification, continuation, or imposition of any rate 
          of duty or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          but not limited to sections 203 and 604 of the Trade Act, and 
          section 301 of title 3, United States Code, do proclaim that:
          (1) The USTR is authorized, upon publication of a notice in 
          the Federal eister of his determination that 
          it is appropriate to add WTO member developing countries to 
          the list of countries in subdivision (d)(i) of Note 11, to add 
          such countries to that list.
          (2) Clause (5) of Proclamation 7529 is amended by deleting the 
          words ``Within 120 days after the date of this proclamation'' 
          and adding in their place the words ``At any time on or before 
          August 31, 2002''. Note 11 is amended in subdivision (c), by 
          deleting the date ``July 3, 2002'' and adding in its place the 
          date ``August 31, 2002.''

[[Page 110]]

          (3) The USTR is authorized to treat requests for exclusion 
          submitted in accordance with the procedures set out in 67 Fed. 
          Reg. 19307 (April 18, 2002); 67 Fed. Reg. 35842 (May 21, 
          2002); or 67 Fed. Reg. 38693 (June 5, 2002) as having been 
          submitted in accordance with the procedures set out in 66 Fed. 
          Reg. 54321, 54322-54323 (October 26, 2001).
          (4) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (5) The modifications to the HTS made by this proclamation 
          shall be effective with respect to goods entered, or withdrawn 
          from warehouse for consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. EST, on 
          March 20, 2002, and shall continue in effect as provided in 
          subchapter III of chapter 99 of the HTS, unless such actions 
          are earlier expressly reduced, modified, or terminated. 
          Effective at the close of March 21, 2006, or such other date 
          that is 1 year from the close of the safeguard measures, the 
          modifications to the HTS established in this proclamation 
          shall be deleted from the HTS.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this third day 
          of July, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7577

Proclamation 7577 of July 17, 2002

Captive Nations Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The United States is proud to stand on the side of brave 
          people everywhere who seek the same freedoms upon which our 
          Nation was founded. Each year, during Captive Nations Week, we 
          reaffirm our determination to work for freedom around the 
          globe. Created against the backdrop of the Cold War, the 
          importance and power of Captive Nations Week continues to 
          resonate in today's world.
          In too many corners of the earth, freedom and independence are 
          the victims of dictators driven by hatred, fear, designs of 
          ethnic superiority, religious intolerance, and xenophobia. 
          These despots deny their citizens the liberty and justice that 
          is the birthright of all people. Some governments, such as 
          those in North Korea, Iraq, and Iran, starve their people, 
          take away their voices, traffic in terror, and threaten the 
          world with weapons of mass destruction. In many other places, 
          from Burma to Belarus, Cuba and Zimbabwe, people are denied 
          the most basic rights to speak in freedom, and their daily 
          lives are haunted by the fear of the secret police.
          This week, America reaffirms our solidarity with and support 
          for people living under conditions of servitude. They are the 
          nonnegotiable demands of human dignity. History teaches us 
          that when people are given a choice between freedom and 
          tyranny, freedom will win. Recently, the world saw this in 
          Afghanistan, where people took to the streets to celebrate the 
          fall

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          of their Taliban oppressors. Those in other lands seeking to 
          unshackle themselves from dictatorship will also have 
          America's support.
          Twenty years ago, President Ronald Reagan said before the 
          British Parliament at Westminster that ``our mission today 
          (is) to preserve freedom as well as peace. It may not be easy 
          to see; but I believe we live now at a turning point.'' These 
          words were a prelude to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. 
          Today, as the events of September 11 made clear, we are at 
          another turning point, where the world faces the prospect of 
          dictators supplying the world's most dangerous weapons to 
          their terrorist allies. These terrorists aspire to impose 
          their brutal will on freedom loving people everywhere.
          One of our greatest strengths in this struggle against a world 
          of fear, chaos, and captivity is our commitment to standing 
          alongside people everywhere determined to build a world of 
          freedom, dignity, and tolerance. This week America affirms its 
          commitment to helping those in captive nations achieve 
          democracy.
          The Congress, by Joint Resolution approved July 17, 1959, (73 
          Stat. 212), has authorized and requested the President to 
          issue a proclamation designating the third week in July of 
          each year as ``Captive Nations Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim July 21 through 27, 2002, as Captive Nations Week. I 
          call upon the people of the United States to observe this week 
          with appropriate ceremonies and activities and to reaffirm 
          their devotion to the aspirations of all peoples for liberty, 
          justice, and self-determination.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of July, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7578

Proclamation 7578 of July 26, 2002

National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Fifty-two years ago, armed forces from North Korea shattered 
          the peace as they crossed the 38th Parallel and invaded South 
          Korea. A 22-country force assembled to face this Cold War 
          challenge, and the majority of them were Americans. The brave 
          men and women of this coalition fought courageously to defend 
          a population facing tyranny and aggression, and they succeeded 
          in defeating the invading forces.
          During the Korean War, approximately 1.8 million members of 
          the United States Armed Forces fought in places such as Pork 
          Chop Hill, Pusan Perimeter, and the Chosin Reservoir. During 
          the intense fighting, approximately 34,000 American lives were 
          lost in combat; 92,000 were wounded; and

[[Page 112]]

          more than 8,000 listed as missing in action or taken prisoner. 
          Their distinguished service reminds us of the words engraved 
          on the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington--``Freedom 
          Is Not Free.''
          As we face the challenges of a new era and a new war, we look 
          to America's Korean War veterans for their example of 
          dedication and sacrifice in defending freedom. These men and 
          women faced a formidable adversary and endured harsh and 
          bitter conditions in upholding our Nation's heritage of valor, 
          tenacity, and honor during this important stand against 
          Communist aggression. For their gallantry in action, 131 
          servicemen earned our Nation's highest military award, the 
          Medal of Honor. More than 90 of them received the award 
          posthumously.
          Forty-nine years ago, the Military Armistice Agreement ended 
          the fighting and stopped the spread of Communism in Korea. In 
          order to thank and honor veterans of the Korean War and their 
          families, America will commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the 
          Korean War through November 11, 2003. Today, as the Republic 
          of Korea stands as a strong, democratic, and progressive 
          nation, we thank our Korean War veterans for serving our 
          Nation and the world with courage and distinction. These 
          patriots advanced the principles and ideals upon which our 
          Nation was founded, and they helped promote liberty, 
          opportunity, and hope.
          The Congress, by Public Law 104-19, as amended (36 U.S.C. 
          127), has designated July 27, 2002, as ``National Korean War 
          Veterans Armistice Day,'' and has authorized and requested the 
          President to issue a proclamation in observance of this day.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim July 27, 2002, as 
          National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day. I call upon the 
          people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate ceremonies and activities that honor and give 
          thanks to our distinguished Korean War veterans. I also ask 
          Federal departments and agencies and interested groups, 
          organizations, and individuals to fly the flag of the United 
          States at half-staff on July 27, 2002, in memory of the 
          Americans who died as a result of their service in Korea.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          sixth day of July, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7579

Proclamation 7579 of July 26, 2002

Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) is one of 
          the most compassionate and successful civil rights laws in 
          American history. In the 12 years since President George H. W. 
          Bush signed the ADA into law, more people with disabilities 
          are participating fully in our society than ever before. As we 
          mark this important anniversary, we celebrate the positive ef

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          fect this landmark legislation has had upon our Nation, and we 
          recognize the important influence it has had in improving 
          employment opportunities, government services, public 
          accommodations, transportation, and telecommunications for 
          those with disabilities.
          Today, Americans with disabilities enjoy greatly improved 
          access to countless facets of life; but more work needs to be 
          done. We must continue to build on the important foundations 
          established by the ADA. Too many Americans with disabilities 
          remain isolated, dependent, and deprived of the tools they 
          need to enjoy all that our Nation has to offer.
          My Administration is committed to removing the barriers that 
          prevent people with disabilities from realizing their full 
          potential and achieving their dreams. The New Freedom 
          Initiative, which I announced last year, builds on the hopeful 
          path of the ADA. It provides Americans with disabilities 
          increased access to assistive technologies, expands 
          educational options, and increases opportunities for them to 
          integrate into our workforce. We are committed to ensuring the 
          delivery of vital services to disabled persons in an 
          integrated, community-based setting.
          My Administration will continue to enforce the Americans with 
          Disabilities Act, and we will work with businesses and State 
          and local governments to increase partnerships that promote 
          the purposes of the ADA. Together, we are working for a day 
          when all people with disabilities are able to live and work 
          with dignity, freedom, and independence and realize their 
          potential as fully integrated members of our society.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim July 26, 2002, as a day in celebration of the 12th 
          Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. I call 
          upon public officials, business leaders, people with 
          disabilities, and all Americans to pursue the ADA's full 
          promise of equal opportunity and to celebrate the expanded 
          freedom that the ADA has brought to American life.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          sixth day of July, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7580

Proclamation 7580 of July 26, 2002

Parents' Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Parenthood is a profound blessing, bringing with it 
          responsibilities that are both challenging and rewarding. The 
          care, dedication, and attention of parents are critical to 
          their children's success. As they teach, guide, and nurture, 
          parents help their children to realize their potential and 
          achieve their dreams. Parents also play a critical role in 
          shaping their children's char

[[Page 114]]

          acter by sharing important life-lessons and values and showing 
          them how to love and care for others.
          As we face the challenges of a new era, families remain the 
          foundation of our civil society; and parents are the corner 
          stone of strong families. This important responsibility often 
          presents difficult problems and trying circumstances as 
          parents balance competing demands such as making a living, 
          raising their children, and participating in their 
          communities.
          Our Nation has made great progress in recognizing the 
          importance of effective parenting, but there is still much to 
          do. My Administration is committed to promoting a healthier 
          society by helping parents build stronger families. Many 
          studies have shown that children do better in two-parent 
          households where the parents are married; and as part of our 
          plan to promote the well-being of children, I have committed 
          significant resources to programs that encourage healthy and 
          stable marriages. While no law can ensure that people love one 
          another, we can support initiatives that help couples learn 
          how to build successful marriages and be good parents.
          My Administration supports community-based efforts that help 
          delinquent fathers improve their lives so they can become 
          effective parents. With job training, employment, counseling, 
          and career advancement education, we hope to make it easier 
          for more fathers to have positive relationships with their 
          sons and daughters. We have also taken important steps to 
          empower and inform parents through the No Child Left Behind 
          Act, ensuring that they will be vital partners in their 
          children's education. Further, every child in America deserves 
          to live in a safe, stable, and loving family; my 
          Administration is committed to increasing public awareness 
          about the importance of adoption and to encouraging Americans 
          to consider adopting children. By pursuing these significant 
          measures, we increase compassion in our society, and we make 
          America a better place for all.
          The nurturing and development of children require widespread 
          investment, focus, and commitment. While Government plays an 
          important role in this process, citizens, schools, and civic 
          institutions must also assist parents by reaching out to help 
          meet the needs of young people in their communities. By 
          working together to provide for our children, we will show 
          them the way to a brighter future.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States and consistent 
          with Public Law 103-362, as amended, do hereby proclaim 
          Sunday, July 28, 2002, as Parents' Day. I encourage all 
          Americans to join me in honoring the millions of mothers and 
          fathers, biological and adoptive, foster parents, and 
          stepparents, whose selfless love and determined efforts 
          influence lives for the good of their children and our Nation. 
          I also urge all Americans to express their love, respect, and 
          appreciation to our parents, and I call upon all citizens to 
          observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
          activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          sixth day of July, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7581

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Proclamation 7581 of July 29, 2002

The Bicentennial of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          For two centuries, the United States Patent Office has played 
          a vital role in the scientific, technical, and economic 
          development of our Nation by granting inventors patents for 
          their inventions. As Abraham Lincoln once stated, patents 
          ``added the fuel of interest to the fire of genius.''
          The first Patent Act of the United States was signed into law 
          by President George Washington on April 10, 1790. Under this 
          legislation, patent applicants petitioned the Secretary of 
          State for the grant of a patent. The Secretary, in 
          consultation with the Secretary of War and the Attorney 
          General, determined whether the invention or discovery was 
          ``sufficiently useful and important.'' At that time, both the 
          President and the Secretary of State signed patents.
          As the number of applications for patents grew, it became 
          necessary to develop an organized review process to handle the 
          increasing volume. In 1793, the law was changed to eliminate 
          examinations, and the job of receiving and granting patents 
          was given to clerks in the Department of State.
          On June 1, 1802, the Secretary of State appointed Dr. William 
          Thornton to serve as the first clerk at the Department of 
          State. In that position, Dr. Thornton was solely responsible 
          for receiving and recording patent applications and issuing 
          patents, and his office effectively became the first patent 
          office. From this simple beginning, the Patent Office has 
          grown to become a modern institution of ideas and innovations.
          For 200 years, millions of inventors have sought to protect 
          their inventions through the American patent system. These 
          patented inventions include Thomas Edison's electric lamp, 
          Alexander Graham Bell's telegraphy, Orville and Wilbur 
          Wright's flying machine, John Deere's steel plow, George 
          Washington Carver's use of legume oils to produce cosmetics 
          and paint, and Edwin Land's Polaroid camera.
          In 1881, the functions of the Patent Office grew to also 
          include the registration of trademarks. Today, the United 
          States Patent and Trademark Office annually receives more than 
          326,000 patent applications and 232,000 trademark 
          applications. Since the signing of the first Patent Act over 
          two centuries ago, more than 6.3 million United States patents 
          have been issued. The United States Patent and Trademark 
          Office represents one of the largest repositories of 
          scientific and technical knowledge in the world, and much of 
          this information is available on the Internet. Similarly, 2 
          million current trademark registrations are also available 
          online.
          As the Patent Office enters its third century, we commend the 
          important work of the United States Patent and Trademark 
          Office that supports scientific, technological, and 
          intellectual property developments; promotes growth in our 
          economy; and encourages increased prosperity for our Nation.

[[Page 116]]

          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim the Bicentennial of the United States Patent and 
          Trademark Office. I call upon all Americans to recognize this 
          anniversary with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
          activities, thereby honoring the Office's many scientific, 
          economic, and cultural contributions to our Nation and the 
          world.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          ninth day of July, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7582

Proclamation 7582 of August 14, 2002

National Airborne Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The history of Airborne forces began after World War I, when 
          Brigadier General William Mitchell first conceived the idea of 
          parachuting troops into combat. Eventually, under the 
          leadership of Major William Lee at Fort Benning, Georgia, 
          members of the Parachute Test Platoon pioneered methods of 
          combat jumping in 1940. In November 1942, members of the 2nd 
          Battalion, 503rd Parachute Infantry Regiment, conducted 
          America's first combat jump, leaping from a C-47 aircraft 
          behind enemy lines in North Africa. This strategy 
          revolutionized combat and established Airborne forces as a key 
          component of our military.
          During World War II, Airborne tactics were critical to the 
          success of important missions, including the D-Day invasion at 
          Normandy, the Battle of the Bulge, the invasion of Southern 
          France, and many others. In Korea and Vietnam, Airborne 
          soldiers played a critical combat role, as well as in later 
          conflicts and peacekeeping operations, including Panama, 
          Grenada, Desert Storm, Haiti, Somalia, and the Balkans. Most 
          recently, Airborne forces were vital to liberating the people 
          of Afghanistan from the repressive and violent Taliban regime; 
          and these soldiers continue to serve proudly around the world 
          in the global coalition against terrorism.
          The elite Airborne ranks include prestigious groups such as 
          the 82nd Airborne Division, ``America's Guard of Honor,'' and 
          the ``Screaming Eagles'' of the 101st Airborne Division (Air 
          Assault). Airborne forces have also been represented in the 
          former 11th, 13th, and 17th Airborne Divisions and numerous 
          other Airborne, glider and air assault units and regiments. 
          Paratroopers in the Army's XVIII Airborne Corps, the 75th 
          Infantry (Ranger) Regiment and other Special Forces units 
          conduct swift and effective operations in defense of peace and 
          freedom.
          Airborne combat continues to be driven by the bravery and 
          daring spirit of sky soldiers. Often called into action with 
          little notice, these forces have earned an enduring reputation 
          for dedication, excellence, and honor. As we

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          face the challenges of a new era, I encourage all people to 
          recognize the contributions of these courageous soldiers to 
          our Nation and the world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim August 16, 2002, as National Airborne Day. As we 
          commemorate the first official Army parachute jump on August 
          16, 1940, I encourage all Americans to join me in honoring the 
          thousands of soldiers, past and present, who have served in an 
          Airborne capacity. I call upon all citizens to observe this 
          day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          fourteenth day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7583

Proclamation 7583 of August 16, 2002

National Health Center Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America's community health centers are a vital part of our 
          healthcare safety net, providing primary care services to 
          uninsured, low-income families and individuals, regardless of 
          their ability to pay.
          Community health centers ensure that all citizens have access 
          to medical treatment and preventative care. Each year, 
          community, migrant, public housing, and homeless health 
          centers serve more than 12 million citizens at over 3,300 
          delivery sites throughout urban and rural communities in all 
          50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and 
          the Virgin Islands. These centers care for 1 of every 5 low-
          income children and 1 of every 12 rural residents. By working 
          together with schools, businesses, churches, community 
          organizations, foundations, and State and local governments, 
          these health centers strive to meet the special needs and 
          priorities of communities and to improve the health and well-
          being of countless families and individuals.
          Health centers offer responsive and cost-effective health care 
          that includes comprehensive primary and preventive services; 
          prenatal and postpartum care; patient education, case 
          management, and outreach; translation and other support 
          services. My Administration is committed to increasing Federal 
          support of healthcare centers. Through my Community and 
          Migrant Health Centers Initiative we are working to double the 
          number of patients served in these centers, and create 1,200 
          new and expanded health center sites over 5 years.
          With the observance of National Health Center Week, we 
          recognize the important role and the invaluable contributions 
          of America's health centers, their staff, board members, and 
          all those responsible for their success. During National 
          Health Center week, I join in encouraging all Americans to 
          celebrate the importance of health centers to our communities 
          by partici

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          pating in health fairs and screenings, blood drives, 
          immunizations, and open house events.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim August 18 through 24, 2002, as National Health Center 
          Week. I encourage all Americans to observe this week with 
          appropriate activities and programs in order to raise their 
          awareness of the importance and variety of services provided 
          by America's health centers.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth 
          day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7584

Proclamation 7584 of August 23, 2002

Women's Equality Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Today, American women enjoy unprecedented opportunities in 
          business, education, politics, and countless other aspects of 
          our society. Historically, however, women suffered grave 
          inequalities and were denied some of the most fundamental 
          benefits of citizenship.
          Each year on August 26th, we mark the important anniversary of 
          the day on which women gained the right to vote. In 
          celebrating Women's Equality Day, we remember the brave and 
          determined individuals who worked to ensure that all women 
          have the opportunity to participate in our democracy. Their 
          dedication to the suffrage movement improved our society, and 
          continues to inspire women today.
          When the first Women's Rights Convention was convened in 
          Seneca Falls in 1848, women in the United States had limited 
          financial, legal, and political power. In addition to being 
          denied the right to vote, they also could not own property, 
          control their wages, or claim custody of their children.
          Courageous heroes like Carrie Chapman Catt, Alice Paul, 
          Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony refused to accept 
          women's status, and began a determined struggle to gain 
          suffrage for women. Leading active and vocal groups like the 
          National American Woman Suffrage Association and the National 
          Woman's Party, these women risked attack and arrest to 
          organize marches, boycotts, and pickets, while mobilizing an 
          influential lobbying force of millions. Finally, on August 26, 
          1920, the women's suffrage movement accomplished its goal 
          through the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the 
          Constitution, guaranteeing women the right to vote.
           In Afghanistan, the Taliban used violence and fear to deny 
          Afghan women access to education, health care, mobility, and 
          the right to vote. Our coalition has liberated Afghanistan and 
          restored fundamental human rights and

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          freedoms to Afghan women, and all the people of Afghanistan. 
          Young girls in Afghanistan are able to attend schools for the 
          first time.
          As we celebrate this day, I encourage all Americans to learn 
          about our important achievements in equality. Looking to the 
          future, we must remain diligent as we work to ensure the 
          rights of all of our citizens, and to support those who 
          struggle daily for life's basic liberties.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim August 26, 2002, as Women's Equality Day. I call upon 
          the people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate programs and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          third day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7585

Proclamation 7585 of August 28, 2002

To Implement an Agreement Regarding Imports of Line Pipe Under Section 203 
of the Trade Act of 1974

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. On February 18, 2000, pursuant to section 203 of the Trade 
          Act of 1974, as amended (the ``Trade Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2253), 
          the President issued Proclamation 7274, which imposed 
          additional duties on certain circular welded carbon quality 
          line pipe (line pipe) provided for in subheadings 7306.10.10 
          and 7306.10.50 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United 
          States (HTS) (safeguard measure) for a period of 3 years plus 
          1 day, with the first 9000 short tons of imports that are the 
          product of each supplying country excluded from the increased 
          duty during each year, and with annual reductions in the rate 
          of duty in the second and third years.
          2. Section 203(a)(3)(E) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2253(a)(3)(E)) authorizes the President to negotiate, 
          conclude, and carry out agreements with foreign countries 
          limiting the export from foreign countries and the import into 
          the United States of an imported article with regard to which 
          the U.S. International Trade Commission has made an 
          affirmative finding regarding serious injury, or the threat 
          thereof. Section 203(f)(1) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2253(f)(1)) authorizes the President, if action under section 
          203 takes effect with regard to an imported article, to 
          negotiate agreements of the type described in subsection 
          (a)(3)(E) and, after such agreements take effect, suspend or 
          terminate, in whole or in part, any action previously taken.
          3. The United States Trade Representative, pursuant to 
          sections 141(c)(1)(C) and 203(f)(1) of the Trade Act (19 
          U.S.C. 2171(c)(1)(C) and 2253(f)(1)), negotiated an agreement 
          with the Republic of Korea (Agreement) limiting the export 
          from Korea and import into the United States of line pipe 
          through

[[Page 120]]

          the imposition of a tariff-rate quota, to take effect on 
          September 1, 2002. The agreement was signed on July 29, 2002.
          4. Pursuant to sections 203(a)(3)(E) and 203(f) of the Trade 
          Act (19 U.S.C. 2253(a)(3)(E) and 2253(f)), I am replacing the 
          additional duties and 9000 short ton exclusion applicable to 
          imports of line pipe from Korea with a tariff-rate quota, on a 
          quarterly basis, to take effect beginning on September 1, 
          2002.
          5. Section 604 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes 
          the President to embody in the HTS the substance of the 
          relevant provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting 
          import treatment, and actions thereunder, including the 
          removal, modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate 
          of duty or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          but not limited to sections 203 and 604 of the Trade Act, do 
          proclaim that:
          (1) In order to establish a tariff-rate quota to carry out the 
          Agreement, subchapter III of chapter 99 of the HTS is modified 
          as provided in the Annex to this proclamation.
          (2) Any provision of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that is inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation is superseded to the extent of the inconsistency.
          (3) The modifications to the HTS made by this proclamation 
          shall be effective with respect to goods entered, or withdrawn 
          from warehouse for consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern 
          daylight time, on September 1, 2002, and shall continue in 
          effect as provided in subchapter III of chapter 99 of the HTS, 
          unless such actions are earlier expressly modified or 
          terminated. Effective at the close of March 1, 2004, or such 
          other date that is 1 year from the close of the safeguard 
          measure, the modifications to the HTS established in this 
          proclamation and by Proclamation 7274 shall be deleted from 
          the HTS.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          eighth day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

[[Page 121]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD30AU02.042


[[Page 122]]


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD30AU02.043

Proc. 7586

[[Page 123]]

Proclamation 7586 of August 28, 2002

To Modify Duty-Free Treatment Under the Generalized System of Preferences 
for Argentina

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. Section 503(c)(2)(C) of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended 
          (the ``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(2)(C)), provides that a 
          country that is no longer treated as a beneficiary developing 
          country with respect to an eligible article may be 
          redesignated as a beneficiary developing country with respect 
          to such article if imports of such article from such country 
          did not exceed the competitive need limitations in section 
          503(c)(2)(A) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(2)(A)) during 
          the preceding calendar year.
          2. Section 503(c)(2)(F) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2463(c)(2)(F)) provides that the President may disregard the 
          competitive need limitation provided in section 
          503(c)(2)(A)(i)(II) (19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(2)(A)(i)(II)) with 
          respect to any eligible article from any beneficiary 
          developing country if the aggregate appraised value of the 
          imports of such article into the United States during the 
          preceding calendar year does not exceed an amount set forth in 
          section 503(c)(2)(F)(ii) (19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(2)(F)(ii)).
          3. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(C) of the 1974 Act, I have 
          determined that Argentina should be redesignated as a 
          beneficiary developing country with respect to certain 
          eligible articles that previously had been imported in 
          quantities exceeding the competitive need limitations of 
          section 503(c)(2)(A).
          4. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(F) of the 1974 Act, I have 
          determined that the competitive need limitation provided in 
          section 503(c)(2)(A)(i)(II) should be waived with respect to 
          certain eligible articles from Argentina.
          5. Section 604 of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes the 
          President to embody in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the 
          United States (HTS) the substance of the relevant provisions 
          of that Act, and of other acts affecting import treatment, and 
          actions thereunder, including the removal, modification, 
          continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty or other import 
          restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and title V and 
          section 604 of the 1974 Act, do proclaim that:
          (1) In order to provide that Argentina, which has not been 
          treated as a beneficiary developing country with respect to 
          certain eligible articles, should be redesignated as a 
          beneficiary developing country with respect to those articles 
          for purposes of the GSP:

   (a) general note 4(d) to the HTS is modified as provided in section A of 
the Annex to this proclamation.

   (b) the Rates of Duty 1-Special subcolumn for each of the HTS 
subheadings enumerated in section B of the Annex to this proclamation is 
modified as provided in such section.

[[Page 124]]

          (2) A waiver of the application of section 503(c)(2)(A) 
          (i)(II) of the 1974 Act shall apply to the eligible articles 
          in the HTS subheadings and to the beneficiary developing 
          country listed in section C of the Annex to this proclamation.
          (3) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (4) The modifications made by the Annex to this proclamation 
          shall be effective with respect to articles entered, or 
          withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after the 15th 
          day after the publication of this proclamation in the Federal 
          eister.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          eighth day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

[[Page 125]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD03SE02.056

Proc. 7587

[[Page 126]]

Proclamation 7587 of August 30, 2002

National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          During National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, Americans 
          renew their commitment to learning more about the causes of 
          this deadly disease, so that we can detect it early and treat 
          it effectively.
          Ovarian cancer continues to cause more deaths than any other 
          cancer of the female reproductive system. It is estimated that 
          this year alone, more than 23,000 women in the United States 
          will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and that almost 14,000 
          women will die from this disease. In cases where ovarian 
          cancer is found and treated in its earliest stages, the 5-year 
          survival rate is 95 percent. However, most women who suffer 
          from this cancer are not diagnosed until it has become more 
          advanced, because their symptoms may be easily confused with 
          other diseases. Since early detection and treatment can often 
          mean the difference between life and death, developing an 
          effective screening test is a great priority.
          Scientists have identified specific substances in the blood 
          that may help indicate whether a woman has ovarian cancer 
          before she shows any symptoms. Additionally, researchers at 
          the National Cancer Institute and the Food and Drug 
          Administration have been working to develop a new type of 
          blood test that may be able to diagnose this disease, and 
          eventually help save the lives of millions of women. By 
          analyzing protein patterns in a single drop of blood, this 
          test was able to recognize ovarian cancer in both its early 
          and late stages. I join thousands of American women and their 
          families in hoping that this promising research will help us 
          in overcoming this terrible disease.
          By increasing awareness of ovarian cancer and its causes, we 
          can better prepare women who face the threat of this illness. 
          Researchers have learned that age, alterations in genes, and 
          certain hormonal and reproductive factors are linked to 
          ovarian cancer risk. Women and their doctors should weigh all 
          the risks and benefits of different therapies and make 
          informed choices about health care.
          I commend the strength and courage of the women who persevere 
          in the face of this serious illness, and I encourage our 
          scientists and researchers to redouble their efforts to find 
          more effective prevention, diagnostic, and treatment 
          strategies to combat ovarian cancer. Additionally, I urge 
          those who suffer from this cancer, and those who may be at 
          risk, to talk with their healthcare providers about 
          participating in clinical trials for new medical therapies 
          designed to combat ovarian cancer. By taking part in these 
          clinical trials, you can make important contributions to the 
          knowledge of this disease and benefit from cutting edge 
          medical research. As we increase awareness of ovarian cancer 
          and advance in our research, we can help bring hope to our 
          citizens and draw closer to winning the war on cancer.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 2002 as National

[[Page 127]]

          Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. I call upon the people of the 
          United States to observe this month with appropriate programs 
          and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth 
          day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7588

Proclamation 7588 of August 31, 2002

National Days of Prayer and Remembrance, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          As we remember the tragic events of September 11, 2001, and 
          the thousands of innocent lives lost on that day, we recall as 
          well the outpouring of compassion and faith that swept our 
          Nation in the face of the evil done that day. In designating 
          September 6-8 as National Days of Prayer and Remembrance, I 
          ask all Americans to join together in cities, communities, 
          neighborhoods, and places of worship to honor those who were 
          lost, to pray for those who grieve, and to give thanks for 
          God's enduring blessings on our land. And let us, through 
          prayer, seek the wisdom, patience, and strength to bring those 
          responsible for the attacks to justice and to press for a 
          world at peace.
          For the families and friends of those who died, each new day 
          has required new courage. Their perseverance has touched us 
          deeply, and their noble character has brought us hope. We 
          stand with them in faith, and we cherish with them the memory 
          of those who perished.
          In the aftermath of the attacks, the words of the Psalms 
          brought comfort to many. We trust God always to be our refuge 
          and our strength, an ever-present help in time of trouble. 
          Believing that One greater than ourselves watches over our 
          lives and over this Nation, we continue to place our trust in 
          Him.
          The events of September 11 altered our lives, the life of this 
          Nation, and the world. Americans responded to terror with 
          resolve and determination, first recovering, now rebuilding, 
          and, at all times, committing ourselves to protecting our 
          people and preserving our freedom. And we have found hope and 
          healing in our faith, families, and friendships. As we 
          confront the challenges before us, I ask you to join me during 
          these Days of Prayer and Remembrance in praying for God's 
          continued protection and for the strength to overcome great 
          evil with even greater good.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Friday, September 6, through Sunday, September 8, 
          2002, as National Days of Prayer and Remembrance. I ask that 
          the people of the United States and places of worship mark 
          these National Days of Prayer and Remembrance with memorial 
          services, the ringing of bells, and evening candlelight 
          remembrance vigils. I invite the people of the world to share 
          in these Days of Prayer and Remembrance.

[[Page 128]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-
          first day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7589

Proclamation 7589 of September 4, 2002

National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Drug and alcohol abuse destroys the hopes of men, women, and 
          young people and takes a terrible toll on society. Addiction 
          destroys the lives of countless Americans, shatters families, 
          and threatens the safety of our neighborhoods.
          National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month provides an 
          important opportunity to promote the values that have given 
          people the strength to beat drug and alcohol abuse and remain 
          drug-free. The theme of this year's commemoration, Join the 
          Voices of Recovery: A Call to Action, emphasizes the critical 
          role of communities in encouraging individuals with substance 
          abuse problems to seek help. While those who suffer from 
          addiction must help themselves, it is also crucial for family, 
          friends, and people with shared experiences to support those 
          fighting to overcome substance abuse. Those in recovery play a 
          key role in helping others achieve healthy lives. They can 
          convey important information about the toll of alcohol and 
          drug addiction and the benefits of recovery, inspire others to 
          succeed, and allow young people to learn valuable lessons 
          about their experiences.
          As a Nation, we must aggressively promote compassionate 
          treatment for those suffering from addiction. When individuals 
          begin the process of recovery, they take an important first 
          step toward regaining dignity and hope. Across our Nation, we 
          know that many Americans who are dependent on drugs are not 
          receiving the treatment they need. My National Drug Control 
          Strategy expands drug treatment to Americans who need it. For 
          2003, my Administration proposes $3.8 billion for drug 
          treatment, an increase of more than 6 percent over 2002. This 
          includes a $100 million increase in treatment spending for 
          2003 as part of a plan to add $1.6 billion over 5 years. 
          Staying clean and sober is a lifelong responsibility, and 
          those who succeed improve their health, can better enjoy their 
          family and friends, and are more likely to find success in the 
          workplace. The vast majority of people in recovery are capable 
          individuals who contribute to America's strength. We celebrate 
          the success of those in recovery, but we must help those still 
          suffering from dependence and battling addiction.
          My Administration is implementing an effective national 
          strategy that is community-based. We have established the goal 
          of a 10 percent reduction of drug use over the next 2 years, 
          and a 25 percent reduction over the next 5 years. We must stop 
          drug use before it starts, heal America's drug users, and 
          disrupt the supply of and demand for drugs in our country. And 
          we must continue the fight against alcohol abuse and the toll 
          it takes on our

[[Page 129]]

          society. Together, we can achieve these goals, help save 
          lives, and restore hope to individuals and families.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 2002 as National Alcohol and Drug Addiction 
          Recovery Month. I call upon all the people of the United 
          States to observe this month with appropriate programs, 
          ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7590

Proclamation 7590 of September 4, 2002

Patriot Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On this first observance of Patriot Day, we remember and honor 
          those who perished in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 
          2001. We will not forget the events of that terrible morning 
          nor will we forget how Americans responded in New York City, 
          at the Pentagon, and in the skies over Pennsylvania--with 
          heroism and selflessness; with compassion and courage; and 
          with prayer and hope. We will always remember our collective 
          obligation to ensure that justice is done, that freedom 
          prevails, and that the principles upon which our Nation was 
          founded endure.
          Inspired by the heroic sacrifices of our firefighters, rescue 
          and law enforcement personnel, military service members, and 
          other citizens, our Nation found unity, focus, and strength. 
          We found healing in the national outpouring of compassion for 
          those lost, as tens of millions of Americans participated in 
          moments of silence, candlelight vigils, and religious 
          services. From the tragedy of September 11 emerged a stronger 
          Nation, renewed by a spirit of national pride and a true love 
          of country.
          We are a people dedicated to the triumph of freedom and 
          democracy over evil and tyranny. The heroic stories of the 
          first responders who gave their all to save others 
          strengthened our resolve. And our Armed Forces have pursued 
          the war against terrorism in Afghanistan and elsewhere with 
          valor and skill. Together with our coalition partners, they 
          have achieved success.
          Americans also have fought back against terror by choosing to 
          overcome evil with good. By loving their neighbors as they 
          would like to be loved, countless citizens have answered the 
          call to help others. They have contributed to relief efforts, 
          improved homeland security in their communities, and 
          volunteered their time to aid those in need. This spirit of 
          service continues to grow as thousands have joined the newly 
          established USA Freedom Corps, committing themselves to 
          changing America one heart at a time through the momentum of 
          millions of acts of decency and kindness.

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          Those whom we lost last September 11 will forever hold a 
          cherished place in our hearts and in the history of our 
          Nation. As we mark the first anniversary of that tragic day, 
          we remember their sacrifice; and we commit ourselves to 
          honoring their memory by pursuing peace and justice in the 
          world and security at home. By a joint resolution approved 
          December 18, 2001 (Public Law 107-89), the Congress has 
          authorized and requested the President to designate September 
          11 of each year as ``Patriot Day.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim September 11, 2002, as 
          Patriot Day. I call upon the people of the United States to 
          observe this day with appropriate ceremonies and activities, 
          including remembrance services and candlelight vigils. I also 
          call upon the Governors of the United States and the 
          Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, as well as appropriate officials 
          of all units of government, to direct that the flag be flown 
          at half-staff on Patriot Day. Further, I encourage all 
          Americans to display the flag at half-staff from their homes 
          on that day and to observe a moment of silence beginning at 
          8:46 a.m. eastern daylight time, or another appropriate 
          commemorative time, to honor the innocent victims who lost 
          their lives as a result of the terrorist attacks of September 
          11, 2001.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7591

Proclamation 7591 of September 13, 2002

National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America's cultural diversity has always been a great strength 
          of our Nation. The Hispanic-American community has a long and 
          important history of commitment to our Nation's core values, 
          and the contributions of this community have helped make our 
          country great. During National Hispanic Heritage Month, we 
          celebrate the many achievements of Hispanic Americans and 
          recognize their contributions to our country.
          In 1968, the Congress authorized President Lyndon Johnson to 
          proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, and this observance 
          was expanded in 1988 to a month-long celebration to honor our 
          Nation's Hispanic heritage. During this month, America 
          celebrates the traditions, ancestry, and unique experiences of 
          those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico, the countries of 
          Central and South America, and the Caribbean.
          Throughout our history, Hispanic Americans have enriched the 
          American way of life, and we recognize the millions of 
          Hispanic Americans whose love of family, hard work, and 
          community have helped unite us as a people and sustain us as a 
          Nation. As entrepreneurs and public servants, scholars and 
          artists, Hispanic Americans have provided wisdom, energy, and 
          leadership to our communities, and to our country. During the 
          Civil

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          War, David Glasgow Farragut, son of Revolutionary War hero 
          Jorge Farragut of Spain, won fame as a Union hero by blocking 
          Southern ports. The Congress rewarded his valor by naming him 
          the Navy's first four-star Admiral. Today, a statue honoring 
          his many accomplishments stands in Farragut Square, 
          Washington, D.C. Nearly a century ago, Hispanic actresses 
          Myrtle Gonzalez and Beatriz Michelena were popular stars in 
          silent films. Many others followed as the industry expanded in 
          the 20th Century, including Rita Hayworth, Fernando Lamas, and 
          Anthony Quinn. In 1959, Dr. Severo Ochoa was a co-recipient of 
          the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of 
          RNA (ribonucleic acid), one of the chemical building blocks of 
          life. In the world of sports, athletes such as Roberto 
          Clemente earned the admiration of countless Americans for his 
          athletic skill and commitment to humanitarian efforts.
          We also remember those Hispanics who established the vibrant 
          and diverse American cities of Los Angeles, San Francisco, 
          Santa Fe, San Antonio, and many others. We remember those who 
          were instrumental in exploring and mapping our great 
          hemisphere and we honor those proud Hispanic-American patriots 
          who fought and died for our country in every war and conflict 
          since our founding.
          During National Hispanic Heritage Month, I join with all 
          Americans in celebrating this rich and diverse culture and 
          encourage all citizens to recognize the important role of 
          Hispanics in creating and building this great Nation.
          To honor the achievements of Hispanic Americans, the Congress, 
          by Public Law 100-402, has authorized and requested the 
          President to issue annually a proclamation designating 
          September 15 through October 15, as ``National Hispanic 
          Heritage Month.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim September 15 through 
          October 15, 2002, as National Hispanic Heritage Month. I call 
          upon public officials, educators, librarians, and all the 
          people of the United States to observe this month with 
          appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          thirteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7592

Proclamation 7592 of September 13, 2002

National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          American farm and ranch families embody our Nation's values of 
          hard work, love of the land, and love of country. Farming not 
          only feeds our country but increasingly provides more of our 
          Nation's energy needs. The

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          success of America's farmers and ranchers is essential to our 
          economy, and helping to ensure their safety is an important 
          goal for our country.
          Because their homes also serve as their workplace, our 
          country's farm families are often exposed to unique hazards. 
          These include powerful machinery, dangerous chemicals, unruly 
          livestock, and buildings containing high dust and gas levels. 
          To ensure safety, young family members helping with farm work 
          must be trained to recognize these dangers; and we must also 
          safeguard older farm workers whose health risks may increase 
          due to aging and previous injuries.
          Professionals in the engineering safety and rural health 
          fields have made significant progress in preventing accidents 
          in agricultural settings. To protect machinery operators, 
          industry has made great strides to incorporate safeguards to 
          prevent rollovers, entanglements, and other accidents. 
          Personal protective gear, new and safer packaging, and 
          advances in respiratory protection and hearing conservation 
          help protect agricultural workers from contact with hazardous 
          products, excessive dust, gas, and unduly loud noise in the 
          work environment.
          To ensure our farmers' continued health, we must increase 
          public awareness of available safety precautions. Simple, 
          economical tools and procedures can help prevent accidents on 
          farms. With proper installation and care, lighting and marking 
          devices reduce the risk of highway collisions between farm 
          equipment and vehicles. By clearly labeling farm chemicals and 
          storing them in locked containers, we can help avoid 
          poisonings and injuries.
          America's farmers make invaluable contributions to our 
          country, and my Administration is committed to preserving the 
          farm way of life for future generations. In May, I was pleased 
          to sign the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002. 
          This generous new law will strengthen American agriculture and 
          support our farmers through difficult times, without 
          encouraging overproduction and depressing prices. I also 
          intend to aggressively use my trade promotion authority to 
          open markets to American farmers. By promoting farm safety, we 
          strengthen our farm economy and help our Nation's farmers 
          continue to be the best, most productive farmers in the world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim the week of September 15 through September 21, 2002, 
          as National Farm Safety and Health Week. I call upon the 
          agencies, organizations, and businesses that serve America's 
          agricultural workers to strengthen their commitment to 
          promoting farm safety and health programs. I also encourage 
          American citizens to recognize the importance of our 
          agricultural heritage and the valuable contributions America's 
          farmers, ranchers, and farm workers make to our Nation's 
          economy and vitality.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          thirteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7593

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Proclamation 7593 of September 13, 2002

National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America's Historically Black Colleges and Universities are a 
          vital part of our Nation's higher education system. During 
          National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, we 
          renew our dedication to these institutions and strengthen our 
          commitment to securing educational freedom, opportunity, and 
          access for every American.
          Emerging more than a century ago in a segregated society, our 
          Historically Black Colleges and Universities have provided 
          quality education and promoted greater participation by 
          African Americans in every sector of our society. These 
          institutions continue to serve as centers of hope and 
          opportunity, reflecting the belief that every student in 
          America should have access to a college education. While 
          constituting less than 3 percent of America's institutions of 
          higher education, today they enroll 14 percent of all African 
          Americans enrolled in colleges or universities.
          These schools represent a source of accomplishment and great 
          pride for both the African-American community and our entire 
          Nation. The various founders of our Historically Black 
          Colleges and Universities understood that high standards and 
          quality instruction would prepare their students to follow 
          their dreams and succeed in life. By opening doors to new 
          academic pursuits, these schools have encouraged and enabled 
          generations of African Americans to reach their full 
          potential.
          America must continue to support these important institutions, 
          because they provide educational opportunities that otherwise 
          might not be available. In 1980, Executive Order 12232 
          established a Federal program to enhance equal opportunity and 
          strengthen the capacity of Historically Black Colleges and 
          Universities to provide excellence in education. My 
          Administration remains committed to this important mission and 
          to making the goal of higher education accessible to our 
          citizens.
          America recognizes and honors the many achievements of 
          Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and their 
          invaluable contributions to our country. They help foster a 
          culture of achievement and create a brighter future for all 
          Americans.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 15 through September 21, 2002, as National 
          Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week. I call upon 
          public officials, educators, librarians, and citizens of the 
          United States to observe this week with appropriate 
          ceremonies, activities, and programs in order to show our 
          appreciation for these remarkable educational institutions, 
          and to commend the achievements of their talented graduates.

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          thirteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7594

Proclamation 7594 of September 16, 2002

Citizenship Day and Constitution Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect Union, 
establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common 
defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty 
to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution 
for the United States of America.

          With these words, written more than 200 years ago, our 
          Forefathers laid the foundations for a great Nation, adopting 
          a Constitution that has since proven to be an enduring and 
          true guide for American government. The Constitution's 
          powerful framework for establishing and preserving liberty, 
          justice, and opportunity has enabled us to prosper as a Nation 
          and thrive as a people through more than two centuries of 
          political change, social transformation, and economic 
          challenge.
          The Founders secured the principles expressed in the 
          Declaration of Independence by establishing a government that 
          derives its power from the consent of the American people. The 
          government established by the Constitution formed a remarkably 
          resilient structure, balancing necessary authority with 
          inherent freedoms, national unity with individual rights, and 
          Federal interests with State powers. In setting this 
          foundation, the Founders also recognized the potential for 
          necessary change. They included a constitutional amendment 
          process, which has proven to be a vitally important mechanism 
          for achieving equality and fairness for all our citizens.
          Our Constitution is sustained by Americans who daily defend 
          the principles of democracy and freedom. We understand that 
          with great privileges come great responsibilities. Citizenship 
          not only involves a commitment to our Nation but also to our 
          neighbors and those in need. Over the past year, we have seen 
          many outstanding examples of selfless sacrifice, courageous 
          compassion, and true generosity. We remain committed to 
          building a culture of service and responsibility that inspires 
          citizens to reach out to the needy, take leadership in 
          improving our communities, and participate fully in our 
          democratic process.
          Today, the United States stands as a beacon of democracy and 
          tolerance, inviting the nations of the world to pursue 
          justice, provide freedom, and protect liberty for their 
          people. As we face the challenges of a new era, we remain 
          resolved and vigilant in the defense of life and liberty 
          against tyranny and terror. Drawing strength and guidance from 
          our Constitution, we will work to ensure that the blessings of 
          American liberty endure and extend for generations to come.

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          In remembrance of the signing of the Constitution and in 
          recognition of the Americans who strive to uphold the duties 
          and responsibilities of citizenship, the Congress, by joint 
          resolution of February 29, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 106, as amended), 
          designated September 17 as ``Citizenship Day,'' and by joint 
          resolution of August 2, 1956 (36 U.S.C. 108, as amended), 
          requested that the President proclaim the week beginning 
          September 17 and ending September 23 of each year as 
          ``Constitution Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim September 17, 2002, as 
          Citizenship Day and September 17 through September 23, 2002, 
          as Constitution Week. I encourage Federal, State, and local 
          officials, as well as leaders of civic, social, and 
          educational organizations, to conduct ceremonies and programs 
          that celebrate our Constitution and reaffirm our commitment as 
          citizens of our great Nation.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth 
          day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7595

Proclamation 7595 of September 19, 2002

National POW/MIA Recognition Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Throughout American history, many men and women have bravely 
          served in our military and sacrificed much to preserve our 
          country and protect the democratic ideals that make our Nation 
          a beacon of hope. Some of those who answered the call to 
          service were captured in conflict and imprisoned by our 
          enemies; and many remain missing in action.
          Each year on National POW/MIA Recognition Day, we honor those 
          Americans who were prisoners of war and recognize them for the 
          courage and determination they showed in the face of 
          unspeakable hardships. We also honor those who remain 
          unaccounted for, especially remembering the sacrifices of 
          their families who must courageously face each day without 
          knowing the fate of their loved ones.
          Nearly 60 years after the end of World War II, the fate of 
          more than 78,000 Americans who fought in that conflict remains 
          unknown. More than 8,100 from the Korean War are missing, more 
          than 120 from the Cold War, more than 1,900 from the Vietnam 
          War, and three from the Gulf War. These Americans, who 
          dedicated their lives to preserving and protecting our 
          freedoms, will never be forgotten.
          On September 20, 2002, the flag of the National League of 
          Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia 
          will be flown over the White House, the Capitol, the 
          Departments of State, Defense, and Veterans Affairs, the 
          Selective Service System Headquarters, the National Vietnam 
          Veterans Memorial, the Korean War Veterans Memorial, U.S. 
          military in

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          stallations, national cemeteries, and other locations across 
          our country. With this observance, we reaffirm our commitment 
          to those who have suffered the horrors of enemy captivity, to 
          those who have yet to return from battle, and to their 
          families. We remain dedicated to resolving discrepancy cases, 
          achieving the fullest possible accounting of our prisoners of 
          war and missing in action, and bringing them home with the 
          honor and dignity that they deserve.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 20, 2002, as National POW/MIA Recognition 
          Day. I call upon all the people of the United States to join 
          me in honoring former American prisoners of war who suffered 
          the hardships of enemy captivity, and in renewing our 
          commitment to those still missing. I also call upon Federal, 
          State, and local government officials and private 
          organizations to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies 
          and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          nineteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7596

Proclamation 7596 of September 20, 2002

Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Entrepreneurs help make America strong and are essential to 
          our economic success. Their talent, skill, and hard work have 
          helped sustain our Nation since its founding; and their 
          disciplined work ethic and capacity for innovation reflect the 
          true character of our country. During Minority Enterprise 
          Development Week, we celebrate our more than 3 million 
          minority- owned businesses, and we recognize the important 
          contributions they make to the United States of America.
          To promote prosperity in our Nation, Government must help 
          create an environment where innovative, hardworking, and 
          determined individuals have the opportunity to fully 
          participate and succeed in our economy. Last year's tax relief 
          initiative, including the repeal of the ``Death Tax,'' was an 
          important part of developing an enhanced business climate in 
          America. And this year, I signed two pieces of legislation 
          into law that will promote growth. The Trade Act of 2002 gives 
          me new Trade Promotion Authority that will help boost our 
          economy, create new jobs, and provide America with the 
          opportunity to participate in new and emerging international 
          markets. And the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 will improve 
          business practices by creating tough corporate responsibility 
          laws that will help expose and punish acts of corruption and 
          protect small investors. These vital initiatives will benefit 
          minority business enterprises and help these important job 
          creators compete fully and fairly in the global economy.

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          My Administration, through the efforts of the Department of 
          Commerce's Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) and the 
          Small Business Administration (SBA), is committed to promoting 
          the growth of minority businesses. In FY 2001, the MBDA 
          assisted minority businesses in gaining access to $1.6 billion 
          in contracts. In addition, last year the SBA offered 
          assistance to more than 1 million small business owners, and 
          continues to play a major role in our Nation's disaster relief 
          efforts by making low-interest recovery loans available to 
          Americans. The important efforts of the MBDA and SBA help 
          businesses build entrepreneurial opportunity for all.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 22 through September 28, 2002, as Minority 
          Enterprise Development Week. I call upon all Americans to 
          celebrate this week with appropriate observances, ceremonies, 
          and activities, and to recognize the countless contributions 
          of our Nation's minority enterprises.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth 
          day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7597

Proclamation 7597 of September 20, 2002

Family Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America's character begins in the home, where children learn 
          proper standards of conduct, principled values, and the 
          importance of service. Families provide children the 
          encouragement, support, and love they need to become 
          confident, compassionate, and successful members of society. 
          We must work together to promote and preserve the health and 
          security of our families by upholding the timeless values that 
          have sustained our society through history.
          Recent events have reminded Americans of the blessings of 
          family and friends, and of the importance of faith. As a 
          Nation, we have a renewed dedication to our freedom, our 
          country, and our principles. In homes, schools, places of 
          worship, the workplace, and civic and social organizations, we 
          must continue to encourage responsibility, compassion, and 
          good citizenship.
          Americans must also act to fight crime and drugs, and provide 
          a safe and healthy environment for our children. We can begin 
          by working to strengthen the bonds and improving communication 
          between parents and children. Research done by the National 
          Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University 
          has consistently shown that the more often children eat dinner 
          with their parents, the less likely children are to smoke, 
          drink, or use illegal drugs. Naturally, parents should be the 
          most

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          prominent and active figures in their children's lives. By 
          spending more family time together, parents can better engage 
          with their children and encourage them to make the right 
          choices.
          The nurturing and development of our families require 
          investment, focus, and commitment. Strong families make strong 
          and drug-free communities. By taking time to develop positive 
          and open relationships with their children, parents help fight 
          the war on drugs and encourage positive choices. Across our 
          land, citizens, schools, and civic institutions can assist 
          families by helping to meet the needs of all those who live in 
          our communities. As we work together to strengthen our 
          families, we will build a Nation of hope and opportunity for 
          all.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 23, 2002, as Family Day. I call upon the 
          people of the United States to observe this day by spending 
          quality time with family members and engaging in other 
          nurturing activities to strengthen the relationships between 
          parents and children and help fight against substance abuse.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this Twentieth 
          day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7598

Proclamation 7598 of September 27, 2002

Gold Star Mother's Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Throughout our rich history, many of our Nation's dedicated 
          military men and women have served and sacrificed their lives 
          to secure our country, defend our freedoms, and preserve the 
          values of our democracy. Many of these heroes fell in battle, 
          leaving behind family, friends, and loved ones who grieve 
          their loss to this day. Every year, we recognize and honor 
          mothers who have lost sons and daughters in service to our 
          country--our Gold Star Mothers--and we thank them for their 
          strength and their contributions to our Nation.
          Our Gold Star Mothers help us remember those who have been 
          lost by upholding the ideals for which their children gave 
          their lives. These brave women are devoted to improving and 
          enhancing the lives of those in our Armed Forces, their 
          families, and our veterans, and they encourage civic 
          education, patriotism, and the teaching of American history. 
          These efforts enrich the lives of countless young Americans, 
          and they support my Administration's work to build a culture 
          of service, citizenship, and responsibility in our country.
          By advancing national pride and promoting international 
          goodwill, Gold Star Mothers serve as models of grace and 
          strength. As we honor their pa

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          triotism and dedication, we renew our commitment to upholding 
          the honorable legacy of their fallen children by pursuing a 
          future of security, liberty, and peace.
          The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 115 of June 23, 1936, 
          (49 Stat. 1895 as amended), has designated the last Sunday in 
          September as ``Gold Star Mother's Day,'' and has authorized 
          and requested the President to issue a proclamation in 
          observance of this day.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, September 29, 
          2002, as Gold Star Mother's Day. I call upon all Government 
          officials to display the flag of the United States over 
          Government buildings on this solemn day. I also encourage the 
          American people to display the flag and to hold appropriate 
          meetings in their homes, places of worship, or other suitable 
          places as a public expression of the sympathy and respect that 
          our Nation holds for our Gold Star Mothers.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          seventh day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7599

Proclamation 7599 of October 1, 2002

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we recognize 
          the progress being made towards a cure for this disease, which 
          robs so many women of their health and, in too many cases, 
          their lives. This year, an estimated 203,000 American women 
          will be diagnosed with breast cancer, and almost 40,000 will 
          die. Although we have made great medical strides in 
          understanding breast cancer, much remains to be done to 
          advance prevention, early detection, and effective treatment.
          Regular screenings remain the most effective way to identify 
          breast cancer in its earliest and most treatable stages. For 
          women 40 and over, having mammograms every 1 to 2 years can 
          reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer. To ensure 
          mammography is available to all American women, the Centers 
          for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides screening 
          and treatment services through the National Breast and 
          Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. Now in its 12th year, 
          this Program has offered free and low-cost mammograms to 
          almost 1.5 million low-income and minority women across our 
          country.
          In addition, the Federal Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention 
          and Treatment Act allows States to expand Medicaid coverage to 
          low-income, uninsured women who were screened through the CDC 
          program and found to need treatment for breast or cervical 
          cancer. To date, the Department of

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          Health and Human Services has approved this Medicaid 
          eligibility in 45 States.
          To prevent breast cancer, we must increase awareness of its 
          risk factors and causes. Age and genetic factors have been 
          shown to increase the risk of breast cancer. And researchers 
          are now exploring how diet and hormonal factors are linked to 
          possible causes. This information will help women and their 
          doctors make informed health care choices.
          My Administration continues to support research efforts to 
          discover a cure and advance our understanding of breast 
          cancer. The National Cancer Institute invested more than $475 
          million last year on breast cancer research, and we will 
          devote an estimated $535.8 million this year and approximately 
          $604.3 million next year. In addition to these important 
          funding increases taken by my Administration, Americans have 
          raised more than $23 million over the past 4 years by 
          purchasing the Breast Cancer Research stamp, which will be 
          available until December 31, 2003, from the United States 
          Postal Service. I also commend all of the private and 
          nonprofit groups, especially everyone who has worked on the 
          Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, for all their efforts and 
          contributions in the fight against breast cancer.
          Much of this funding is directed towards clinical trials 
          dedicated to finding new and more effective ways of 
          preventing, detecting, and treating breast cancer. America is 
          grateful to the brave and generous women who help fight this 
          disease by participating in clinical trials. Researchers rely 
          on these courageous patients, who help us learn about the 
          safety and effectiveness of new approaches of treatment and, 
          in doing so, bring us closer to eliminating this terrible 
          disease.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 2002 as National Breast Cancer Awareness 
          Month. I call upon government officials, businesses, 
          communities, healthcare professionals, educators, volunteers, 
          and all the people of the United States to publicly reaffirm 
          our Nation's strong and continuing commitment to controlling 
          and curing breast cancer.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7600

Proclamation 7600 of October 1, 2002

National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          All of our citizens should have the opportunity to live and 
          work with dignity and freedom. Every October, we observe 
          National Disability Employment Awareness Month, to recognize 
          the talents, skills, and dedication of disabled Americans who 
          are a vital part of our workforce. During this

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          month, we reaffirm our commitment to ensuring that people with 
          disabilities who want to work can receive the training they 
          need to achieve their goal.
          This year marks the 12th anniversary of the Americans with 
          Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). The ADA has allowed disabled 
          persons to participate more fully in our society; and it has 
          opened doors for countless Americans by removing barriers, 
          improving employment opportunities, expanding government 
          services, and regulating public accommodations, 
          transportation, and telecommunications. Much work remains to 
          be done; for many individuals with disabilities still find it 
          difficult to pursue an education, obtain a job, or own a home.
          My Administration remains committed to helping America's more 
          than 50 million disabled persons to obtain meaningful work and 
          to achieve the ADA's promise of equality of opportunity, 
          independent living, and economic self-sufficiency. Last year, 
          I announced my New Freedom Initiative to promote these goals. 
          It is a comprehensive plan that fosters the full participation 
          of people with disabilities in all aspects of American life. 
          This initiative provides increased access to innovative 
          assistive technologies, expands educational options, increases 
          access to gainful employment, and promotes full access to 
          community life.
          My Administration continues to enforce the ADA and is working 
          with employers to build partnerships that support creative job 
          accommodations and provide all Americans with meaningful and 
          successful careers. Breaking down barriers requires this kind 
          of cooperative, sustained, and consistent effort. We must 
          continue to work for an America where all individuals are 
          respected for who they are, celebrated for their abilities, 
          and encouraged to realize their full potential and achieve 
          their dreams.
          By joint resolution approved August 11, 1945, as amended (36 
          U.S.C. 121), the Congress has, each year since 1945, called 
          upon this Nation to recognize the contributions that workers 
          with disabilities have made, and requested the President to 
          issue a proclamation calling for appropriate ceremonies and 
          activities.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 2002 as National 
          Disability Employment Awareness Month. I call upon all 
          government leaders, labor leaders, and employers to 
          collaborate to ensure the full inclusion of our Nation's 
          persons with disabilities in the 21st century workforce.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7601

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Proclamation 7601 of October 1, 2002

National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Domestic violence in America is intolerable and must be 
          stopped. According to the 2000 National Crime Victimization 
          Survey, almost 700,000 incidents of violence between partners 
          were documented in our Nation, and thousands more go 
          unreported. And in the past quarter century, almost 57,000 
          Americans were murdered by a partner. Children who witness 
          domestic violence often grow up believing that physical 
          cruelty in relationships is acceptable behavior, and thus they 
          may tend to perpetuate a cycle of violence in society.
          Many Federal, State, and local programs addressing the 
          domestic violence problem have achieved success, bringing 
          greater safety to families. The success of coordinated 
          community-based efforts is helping us win the battle against 
          domestic violence. Community leaders, police, judges, 
          advocates, healthcare workers, and concerned Americans are 
          working together across America to develop solutions to this 
          serious problem and to implement services that will improve 
          our responses when it occurs. For example, many police 
          departments and district attorneys offices have created 
          specialized domestic violence units that cooperate with 
          community advocates to enhance services for victims; and 
          representatives from the faith community frequently provide 
          essential support in areas where there may be no other 
          services available. Programs designed to educate men and women 
          about ways they can help prevent domestic violence are being 
          developed across our Nation. Every citizen has the ability to 
          aid and assist those suffering from domestic abuse and to let 
          victims know that support is available through shelters, 
          hotlines, and other services.
          To better assist victims in need, my Administration recently 
          implemented funding for new programs to improve outreach and 
          services for people who are older or who have disabilities.
          We have also intensified our efforts to provide meaningful 
          access to Federally sponsored programs for individuals with 
          limited English proficiency, making it easier for them to 
          escape violence, report crime, and gain access to community 
          services.
          We must continue to hold domestic abusers accountable; we must 
          punish them to the full extent of the law; and we must prevent 
          them from inflicting more abuse. Protective orders are helpful 
          and can be enforced in every jurisdiction in our country, 
          which means their power extends across State lines and onto 
          tribal lands. This legal authority makes it easier for police 
          and prosecutors to keep aggressors away from their intended 
          targets. Many abusers become more dangerous after court-
          enforced separation from their victims and often use 
          visitation or exchange of children as an opportunity to 
          inflict abuse. We are working to expand programs that improve 
          the safety of family members in these situations.
          During Domestic Violence Awareness Month, I urge all Americans 
          to join together in recommitting themselves to eliminating 
          domestic violence and reaching out to its victims, letting 
          them know that help is available. With

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          dedication and vigilance, we can increase safety for thousands 
          of our citizens and bring hope to countless Americans.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 2002 as National Domestic Violence Awareness 
          Month. I urge all Americans to become a part of the 
          coordinated community response to domestic violence and to 
          send the message that this crime will not be tolerated in our 
          Nation.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7602

Proclamation 7602 of October 4, 2002

Fire Prevention Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Every year, fires needlessly take lives and destroy homes, 
          natural habitats, and livelihoods. This year, as we observe 
          Fire Prevention Week, I ask all citizens to take responsible 
          steps to prevent fires at home and outdoors and to ensure that 
          safety and emergency plans are in place and in practice.
          Approximately 3,500 Americans die each year in home fires; and 
          85 percent of all annual fire fatalities occur in residences. 
          To prevent this tragic loss of life, the National Fire 
          Protection Association, in partnership with the Federal 
          Emergency Management Agency, the United States Fire 
          Administration, and America's 26,354 fire departments, is 
          sponsoring the 2002 Fire Prevention Week campaign, ``Team Up 
          for Fire Safety.'' I encourage all Americans to heed the 
          recommendations of fire safety experts by ensuring that every 
          home is equipped with the appropriate number of properly 
          installed and maintained smoke alarms and that every family 
          has fire safety and escape plans. These measures will help to 
          prevent fires and protect our families, our communities, and 
          our firefighters.
          America has faced a devastating wildfire season this year, and 
          much wildlife habitat has been destroyed by fires in our 
          overgrown forests. To reduce the threat of these catastrophic 
          wildfires and to restore the health of America's forests, we 
          must continue to develop improved forest management plans. My 
          Healthy Forests Initiative aims to ensure our environment's 
          health by thinning dangerous overgrowth. Firefighters and 
          forest experts agree that we could strengthen the health of 
          our forests by targeted thinning of dense forests and quickly 
          restoring fire- damaged areas to prevent erosion. Through 
          these improved forest policies, we can protect our citizens, 
          prevent catastrophic fires, preserve healthy forests, and 
          sustain wildlife habitat.
          During Fire Prevention Week, our Nation also gives thanks for 
          the invaluable service rendered by our firefighters, who risk 
          their lives to preserve and protect our communities. These 
          courageous public servants have in

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          spired us with their dedication and professionalism. On 
          September 11, 2001, we saw that our brave firefighters are 
          among America's greatest heroes. As we remember the sacrifice 
          of so many firefighters that day, let us draw great strength 
          from their example of selfless service to others. These 
          firefighters embodied the best of the American spirit.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 6 through October 12, 2002, as Fire 
          Prevention Week. On Sunday, October 6, 2002, pursuant to 
          Public Law 107-51, flags will be flown at half-staff on all 
          Federal office buildings in honor of the National Fallen 
          Firefighters Memorial Service. I invite the people of the 
          United States to participate in this observance by flying our 
          Nation's flag over their homes at half-staff on this day, to 
          mark this week with appropriate programs and activities, and 
          to renew efforts throughout the year to prevent fires and 
          their tragic consequences.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7603

Proclamation 7603 of October 4, 2001

Child Health Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On Child Health Day, we renew our commitment to the well-being 
          and safety of our children. Parents, families, teachers, and 
          neighbors all play important roles in preparing children to 
          face life's physical, spiritual, intellectual, and emotional 
          demands. For the future of our country, we must work together 
          to provide our young people with the knowledge and skills they 
          need to be safe, self-confident, and successful.
          From maintaining a healthy environment and high safety 
          standards to providing immunizations and quality health care, 
          children rely on our vigilance and support. Each year, 30 
          million children require emergency care due to acute illness 
          and injury. We can all take important steps to help prevent 
          these accidents and to improve the health and safety of young 
          Americans.
          Parents and other caregivers should be aware of the latest 
          safety precautions and pay careful attention to consumer 
          safety warnings. They should always secure infants, toddlers, 
          and small children in safety seats and booster seats. Children 
          should be taught always to wear their seatbelts when riding in 
          a vehicle and to use protective gear when riding a bicycle, 
          roller blading, skate boarding, playing sports, and 
          participating in other similar activities. Parents should set 
          a good example by refraining from smoking and should teach 
          their children about the health risks of tobacco, drugs, and 
          alcohol.

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          Child obesity has become a serious problem in this country. 
          About 8 million young Americans--almost 15 percent of all 
          children--are overweight. Obesity can cause medical 
          complications that can lead to hospitalization for type 2 
          diabetes, sleep apnea, and asthma. Ensuring regular 
          participation in physical activity can help children manage 
          weight, control blood pressure, and maintain healthy bones, 
          muscles, and joints.
          My Administration is strongly committed to advancing programs 
          that help children discover and understand the benefits of 
          healthy living. The recently introduced HealthierUS Initiative 
          will help Americans improve their health and quality of life 
          through modest improvements in physical activity, nutrition, 
          getting preventive screenings, and making healthy choices. 
          Families play a vital role and can help to promote and 
          encourage these beneficial habits.
          By committing ourselves to health and safety, we better enable 
          young people to achieve their goals, live longer, fuller 
          lives, and we strengthen our Nation. The Congress, by a joint 
          resolution approved May 18, 1928, as amended (36 U.S.C. 105), 
          has called for the designation of the first Monday in October 
          as ``Child Health Day'' and has requested the President to 
          issue a proclamation in observance of this day.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim Monday, October 7, 2002, 
          as Child Health Day. On this day, and on every day throughout 
          the year, I call upon families, schools, child health 
          professionals, communities, and governments to help all of our 
          children discover the rewards of good health and wellness.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7604

Proclamation 7604 of October 4, 2002

German-American Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          As the oldest and longest-lived democracy in the world, our 
          Nation is committed to promoting freedom, protecting liberty, 
          and pursuing peace. For over 225 years, America has been a 
          place where people have come to realize their dreams and enjoy 
          the blessings of religious tolerance and individual rights.
          In 1683, 13 immigrant families left Germany to escape 
          religious persecution and establish the first German 
          settlement in North America in Germantown, Pennsylvania. Since 
          that time, more than 7 million German immigrants have come to 
          America, and through hard work, innovation, and dedication, 
          they have influenced our Nation and strengthened our country. 
          Each year, we celebrate German-American Day, which offers us 
          the chance to reflect on the proud and important contributions 
          that German Americans have made to the United States.

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          Carl Schurz, who emigrated from the Rhineland, served as a 
          United States Senator and Secretary of the Interior. He said 
          that German immigrants ``could render no greater honor to 
          their former fatherland than by becoming conscientious and 
          faithful citizens of their new country.'' As farmers, 
          businessmen, scientists, artists, teachers, and politicians, 
          German Americans have contributed to the values that make our 
          Nation strong. Through his artistic abilities as a cartoonist 
          and caricaturist during and following the Civil War, Thomas 
          Nast established himself as a political voice for the 
          underprivileged and champion of equal rights for all citizens.
          The important work of Joseph Pulitzer helped to create the 
          American legacy of freedom of the press and to advance the 
          field of journalism. Oscar Hammerstein is known as an integral 
          figure in the history of the United States opera for building 
          his second Manhattan Opera House in addition to several other 
          theaters. This tradition of excellence continued with the 
          musical talents of his grandson, Oscar Hammerstein II, as he 
          elevated the American musical comedy to musical theater that 
          Americans enjoy today. The efforts of German-American 
          entrepreneurs Levi Strauss, the creator of blue jeans, and 
          Walter Percy Chrysler, the first president of Chrysler 
          Corporation in 1925, reflect the entrepreneurial spirit of our 
          country. Today, German Americans continue to serve this Nation 
          with distinction in our Armed Forces, in our communities, and 
          throughout all sectors of our society.
          On this day, we recognize the important and continuing 
          relationship between Germany and the United States. Our 
          friendship was forged after World War II and is based on 
          mutual support and respect. Germany showed meaningful support 
          for the United States after the September 11, 2001, terrorist 
          attacks. On this day, I am pleased to call all Americans to 
          celebrate the contributions that German Americans have made to 
          our Nation.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 6, 2002, as German-American Day. I encourage 
          all Americans to recognize the contributions of our citizens 
          of German descent to the liberty and prosperity of the United 
          States, and to celebrate our close ties to the people of 
          Germany.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7605

Proclamation 7605 of October 8, 2002

Leif Erikson Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          More than 1,000 years ago, Leif Erikson and his crew journeyed 
          across the Atlantic seeking unknown lands. Their pioneering 
          spirit of courage, deter

[[Page 147]]

          mination, and discovery helped to open the world to new 
          exploration and unprecedented development. Each October, we 
          join our friends in Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and 
          Finland in honoring this historic voyage and in celebrating 
          the strong transatlantic bonds that exist between those 
          countries and the United States.
          Our Nation is committed to promoting prosperity and stability 
          throughout Northern Europe. Through the Northern Europe 
          Initiative, we have partnered with other nations in the region 
          to enhance security and economic growth in the Baltic region. 
          This Initiative addresses concrete needs in six areas: the 
          environment; public health; law enforcement and rule-of-law; 
          civil society; energy; and trade. Our Nation also supports the 
          European Union's ``Northern Dimension'' strategy, which aims 
          to strengthen the integration of Northwest Russia and the 
          accession countries to the European Union. These important 
          efforts, along with the bilateral programs of all Nordic 
          countries, are helping to build a brighter future for the 
          entire region.
          As we defend ourselves against terrorism, we are grateful for 
          the support of our coalition partners around the world, 
          including our Nordic friends and allies. The goodwill 
          demonstrated by the people of this region has reinforced our 
          close ties and strengthened our resolve to overcome the evil 
          that is before us. As we celebrate Leif Erikson Day, we 
          recommit ourselves to a world of innovation, prosperity, and 
          opportunity.
          To honor Leif Erikson, the brave son of Iceland and grandson 
          of Norway, and to recognize our Nation's Nordic-American 
          heritage, the Congress, by joint resolution (Public Law 88-
          566) approved on September 2, 1964, has authorized and 
          requested the President to proclaim October 9 of each year as 
          ``Leif Erikson Day.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 9, 2002, as Leif 
          Erikson Day. I call upon all Americans to observe this day 
          with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs to honor 
          our rich Nordic-American heritage.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7606

Proclamation 7606 of October 9, 2002

Columbus Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          In August 1492, Christopher Columbus sailed from Palos, Spain, 
          embarking on a westward voyage and intending to establish a 
          new trade route from Spain to the Far East. With three ships 
          and a crew of approximately 100 men, he journeyed across the 
          Atlantic Ocean. Instead of finding a new route to the Indies, 
          Columbus discovered the Bahama Islands. Today, more than five 
          centuries later, Americans continue to celebrate Columbus' 
          bold

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          expedition and recognize his pioneering achievements as an 
          enduring symbol of imagination, courage, and perseverance.
          Columbus brought European settlers to North America and helped 
          establish a new era of world exploration during his four 
          journeys to the ``New World.'' In the years following his 
          voyage of discovery, others such as John Cabot, Vasco da Gama, 
          and Ferdinand Magellan followed Columbus' example to explore 
          and discover new lands, peoples, and cultures.
          Today, Columbus' spirit of innovation and discovery flourishes 
          in America as we seek to advance knowledge and ensure 
          prosperity and hope for all people. We challenge our young men 
          and women particularly to reach for all their dreams as the 
          great explorers of the past did.
          In commemoration of Columbus' remarkable journey 510 years 
          ago, the Congress, by joint resolution of April 30, 1934, and 
          modified in 1968 (36 U.S.C. 107), as amended, has requested 
          that the President proclaim the second Monday of October of 
          each year as ``Columbus Day.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 14, 2002, as 
          Columbus Day. I call upon the people of the United States to 
          observe this day with appropriate ceremonies and activities. I 
          also direct that the flag of the United States be displayed on 
          all public buildings on the appointed day in honor of 
          Christopher Columbus.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7607

Proclamation 7607 of October 10, 2002

General Pulaski Memorial Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Americans celebrate our friendship and common commitment to 
          freedom with the people of Poland each year on October 11, 
          when we honor Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski, a hero of the 
          American Revolutionary War. As a brave Polish patriot, General 
          Pulaski made the ultimate sacrifice for our Nation, giving his 
          life in 1779 to help America gain its independence. His 
          devotion to liberty continues to inspire us today as we join 
          with our allies to secure peace and freedom around the globe.
          Before joining the American Revolution in 1777, Casimir 
          Pulaski struggled against oppression in his native Poland, 
          fighting alongside his father and brothers to defend their 
          homeland from Prussian and Imperial Russian invaders. Though 
          his cause was ultimately overcome by those powerful forces, 
          Pulaski was widely recognized for his courageous actions as a 
          cavalry officer and leader of Polish forces. Benjamin Franklin 
          lauded Pulaski as ``famous throughout Europe for his bravery 
          and conduct in defense of the liberties of his country.''

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          When General Pulaski joined General George Washington's staff, 
          he immediately made important contributions to the war effort. 
          He led a critical counterattack at the Battle of Brandywine 
          that avoided a potential military disaster, earning him a 
          commission as a Brigadier General. American leaders valued 
          Pulaski's experience in battle, his knowledge of military 
          strategy, and his pioneering efforts that led to a recognition 
          that he was the ``Father of the American cavalry.'' While 
          leading cavalry forces in the Siege of Savannah, Pulaski was 
          wounded, and died on October 11, 1779.
          Two hundred and twenty-five years ago, Casimir Pulaski joined 
          forces with Americans to establish liberty and overcome 
          despotism. That inspiration and solidarity is mirrored today 
          as we engage in a war against terrorism. As part of a global 
          coalition, which includes the government and people of Poland, 
          we are working to ensure that our two nations remain strong 
          friends and allies in our effort to build a safer, more 
          peaceful world for all.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Friday, October 11, 2002, as General Pulaski Memorial 
          Day. I encourage all Americans to commemorate this occasion 
          with appropriate programs and activities paying tribute to 
          Casimir Pulaski and honoring all those who defend the freedom 
          of our great Nation.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7608

Proclamation 7608 of October 11, 2002

National Cystic Fibrosis Awareness Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common fatal genetic 
          diseases in the United States. During this week, we renew our 
          commitment to fighting this deadly disease that affects an 
          estimated 30,000 American men, women, and children.
          Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder that can be passed on 
          directly from parents to children. Millions of Americans are 
          unknowing, symptom-free carriers of the defective gene that 
          can cause this disease. When both parents are carriers of the 
          abnormal gene, their children have a 1 in 4 chance of being 
          born with the disorder. Individuals who suffer from cystic 
          fibrosis experience frequent lung infections and digestive 
          problems caused by cell disorders in the lining of the lungs, 
          small intestines, sweat glands, and pancreas.
          Though there is as yet no known cure for cystic fibrosis, 
          scientists and researchers have made great progress in 
          understanding and treating this disease. Thanks to these 
          efforts, the average life expectancy for people with cystic 
          fibrosis has increased significantly in recent decades, and it 
          is now

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          approximately 30 years. In addition, advances in antibiotic 
          therapy and the management of lung and digestive problems have 
          improved the quality of life for these individuals.
          Recent genetic research may also accelerate the discovery of a 
          cure. To help advance the work to end cystic fibrosis, my 
          Administration is dedicated to increasing Federal funding for 
          medical research at the National Institutes of Health. Until 
          cystic fibrosis is eliminated, we are hopeful that our 
          research efforts will continue to extend and improve the 
          quality of life of those stricken with this grave disease.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 13 through October 19, 2002, as National 
          Cystic Fibrosis Awareness Week. I call upon all Americans to 
          observe this week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
          activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7609

Proclamation 7609 of October 11, 2002

National School Lunch Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The future success of our Nation depends on our children's 
          healthy development. Since 1946, the National School Lunch 
          Program (NSLP) has made important contributions to the well-
          being of our school children. As part of the NSLP, more than 
          96,000 schools and residential childcare institutions serve 
          more than 27 million children each day. In addition to 
          providing young people with nutritious meals, this program 
          supports the academic mission of our schools and helps to 
          ensure that all our Nation's children reach their full 
          potential.
          To avoid the formation of poor eating habits, which are 
          generally established during childhood, we must encourage 
          positive choices that fulfill dietary recommendations. It is 
          critical that our children eat sufficient amounts of fruits 
          and vegetables, reduce fat in their diets, and consume 
          essential nutrients in an overall diet with appropriate 
          calories. By making modest improvements to their diets and 
          increasing physical activities, children can dramatically 
          improve their overall health.
          To help meet this goal, the Department of Agriculture launched 
          the School Meals Initiative for Healthy Children. This plan 
          empowers schools to serve ``kid-friendly'' meals that meet the 
          recommendations defined in the Dietary Guidelines for 
          Americans and the Food Guide Pyramid. Through Team Nutrition, 
          a comprehensive, behavior-based plan, the USDA assists schools 
          by supporting food service personnel with important training. 
          New recipes are now created by teams of dietitians and chefs, 
          and then taste-tested by chil-

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          dren. As a result, more children are enjoying lunches that are 
          lower in fat, saturated fat, and sodium.
          To motivate children to make sound choices, Team Nutrition 
          also educates them about the benefits of healthy eating. State 
          and local governments are supplementing these programs through 
          innovative partnerships with educators, school administrators, 
          community organizations, the food industry, and others. 
          Through these cooperative efforts we are addressing solutions 
          to health problems, such as the increasing incidence of 
          childhood obesity, and we are enhancing access to nutrition 
          programs for needy children.
          During National School Lunch Week, we recognize the hard work 
          and dedication of the thousands of food service professionals 
          who plan and prepare meals, and provide vital nutritional 
          education to our young people.
          In recognition of the contributions of the National School 
          Lunch Program to the health, education, and well-being of our 
          Nation's children, the Congress, by joint resolution of 
          October 9, 1962 (Public Law 87-780), as amended, has 
          designated the week beginning on the second Sunday in October 
          of each year as ``National School Lunch Week'' and has 
          requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance 
          of this week.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 13 through 
          October 19, 2002, as National School Lunch Week. I call upon 
          all Americans to join the dedicated individuals who administer 
          the National School Lunch Program at the State and local 
          levels in appropriate activities and celebrations that promote 
          all programs that support the health and well-being of our 
          Nation's children.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7610

Proclamation 7610 of October 11, 2002

White Cane Safety Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The white cane is a powerful symbol of independence and 
          opportunity for visually impaired persons. It is also an 
          essential tool for increasing mobility and productivity for 
          those who are blind as well as those who suffer from severe 
          visual impairment. On White Cane Safety Day, our Nation renews 
          its dedication to eliminating barriers for every disabled 
          American, especially the blind and visually impaired.
          My Administration seeks to ensure that all Americans enjoy 
          full access to employment, education, and all the blessings of 
          freedom. Through my ``New Freedom Initiative,'' we are working 
          to provide people with disabilities more employment 
          opportunities and increased access to new technologies for 
          independent living. My 2003 budget for this initiative 
          proposes

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          $145 million for alternative transportation and innovative 
          transportation grants that will improve accessibility to vital 
          aspects of society including schools, jobs, and places of 
          worship. By implementing these and other important reforms, we 
          can make great progress towards an America where individuals 
          are celebrated for their talents and abilities, not judged by 
          their limitations and disabilities.
          The Congress, by joint resolution (Public Law 88-628) approved 
          on October 6, 1964, as amended, has designated October 15 of 
          each year as ``White Cane Safety Day.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 15, 2002, as 
          White Cane Safety Day. I call upon public officials, 
          educators, librarians, and all the people of the United States 
          to join with me in ensuring that all the benefits and 
          privileges of life in our great Nation are available to blind 
          and visually impaired individuals, and to observe this day 
          with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7611

Proclamation 7611 of October 17, 2002

Year of Clean Water, 2002-2003

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On October 18, 2002, our Nation marks the 30th anniversary of 
          the Clean Water Act and begins the Observance of the Year of 
          Clean Water. This landmark environmental legislation has been 
          central to the important progress we have made as a Nation in 
          improving the quality of our drinking water and the health of 
          our waters, wetlands, and watersheds. During this time, we 
          renew our commitment to building on these successes and to 
          developing new approaches and partnerships to meet our 
          environmental challenges.
          The Clean Water Act of 1972 and the Safe Drinking Water Act of 
          1974 have helped our citizens enjoy one of the safest and 
          cleanest water supplies in the world. Under the Clean Water 
          Act, the Federal Government has provided more than $80 billion 
          in wastewater assistance to the States and localities. This 
          fundamentally important investment has ensured that 165 
          million citizens now benefit from modern sewage treatment, up 
          from 86 million in 1968. The important advances in waste water 
          treatment since the Clean Water Act's passage constitute one 
          of the major achievements in modern American public health.
          In the last 30 years, the overall health of our marine waters, 
          lakes, rivers, streams, and wetlands has also dramatically 
          improved. The Federal Government has cooperated with States, 
          tribes, local communities, businesses, and concerned 
          individuals to reduce significantly all forms of water pollu

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          tion, making our waters better suited for recreation and other 
          pursuits and more hospitable to aquatic life. Recent studies 
          show that we are close to achieving our goal of halting 
          overall wetlands loss, and we are hopeful that in the near 
          future we will begin increasing the overall function and value 
          of our wetlands. As we look to the challenges ahead, the Clean 
          Water Act will be an important mainstay and tool for further 
          progress.
          As part of our Nation's long-term commitment to protecting our 
          environment and natural resources, we must continue to focus 
          on cleaner air, water, and land; healthier citizens, and 
          vibrant ecosystems. We will continue to collaborate with 
          private organizations, landowners, and all levels of 
          government to encourage the development of new technologies 
          and innovative approaches to protecting our environment. 
          Through policies and programs that recognize regional 
          differences, employ market forces, and empower individuals to 
          be good stewards of the earth, we can and will meet the 
          environmental challenges of the future.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim the year beginning October 18, 2002, as the Year of 
          Clean Water in commemoration of the 30th anniversary of the 
          Clean Water Act. I call upon all Americans to observe this 
          year with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities, 
          and to join in setting good examples of environmental 
          stewardship in our daily lives.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of October, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7612

Proclamation 7612 of October 18, 2002

National Character Counts Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          President Theodore Roosevelt once said that, ``Character, in 
          the long run, is the decisive factor in the life of an 
          individual and of nations alike.'' During National Character 
          Counts Week, Americans reaffirm our dedication to promoting 
          good character and upholding the timeless virtues that make 
          our Nation strong.
          Our Founding Fathers understood that our country would survive 
          and flourish if our Nation was committed to good character and 
          an unyielding dedication to liberty and justice for all. 
          Throughout our history, our most honorable heroes practiced 
          the values of hard work and honesty, commitment to excellence 
          and courage, and self-discipline and perseverance. Today, as 
          we work to preserve peace and freedom throughout the world, we 
          are guided by a national character that respects human dignity 
          and values every life.
          The future success of our Nation depends on our children's 
          ability to understand the difference between right and wrong 
          and to have the strength

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          of character to make the right choices. To help them reach 
          their full potential and live with integrity and pride, we 
          must teach our children to be kind, responsible, honest, and 
          self-disciplined. These important values are first learned in 
          the family, but all of our citizens have an obligation to 
          support parents in the character education of our children.
          Our schools play a crucial role in teaching the skills, 
          knowledge, and moral values that will help our children 
          succeed. As Martin Luther King, Jr., stated, ``. . . 
          intelligence is not enough. Intelligence plus character--that 
          is the goal of true education.'' By guiding children to 
          understand universal values such as respect, tolerance, 
          compassion, and commitment to family and community, our 
          schools are working to achieve this goal.
          My Administration is committed to promoting character by 
          encouraging public service and civic awareness. The USA 
          Freedom Corps is helping citizens discover volunteer 
          opportunities in their communities and spreading the message 
          that everyone can do something to care for their neighbors in 
          need. This past June, we convened the White House Conference 
          on Character and Community, which showcased programs from 
          around the country that are proving that sound values can be 
          effectively taught.
          By affirming the importance of good character in our society 
          and encouraging all people to lead lives of virtuous purpose, 
          we can prepare our Nation, and especially our Nation's 
          children, for the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. 
          Strengthening our national character will help secure greater 
          opportunity, prosperity, and hope for all.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 20 through October 26, 2002, as National 
          Character Counts Week. I call upon all public officials, 
          educators, librarians, and all the people of the United States 
          to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies, activities, 
          and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          eighteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7613

Proclamation 7613 of October 18, 2002

National Forest Products Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America's forests are one of our greatest natural resources. 
          They offer majestic beauty and fabulous recreational 
          opportunities for all Americans to enjoy. They also are an 
          important source of materials that help our Nation's economy 
          to grow and flourish. By observing National Forest Products 
          Week, we recognize the countless ways in which forests enrich 
          our lives, and we renew our commitment to preserving these 
          natural assets for future generations.

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          Forests strengthen our economy by supplying us with renewable, 
          energy-efficient, and environmentally friendly resources that 
          are the source of good jobs and valuable products. The wood we 
          get from forests is a prime construction and manufacturing 
          product that is used to build our homes and many other 
          essential structures. Wood is also recyclable, biodegradable, 
          and serves as a raw material for many items we use and enjoy 
          every day, including paper, tissue, furniture, packaging 
          materials, musical instruments, and postage stamps. The use of 
          wood for biomass energy generation derived from thinning 
          projects conserves fossil fuels and strengthens rural 
          economies.
          In addition, our Nation's forests protect watersheds, preserve 
          water quality, help keep our air clean, and provide habitat 
          for our wildlife.
          To protect these vital natural resources, we must take 
          affirmative steps towards managing our forests better, and we 
          must work together to safeguard the health of our forests. My 
          Administration has developed the Healthy Forests Initiative, 
          which seeks to restore the health of our woodlands and prevent 
          forest fires through a combination of thinning overgrowth and 
          restoring fire-damaged areas. For the safety of our citizens, 
          the good of our forests, and the prosperity of our economy, we 
          must make forest health a national priority.
          Recognizing the importance of our forests in ensuring our 
          Nation's well-being, the Congress, by Public Law 86-753 (36 
          U.S.C. 123), as amended, has designated the week beginning on 
          the third Sunday in October of each year as ``National Forest 
          Products Week'' and has authorized and requested the President 
          to issue a proclamation in observance of this week.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 20 through 
          October 26, 2002, as National Forest Products Week. I call 
          upon all Americans to observe this week with appropriate 
          ceremonies and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          eighteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7614

Proclamation 7614 of October 23, 2002

United Nations Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The United Nations was founded 57 years ago to improve our 
          global community by strengthening the ties among member 
          nations through improved communication, expanded 
          understanding, and enhanced security. On United Nations Day, 
          America joins the world in commemorating the founding of this 
          important international organization and recognizing the 
          profound impact it has had on our world and the role that it 
          continues to play.

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          Since October 24, 1945, the United Nations Organization has 
          grown to include 191 member states. Through its relief 
          agencies, the U.N. aids and protects millions of refugees and 
          displaced persons worldwide. For example, in 2001, the United 
          Nations World Food Program provided aid to 77 million people 
          in 82 countries and helped to avert a severe famine that 
          threatened Afghanistan. The U.N. also seeks to improve living 
          conditions around the globe by immunizing children, providing 
          safe drinking water, and fighting disease.
          The United States remains committed to helping the U.N. to 
          advance human rights, healthcare, security, and education 
          throughout the world; and we will continue to meet these and 
          other commitments as we rejoin the United Nations Educational, 
          Scientific, and Cultural Organization. Our country continues 
          to work with the U.N. in supplying aid for nations and peoples 
          in need or distress, and in providing medical care and other 
          essentials through U.N. agencies such as UNICEF.
          As our world faces new challenges and opportunities, the 
          efforts of the United Nations take on a renewed significance. 
          The United States recognizes the U.N. for its efforts to 
          support and strengthen the international coalition against 
          global terror. And we hope the United Nations will fulfill its 
          role in addressing the threats posed to the civilized world, 
          particularly the threat now posed by Iraq. As a founding 
          member of the U.N., the United States reaffirms our dedication 
          to this vital organization and our hope that it will continue 
          to fulfill the vision of its founders.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 24, 2002, as United Nations Day. I call upon 
          the people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate programs and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          third day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7615

Proclamation 7615 of October 29, 2002

National Family Caregivers Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          One of our most important responsibilities as citizens is to 
          give back to our communities. Individuals who care for loved 
          ones in their homes demonstrate the compassionate spirit of 
          America. During National Family Caregivers Month, we honor 
          these individuals who bring hope and comfort to their fellow 
          citizens in need.
          America's family caregivers are vital to the strength of our 
          communities. Through specialized care for family members with 
          disabilities or those who are aging or chronically ill, 
          millions of caregivers help their loved ones live

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          in a comforting environment. As the size of our elderly 
          population continues to grow, home care increasingly 
          represents an important, dignified, and compassionate 
          alternative for countless individuals.
          To support and train families at all stages of caregiving, the 
          Administration on Aging provides community-based assistance 
          through the ``National Family Caregiver Support Program.'' 
          This network of community service providers, faith-based 
          organizations, tribal organizations, State and local agencies 
          on aging, and hundreds of thousands of volunteers informs 
          caregivers that they are not alone, and that help is always 
          available through counseling, support groups, training, 
          respite care, and supplemental services.
          As we work to build a culture of service, responsibility, and 
          compassion, caregivers continue to bring our families and 
          communities together. Through their efforts to assist loved 
          ones in need, family caregivers demonstrate the true spirit of 
          our Nation.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2002 as National Family Caregivers Month. I 
          encourage all Americans to pause to honor the family members, 
          friends, and neighbors who shoulder caregiving 
          responsibilities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          ninth day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7616

Proclamation 7616 of October 31, 2002

To Implement the Andean Trade Promotion and Drug

Eradication Act

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. Section 3103 of the Andean Trade Promotion and Drug 
          Eradication Act (title XXXI of the Trade Act of 2002, Public 
          Law 107-210) (ATPDEA) amended section 204(b) of the Andean 
          Trade Preference Act (19 U.S.C. 3203(b)) (ATPA) to provide 
          that certain preferential tariff treatment may be provided to 
          eligible articles that are the product of any country that the 
          President designates as an ``ATPDEA beneficiary country'' 
          pursuant to section 204(b)(6)(B) of the ATPA, as amended, 
          provided that the President determines that the country has 
          satisfied the requirements of section 204(b)(5)(A)(ii)(I) of 
          the ATPA, as amended, relating to the implementation of 
          procedures and requirements similar to those in chapter 5 of 
          the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).
          2. Section 3103(a)(2) of the ATPDEA amended section 204(b) of 
          the ATPA to authorize the President to proclaim duty-free 
          treatment for any article described in section 204(b)(1)(A) 
          through (D) of the ATPA, as amended,

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          that is the growth, product, or manufacture of an ATPDEA 
          beneficiary country, that is imported directly into the 
          customs territory of the United States from an ATPDEA 
          beneficiary country, and that meets the requirements of 
          section 204 of the ATPA, as amended, if the President 
          determines that such article is not import-sensitive in the 
          context of imports from ATPDEA beneficiary countries, provided 
          that the President determines that the country has satisfied 
          the requirements of section 204(b)(5)(A)(ii)(I) of the ATPA, 
          as amended, relating to the implementation of procedures and 
          requirements similar to those in chapter 5 of the NAFTA.
          3. Section 3103(a)(2) of the ATPDEA amended section 204(b) of 
          the ATPA to provide that eligible textile and apparel articles 
          of a designated ATPDEA beneficiary country shall enter the 
          United States free of duty and free of quantitative 
          limitations, provided that the President determines that the 
          country has satisfied the requirements of section 
          204(b)(5)(A)(ii)(I) of the ATPA, as amended, relating to the 
          implementation of procedures and requirements similar to those 
          in chapter 5 of the NAFTA.
          4. Section 3103(a)(2) of the ATPDEA amended section 204(b) of 
          the ATPA to provide that eligible tuna products of a 
          designated ATPDEA beneficiary country shall enter the United 
          States free of duty and free of quantitative limitations, 
          provided that the President determines that the country has 
          satisfied the requirements of section 204(b)(5)(A)(ii)(I) of 
          the ATPA, as amended, relating to the implementation of 
          procedures and requirements similar to those in chapter 5 of 
          the NAFTA.
          5. Section 203(e)(2)(A) of the ATPA (19 U.S.C. 3202(e)(2)(A)) 
          requires the President to publish in the Federal 
          eister notice of proposed action under section 
          203(e)(1) of the ATPA (19 U.S.C. 3202(e)(1)) at least 30 days 
          prior to taking such action. Section 212(e)(2)(A) of the 
          Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) (19 U.S.C. 
          2702(e)(2)(A)) requires the President to publish in the 
          Federal eister notice of proposed action under 
          section 212(e)(1) of the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2702(e)(1)) at least 
          30 days prior to taking such action.
          6. In order to implement the tariff treatment provided under 
          the ATPDEA, it is necessary to modify the Harmonized Tariff 
          Schedule of the United States (HTS).
          7. Section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2483) (1974 
          Trade Act) authorizes the President to embody in the HTS the 
          substance of the relevant provisions of that Act, and of other 
          acts affecting import treatment, and actions thereunder, 
          including the removal, modification, continuance, or 
          imposition of any rate of duty or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
          including section 604 of the 1974 Trade Act, do proclaim as 
          follows:
          (1) I have designated the following countries as ATPDEA 
          beneficiary countries pursuant to section 204(b)(6)(B) of the 
          ATPA, as amended, and have determined that these countries 
          have satisfied the requirements of section 204(b)(5)(A)(ii)(I) 
          of the ATPA, as amended, relating to the implementation of 
          procedures and requirements similar to those in chapter 5 of 
          the NAFTA:
          Bolivia

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          Colombia
          Ecuador
          Peru.
          (2) In order to provide for the preferential treatment 
          provided for in section 204(b) of the ATPA, as amended, the 
          HTS is modified as provided in the annex to this proclamation.
          (3) The functions of the President under section 203(e)(2)(A) 
          of the ATPA and section 212(e)(2)(A) of the CBERA with respect 
          to publishing notice of this proclamation are delegated to the 
          United States Trade Representative.
          (4) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with this proclamation are 
          superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
          (5) This proclamation is effective on the date of signature.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-
          first day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Proc. 7617

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Proclamation 7617 of October 31, 2002

National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Alzheimer's Disease robs its victims of their independence and 
          identity and greatly affects the lives of their loved ones. 
          This disease and other forms of dementia afflict approximately 
          50 percent of Americans age 85 and older. Due to the rapid 
          growth of our elderly population, experts expect that the 
          number of individuals who will develop this debilitating 
          illness will dramatically increase. As we observe National 
          Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, we rededicate ourselves 
          to fighting this devastating affliction and to supporting 
          Alzheimer's patients, their families, and their caregivers.
          Alzheimer's Disease harms its victims by altering the brain's 
          chemistry and disrupting signals to the brain by attacking 
          cells, nerves, and transmitters. Those who develop Alzheimer's 
          Disease may experience memory lapses, confusion, or mood 
          swings. They can also become withdrawn and depressed due to 
          lost confidence, and they have significant problems 
          communicating. These symptoms usually worsen over time and, in 
          most cases, patients eventually need help with all of their 
          daily activities.
          Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and in 
          the private sector are working to understand how Alzheimer's 
          develops. We hope that their advances will lead to new methods 
          for early diagnosis, new medications that will aid Alzheimer's 
          patients in all stages of the disease, and ultimately a cure 
          for this debilitating illness. Recent studies suggest that 
          commonly used substances, including certain vitamins and anti-
          inflammatory drugs, may help prevent Alzheimer's Disease. In 
          addition, we are working to increase understanding of the 
          genetic and nongenetic risk factors that may influence the 
          development of this disease.
          As we continue to pursue better prevention and treatment 
          regimes, we remain committed to caring for those now afflicted 
          with Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's patients generally live 
          for an average of 8 to 10 years after they are diagnosed. As 
          the disease progresses, patients require increased support 
          from families and caregivers.
          Scientists at the NIH and the Department of Veterans Affairs 
          are continuing their research to help improve patient care and 
          ease the burdens of caregivers at home and in nursing 
          facilities. The Administration on Aging is working to develop 
          best practices for serving persons with Alzheimer's disease 
          and assisting States as they attempt to improve their 
          responsiveness and the accessibility of home and community-
          based long-term care services and other support resources. My 
          Administration is increasing access to available information, 
          education, and referrals about diagnostic and treatment 
          services for those afflicted with Alzheimer's Disease.
          During National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, I commend 
          the members of our research community for their commitment to 
          improving diagnosis and treatment for Alzheimer's Disease; and 
          I encourage those suffering from or at risk for Alzheimer's to 
          participate in clinical treatment studies and therapy trials. 
          These studies and trials have been and continue

[[Page 168]]

          to be an important part of our progress against this disease. 
          I also commend the families and caregivers of individuals 
          suffering from Alzheimer's disease who provide the care and 
          support to their loved ones and carry the daily burden of this 
          tragic disease.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2002 as National Alzheimer's Disease 
          Awareness Month. I call upon the people of the United States 
          to observe this month with appropriate programs and 
          activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-
          first day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7618

Proclamation 7618 of October 31, 2002

National Diabetes Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects approximately 17 
          million Americans. During National Diabetes Month, we renew 
          our commitment to preventing and eradicating this illness.
          Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to process sugars 
          normally and can lead to adverse complications of the eyes, 
          heart, kidneys, or nerves. There are two major types of 
          diabetes, and both have debilitating effects on organ systems. 
          Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes, is an 
          autoimmune disorder that destroys insulin-producing cells in 
          the pancreas. The young people who are affected by this 
          disease must maintain their health by taking insulin and 
          carefully regulating their diets. Type 2 diabetes, which is 
          also known as ``adult onset diabetes,'' is a metabolic 
          disorder that is linked to a combination of genetics, excess 
          weight, and lack of exercise. The most common form of diabetes 
          is type 2, which comprises 95 percent of the diabetes cases in 
          our Nation. It usually occurs in adults but now also affects a 
          growing number of children who do not get enough exercise. At 
          least 16 million Americans are currently at high risk of 
          developing type 2 diabetes.
          To ensure the future health of our Nation, Americans must 
          safeguard our children and our families from diabetes by 
          encouraging good health and regular exercise. Following the 
          guidelines for good nutrition, getting enough physical 
          exercise, and maintaining proper weight can help prevent 
          diabetes and aid those suffering from it to reduce the chance 
          of severe complications associated with the disease. Doctors 
          have found that even minor weight loss in patients with type 2 
          diabetes can improve glucose control, decrease dependence on 
          medications, and enhance quality of life.
          My Administration is committed to fighting diabetes and its 
          complications through advanced research funded by the National 
          Institutes of Health

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          (NIH), improved medical treatments, and education. In fiscal 
          year 2002, the NIH dedicated approximately $781 million to 
          diabetes research. My Administration will continue to support 
          NIH's important efforts in this area as well as other 
          scientists and researchers who are working to prevent, manage, 
          and cure this disease. Through the National Diabetes Education 
          Program, a joint effort of the NIH and the Centers for Disease 
          Control and Prevention, we are educating Americans about the 
          diabetes risk factors and encouraging them to make simple 
          changes in their life that will help them stay healthy and 
          prevent this serious disease. We are also working with 
          volunteers from the American Diabetes Association, Juvenile 
          Diabetes Research Foundation, and other organizations to raise 
          awareness of diabetes in our communities and to provide 
          assistance for families who have loved ones with diabetes.
          As we observe National Diabetes Awareness Month, I encourage 
          all Americans to help fight this disease by making healthy 
          lifestyle choices and by providing support to those suffering 
          from diabetes. We can help overcome diabetes and give hope and 
          comfort to countless individuals in the United States and 
          around the world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2002 as National Diabetes Month. I call on 
          all Americans to increase their awareness of the risk factors 
          and symptoms related to diabetes and to observe this month 
          with appropriate programs and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-
          first day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7619

Proclamation 7619 of November 1, 2002

National Adoption Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Every year, thousands of American families are blessed by 
          adoption. Whether through domestic or international adoption 
          or through the adoption of children from foster care, the love 
          of compassionate families embraces children of all ages and 
          from every background. During National Adoption Month, we 
          recognize the heartfelt commitment of these good citizens, and 
          we renew our pledge to make adoption a more accessible and 
          positive path for American families.
          Children thrive in loving families where they are nurtured, 
          comforted, and protected. We are making important progress in 
          placing children in foster care with adoptive families; and 
          the overall number of children being adopted continues to 
          rise. In the past 5 years, adoptions have increased 
          dramatically; and thus far in 2002, tens of thousands of 
          children have already been adopted.

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          Twenty-three States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico 
          received adoption incentive awards in FY 2001 for increasing 
          the number of children they placed from foster care into 
          permanent adoptive homes. These recipients have reinvested 
          their bonuses to help improve their respective adoption and 
          child welfare programs. Americans also continue to welcome 
          children from other countries into their homes through 
          international adoptions. Last year, families in the United 
          States adopted over 19,000 children from around the world.
          Despite the progress we have made in increasing our adoption 
          rate, we still have much work to do. More than 130,000 
          children, ranging from toddlers to teenagers, still remain in 
          foster care awaiting adoption. While foster parents offer 
          temporary essential care, the children for whom they care need 
          the stability of a permanent family. It is often challenging 
          to find families for older children and those children who 
          have special needs. Yet they deserve a future with a nurturing 
          family.
          To help States promote adoption and support families who 
          adopt, I signed a tax relief bill last year that permanently 
          eases the financial burden on families that adopt children. 
          And in January 2002, I signed into law a bill to extend and 
          expand the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program. Through 
          this legislation, we are strengthening families by promoting 
          adoption, offering post-adoptive services to families that 
          adopt, and providing education and training vouchers to older 
          adopted children and foster youth.
          In July 2002, my Administration launched the AdoptUSKids 
          national campaign to increase awareness about adoption and its 
          role in helping all children reach their full potential. We 
          have also created the first Federal adoption photo-listing web 
          site devoted to children awaiting adoption and families who 
          adopt, www.AdoptUSKids.org. During its first year, the web 
          site will feature pictures and profiles of more than 6,500 
          children awaiting adoption, as well as a database of approved 
          adoptive families. This unique web site will help to connect 
          children from across the country with loving adoptive 
          families, and it will also serve as a great resource for all 
          adoptive families.
          On November 23, dozens of communities will gather in 
          courtrooms across the country to celebrate National Adoption 
          Day. On this momentous day, thousands of adoptions will be 
          finalized and celebrated. These efforts demonstrate our 
          Nation's dedication to ensuring that every child can thrive in 
          a secure, loving, and stable home.
          Through adoption, Americans can forever change not only a 
          child's life but also their own. By providing children in need 
          with the opportunity to grow and succeed through adoption, we 
          can help them become confident, compassionate, and successful 
          members of society.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2002 as National Adoption Month. I call on 
          all Americans to observe this month with appropriate programs 
          and activities to honor adoptive families, and to participate 
          in efforts to find permanent homes for waiting children.

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7620

Proclamation 7620 of November 1, 2002

National American Indian Heritage Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          During American Indian Heritage Month, we celebrate the rich 
          cultural traditions and proud ancestry of American Indians and 
          Alaska Natives, and we recognize the vital contributions these 
          groups have made to the strength and diversity of our society.
          American Indians and Alaska Natives have played a central role 
          in our history. In 1805 and 1806, Sakajawea, a Shoshone Indian 
          woman, helped guide Lewis and Clark on their historic 
          expedition to explore the uncharted West. This remarkable 
          journey, known as the ``Voyage of Discovery,'' would not have 
          been possible without her efforts, and today she remains a 
          proud symbol of American Indian courage and strength.
          We are also grateful to the Navajo Codetalkers for their 
          service during World War II. Participating in every assault 
          the U.S. Marines conducted in the Pacific from 1942-1945, the 
          Navajo Codetalkers relayed secret messages that helped our 
          Nation and the allies secure victory. The Congress recognized 
          these heroes by authorizing the President to award them 
          Congressional Gold Medals, which I was honored to present last 
          year. These examples of our true American spirit reflect our 
          shared history and serve as reminders of the unique heritage 
          of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Upon its completion on 
          the National Mall, the Smithsonian Institution's National 
          Museum of the American Indian will help educate all Americans 
          about the lives, contributions, and culture of our Native 
          peoples.
          Education is essential to the future success of tribal 
          communities. We will work together to ensure that our Indian 
          education programs offer high-quality instruction and job 
          training that contribute to the vitality of our Native 
          American communities. We will also work to maintain the legacy 
          of American Indians and Alaska Natives by preserving 
          irreplaceable languages and cultural traditions.
          To enhance our efforts to help Indian nations be self-
          governing, self-supporting, and self-reliant, my 
          Administration will continue to honor tribal sovereignty by 
          working on a government-to-government basis with American 
          Indians and Alaska Natives. We will honor the rights of Indian 
          tribes and work to protect and enhance tribal resources.
          My Administration is working to increase employment and expand 
          economic opportunities for all Native Americans. Several 
          Federal agencies recently participated in the National Summit 
          on Emerging Tribal Economies to help us accomplish this goal. 
          In order to build upon this effort, my Administration will 
          work to promote cooperation and coordination among

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          Federal agencies for the purpose of fostering greater economic 
          development of tribal communities. By working together on 
          important economic initiatives, we will strengthen America by 
          building a future of hope and promise for all Native 
          Americans.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2002 as National American Indian Heritage 
          Month. I call upon all Americans to commemorate this month 
          with appropriate programs and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7621

Proclamation 7621 of November 1, 2002

National Hospice Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Hospice organizations provide people who are near the end of 
          their lives with family-centered, quality care, that 
          emphasizes compassion, independence, respect, and dignity. 
          During National Hospice Month, our Nation pays tribute to 
          hospice care and the persons and organizations involved with 
          it, by recognizing and honoring its value and importance for 
          people who are dying, for their families and friends, and for 
          our communities.
          Hospice has emerged as a successful model of care that helps 
          terminally ill individuals achieve practical, physical, 
          psychological, and spiritual goals. According to the National 
          Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO), in 2001, an 
          estimated 3,200 operating hospice programs in the United 
          States admitted about 775,000 patients. Hospice care relies 
          upon a team of committed physicians, nurses, medical social 
          workers, therapists, counselors, and volunteers. This team 
          provides medical services that are designed to improve the 
          comfort of the patient, manage symptoms, provide proper 
          nutrition, and deal with other difficulties such as emotional 
          distress and grief. Hospice care also provides important 
          emotional and spiritual support to families and friends as 
          they cope with their impending loss.
          While we have made great progress in encouraging hospice care, 
          much work remains to be done to increase awareness of hospice 
          and its benefits. The NHPCO reports that in 2000, 2.4 million 
          people in our Nation died. It is estimated that one in four 
          used hospice care and services. Also, many people at the end 
          of life are referred to hospice only a few days before death. 
          By strengthening and expanding hospice programs and working to 
          promote, where appropriate, their services as a positive 
          alternative for terminally ill patients, we can make a 
          difference in the lives of countless Americans.
          As we observe National Hospice Month, we applaud hospice 
          organizations, health professionals, and other caregivers for 
          their dedication to ensuring

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          respect and quality of life for all. We also reaffirm our 
          commitment as a Nation to honoring the dignity of every person 
          and to promoting compassion and concern for our fellow 
          citizens.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2002 as National Hospice Month. I encourage 
          Americans to increase their awareness of the importance and 
          availability of hospice service and to observe this month with 
          appropriate activities and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7622

Proclamation 7622 of November 5, 2002

In Celebration of the Centennial of the West Wing of the White House, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          For 100 years, the West Wing of the White House has served as 
          the workplace of the President of the United States and his 
          staff. Now housing the Oval Office, the Roosevelt Room, 
          Cabinet Room, offices of the President's senior staff, and the 
          James C. Brady Press Briefing Room, the West Wing has become 
          the center of executive branch operation.
          Prior to 1902, the President and his staff worked out of 
          offices housed in the White House Residence, causing crowded 
          staff conditions and a lack of privacy for the President's 
          family. This overcrowding prompted planning for the 
          construction of a new wing to serve as offices for the 
          President and his staff. While plans were reviewed during 
          several Administrations, construction did not begin until 
          Theodore Roosevelt's presidency. The wing was completed in 
          1902, and the Presidential Offices were then moved from the 
          Residence to the new addition. The wing underwent a major 
          expansion in 1909, doubling its size, and further renovations 
          were done in 1929, 1934, and 1969.
          Following a Christmas Eve fire in 1929, renovations and 
          restoration displaced Herbert Hoover for several months while 
          new and improved facilities were built. In 1934 the Oval 
          Office was moved to its current location on the southeast 
          corner, over looking the Rose Garden. In the 1940's, the 
          building became known as the ``West Wing.''
          For a century, the West Wing has served as the headquarters of 
          White House staff members who work to address national and 
          international concerns, advance democracy, and secure a future 
          of opportunity for all. Government and military leaders, 
          Olympic athletes, college champions, artists, entertainers, 
          and citizens from around the world have been welcomed to the 
          West Wing to attend briefings, meetings, bill signing 
          ceremonies, and

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          countless activities that have contributed to the prosperity 
          and security of our Nation and the world. As we celebrate its 
          100th anniversary, I encourage all Americans to recognize the 
          vital role the West Wing has played in the ongoing work to 
          ensure that the United States of America remains a beacon of 
          freedom, and symbol of hope.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Wednesday, November 6, 2002, as West Wing Centennial 
          Day. I encourage all Americans to commemorate this occasion 
          with appropriate programs and activities, thereby celebrating 
          this important part of our American heritage and the values it 
          represents and upholds for our Nation and the world.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7623

Proclamation 7623 of November 6, 2002

Veterans Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America was founded on the principles of liberty, opportunity, 
          and justice for all, and on Veterans Day we recognize the men 
          and women of our Armed Forces who have valiantly defended 
          these values throughout our Nation's history. These remarkable 
          individuals have helped to make our Nation secure and to 
          advance the cause of freedom worldwide. By answering the call 
          of duty and risking their lives to protect their fellow 
          countrymen, these patriots have inspired our Nation with their 
          courage, compassion, and dedication.
          There are currently more than 25 million living American 
          veterans, many of whom put their lives on the line to preserve 
          our freedoms. Our veterans served on the land, at sea, and in 
          the air, from the shores of Omaha Beach and the jungles of 
          Vietnam, to the sands of the Persian Gulf, the mountains of 
          Afghanistan, and many other battlefields around the globe. 
          Through each of these challenges, the members of the Army, 
          Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard have protected our 
          country and liberated millions of people around the world from 
          the threats of tyranny and terror.
          Our proud veterans have also helped to shape the American 
          character. They have given us an extraordinary legacy of 
          patriotism and honor, and their service represents the highest 
          form of citizenship. So that young Americans can better 
          understand the commitment and sacrifice of these heroes in 
          securing the blessings of liberty, I ask all schools to 
          observe November 10 through November 16, 2002, as National 
          Veterans Awareness Week. I encourage educators to invite 
          veterans to teach our young people about their experiences. By 
          sharing their knowledge on some of the most proud

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          and dramatic moments in our history, they can help educate and 
          inspire a new generation of Americans.
          On the observance of Veterans Day in 1954, President Dwight D. 
          Eisenhower called on all citizens to not only remember ``the 
          sacrifices of all those who fought so valiantly...'' but also 
          to rededicate themselves ``to the task of promoting an 
          enduring peace....'' Today, almost 50 years later, we remember 
          the dedication of our veterans, and resolve ourselves to 
          upholding their legacy of justice, liberty, and opportunity 
          for all.
          In recognition of the contributions our service men and women 
          have made to the cause of peace and freedom around the world, 
          the Congress has provided (5 U.S.C. 6103(a)) that November 11 
          of each year shall be set aside as a legal public holiday to 
          honor veterans.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim November 11, 2002, as 
          Veterans Day and urge all Americans to observe November 10 
          through November 16, 2002, as National Veterans Awareness 
          Week. I urge all Americans to recognize the valor and 
          sacrifice of our veterans through appropriate public 
          ceremonies and private prayers. I call upon Federal, State, 
          and local officials to display the flag of the United States 
          and to encourage and participate in patriotic activities in 
          their communities. I invite civic and fraternal organizations, 
          places of worship, schools, businesses, unions, and the media 
          to support this national observance with suitable 
          commemorative expressions and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7624

Proclamation 7624 of November 8, 2002

National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our National Guard and Reserve units comprise 38 percent of 
          America's military forces, and we are grateful for the 
          commitment of these brave men and women. During National 
          Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, we pay tribute 
          to those serving our Nation in the National Guard and Reserve, 
          and to the civilian employers whose continued support enables 
          our Reserve component soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines, and 
          coast guardsmen to defend our country with honor and 
          distinction.
          Through their service, National Guard and Reserve personnel 
          play an important role in our efforts to advance democracy, 
          peace, and freedom across our Nation and around the world. 
          These dedicated men and women train vigorously and work 
          closely with our active-duty forces, serving as equal partners 
          in our integrated Armed Forces. As our need for their efforts 
          ex

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          pands, these citizen-soldiers will spend more time away from 
          their families, homes, and workplaces protecting our Nation 
          and the ideals that make us strong.
          As we face new challenges and welcome new opportunities, the 
          continued support of patriotic employers remains vital to the 
          success of our National Guard and Reserve. Our volunteer 
          National Guardsmen and Reservists rely on their employers for 
          essential support and encouragement that often come at the 
          employer's expense. These employers reflect the spirit of our 
          Nation, and during this week I join with members of our Armed 
          Forces and all our citizens in recognizing those who serve in 
          our National Guard and Reserve and all who support them, and 
          all Americans whose contributions and sacrifices help our 
          military remain the finest fighting force in the world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 10 through November 16, 2002, as National 
          Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week. I encourage 
          all Americans to join me in expressing our heartfelt thanks to 
          the civilian employers of the members of our National Guard 
          and Reserve for their extraordinary sacrifices on behalf of 
          our Nation. I also call upon State and local officials, 
          private organizations, businesses, and all military commanders 
          to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and 
          activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth 
          day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7625

Proclamation 7625 of November 8, 2002

World Freedom Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On World Freedom Day, the United States joins with the nations 
          of the world that are dedicated to liberty and democratic 
          values in commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall, which 
          occurred on November 9, 1989. As we remember this historic 
          event, we renew our commitment to advancing democracy, peace, 
          and freedom for all throughout the world.
          The fall of the Berlin Wall ushered in a new era of liberty 
          and self-determination in Central and Eastern Europe. In the 
          years that followed this remarkable event, the citizens of 
          formerly Communist states participated in open elections, 
          secured their common rights to free speech, and claimed other 
          fundamental freedoms. This triumph for democracy demonstrated 
          that tyranny is temporary, and that liberty is the universal 
          and guiding goal for all mankind.
          Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, we have made great progress 
          in encouraging free and open societies on every continent. But 
          challenges remain.

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          Today, too many people still suffer at the hands of dictators 
          who deny liberty and support activities and organizations that 
          aim to disrupt the freedom of other countries.
          On World Freedom Day, we celebrate freedom and its capacity to 
          improve lives around the world. We also honor the people of 
          the former Soviet bloc countries who fought against tyranny, 
          and we recognize those who continue the struggle for freedom 
          worldwide. As we face new challenges and welcome new 
          opportunities, we remain committed to protecting our freedom 
          and helping others realize their dreams of liberty.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 9, 2002, as World Freedom Day. I call upon 
          the people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate ceremonies and activities and to reaffirm their 
          dedication to freedom and democracy for all.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth 
          day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7626

Proclamation 7626 of November 13, 2002

To Implement Modifications to the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act and 
the African Growth and Opportunity Act

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. Section 3107 of the Trade Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-210) 
          amended the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (Title II of 
          the Trade Act of 2000, Public Law 106-200) (CBERA) to modify 
          the type and quantity of textile and apparel articles eligible 
          for the preferential tariff treatment now accorded to 
          designated beneficiary Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act 
          (CBTPA) countries.
          2. Section 3108 of the Trade Act of 2002 amended the African 
          Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of the Trade Act of 2000, 
          Public Law 106-200) (AGOA) to modify the type and quantity of 
          textile and apparel articles eligible for the preferential 
          tariff treatment now accorded to designated beneficiary sub-
          Saharan African countries.
          3. In order to implement the tariff treatment provided under 
          sections 3107 and 3108 of the Trade Act of 2002, it is 
          necessary to modify the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the 
          United States (HTS).
          4. Section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2483) (1974 
          Trade Act) authorizes the President to embody in the HTS the 
          substance of the relevant provisions of that Act, and of other 
          acts affecting import treatment, and actions thereunder, 
          including the removal, modification, continuance, or 
          imposition of any rate of duty or other import restriction.

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          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          section 604 of the 1974 Trade Act, do proclaim that:
          (1) In order to provide the preferential treatment provided 
          for in section 213(b)(2)(A) of the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 
          2703(b)(2)(A)), as amended by section 3107(a) of the Trade Act 
          of 2002, the HTS is modified as provided in Annex I to this 
          proclamation.
          (2) In order to provide for the preferential treatment 
          provided for in section 112(b) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 
          3721(b)), as amended by section 3108(a) of the Trade Act of 
          2002, the HTS is modified as provided in Annex II to this 
          proclamation.
          (3) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with this proclamation are 
          superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
          (4) This proclamation is effective with respect to eligible 
          articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, 
          on or after August 6, 2002; except that section I of Annex I 
          to this proclamation relating to the dyeing, printing, and 
          finishing of fabrics shall be effective with respect to 
          eligible articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for 
          consumption, on or after September 1, 2002; and except that 
          section II of Annex I and Annex II relating to increases in 
          the amount of certain articles eligible for duty-free 
          treatment shall be effective with respect to articles entered, 
          or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after the 
          dates provided in such annex sections.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          thirteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Proc. 7627

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Proclamation 7627 of November 14, 2002

America Recycles Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Americans are dedicated to protecting our land, ensuring that 
          our air is clean, and preserving the purity of our water. To 
          help fulfill these responsibilities, government, businesses, 
          community organizations, and every citizen must work together 
          to serve as good stewards of all of our natural resources. On 
          America Recycles Day, we renew our commitment to preserving 
          our resources by recycling and using products made with 
          recycled materials.
          Recycling has become one of the most successful environmental 
          initiatives in our Nation's history. In 1990, Americans 
          recycled or composted 34 million tons of material. In the 
          following decade, this number more than doubled to nearly 70 
          million tons. These efforts are helping to safeguard our 
          environme by reducing the need for landfills and incinerators. 
          Last year, the Federal Government contributed to these 
          important goals by purchasing paper, retread tires, re-refined 
          oil, concrete, insulation, and other products containing 
          recycled materials.
          Our Nation also continues to develop innovative ways to 
          reduce, reuse, and recycle our waste. Although we have made 
          significant progress, much work still remains. Americans 
          generate more than 230 million tons of solid waste each year. 
          Simple measures can help communities, businesses, and 
          individuals decrease waste and extend the use of our natural 
          resources. Individuals and families can participate in the 
          recycling programs offered in their neighborhoods.
          At home and in school, parents and teachers can educate 
          children about the benefits of recycling and the importance of 
          caring for our environment. By purchasing products made from 
          recycled materials, American consumers provide economic 
          incentives for businesses to collect, produce, and market more 
          products that are recycled and recyclable. Our recycling and 
          reuse industry provides approximately 1.4 million jobs, 
          producing billions of dollars in annual revenues that 
          contribute to the prosperity of our country. By recycling, we 
          conserve our valuable resources, protect our air and water 
          from harmful pollutants, and strengthen our economy.
          On America Recycles Day, I encourage all Americans to 
          rededicate themselves to using our resources more wisely by 
          reusing and recycling the materials they purchase. Through 
          these efforts, we help make our communities more livable, our 
          businesses more competitive, and our Nation a healthier place 
          for future generations to enjoy.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 15, 2002, as America Recycles Day. I call 
          upon the people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate programs and activities.

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          fourteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7628

Proclamation 7628 of November 21, 2002

Thanksgiving Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          In celebration of Thanksgiving Day 1902, President Theodore 
          Roosevelt wrote, ``Rarely has any people enjoyed greater 
          prosperity than we are now enjoying. For this we render 
          heartfelt and solemn thanks to the Giver of Good; and we seek 
          to praise Him--not by words only--but by deeds, by the way in 
          which we do our duty to ourselves and to our fellow men.'' 
          President Roosevelt's words gracefully remind us that, as 
          citizens of this great Nation, we have much for which to be 
          thankful; and his timeless call inspires us to meet our 
          responsibilities to help those in need and to promote greater 
          understanding at home and abroad.
          As the Pilgrims did almost four centuries ago, we gratefully 
          give thanks this year for the beauty, abundance, and 
          opportunity this great land offers. We also thank God for the 
          blessings of freedom and prosperity; and, with gratitude and 
          humility, we acknowledge the importance of faith in our lives.
          Throughout the Thanksgiving holiday, let us renew our 
          commitment to make our country and our world better. As we 
          welcome new opportunities and face new challenges, we are 
          thankful for the resolve and generosity of so many of our 
          people who are touching countless hearts and souls through 
          thoughtful acts of kindness. By answering the call to serve 
          others, Americans are building a culture of service that 
          strengthens our Nation. We also honor and salute the selfless 
          sacrifice of the brave men and women of our Armed Forces who 
          are defending our lives and liberty at home and abroad with 
          skill, honor, and dedication.
          This Thanksgiving, we recognize the ties of friendship and 
          respect that bind us together. And we renew our pledge to 
          uphold the timeless principles of freedom, equality, and 
          opportunity that have made our country into a great Nation. By 
          working together, we will continue to build mutual trust, 
          peace, and hope for all across this land and around the world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Thursday, November 28, 2002, as a National Day of 
          Thanksgiving. I encourage Americans to gather in their homes, 
          places of worship, and community centers to share the spirit 
          of understanding and unity, and of prayer, as we express our 
          thanks for the many blessings we enjoy. I also encourage 
          Americans to reach out in friendship to the larger family of 
          humankind.

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          first day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7629

Proclamation 7629 of November 22, 2002

National Farm-City Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Agriculture has always been a cornerstone of our Nation's way 
          of life. As wise stewards and innovative entrepreneurs, our 
          dedicated farmers and ranchers improve our well-being by 
          working to ensure a healthy and abundant agricultural supply. 
          To succeed in this important enterprise, our farmers rely on 
          essential partnerships with urban communities to supply, sell, 
          and deliver finished products across the country and around 
          the world. During National Farm-City Week, we recognize the 
          importance of this cooperative network to the success of 
          America's agricultural industry.
          Farming was America's first industry. Today, this industry 
          provides us with many of the necessities of life, such as 
          food, clothing, and,increasingly, fuel for our energy needs. 
          Agriculture employs more than 24 million workers including 
          farmers, shippers, processors, marketers, grocers, truck 
          drivers, inspectors, and others who annually contribute more 
          than $1.3 trillion to our gross domestic product. In the 
          international market, our farmers export more than $50 billion 
          in products that help feed people in countries around the 
          world. As we welcome new opportunities for trade, the hard 
          work and successful cooperation between farmers and city 
          workers will continue to play a vital role in our Nation's 
          success and will continue to be a critical resource for 
          countless people here at home and around the globe.
          My Administration remains committed to helping the millions of 
          Americans who work in the agricultural industry. Earlier this 
          year, I signed the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 
          2002 to support these important workers and to strengthen the 
          farm economy. This Act will help our farmers and ranchers by 
          providing financial assistance that encourages sound 
          conservation and environmental practices, and promotes open 
          trade. And to expand opportunities for our farmers to compete 
          in the inter national marketplace and encourage further 
          economic growth, my Administration is committed to opening 
          international markets and reducing tariffs and other barriers 
          to food distribution throughout the world.
          Farm-city collaborations help maintain and improve our 
          Nation's food supply and contribute to a better quality of 
          life for countless citizens. With this Farm-City Week 
          observance, we commend the many Americans whose hard work and 
          ingenuity reflect the true spirit of America and help ensure a 
          prosperous future for all.

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          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 22 through November 28, 2002, as National 
          Farm-City Week. I call upon all Americans, in rural and urban 
          communities, to join in recognizing the accomplishments of all 
          those who work together to produce and promote America's 
          agricultural abundance. I also encourage citizens to 
          strengthen our understanding of the American farm-city 
          partnership by participating in appropriate community events 
          and celebrations.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          second day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7630

Proclamation 7630 of November 22, 2002

National Family Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Families provide a loving environment where children can 
          flourish; and they help ensure that cultural traditions and 
          timeless values are passed on to future generations. During 
          National Family Week, we reaffirm the importance of families 
          as a vital source of strength, confidence, and compassion for 
          all of our citizens.
          Strong families play a critical role in developing the 
          character of our Nation. They teach children important 
          standards of conduct such as accepting responsibility, 
          respecting others, and distinguishing the difference between 
          right and wrong. By helping America's youth to grow into 
          mature, thoughtful, and caring citizens, families help make 
          our communities and our Nation safer and more civilized.
          Raising a child requires sacrifice, commitment, and time; and 
          we must expand our efforts to strengthen and empower families 
          so that they can prepare children more effectively for the 
          challenges of adulthood. We know that by helping couples to 
          build and sustain strong, two-parent families, we will 
          contribute to the well-being of our children and the strength 
          of our society. Many single parents, grandparents, and others 
          also raise their children in difficult circumstances, and 
          these dedicated individuals deserve our respect and support.
          My Administration is firmly committed to helping our Nation's 
          youth reach their full potential; and one of the most 
          important ways to do this is by strengthening America's 
          families. Earlier this year, I signed bipartisan legislation 
          to expand the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program, 
          which provides States with vital resources to help families 
          stay together and to promote adoption. The Program seeks to 
          prevent child abuse and neglect, avoid removing children from 
          their homes, support family reunification services, and help 
          those children who are unable to return home by pro

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          viding crucial adoption and post-adoptive services. These 
          important resources benefit families across our Nation and 
          hold the promise of a bright future for countless young 
          people.
          My welfare reform agenda also will strengthen families. We 
          plan on continuing to provide historically high levels of 
          support for childcare and child support enforcement. And we 
          will continue to encourage strong marriages and two-parent 
          married families as a worthy policy goal.
          No marriage or family is perfect. But through education and 
          counseling programs that our faith-based, charitable, and 
          government communities can provide, we will support couples as 
          they work to build and sustain healthy marriages and strive to 
          provide a better quality of life for their children. By 
          promoting responsible child-rearing and strong families, my 
          Administration will work towards the goal that every child has 
          the opportunity to grow up in a safe and loving home.
          As families come together to celebrate this Thanksgiving, I 
          encourage every member of a family in America to recognize the 
          important role every other family member plays in making their 
          lives whole and more complete. And as we give thanks for the 
          love, commitment, and encouragement our families provide, we 
          must recommit ourselves to strengthen our Nation by 
          strengthening our families in ways that government never can.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 24 through November 30, 2002, as National 
          Family Week. I invite the States, communities, and people of 
          the United States to join together in observing this day with 
          appropriate ceremonies and activities to honor our Nation's 
          families.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          second day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7631

Proclamation 7631 of November 27, 2002

World AIDS Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The HIV/AIDS pandemic has taken the lives of more than 20 
          million people and is projected to take millions more. On 
          World AIDS Day, countries around the world are united to 
          support the individuals, families, and communities affected by 
          this disease, and to renew our commitment to preventing the 
          spread of HIV/AIDS, developing and delivering more effective 
          treatments, and finding a cure.
          To support our struggle against HIV/AIDS, we must call upon 
          the compassion, energy, and generosity of all people. Through 
          their service and dedication, faith-based and volunteer 
          organizations are providing local and

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          global communities with strategies to confront the HIV/AIDS 
          pandemic. By responding to the needs of their neighbors, these 
          organizations and individual citizens offer invaluable support 
          and hope to countless people. These organizations also help 
          overcome dangerous barriers to HIV prevention, care, and 
          treatment such as the stigma and discrimination that often 
          attaches to those suffering from HIV/AIDS. By raising 
          awareness and promoting acceptance of people living with HIV/
          AIDS, we help improve the lives of millions of people around 
          the world and demonstrate the compassion of our Nation.
          My Administration remains strongly committed to supporting 
          research that treats those living with HIV/AIDS, prevents the 
          spread of this disease, and that can develop a cure. For this 
          coming year, my Administration has requested $2.9 billion for 
          research on vaccines and treatments to combat the disease. 
          This is a significant increase over prior year funding for 
          these efforts, and expresses my Administration's commitment to 
          helping find a cure.
          To help stop the global spread of AIDS we must prevent mothers 
          from passing the HIV virus to their children. My 
          Administration has committed $500 million to the new 
          International Mother and Child HIV Prevention Initiative, 
          which will focus on countries in Africa and the Caribbean 
          where the problem is the most severe. This Initiative seeks to 
          treat 1 million women annually and to reduce mother-to-child 
          transmission of HIV/AIDS by 40 percent within 5 years. It also 
          increases the availability of preventative care and drug 
          treatment therapy, and seeks to improve critical healthcare 
          delivery systems. The International Mother and Child 
          Prevention Initiative will save thousands of lives, and assist 
          our vital effort to overcome the global devastation of HIV/
          AIDS.
          The United States intends to provide more than $1.3 billion in 
          2003 to international efforts to combat HIV/AIDS, a 30 percent 
          increase over the prior year's commitment. I was very pleased 
          to help launch the Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, 
          Tuberculosis, and Malaria together with U.N. Secretary-General 
          Annan and Nigerian President Obasanjo. My Administration has 
          since then pledged $500 million to the Global Fund, and we are 
          committed to further support the Fund as it continues to 
          demonstrate its success.
          On World AIDS Day, I urge world leaders and citizens to join 
          the efforts to combat HIV/AIDS. By working together, we can 
          provide hope and comfort to all those affected by this 
          devastating disease.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim December 1, 2002, as World AIDS Day. I invite the 
          Governors of the States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, 
          officials of other territories subject to the jurisdiction of 
          the United States, and the American people to join me in 
          reaffirming our commitment to combating HIV/AIDS. I encourage 
          all Americans to participate in appropriate commemorative 
          programs and ceremonies in houses of worship, workplaces, and 
          other community centers to remember those who have lost their 
          lives to this deadly disease and to comfort and support those 
          living with and impacted by HIV/AIDS.

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          seventh day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          two, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7632

Proclamation 7632 of December 3, 2002

National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Drunk and drugged driving threatens the safety of millions of 
          Americans. Reducing the incidence of impaired driving remains 
          one of our Nation's greatest challenges. As we gather with 
          family and friends to celebrate this holiday season, I urge 
          all Americans to observe National Drunk and Drugged Driving 
          Prevention Month by making responsible choices that will help 
          keep our roads safer for all.
          Drunk driving accidents take a life every 30 minutes and 
          injure someone every 2 minutes. In the last 24 months, 41 
          percent of those killed in traffic accidents, which is almost 
          35,000 Americans, have been killed in alcohol-related crashes. 
          To better protect our citizens and decrease the number of 
          drunk and drugged driving traffic accidents, we must work 
          together to educate our communities about the seriousness of 
          this offense and we must raise awareness of its devastating 
          consequences.
          My Administration supports efforts to save lives and prevent 
          injuries resulting from impaired driving. The Department of 
          Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety 
          Administration (NHTSA) works with local law enforcement 
          agencies that conduct sobriety checkpoints and saturation 
          patrols; and it also supports State efforts to pass 
          legislation that increases punishment for those who drink and 
          drive.
          The NHTSA and its State and local partners are dedicated to 
          eliminating impaired driving and stopping the associated 
          injuries and fatalities. The NHTSA's national safety 
          campaign--You Drink & Drive. You Lose.--aims to lower 
          America's impaired driving fatality rate to less than 11,000 
          people per year by the year 2005. By providing its partner 
          organizations with guidance on overcoming this national 
          challenge, this important campaign is assisting local law 
          enforcement agencies, community groups and organizations, 
          public health professionals, and businesses to coordinate and 
          address this vital issue.
          As part of the You Drink & Drive. You Lose. campaign, law 
          enforcement agencies across the Nation will be out in full 
          force from December 20, 2002, to January 5, 2003, to stop 
          drunk and drugged driving. During the holiday season, 
          organizations and citizens throughout the country also will be 
          working to prevent this deadly activity by encouraging 
          citizens to choose sober, designated drivers, keep impaired 
          family members and friends off our roads, report drivers who 
          are under the influence, and edu

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          cate young people about safe, alcohol- and drug-free driving 
          behavior. Through cooperation and determination, every 
          American can do something to make a difference and help stop 
          impaired drivers before they harm others.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim December 2002 as National Drunk and Drugged Driving 
          Prevention Month. I call upon State and community leaders to 
          join the You Drink & Drive. You Lose. national mobilization 
          between December 20, 2002, and January 5, 2003. I also urge 
          all Americans to work to enhance the safety of our Nation's 
          roadways and protect the well-being of our drivers, 
          passengers, and pedestrians during this holiday season and 
          every day of the year.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this third day 
          of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7633

Proclamation 7633 of December 6, 2002

National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Early on a quiet Sunday morning on December 7, 1941, aircraft 
          of the Empire of Japan, without provocation or warning, 
          attacked the United States forces at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 
          More than 2,400 Americans died that day and another 1,100 were 
          wounded, in what was the start of a long and terrible war 
          against the forces of fascism, tyranny, and imperialism.
          Out of that surprise attack grew a steadfast resolve to defend 
          the freedoms on which our Nation was founded. From the ruins 
          of Pearl Harbor, America built the strongest Navy in the world 
          and emerged as a superpower to lead a coalition of allies to 
          victory over evil in World War II. Our Soldiers, Sailors, 
          Airmen, and Marines fought and won many crucial battles, 
          defeating history's most powerful tyranny. Our Nation must 
          always remember the heroism, dedication, and sacrifice of 
          those who served. Their courage in battle continues to inspire 
          us today as our Armed Forces fight against terrorism in 
          Afghanistan and around the world.
          The men and women who fought for America at Pearl Harbor not 
          only protected our Nation, but also helped to shape its 
          character. Nine Americans who fell had Navy ships named after 
          them, and 15 men earned the Medal of Honor for bravery, with 
          10 of them awarded the Medal posthumously. As we remember the 
          lost on what President Franklin Delano Roosevelt called ``a 
          date which will live in infamy,'' I encourage our veterans to 
          share their experiences with our youth so that new generations 
          can learn about this important moment in our history.
          Today, we salute our veterans of Pearl Harbor and World War 
          II, whose sacrifices saved democracy during a dark hour. In 
          their memory, a new

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          generation of our Armed Forces goes forward against new 
          enemies in a new era. Once again, we pledge to defend freedom, 
          secure our homeland, and advance peace around the world. 
          Americans have been tested before, and our Nation will triumph 
          again.
          The Congress, by Public Law 103-308, as amended, has 
          designated December 7, 2002, as ``National Pearl Harbor 
          Remembrance Day.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim December 7, 2002, as 
          National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. I encourage all 
          Americans to observe this solemn occasion with appropriate 
          ceremonies and activities. I urge all Federal agencies, 
          interested organizations, groups, and individuals to fly the 
          flag of the United States at half-staff this and every 
          December 7 in honor of those who died as a result of their 
          service at Pearl Harbor.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day 
          of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7634

Proclamation 7634 of December 9, 2002

Human Rights Day, Bill of Rights Day, and Human Rights Week, 2002

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America's commitment to individual freedom and democracy 
          provides the foundation for our society. As a Nation, we 
          cherish the values of free speech, equal justice, and 
          religious tolerance, and we steadfastly oppose the forces of 
          cruelty, injustice, and tyranny. Since the founding of our 
          country, the Bill of Rights has served to guide our people and 
          our Government to ensure basic human rights and liberties. The 
          United States is a country where all citizens have the 
          opportunity to voice their opinions, practice their faith, and 
          enjoy the blessings of freedom.
          Today, countless people around the world cannot exercise their 
          basic human rights. America has pledged to support all 
          individuals who seek to secure their unalienable rights. 
          Across the globe, we will continue to stand with those who 
          fight for fundamental freedoms, whether they be democracy 
          activists in Cuba, university faculty and students in Iran, 
          opposition leaders in Zimbabwe, journalists in Belarus, or the 
          people of North Korea who have never known freedom. We are 
          leading a coalition of more than 90 nations to defeat terror 
          and to secure liberty and opportunity for people throughout 
          the world. Our fight against oppression demonstrates our 
          Nation's dedication to a future of hope and understanding for 
          all people. One year after the liberation of Afghanistan from 
          the clutches of terror and tyranny, we are helping the Afghan 
          people build institutions of democracy and tolerance that are 
          essential to the country's future stability, security, and 
          prosperity. And I hope the brave people of Iraq will soon 
          realize their own dreams of peace and freedom.

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          In commemorating Human Rights Day, Bill of Rights Day, and 
          Human Rights Week, we renew our pledge to uphold the vital 
          principles of freedom, equality, and opportunity that have 
          made our Nation strong. By working together to advance the 
          rights of all people, we help to build mutual trust and peace 
          for all individuals across this land and around the world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim December 10, 2002, as Human Rights Day; December 15, 
          2002, as Bill of Rights Day; and the week beginning December 
          10, 2002, as Human Rights Week. I call upon the people of the 
          United States to honor the legacy of human rights passed down 
          to us from previous generations and to resolve that such 
          liberties will prevail in our Nation and throughout the world.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7635

Proclamation 7635 of December 16, 2002

Wright Brothers Day, 2002

By the President of the United States of America



          Throughout our Nation's history, Americans have contributed to 
          important technological breakthroughs that have improved the 
          quality of life for countless individuals. On December 17, 
          1903, near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Orville and Wilbur 
          Wright achieved the first successfully sustained and 
          controlled flight with a heavier-than-air, engine-powered 
          aircraft. In the 99 years since that revolutionary event, 
          mankind has flown across oceans, broken the sound barrier, 
          launched satellites, and landed on the moon. On Wright 
          Brothers Day, we celebrate the vision and determination of 
          these innovators whose remarkable achievements changed the 
          world forever.
          The first successful powered flight on the morning of December 
          17, 1903, lasted only 12 seconds and spanned approximately 120 
          feet; but the Wright brothers' ideas and design led to 
          countless advances in aviation. Between 1899 and 1905, they 
          constructed a total of seven aircraft, and through this 
          extensive research and experimentation, Orville and Wilbur 
          Wright established the foundation of modern aeronautics.
          The airplane has played a critical role in improving our 
          national defense, our economy, and our Nation. It has enabled 
          trade to thrive, strengthened our economic security, and 
          fostered friendship and goodwill throughout the world. Today, 
          Americans rely on airplanes to deliver emergency treatment to 
          the sick or injured, bring families together, and link us to 
          every corner of the globe.
          The United States remains committed to supporting progress in 
          technology that secures air travel, enhances our national 
          defense, and ensures the suc

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          cess and prosperity of our country. Inspired by the 
          extraordinary accomplishments of the Wright brothers, our 
          Nation will continue to explore new ideas, improve technology, 
          and work for a brighter future for all.
          The Congress, by a joint resolution approved December 17, 1963 
          (77 Stat. 402; 36 U.S.C. 143) as amended, has designated 
          December 17 of each year as ``Wright Brothers Day'' and has 
          authorized and requested the President to issue annually a 
          proclamation inviting the people of the United States to 
          observe that day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim December 17, 2002, as 
          Wright Brothers Day. Through their courage and willingness to 
          take risks, the Wright brothers reflect the true American 
          character.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth 
          day of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

[[Page 195]]

Title 3--The President

Executive Orders




                              EXECUTIVE ORDERS




EO 13252

Executive Order 13252 of January 7, 2002

Exclusions From the Federal Labor-Management Relations Program

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          section 7103(b)(1) of title 5, United States Code, and in 
          order to exempt certain subdivisions of the Department of 
          Justice from coverage under the Federal Labor-Management 
          Relations Program, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Determinations. The subdivisions 
          of the Department of Justice set forth in section 2 of this 
          order are hereby determined to have as a primary function 
          intelligence, counterintelligence, investigative, or national 
          security work. It is further determined that chapter 71 of 
          title 5, United States Code, cannot be applied to these 
          subdivisions in a manner consistent with national security 
          requirements and considerations.
          e. 2. Amendment of Executive Order 12171. 
          Executive Order 12171 of November 19, 1979, as amended, is 
          further amended by adding to the end of section 1-209 the 
          following new subsections:
          ``(c) United States Attorneys' Offices.
          (d) Criminal Division.
          (e) INTERPOL--U.S. National Central Bureau.
          (f) National Drug Intelligence Center.
          (g) Office of Intelligence Policy and Review.''

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 January 7, 2002.

EO 13253

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Executive Order 13253 of January 16, 2002

Amendment to Executive Order 13223, Ordering the Ready Reserve of the Armed 
Forces to Active Duty and Delegating Certain Authorities to the Secretary 
of Defense and the Secretary of Transportation

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.) and section 
          301 of title 3, United States Code, and in furtherance of 
          Proclamation 7463 of September 14, 2001, Declaration of 
          National Emergency by Reason of Certain Terrorist Attacks, 
          which declared a national emergency by reason of the terrorist 
          attacks on the World Trade Center, New York, New York, and the 
          Pentagon, and the continuing and immediate threat of further 
          attacks on the United States, and in order to provide the 
          Secretary of Transportation, with respect to the Coast Guard, 
          with the authority to manage personnel requirements in a 
          manner consistent with the authorization provided to the 
          Secretary of Defense in Executive Order 13223 of September 14, 
          2001, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Section 5 of Executive Order 
          13223 is amended by adding at the end: ``The Secretary of 
          Transportation is further designated and empowered, without 
          the approval, ratification or any other action by the 
          President, to exercise the authority vested in the President 
          by sections 123 and 123a of title 10, United States Code, and 
          sections 149 (detail members to assist foreign governments), 
          275(a) (suspension of provisions on selection, promotion, or 
          involuntary separation of officers), and 722 (administration 
          of reserve forces) of title 14, United States Code, as invoked 
          by section 2 of Executive Order 13223.''
          e. 2. Section 7 of Executive Order 13223 
          is deleted and revised to read as follows: ``Based upon my 
          determination under 10 U.S.C. 2201(c) that it is necessary to 
          increase (subject to limits imposed by law) the number of 
          members of the armed forces on active duty for the Department 
          of Defense beyond the number for which funds are provided in 
          the appropriation Act for the Department of Defense, which, by 
          virtue of 14 U.S.C. 652, applies to the Department of 
          Transportation with respect to the Coast Guard, the Secretary 
          of Defense and the Secretary of Transportation may provide for 
          the cost of such additional members under their respective 
          jurisdictions as an excepted expense under section 11(a) of 
          title 41, United States Code.''

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 January 16, 2002.

EO 13254

Executive Order 13254 of January 29, 2002

Establishing the USA Freedom Corps

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:

[[Page 197]]

          etion 1. Policy. Building on our Nation's 
          rich tradition of citizen service, this Administration's 
          policy is to foster a culture of responsibility, service, and 
          citizenship by promoting, expanding, and enhancing public 
          service opportunities for all Americans and by making these 
          opportunities readily available to citizens from all 
          geographic areas, professions, and walks of life. More 
          specifically, this Administration encourages all Americans to 
          serve their country for the equivalent of at least 2 years 
          (4,000 hours) over their lifetimes. Toward those ends, the 
          executive departments, agencies, and offices constituting the 
          USA Freedom Corps shall coordinate and strengthen Federal and 
          other service opportunities, including opportunities for 
          participation in homeland security preparedness and response, 
          other areas of public and social service, and international 
          service. The executive branch departments, agencies, and 
          offices also will work with State and local governments and 
          private entities to foster and encourage participation in 
          public and social service programs, as appropriate.
          e. 2. USA Freedom Corps. The USA Freedom 
          Corps shall be an interagency initiative, bringing together 
          executive branch departments, agencies, and offices with 
          public service programs and components, including but not 
          limited to programs and components with the following 
          functions:
          (i) recruiting, mobilizing, and encouraging all Americans to 
          engage in public service;
          (ii) providing concrete opportunities to engage in public 
          service;
          (iii) providing the public with access to information about 
          public service opportunities through Federal programs and 
          elsewhere; and
          (iv) providing recognition and awards to volunteers and other 
          participants in public service programs.
          e. 3. USA Freedom Corps Council. (a) 
          Establishment and Mission. There shall be a USA Freedom Corps 
          Council (Council) chaired by the President and composed of 
          heads of executive branch departments, agencies, and offices, 
          which shall have the following functions:

  (i) serving as a forum for Federal officials responsible for public 
service programs to coordinate and improve public service programs and 
activities administered by the executive branch;

  (ii) working to encourage all Americans to engage in public service, 
whether through Federal programs or otherwise;

  (iii) advising the President and heads of executive branch departments, 
agencies, and offices concerning the optimization of current Federal 
programs to enhance public service opportunities;

  (iv) coordinating public outreach and publicity of citizen service 
opportunities provided by Federal programs;

  (v) encouraging schools, universities, private public service 
organizations, and other non-Federal entities to foster and reward public 
service;

  (vi) studying the availability of public service opportunities provided 
by the Federal Government and elsewhere; and

  (vii) tracking progress in participation in public service programs.

          (b) Membership. In addition to the Chair, the members of the 
          Council shall be the heads of the executive branch 
          departments, agencies, and of

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          fices listed below, or their designees, and such other 
          officers of the executive branch as the President may from 
          time to time designate. Every member of the Council or 
          designee shall be a full-time or permanent part-time officer 
          or employee of the Federal Government. Members shall not be 
          compensated for their service on the Council in addition to 
          the salaries they receive as employees or officers of the 
          Federal Government.

  (i) Vice President;

  (ii) Attorney General;

  (iii) Secretary of State;

  (iv) Secretary of Health and Human Services;

  (v) Secretary of Commerce;

  (vi) Secretary of Education;

  (vii) Secretary of Veterans Affairs;

  (viii) Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency;

  (ix) Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation for National and 
Community Service;

  (x) Director of the Peace Corps;

  (xi) Administrator of the United States Agency for International 
Development;

  (xii) Director of the USA Freedom Corps Office; and

  (xiii) Director of the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives.

          (c) Chair. The President shall be the Chair of the USA Freedom 
          Corps Council, and in his absence, the Vice President shall 
          serve as Chair. The Director of the USA Freedom Corps Office 
          may, at the President's direction, preside over meetings of 
          the Council in the President's and Vice President's absence.
          (d) Honorary Co-Chair. The President may, from time to time, 
          designate an Honorary Co-Chair or Co-Chairs, who shall serve 
          in an advisory role to the Council and to the President on 
          matters considered by the Council. Any Honorary Co-Chair shall 
          be a full-time or permanent part-time employee or officer of 
          the Federal Government.
          (e) Meetings. The Council shall meet at the President's 
          direction. The Director of the USA Freedom Corps Office shall 
          be responsible, at the President's direction, for determining 
          the agenda, ensuring that necessary papers are prepared, and 
          recording Council actions and Presidential decisions.
          (f) Responsibilities of Executive Branch Departments, 
          Agencies, and Offices.

  (i) Members of the Council shall remain responsible for overseeing the 
programs administered by their respective departments, agencies, and 
offices. Each such department, agency, and office will retain its authority 
and responsibility to administer those programs according to law;

  (ii) Each executive branch department, agency, or office with 
responsibility for programs relating to the functions and missions of the 
USA Freedom Corps as described in section 2 of this order shall be 
responsible for identifying those public service opportunities and 
coordinating

[[Page 199]]

with the USA Freedom Corps Council to ensure that such programs are, if 
appropriate, publicized and encouraged by the Council; and

  (iii) Upon the request of the Chair, and to the extent permitted by law, 
the heads of executive branch departments and agencies shall provide the 
Council with relevant information.

          e. 4. USA Freedom Corps Office. (a) 
          General. The USA Freedom Corps also shall be supported by a 
          USA Freedom Corps Office (Office), which shall be a component 
          of the White House Office. The USA Freedom Corps Office shall 
          have a Director who shall be appointed by the President. The 
          Director shall be assisted by an appropriate staff within the 
          White House Office.
          (b) Presidential Recognition to Participants in USA Freedom 
          Corps Programs. In addition to supporting and facilitating the 
          functions of the Council listed in section 3 of this order, 
          the Office shall support the President in providing 
          recognition to volunteers and other participants in programs 
          and activities relating to the functions and missions of the 
          USA Freedom Corps as described in section 2 of this order.
          e. 5. General Provisions. (a) The White 
          House Office shall provide the Council and Office with such 
          funding and administrative support, to the extent permitted by 
          law and subject to the availability of appropriations, as 
          directed by the Chief of Staff to the President to carry out 
          the provisions of this order.
          (b) This order does not alter the existing authorities or 
          roles of executive branch departments, agencies, or offices. 
          Nothing in this order shall supersede any requirement made by 
          or under law.
          (c) This order does not create any right or benefit, 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity, 
          against the United States, its departments, agencies, or other 
          entities, its officers or employees, or any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 January 29, 2002.

EO 13255

Executive Order 13255 of February 6, 2002

Amendment to Executive Order 13227, President's Commission on Excellence in 
Special Education

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          extend the reporting date of the President's Commission on 
          Excellence in Special Education, it is hereby ordered that 
          Executive Order 13227 of October 2, 2001, is amended by 
          deleting ``April 30, 2002'' in section 3(b) of that order and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``July 1, 2002''.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 February 6, 2002.

EO 13256

[[Page 200]]

Executive Order 13256 of February 12, 2002

President's Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, in order to 
          advance the development of the Nation's full human potential 
          and to advance equal opportunity in higher education, to 
          strengthen the capacity of historically black colleges and 
          universities to provide the highest quality education, and to 
          increase opportunities for these institutions to participate 
          in and benefit from Federal programs, as do other colleges and 
          universities, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. There is established, in the 
          Office of the Secretary of Education, a Presidential advisory 
          committee entitled the ``President's Board of Advisors on 
          Historically Black Colleges and Universities'' (Board). The 
          Board shall prepare and issue an annual report to the 
          President on the results of the participation of historically 
          black colleges and universities in Federal programs. The Board 
          also shall provide advice to the President and to the 
          Secretary of Education (Secretary) regarding the needs of 
          historically black colleges and universities in the areas of 
          infrastructure, academic programs, and faculty and 
          institutional development. In the annual report to the 
          President, the Board shall make recommendations on how to 
          increase the private sector role, including the role of 
          private foundations, in strengthening historically black 
          colleges and universities. Particular emphasis should also be 
          given in the report to enhancing institutional planning and 
          development, strengthening fiscal stability and financial 
          management, and improving institutional infrastructure, 
          including the use of technology, to ensure the long-term 
          viability and enhancement of these institutions.
          e. 2. The Board shall be appointed by the 
          President. The Board membership shall include sitting 
          presidents of historically black colleges and universities, 
          representatives of other higher education institutions, 
          business and financial leaders, representatives of private 
          foundations, and secondary school administrators. The 
          President shall designate a Chair or Co-Chairs from among the 
          members.
          e. 3. The White House Initiative on 
          Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Initiative), 
          located in the Office of the Secretary of Education, shall: 
          (1) provide staff, resources, and assistance to the Board; (2) 
          assist the Secretary in performing the liaison function 
          between the executive branch and historically black colleges 
          and universities; and (3) serve the Secretary in carrying out 
          the responsibilities described in section 6 of this order.
          e. 4. To carry out this order, each 
          executive department and agency identified by the Secretary 
          may, consistent with applicable law and regulations, enter 
          into appropriate grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements 
          with historically black colleges and universities. The head of 
          each department or agency so identified shall establish an 
          annual plan that will establish clear goals for how the 
          department or agency intends to increase the capacity of 
          historically black colleges and universities to compete 
          effectively for grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements 
          and to encourage historically black colleges and universities 
          to participate in Federal programs. The department's or 
          agency's annual goal should be clearly reflected in the 
          depart-

[[Page 201]]

          ment's or agency's annual budget submission to the Office of 
          Management and Budget. To facilitate the attainment of these 
          goals, the head of each department or agency identified by the 
          Secretary shall provide, as appropriate, technical assistance 
          and information to historically black colleges and 
          universities regarding the program activities of the 
          department or agency and the preparation of applications or 
          proposals for grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements.
          e. 5. Each executive department and 
          agency identified by the Secretary shall appoint a senior 
          official, who is a full-time officer of the Federal 
          Government, to report directly to the department or agency 
          head with respect to department or agency activity under this 
          order, and to serve as liaison to the Board and to the 
          Initiative. To the extent permitted by law and regulations, 
          each executive department and agency identified by the 
          Secretary shall provide appropriate information requested by 
          the Board and staff pursuant to the order.
          e. 6. Each executive department and 
          agency identified by the Secretary shall develop an annual 
          plan for, and shall document the agency's effort in, 
          increasing the capacity of historically black colleges and 
          universities to participate in Federal programs. Each 
          department's and agency's plan shall describe new or existing 
          department and agency programs and measurable objectives for 
          proposed department and agency actions, in connection with 
          those programs, to achieve the purposes of this order. These 
          plans shall be submitted at such time and in such form as the 
          Secretary shall require. In consultation with the 
          participating departments and agencies, the Secretary shall 
          review the plans and develop, with the advice of the Board, an 
          integrated Annual Federal Plan for Assistance to Historically 
          Black Colleges and Universities for submission to the 
          President. The Secretary shall provide the president of each 
          historically black college and university with a copy of, and 
          an opportunity to comment on, the proposed Annual Federal Plan 
          prior to its submission to the President. Each participating 
          department and agency shall submit to the Secretary an Annual 
          Performance Report that shall measure each department's and 
          agency's performance against the objectives set forth in the 
          department's or agency's annual plan. The Secretary shall be 
          responsible for monitoring compliance with the Annual Federal 
          Plan after it is approved by the President.
          e. 7. In developing its annual plan, each 
          executive department and agency identified by the Secretary 
          shall emphasize programs and activities that develop the 
          capacity of historically black colleges and universities to 
          contribute to the development of human capital and to 
          strengthen America's economic and technological base through: 
          (1) infrastructure development and acquisitions for 
          instruction and research; (2) student and faculty doctoral 
          fellowships and faculty development; (3) domestic and 
          international faculty and student exchanges and study-abroad 
          opportunities; (4) undergraduate and graduate student 
          internships; and (5) summer, part-time, and permanent 
          employment opportunities.
          e. 8. Each year, the Board shall report 
          to the President on the progress achieved in enhancing the 
          capacity of historically black colleges and universities to 
          serve their students, including findings and recommendations 
          for individual departments and agencies in connection with 
          their Annual Performance Reports, as described in section 6 of 
          this order.

[[Page 202]]

          e. 9. The Board, in consultation with the 
          Department of Education and other executive departments and 
          agencies, shall develop a Private Sector Strategy to assist 
          historically black colleges and universities in: (1) 
          increasing voluntary private-sector contributions to support 
          the enhancement of endowments and the overall financial 
          stability of such institutions; (2) improving and enhancing 
          the quality and number of private-sector partnerships focused 
          on academic program development, student achievement and 
          faculty development, cooperative research and development 
          projects, and faculty exchanges; and (3) improving information 
          management, and facilities, and strengthening academic course 
          offerings.
          e. 10. (a) The provisions in this 
          Executive Order shall be implemented to the fullest extent 
          permitted by law.
          (b) The Department of Education shall provide funding and 
          administrative support for the Board and the Initiative.
          (c) Members of the Board shall serve without compensation, but 
          shall be reimbursed for all travel expenses, including per 
          diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by law;
          (d) Insofar as the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended, 
          may apply to the Board, any functions of the President under 
          that Act, except for those in section 6 of that Act, shall be 
          performed by the Department of Education, in accordance with 
          the guidelines that have been issued by the Administrator of 
          General Services.
          e. 11. Executive Order 12876 of November 
          1, 1993, as amended, is hereby revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 February 12, 2002.

EO 13257

Executive Order 13257 of February 13, 2002

President's Interagency Task Force To Monitor and Combat Trafficking in 
Persons

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, (22 U.S.C. 7103) 
          (the ``Act''), and in order to combat trafficking in persons, 
          a contemporary manifestation of slavery whose victims are 
          predominantly women and children, to ensure just and effective 
          punishment of traffickers, and to protect their victims, it is 
          hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. (a) The President's Interagency 
          Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons is 
          hereby established.
          (b) The Task Force shall consist of:

  (i) the Secretary of State;

  (ii) the Attorney General;

  (iii) the Secretary of Labor;

[[Page 203]]

  (iv) the Secretary of Health and Human Services;

  (v) the Director of Central Intelligence;

  (vi) the Director of the Office of Management and Budget;

  (vii) the Administrator of the United States Agency for International 
Development; and

  (viii) any additional officers or employees of the United States as may 
be designated by the President.

          (c) The Task Force shall be chaired by the Secretary of State.
          e. 2. Activities. The Task Force shall, 
          consistent with applicable law and the constitutional 
          authorities and duties of the President, carry out the 
          following activities:
          (a) coordinate the implementation of the Act;
          (b) measure and evaluate progress of the United States and 
          other countries in the areas of trafficking in persons 
          prevention, protection, and assistance to victims of 
          trafficking in persons, and prosecutions and other enforcement 
          efforts against traffickers, including the role of public 
          corruption in facilitating trafficking in persons;
          (c) assist the Secretary of State in the preparation of the 
          annual reports described in section 110 of the Act;
          (d) expand interagency procedures to collect and organize 
          data, including significant research and resource information 
          on domestic and international trafficking in persons, while 
          ensuring that any data collection procedures involved, respect 
          the confidentiality of victims of trafficking in persons;
          (e) engage in efforts to facilitate cooperation among 
          countries of origin, transit, and destination, and such 
          efforts shall aim to strengthen local and regional capacities 
          to prevent trafficking in persons, prosecute traffickers and 
          assist trafficking victims; shall include initiatives to 
          enhance cooperative efforts between destination countries, 
          transit countries, and countries of origin; and shall assist 
          in the appropriate reintegration of stateless victims of 
          trafficking in persons;
          (f) examine the role of the international ``sex tourism'' 
          industry in the trafficking of persons and in the sexual 
          exploitation of women and children around the world;
          (g) engage in consultation and advocacy with governmental and 
          nongovernmental organizations, among other entities, to 
          advance the purposes of the Act; and
          (h) address such other matters related to the purposes of the 
          Act as the President may determine.
          e. 3. Administration. (a) The Department 
          of State shall provide funding and administrative support for 
          the Task Force, except as otherwise provided by the Act.
          (b) At the call of the Chair, the Task Force shall meet as 
          necessary to accomplish its mission.
          (c) Task Force members may designate representatives from 
          their respective agencies to represent them at Task Force 
          meetings.

[[Page 204]]

          (d) Whenever the work of the Task Force involves a matter 
          committed by law or Presidential directive to the 
          consideration of the National Security Council, or by 
          Executive Order 13228 of October 8, 2001, to the consideration 
          of the Homeland Security Council, that work shall be 
          undertaken, and any communication by the Secretary of State to 
          the President shall be undertaken, in a manner consistent with 
          such law, Presidential directive, or Executive Order.
          (e) The Task Force shall have no directive authority or other 
          substantial independent authority.
          (f) As necessary and appropriate, the Task Force shall report 
          to the President, through the Secretary of State, the 
          following:

  (i) progress on the implementation of the Act; and

  (ii) recommendations for United States policy to monitor and eliminate 
trafficking in persons and to protect the victims of trafficking in 
persons.

          e. 4. Judicial Review. This order does 
          not create any rights or benefits, enforceable at law or 
          equity, against the United States, its departments, its 
          agencies, or other entities, its officers or employees, or any 
          other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

February 13, 2002.

EO 13258

Executive Order 13258 of February 26, 2002

Amending Executive Order 12866 on Regulatory Planning and Review

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered that Executive Order 12866, of September 30, 1993, is 
          amended as follows:
          etion 1. Section (2)(b) is amended by 
          striking ``, the Vice President, and other regulatory policy 
          advisors'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``and regulatory 
          policy advisors''.
          e. 2. Section (2)(c) is amended by:
          (a) striking in the heading the words ``The Vice President'' 
          and inserting in lieu thereof ``Assistance'';
          (b) striking the sentence that begins ``The Vice President 
          is'';
          (c) striking ``In fulfilling their responsibilities'' and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``In fulfilling his 
          responsibilities''; and
          (d) striking ``and the Vice President'' both times it appears.
          e. 3. Section 3(a) is amended by:
          (a) striking ``and Vice President'';
          (b) striking ``the Assistant to the President for Science and 
          Technology'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``the Director of 
          the Office of Science and Technology Policy'';

[[Page 205]]

          (c) striking ``the Assistant to the President for 
          Intergovernmental Affairs'' and inserting in lieu thereof 
          ``the Deputy Assistant to the President and Director for 
          Intergovernmental Affairs'';
          (d) striking ``the Deputy Assistant to the President and 
          Director of the White House Office of Environmental Policy'' 
          and inserting in lieu thereof ``the Chairman of the Council on 
          Environmental Quality and Director of the Office of 
          Environmental Quality''; and
          (e) striking ``and (12)'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``(12) 
          the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security; and 
          (13)''.
          e. 4. Section 4(a) is amended by striking 
          ``the Vice President shall convene'' and inserting in lieu 
          thereof ``the Director shall convene''.
          e. 5. Section 4(c)(3) is amended by 
          striking ``, the Advisors, and the Vice President'' and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``and the Advisors''.
          e. 6. Section 4(c)(4) is amended by 
          striking ``, the Advisors, and the Vice President'' and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``and the Advisors''.
          e. 7. Section 4(c)(5) is amended by 
          striking ``, the Advisors, and the Vice President'' and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``and the Advisors''.
          e. 8. Section 4(c)(6) is amended by 
          striking ``Vice President, with the Advisors' assistance,'' 
          and inserting in lieu thereof ``Director''.
          e. 9. Section 4(d) is amended by:
          (a) striking ``, the Advisors, and the Vice President'' and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``and the Advisors''; and
          (b) striking ``periodically advise the Vice President'' and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``periodically advise the 
          Director''.
          e. 10. Section 5(c) is amended by 
          striking ``Vice President'' and inserting in lieu thereof 
          ``Director''.
          e. 11. Section 6(b)(4)(C)(i) is amended 
          by striking ``Vice Presidential and''.
          e. 12. Section 7 is amended by:
          (a) striking ``resolved by the President, or by the Vice 
          President acting at the request of the President'' and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``resolved by the President, with 
          the assistance of the Chief of Staff to the President (``Chief 
          of Staff'')'';
          (b) striking ``Vice Presidential and Presidential 
          consideration'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``Presidential 
          consideration'';
          (c) striking ``recommendations developed by the Vice 
          President'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``recommendations 
          developed by the Chief of Staff'';
          (d) striking ``Vice Presidential and Presidential review 
          period'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``Presidential review 
          period'';
          (e) striking ``or to the staff of the Vice President'' and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``or to the staff of the Chief of 
          Staff'';
          (f) striking ``the President, or the Vice President acting at 
          the request of the President, shall notify'' and insert in 
          lieu thereof ``the President, or the Chief of Staff acting at 
          the request of the President, shall notify''.

[[Page 206]]

          e. 13. Section 7 is also amended in the 
          first paragraph by inserting the designation ``(a)'' after the 
          words ``Resolution of Conflicts.'', and by designating the 
          following three paragraphs as ``(b)'', ``(c)'', and ``(d)'' in 
          order.
          e. 14. Section 8 is amended by striking 
          ``Vice President'' both times it appears and inserting in lieu 
          thereof ``Director''.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

February 26, 2002.

EO 13259

Executive Order 13259 of March 19, 2002

Designation of Public International Organizations for Purposes of the 
Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 
1977

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          section 30A(f)(1)(B)(ii) of the Securities Exchange Act of 
          1934 (15 U.S.C. 78dd-1(f)(1)(B)(ii)) and sections 
          104(h)(2)(B)(ii) and 104A(f)(2)(B)(ii) of the Foreign Corrupt 
          Practices Act of 1977 (15 U.S.C. 78dd-2(h)(2)(B)(ii), 78dd-
          3(f)(2)(B)(ii)), I hereby designate as ``public international 
          organizations'' for the purposes of application of section 30A 
          of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and sections 104 and 
          104A of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977:
          (a) The European Union, including: the European Communities 
          (the European Community, the European Coal & Steel Community, 
          and the European Atomic Energy Community); institutions of the 
          European Union, such as the European Commission, the Council 
          of the European Union, the European Parliament, the European 
          Court of Justice, the European Court of Auditors, the Economic 
          and Social Committee, the Committee of the Regions, the 
          European Central Bank, and the European Investment Bank; and 
          any departments, agencies, and instrumentalities thereof; and
          (b) The European Police Office (Europol), including any 
          departments, agencies, and instrumentalities thereof.
          Designation in this Executive Order is intended solely to 
          further the purposes of the statutes mentioned above and is 
          not determinative of whether an entity is a public 
          international organization for the purpose of other statutes 
          or regulations.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 March 19, 2002.

EO 13260

[[Page 207]]

Executive Order 13260 of March 19, 2002

Establishing the President's Homeland Security Advisory Council and Senior 
Advisory Committees for Homeland Security

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. President's Homeland Security 
          Advisory Council.
          (a) Establishment and Membership. I hereby establish the 
          President's Homeland Security Advisory Council (PHSAC). The 
          PHSAC shall be composed of not more than 21 members appointed 
          by the President. In addition, the Chair and the Vice Chair of 
          the National Infrastructure Advisory Council; the Chairman of 
          the President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory 
          Committee; and the Chair of the Panel on the Science and 
          Technology of Combating Terrorism, President's Council of 
          Advisors on Science and Technology, shall serve as ex officio 
          members of the PHSAC. The appointed members of the PHSAC shall 
          be selected from the private sector, academia, professional 
          service associations, federally funded research and 
          development centers, nongovernmental organizations, State and 
          local governments, and other appropriate professions and 
          communities.
          (b) Chair and Vice Chair. The President shall designate a 
          Chair and Vice Chair from among the appointed members of the 
          PHSAC.
          (c) Senior Advisory Committees. (i) Establishment and 
          Membership. The following four Senior Advisory Committees for 
          Homeland Security (SACs) are hereby established to advise the 
          PHSAC: (1) State and Local Officials; (2) Academia and Policy 
          Research; (3) Private Sector; and (4) Emergency Services, Law 
          Enforcement, and Public Health and Hospitals. Each SAC shall 
          generally be composed of not more than 17 members selected by 
          the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security 
          (Assistant). The President may establish additional SACs as 
          appropriate, consistent with this order.
          (ii) Chairs and Vice Chairs. The Assistant shall from time to 
          time designate a Chair and Vice Chair for each of the SACs 
          from among the PHSAC's members.
          (iii) Subcommittees. The Chair of each SAC, in consultation 
          with the PHSAC, may as appropriate establish subcommittees to 
          advise the SAC.
          e. 2. Functions. The PHSAC shall meet 
          periodically at the Assistant's request to:
          (a) provide advice to the President through the Assistant on 
          developing and coordinating the implementation of a 
          comprehensive national strategy to secure the United States 
          from terrorist threats or attacks;
          (b) recommend to the President through the Assistant ways to 
          improve coordination, cooperation, and communication among 
          Federal, State, and local officials and private and other 
          entities, and provide a means to collect scholarly research, 
          technological advice, and information concerning processes and 
          organizational management practices both inside and outside of 
          the Federal Government;
          (c) provide advice to the President through the Assistant 
          regarding the feasibility of implementing specific measures to 
          detect, prepare for, pre

[[Page 208]]

          vent, protect against, respond to, and recover from terrorist 
          threats or attacks within the United States;
          (d) examine, and advise the President through the Assistant 
          on, the effectiveness of the implementation of specific 
          strategies to detect, prepare for, prevent, protect against, 
          respond to, and recover from terrorist threats or attacks 
          within the United States; and
          (e) report periodically, as appropriate, to the President 
          through the Assistant on matters within the scope of the 
          PHSAC's functions as described in paragraphs (a) through (d) 
          of this section.
          e. 3. Administration. (a) Upon the 
          request of the Chair of the PHSAC, through the Assistant, and 
          to the extent permitted by law, the heads of executive 
          departments and agencies shall provide the PHSAC with such 
          information relating to homeland security matters as the PHSAC 
          may need for the purpose of carrying out its functions.
          (b) The PHSAC shall have an Executive Director selected by the 
          Assistant.
          (c) Members shall serve without compensation for their work on 
          the PHSAC, the SACs, and any subcommittees thereof. However, 
          members shall be allowed travel expenses, including per diem 
          in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by law for persons 
          serving intermittently in Federal Government service (5 U.S.C. 
          5701-5707).
          (d) To the extent permitted by law, and subject to the 
          availability of appropriations, the Office of Administration 
          shall provide the PHSAC with administrative support and with 
          such funds as may be necessary for the performance of the 
          PHSAC's functions.
          e. 4. General Provisions. (a) Insofar as 
          the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.) 
          (Act), may apply to the administration of any portion of this 
          order, any functions of the President under that Act, except 
          that of reporting to the Congress, shall be performed by the 
          Administrator of General Services in accordance with the 
          guidelines that have been issued by the Administrator.
          (b) The PHSAC, any SACs, and any SAC subcommittees shall 
          terminate 2 years from the date of this order unless extended 
          by the President.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 March 19, 2002.

EO 13261

Executive Order 13261 of March 19, 2002

Providing An Order of Succession in the Environmental Protection Agency and 
Amending Certain Orders on Succession

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998, 5 U.S.C. 3345, et seq., 
          it is hereby ordered that:

[[Page 209]]

          etion 1. Subject to the provisions of 
          section 3 of this order, the officers named in section 2, in 
          the order listed, shall act as and perform the functions and 
          duties of the office of the Administrator of the Environmental 
          Protection Agency (Administrator) during any period when both 
          the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator of the 
          Environmental Protection Agency have died, resigned, or become 
          otherwise unable to perform the functions and duties of the 
          office of Administrator.
          e. 2. Order of Succession.
          (a) Assistant Administrator for Toxic Substances;
          (b) Assistant Administrator (Air and Radiation);
          (c) Assistant Administrator, Office of Solid Waste;
          (d) Assistant Administrator (Water Programs);
          (e) Assistant Administrator (General Counsel);
          (f) Assistant Administrator (Enforcement and Compliance 
          Assurance);
          (g) Chief Financial Officer;
          (h) Assistant Administrator (Research and Development);
          (i) Assistant Administrator (International Activities);
          (j) Assistant Administrator (Administration and Resources 
          Management); and
          (k) Assistant Administrator (Environmental Information).
          e. 3. Exceptions.
          (a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(k) in an acting capacity, by virtue of so 
          serving, shall act as Administrator pursuant to this order.
          (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of this order, the 
          President retains discretion, to the extent permitted by the 
          Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998, 5 U.S.C. 3345 et seq., 
          to depart from this order in designating an acting 
          Administrator.
          e. 4. Amendments to Certain Executive 
          Orders providing Orders of Succession. Executive Orders 13241, 
          13242, 13243, 13244, 13245, 13246, and 13247 of December 18, 
          2001, and Executive Orders 13250 and 13251 of December 28, 
          2001, are hereby amended as follows:
          (a) Section 3(a) of Executive Order 13241 of December 18, 
          2001, entitled ``Providing an Order of Succession Within the 
          Department of Agriculture,'' is replaced with the following: 
          ``(a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(j) in an acting capacity shall, by virtue of so 
          serving, act as Secretary pursuant to this order.'';
          (b) Section 3(a) of Executive Order 13242 of December 18, 
          2001, entitled ``Providing an Order of Succession Within the 
          Department of Commerce,'' is replaced with the following: 
          ``(a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(h) in an acting capacity shall, by virtue of so 
          serving, act as Secretary pursuant to this order.'';
          (c) Section 3(a) of Executive Order 13243 of December 18, 
          2001, entitled ``Providing an Order of Succession Within the 
          Department of Housing and Urban Development,'' is replaced 
          with the following: ``(a) No individual

[[Page 210]]

          who is serving in an office listed in section 2(a)-(i) in an 
          acting capacity shall, by virtue of so serving, act as 
          Secretary pursuant to this order.'';
          (d) Section 3(a) of Executive Order 13244 of December 18, 
          2001, entitled ``Providing an Order of Succession Within the 
          Department of the Interior,'' is replaced with the following: 
          ``(a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(f) in an acting capacity shall, by virtue of so 
          serving, act as Secretary pursuant to this order.'';
          (e) Section 3(a) of Executive Order 13245 of December 18, 
          2001, entitled ``Providing an Order of Succession Within the 
          Department of Labor,'' is replaced with the following: ``(a) 
          No individual who is serving in an office listed in section 
          2(a)-(l) in an acting capacity shall, by virtue of so serving, 
          act as Secretary pursuant to this order.'';
          (f) Section 3(a) of Executive Order 13246 of December 18, 
          2001, entitled ``Providing an Order of Succession Within the 
          Department of the Treasury,'' is replaced with the following: 
          ``(a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(c) in an acting capacity shall, by virtue of so 
          serving, act as Secretary pursuant to this order.'';
          (g) Section 3(a) of Executive Order 13247 of December 18, 
          2001, entitled ``Providing an Order of Succession Within the 
          Department of Veterans Affairs,'' is replaced with the 
          following: ``(a) No individual who is serving in an office 
          listed in section 2(a)-(h) in an acting capacity shall, by 
          virtue of so serving, act as Secretary pursuant to this 
          order.'';
          (h) Section 3(a) of Executive Order 13250 of December 28, 
          2001, entitled ``Providing an Order of Succession Within the 
          Department of Health and Human Services,'' is replaced with 
          the following: ``(a) No individual who is serving in an office 
          listed in section 2(a)-(c) in an acting capacity shall, by 
          virtue of so serving, act as Secretary pursuant to this 
          order.'' and;
          (i) Section 3(b) of Executive Order 13251 of December 28, 
          2001, entitled ``Providing an Order of Succession Within the 
          Department of State,'' is replaced with the following: ``(b) 
          No individual who is serving in an office listed in section 
          2(a)-(m) in an acting capacity shall, by virtue of so serving, 
          act as Secretary pursuant to this order.''.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 March 19, 2002.

EO 13262

Executive Order 13262 of April 11, 2002

2002 Amendments to the Manual for Courts-Martial, United States

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          chapter 47 of title 10, United States Code (Uniform Code of 
          Military Justice, 10 U.S.C. 801-946), and in order to 
          prescribe amendments to the Manual for Courts-Martial, United 
          States, prescribed by Executive Order 12473, as amended, it is 
          hereby ordered as follows:

[[Page 211]]

          etion 1. Thirty days after the date of 
          this Executive Order, the provisions of Federal Rule of 
          Evidence 415, adopted September 13, 1994, will no longer be 
          applicable to the Military Rules of Evidence. This evidentiary 
          rule became applicable to courts-martial on January 6, 1996, 
          pursuant to Military Rule of Evidence 1102.
          e. 2. The last subparagraph of paragraph 
          4, of Part I, of the Manual for Courts-Martial, United States, 
          is amended as follows:
          ``The Manual shall be identified as ``Manual for Courts-
          Martial, United States (2002 edition).'' Any amendments to the 
          Manual made by Executive Order shall be identified as ``2002'' 
          Amendments to the Manual for Courts-Martial, United States'' ; 
          ``2002'' being the year the Executive Order was signed. If two 
          or more Executive Orders amending the Manual are signed during 
          the same year, then the second and any subsequent Executive 
          Orders will be identified by placing a small case letter of 
          the alphabet after the last digit of the year beginning with 
          ``a'' for the second Executive Order and continuing in 
          alphabetic order for subsequent Executive Orders.''.
          e. 3. Part II of the Manual for Courts-
          Martial, United States, is amended as follows:
          a. R.C.M. 201(f)(2)(B) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(i) Upon a finding of guilty, special courts-martial may adjudge, 
under limitations prescribed by this Manual, any punishment authorized 
under R.C.M. 1003 except death, dishonorable discharge, dismissal, 
confinement for more than 1 year, hard labor without confinement for more 
than 3 months, forfeiture of pay exceeding two-thirds pay per month, or any 
forfeiture of pay for more than 1 year.

   ``(ii) A bad-conduct discharge, confinement for more than six months, or 
forfeiture of pay for more than six months, may not be adjudged by a 
special court-martial unless:

     ``(a) Counsel qualified under Article 27(b) is detailed to represent 
the accused; and

     ``(b) A military judge is detailed to the trial, except in a case in 
which a military judge could not be detailed because of physical conditions 
or military exigencies. Physical conditions or military exigencies, as the 
terms are here used, may exist under rare circumstances, such as on an 
isolated ship on the high seas or in a unit in an inaccessible area, 
provided compelling reasons exist why the trial must be held at that time 
and at that place. Mere inconvenience does not constitute a physical 
condition or military exigency and does not excuse a failure to detail a 
military judge. If a military judge cannot be detailed because of physical 
conditions or military exigencies, a bad-conduct discharge, confinement for 
more than six months, or forfeiture of pay for more than six months, may be 
adjudged provided the other conditions have been met. In that event, 
however, the convening authority shall, prior to trial, make a written 
statement explaining why a military judge could not be obtained. This 
statement shall be appended to the record of trial and shall set forth in 
detail the reasons why a military judge could not be detailed, and why the 
trial had to be held at that time and place.''

          b. R.C.M. 701(b)(4) is amended to read as follows:

[[Page 212]]

   ``(4) Reports of examination and tests. If the defense requests 
disclosure under subsection (a)(2)(B) of this rule, upon compliance with 
such request by the Government, the defense, on request of trial counsel, 
shall (except as provided in R.C.M. 706, Mil. R. Evid. 302, and Mil. R. 
Evid. 513) permit the trial counsel to inspect any results or reports of 
physical or mental examinations and of scientific tests or experiments made 
in connection with the particular case, or copies thereof, that are within 
the possession, custody, or control of the defense that the defense intends 
to introduce as evidence in the defense case-in-chief at trial or that were 
prepared by a witness whom the defense intends to call at trial when the 
results or reports relate to that witness' testimony.''

          c. R.C.M. 806 is amended by adding at the end the following 
          new subsection (d):

   ``(d) Protective orders. The military judge may, upon request of any 
party or sua sponte, issue an appropriate protective order, in writing, to 
prevent parties and witnesses from making extrajudicial statements that 
present a substantial likelihood of material prejudice to a fair trial by 
impartial members. For purposes of this subsection, ``military judge'' does 
not include the president of a special court-martial without a military 
judge.''.

          d. R.C.M. 1001(b)(3)(A) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(A) In general. The trial counsel may introduce evidence of military 
or civilian convictions of the accused. For purposes of this rule, there is 
a ``conviction'' in a court-martial case when a sentence has been adjudged. 
In a civilian case, a ``conviction'' includes any disposition following an 
initial judicial determination or assumption of guilt, such as when guilt 
has been established by guilty plea, trial, or plea of nolo contendere, 
regardless of the subsequent disposition, sentencing procedure, or final 
judgment. However, a ``civilian conviction'' does not include a diversion 
from the judicial process without a finding or admission of guilt; expunged 
convictions; juvenile adjudications; minor traffic violations; foreign 
convictions; tribal court convictions; or convictions reversed, vacated, 
invalidated or pardoned because of errors of law or because of subsequently 
discovered evidence exonerating the accused.''.

          e. R.C.M. 1003(b)(3) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(3) Fine. Any court-martial may adjudge a fine in lieu of or in 
addition to forfeitures. Special and summary courts-martial may not adjudge 
any fine or combination of fine and forfeitures in excess of the total 
amount of forfeitures that may be adjudged in that case. In order to 
enforce collection, a fine may be accompanied by a provision in the 
sentence that, in the event the fine is not paid, the person fined shall, 
in addition to any period of confinement adjudged, be further confined 
until a fixed period considered an equivalent punishment to the fine has 
expired. The total period of confinement so adjudged shall not exceed the 
jurisdictional limitations of the court- martial;''

          f. R.C.M. 1003(b)(7) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(7) Confinement. The place of confinement shall not be designated by 
the court-martial. When confinement for life is authorized, it may be with 
or without eligibility for parole. A court-martial shall not adjudge a 
sentence to solitary confinement or to confinement without hard labor;''.

[[Page 213]]

          g. R.C.M. 1004(e) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(e) Other penalties. Except for a violation of Article 106, when death 
is an authorized punishment for an offense, all other punishments 
authorized under R.C.M. 1003 are also authorized for that offense, 
including confinement for life, with or without eligibility for parole, and 
may be adjudged in lieu of the death penalty, subject to limitations 
specifically prescribed in this Manual. A sentence of death includes a 
dishonorable discharge or dismissal as appropriate. Confinement is a 
necessary incident of a sentence of death, but not a part of it.''

          h. R.C.M. 1006(d)(4)(B) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(B) Confinement for life, with or without eligibility for parole, or 
more than 10 years. A sentence that includes confinement for life, with or 
without eligibility for parole, or more than 10 years may be adjudged only 
if at least three-fourths of the members present vote for that sentence.''

          i. R.C.M. 1009(e)(3)(B)(ii) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(ii) In the case of a sentence which includes confinement for life, 
with or without eligibility for parole, or more than 10 years, more than 
one-fourth of the members vote to reconsider; or''.

          j. R.C.M. 1103(b)(2)(B)(i) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(i) Any part of the sentence adjudged exceeds six months confinement, 
forfeiture of pay greater than two-thirds pay per month, or any forfeiture 
of pay for more than six months or other punishments that may be adjudged 
by a special court-martial; or''.

          k. R.C.M. 1103(c) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(c) Special courts-martial.

     ``(1) Involving a bad-conduct discharge, confinement for more than six 
months, or forfeiture of pay for more than six months. The requirements of 
subsections (b)(1), (b)(2)(A), (b)(2)(B), (b)(2)(D), and (b)(3) of this 
rule shall apply in a special court-martial in which a bad-conduct 
discharge, confinement for more than six months, or forfeiture of pay for 
more than six months, has been adjudged.

     ``(2) All other special courts-martial. If the special court-martial 
resulted in findings of guilty but a bad-conduct discharge, confinement for 
more than six months, or forfeiture of pay for more than six months, was 
not adjudged, the requirements of subsections (b)(1), (b)(2)(D), and 
(b)(3)(A)-(F) and (I)-(M) of this rule shall apply.''.

          l. R.C.M. 1103(f)(1) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(1) Approve only so much of the sentence that could be adjudged by a 
special court-martial, except that a bad-conduct discharge, confinement for 
more than six months, or forfeiture of two-thirds pay per month for more 
than six months, may not be approved; or''.

          m. R.C.M. 1104(a)(2)(A) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(A) Authentication by the military judge. In special courts-martial in 
which a bad-conduct discharge, confinement for more than six months, or 
forfeiture of pay for more than six months, has been adjudged and in 
general courts-martial, except as provided in subsection (a)(2)(B) of this 
rule, the military judge present at the end of the proceedings shall 
authenticate the record of trial, or that portion over which the military

[[Page 214]]

judge presided. If more than one military judge presided over the 
proceedings, each military judge shall authenticate the record of the 
proceedings over which that military judge presided, except as provided in 
subsection (a)(2)(B) of this rule. The record of trial of special courts-
martial in which a bad-conduct discharge, confinement for more than six 
months, or forfeiture of pay for more than six months, was not adjudged 
shall be authenticated in accordance with regulations of the Secretary 
concerned.''

          n. R.C.M. 1104(e) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(e) Forwarding. After every court-martial, including a rehearing and 
new and other trials, the authenticated record shall be forwarded to the 
convening authority for initial review and action, provided that in case of 
a special court-martial in which a bad-conduct discharge or confinement for 
one year was adjudged or a general court-martial, the convening authority 
shall refer the record to the staff judge advocate or legal officer for 
recommendation under R.C.M. 1106 before the convening authority takes 
action.''.

          o. R.C.M. 1106(a) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(a) In general. Before the convening authority takes action under 
R.C.M. 1107 on a record of trial by general court-martial or a record of 
trial by special court-martial that includes a sentence to a bad-conduct 
discharge or confinement for one year, that convening authority's staff 
judge advocate or legal officer shall, except as provided in subsection (c) 
of this rule, forward to the convening authority a recommendation under 
this rule.''.

          p. R.C.M. 1107(d)(4) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(4) Limitations on sentence based on record of trial. If the record of 
trial does not meet the requirements of R.C.M. 1103(b)(2)(B) or (c)(1), the 
convening authority may not approve a sentence in excess of that which may 
be adjudged by a special court-martial, or one that includes a bad-conduct 
discharge, confinement for more than six months, forfeiture of pay 
exceeding two-thirds pay per month, or any forfeiture of pay for more than 
six months.''.

          q. R.C.M. 1107(d) is amended by adding at the end the 
          following new paragraph:

   ``(5) Limitations on sentence of a special court-martial where a fine 
has been adjudged. A convening authority may not approve in its entirety a 
sentence adjudged at a special court-martial when, if approved, the 
cumulative impact of the fine and forfeitures, whether adjudged or by 
operation of Article 58b, would exceed the jurisdictional maximum dollar 
amount of forfeitures that may be adjudged at that court-martial.''.

          r. R.C.M. 1109(e) and (e)(1) are amended to read as follows:

   ``(e) Vacation of a suspended special court-martial sentence wherein a 
bad-conduct discharge or confinement for one year was not adjudged.

     ``(1) In general. Before vacating the suspension of a special court-
martial punishment that does not include a bad-conduct discharge or 
confinement for one year, the special court-martial convening authority for 
the command in which the probationer is serving or assigned shall cause a 
hearing to be held on the alleged violation(s) of the conditions of 
suspension.''.

[[Page 215]]

          s. R.C.M. 1109(f) and (f)(1) are amended to read as follows:

   ``(f) Vacation of a suspended special court-martial sentence that 
includes a bad-conduct discharge or confinement for one year.

     ``(1) The procedure for the vacation of a suspended approved bad-
conduct discharge or of any suspended portion of an approved sentence to 
confinement for one year, shall follow that set forth in subsection (d) of 
this rule.''.

          t. R.C.M. 1110(a) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(a) In general. After any general court-martial, except one in which 
the approved sentence includes death, and after any special court-martial 
in which the approved sentence includes a bad-conduct discharge or 
confinement for one year, the accused may waive or withdraw appellate 
review.''.

          u. R.C.M. 1111(b) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(1) Cases including an approved bad-conduct discharge or confinement 
for one year. If the approved sentence of a special court-martial includes 
a bad-conduct discharge or confinement for one year, the record shall be 
disposed of as provided in subsection (a) of this rule.

   ``(2) Other cases. The record of trial by a special court-martial in 
which the approved sentence does not include a bad-conduct discharge or 
confinement for one year shall be forwarded directly to a judge advocate 
for review under R.C.M. 1112. Four copies of the order promulgating the 
result of trial shall be forwarded with the record of trial, unless 
otherwise prescribed by regulations of the Secretary concerned.''.

          v. R.C.M. 1112(a)(2) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(2) Each special court-martial in which the accused has waived or 
withdrawn appellate review under R.C.M. 1110 or in which the approved 
sentence does not include a bad-conduct discharge or confinement for one 
year; and''.

          w. R.C.M 1305(d)(2) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(2) Forwarding to the convening authority. The original and one copy 
of the record of trial shall be forwarded to the convening authority after 
compliance with subsection (d)(1) of this rule.''.

          e. 4. Part III of the Manual for Courts-
          Martial, United States, is amended in Mil. R. Evid. 615 by 
          striking the period at the end of the rule and adding ``, or 
          (4) a person authorized by statute to be present at courts-
          martial, or (5) any victim of an offense from the trial of an 
          accused for that offense because such victim may testify or 
          present any information in relation to the sentence or that 
          offense during the presentencing proceedings.''.
          e. 5. Part IV of the Manual for Courts-
          Martial, United States, is amended as follows:
          a. All ``Sample specification(s)'' subparagraphs in the 
          Punitive Articles (Part IV, M.C.M.) are amended by striking 
          ``-------------- 19----'' and inserting ``-------------- 20--
          --.''.
          b. Paragraph 27e(1)(a) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(a) of a value of $500.00 or less. Bad-conduct discharge, forfeiture 
of all pay and allowances, and confinement for 6 months.''.

          c. Paragraph 27e(1)(b) is amended to read as follows:

[[Page 216]]

   ``(b) of a value of more than $500.00 or any firearm or explosive. 
Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and 
confinement for 5 years.''.

          d. Paragraph 27f(3) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(3) Dealing in captured or abandoned property. In that ---------- 
(personal jurisdiction data), did, (at/on board - location), on or about --
-------- 20 ----------, (buy) (sell) (trade) (deal in) (dispose of) (------
----------) certain (captured) (abandoned) property, to wit: ----------, (a 
firearm) (an explosive), of a value of (about) $----------, thereby 
(receiving) (expecting) a (profit) (benefit) (advantage) to (himself/
herself) (----------, his/her accomplice) (----------, his/her brother) (--
--------------).''.

          e. Strike paragraph 31c(6).
          f. Paragraph 43e(1), is amended to read as follows:

   ``(1) Article 118(1) or (4)--death. Mandatory minimum--imprisonment for 
life with eligibility for parole.''.

          g. Paragraph 45e(3) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(3) Carnal knowledge with a child under the age of 12 years at the 
time of the offense. Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and 
allowances, and confinement for life without eligibility for parole.''.

          h. Paragraph 46c(1)(h) is amended by adding at the end the 
          following new clause:

   ``(vi) Credit, Debit, and Electronic Transactions. Wrongfully engaging 
in a credit, debit, or electronic transaction to obtain goods or money is 
an obtaining- type larceny by false pretense. Such use to obtain goods is 
usually a larceny of those goods from the merchant offering them. Such use 
to obtain money or a negotiable instrument (e.g., withdrawing cash from an 
automated teller or a cash advance from a bank) is usually a larceny of 
money from the entity presenting the money or a negotiable instrument. For 
the purpose of this section, the term 'credit, debit, or electronic 
transaction' includes the use of an instrument or device, whether known as 
a credit card, debit card, automated teller machine (ATM) card or by any 
other name, including access devices such as code, account number, 
electronic serial number or personal identification number, issued for the 
use in obtaining money, goods, or anything else of value.''.

          i. Paragraph 51e(1) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(1) By force and without consent. Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture 
of all pay and allowances, and confinement for life without eligibility for 
parole.''.

          j. Paragraph 51e(3) is amended to read as follows:

   ``(3) With a child under the age of 12 years at the time of the offense. 
Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and 
confinement for life without eligibility for parole.''

          k. Paragraph 62c is amended to read as follows:

   ``c. Explanation.

   ``(1) Nature of offense. Adultery is clearly unacceptable conduct, and 
it reflects adversely on the service record of the military member.

[[Page 217]]

   ``(2) Conduct prejudicial to good order and discipline or of a nature to 
bring discredit upon the armed forces. To constitute an offense under the 
UCMJ, the adulterous conduct must either be directly prejudicial to good 
order and discipline or service discrediting. Adulterous conduct that is 
directly prejudicial includes conduct that has an obvious, and measurably 
divisive effect on unit or organization discipline, morale, or cohesion, or 
is clearly detrimental to the authority or stature of or respect toward a 
servicemember. Adultery may also be service discrediting, even though the 
conduct is only indirectly or remotely prejudicial to good order and 
discipline. Discredit means to injure the reputation of the armed forces 
and includes adulterous conduct that has a tendency, because of its open or 
notorious nature, to bring the service into disrepute, make it subject to 
public ridicule, or lower it in public esteem. While adulterous conduct 
that is private and discreet in nature may not be service discrediting by 
this standard, under the circumstances, it may be determined to be conduct 
prejudicial to good order and discipline. Commanders should consider all 
relevant circumstances, including but not limited to the following factors, 
when determining whether adulterous acts are prejudicial to good order and 
discipline or are of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces:

     ``(a) The accused's marital status, military rank, grade, or position;

     ``(b) The co-actor's marital status, military rank, grade, and 
position, or relationship to the armed forces;

     ``(c) The military status of the accused's spouse or the spouse of co-
actor, or their relationship to the armed forces;

     ``(d) The impact, if any, of the adulterous relationship on the 
ability of the accused, the co-actor, or the spouse of either to perform 
their duties in support of the armed forces;

     ``(e) The misuse, if any, of government time and resources to 
facilitate the commission of the conduct;

     ``(f) Whether the conduct persisted despite counseling or orders to 
desist; the flagrancy of the conduct, such as whether any notoriety ensued; 
and whether the adulterous act was accompanied by other violations of the 
UCMJ;

     ``(g) The negative impact of the conduct on the units or organizations 
of the accused, the co-actor or the spouse of either of them, such as a 
detrimental effect on unit or organization morale, teamwork, and 
efficiency;

     ``(h) Whether the accused or co-actor was legally separated; and

     ``(i) Whether the adulterous misconduct involves an ongoing or recent 
relationship or is remote in time.

   ``(3) Marriage. A marriage exists until it is dissolved in accordance 
with the laws of a competent state or foreign jurisdiction.

   ``(4) Mistake of fact. A defense of mistake of fact exists if the 
accused had an honest and reasonable belief either that the accused and the 
co-actor were both unmarried, or that they were lawfully married to each 
other. If this defense is raised by the evidence, then the burden of proof 
is upon the United States to establish that the accused's belief was 
unreasonable or not honest.''.

[[Page 218]]

          l. Paragraph 92e is amended to read as follows:

   ``e. Maximum punishment. Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay 
and allowances, and confinement for life without eligibility for parole.''.

          m. Paragraphs 32e, 33e, 46c(1)(g)(iii), 46e, 49e, 52e, 58e, 
          78e and 106e are amended by striking ``$100.00'' each place it 
          appears and inserting ``$500.00''.
          e. 6. These amendments shall take effect 
          on May 15, 2002.
          a. The amendments made to Rules for Courts-Martial 806(d) and 
          1001(b)(3)(A) shall only apply in cases in which arraignment 
          has been completed on or after May 15, 2002.
          b. The amendments made to Rules for Courts- Martial 
          1003(b)(7), 1004(e), 1006(d)(4)(B), and 1009(e)(3)(B)(ii) 
          shall only apply to offenses committed after November 18, 
          1997. In cases not involving these amendments, the maximum 
          punishment for an offense committed prior to May 15, 2002, 
          shall not exceed the applicable maximum in effect at the time 
          of the commission of such offense. Provided further, that for 
          offenses committed prior to May 15, 2002, for which a sentence 
          is adjudged on or after May 15, 2002, if the maximum 
          punishment authorized in this Manual is less than that 
          previously authorized, the lesser maximum authorized 
          punishment shall apply.
          c. The amendment made to Military Rules of Evidence 615 shall 
          apply only in cases in which arraignment has been completed on 
          or after May 15, 2002.
          d. Nothing in these amendments shall be construed to make 
          punishable any act done or omitted prior to May 15, 2002, that 
          was not punishable when done or omitted.
          e. Nothing in these amendments shall be construed to 
          invalidate any nonjudicial punishment proceeding, restraint, 
          investigation, referral of charges, trial in which arraignment 
          occurred, or other action begun prior to May 15, 2002, and any 
          such nonjudicial punishment, restraint, investigation, 
          referral of charges, trial, or other action may proceed in the 
          same manner and with the same effect as if these amendments 
          had not been prescribed.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

April 11, 2002.

CHANGES TO THE DISCUSSION ACCOMPANYING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL, 
UNITED STATES

          a. The Discussion following the Preamble is amended by adding 
          the following at the end of the Discussion:
          ``The amendment to paragraph 4 of the Preamble is intended to 
          address the possibility of more frequent amendments to the 
          Manual and the arrival of the 21st century. In the event that 
          multiple editions of the Manual are published in the same 
          year, the numbering and lettering of the edition

[[Page 219]]

          should match that of the most recent Executive Order included 
          in the publication.''
          b. The seventh paragraph of the Discussion following R.C.M. 
          601(e)(1) is amended to read as follows:
          ``The convening authority should acknowledge by an instruction 
          that a bad-conduct discharge, confinement for more than six 
          months, or forfeiture of pay for more than six months, may not 
          be adjudged when the prerequisites under Article 19 will not 
          be met. See R.C.M. 201(f)(2)(B)(ii). For example, this 
          instruction should be given when a court reporter is not 
          detailed.''.
          c. The Discussion following R.C.M. 701(a)(2)(B) is amended to 
          read as follows:
          ``For specific rules concerning certain mental examinations of 
          the accused or third party patients, see R.C.M. 701(f), R.C.M. 
          706, Mil. R. Evid. 302, and Mil. R. Evid. 513.''
          d. The ninth paragraph of the Discussion following R.C.M. 
          806(b) is amended to read as follows:
          ``There are other methods of protecting the proceedings from 
          harmful effects of publicity, including a thorough voir dire 
          (see R.C.M. 912), and, if necessary, a continuance to allow 
          the harmful effects of publicity to dissipate. See R.C.M. 
          906(b)(1). Other methods that may occasionally be appropriate 
          and which are usually preferable to closing a session include: 
          directing members not to read, listen to, or watch any 
          accounts concerning the case; issuing a protective order under 
          R.C.M. 806(d); and selecting members from recent arrivals in 
          the command, or from outside the immediate area. See R.C.M. 
          503(a)(3). In more extreme cases, the place of trial may be 
          changed (see R.C.M. 906(b)(11), or members may be sequestered.
          e. The following Discussion is added after R.C.M. 806(d):
          ``A protective order may proscribe extrajudicial statements by 
          counsel, parties, and witnesses that might divulge prejudicial 
          matter not of public record in the case. Other appropriate 
          matters may also be addressed by such a protective order. 
          Before issuing a protective order, the military judge must 
          consider whether other available remedies would effectively 
          mitigate the adverse effects that any publicity might create, 
          and consider such an order's likely effectiveness in ensuring 
          an impartial court-martial panel. A military judge should not 
          issue a protective order without first providing notice to the 
          parties and an opportunity to be heard. The military judge 
          must state on the record the reasons for issuing the 
          protective order. If the reasons for issuing the order change, 
          the military judge may reconsider the continued necessity for 
          a protective order.''
          f. The first paragraph of the Discussion following R.C.M. 808 
          is amended to read as follows:
          ``Except in a special court-martial not authorized to adjudge 
          a bad-conduct discharge, confinement for more than six months, 
          or forfeiture of pay for more than six months, the trial 
          counsel should ensure that a qualified court reporter is 
          detailed to the court-martial. Trial counsel should also 
          ensure that all exhibits and other documents relating to the 
          case are properly maintained for later inclusion in the 
          record. See also R.C.M. 1103(j) as to the use of videotapes, 
          audiotapes, and similar recordings for the record of trial. 
          Because of the potential requirement for a verbatim 
          transcript, all pro

[[Page 220]]

          ceedings, including sidebar conferences, arguments, and 
          rulings and instructions by the military judge, should be 
          recorded.''
          g. The Discussion following R.C.M. 1001(b)(3)(A) is amended by 
          adding the following at the end of the Discussion:
          ``Whether a civilian conviction is admissible is left to the 
          discretion of the military judge. As stated in the rule, a 
          civilian ``conviction'' includes any disposition following an 
          initial judicial determination or assumption of guilt 
          regardless of the sentencing procedure and the final judgment 
          following probation or other sentence. Therefore, convictions 
          may be admissible regardless of whether a court ultimately 
          suspended judgment upon discharge of the accused following 
          probation, permitted withdrawal of the guilty plea, or applies 
          some other form of alternative sentencing. Additionally, the 
          term ``conviction'' need not be taken to mean a final judgment 
          of conviction and sentence.''
          h. The sixth paragraph of the Discussion following R.C.M. 
          1003(b)(2) is amended to read as follows:
          ``At a special court-martial, if a bad-conduct discharge and 
          confinement are adjudged, then the operation of Article 58b 
          results in a forfeiture of two-thirds of pay only (not 
          allowances) during that period of confinement. If only 
          confinement is adjudged, and that confinement exceeds six 
          months, then the operation of Article 58b results in a 
          forfeiture of two-thirds of pay only (not allowances) during 
          the period of confinement. If only a bad conduct discharge is 
          adjudged, Article 58b has no effect on pay.''.
          i. The Discussion following R.C.M. 1003(b)(3) is amended by 
          adding at the end the following paragraph:
          ``Where the sentence adjudged at a special court-martial 
          includes a fine, see R.C.M. 1107(d)(5) for limitations on 
          convening authority action on the sentence.''
          j. The Discussion following R.C.M. 1003(b)(8) is amended by 
          adding the following at the end of the Discussion:
          ``See Article 56a.''
          k. The Discussion following R.C.M. 1003(c)(4) is amended by 
          striking ``R.C.M. 1107(d)(3)'' and inserting ``R.C.M. 
          1107(d)(4).''
          l. The Discussion following R.C.M. 1006(c) is amended to read 
          as follows:
          ``A proposal should state completely each kind and, where 
          appropriate, amount of authorized punishment proposed by that 
          member. For example, a proposal of confinement for life would 
          state whether it is with or without eligibility for parole. 
          See R.C.M. 1003(b).''
          m. The second paragraph of the Discussion following R.C.M. 
          1107(d)(1) is amended to read as follows:
          ``When mitigating forfeitures, the duration and amounts of 
          forfeiture may be changed as long as the total amount 
          forfeited is not increased and neither the amount nor duration 
          of the forfeitures exceeds the jurisdiction of the court-
          martial. When mitigating confinement or hard labor without 
          confinement, the convening authority should use the 
          equivalencies at R.C.M. 1003(b)(6) and (7), as appropriate. 
          One form of punishment may be changed to a less severe 
          punishment of a different nature, as long as the changed 
          punishment is one that the court-martial could have adjudged. 
          For example, a bad-conduct discharge adjudged by a special 
          court-martial

[[Page 221]]

          could be changed to confinement for up to one year (but not 
          vice versa). A pretrial agreement may also affect what 
          punishments may be changed by the convening authority.''.
          n. The Discussion following R.C.M. 1109(f) is amended to read 
          as follows:
          ``An officer exercising special court-martial jurisdiction may 
          vacate any suspended punishments other than an approved 
          suspended bad-conduct discharge or any suspended portion of an 
          approved sentence to confinement for one year, regardless of 
          whether they are contained in the same sentence as the bad-
          conduct discharge or confinement for one year. See Appendix 18 
          for a sample of a Report of Proceedings to Vacate Suspension 
          of a Special Court-Martial Sentence including a bad-conduct 
          discharge or confinement for one year under Article 72, UCMJ, 
          and R.C.M. 1109 (DD Form 455).''.
          o. The Discussion following R.C.M. 1110(a) is amended to read 
          as follows:
          ``Appellate review is not available for special courts-martial 
          in which a bad-conduct discharge or confinement for one year 
          was not adjudged or approved or for summary courts-martial. 
          Cases not subject to appellate review, or in which appellate 
          review is waived or withdrawn, are reviewed by a judge 
          advocate under R.C.M. 1112. Such cases may also be submitted 
          to the Judge Advocate General for review. See R.C.M. 
          1201(b)(3). Appellate review is mandatory when the approved 
          sentence includes death.''.

          HANGE O APPENDI 8, 
          GIDE FO GENEAL AND 
          PEIAL 
          O-
          MAIAL, MANAL FO 
          O-
          MAIAL, NIED 
          AE

          Appendix 8, is amended--
          a. by amending the left margin entry to Note 100 to read as 
          follows:
          ``Advice in GCMs and SPCMs in which BCD or confinement for one 
          year is adjudged'';
          b. by amending Note 100 to read as follows:
          ``[Note 100. In cases subject to review by a Court of Criminal 
          Appeals, the following advice should be given. In other cases 
          proceed to Note 101 or 102 as appropriate.]'';
          c. by amending the left margin entry to Note 102 to read as 
          follows:
          ``SPCM not involving a BCD or confinement for one year''; and
          d. by amending Note 102 to read as follows:
          [Note 102. In special courts-martial not involving BCD or 
          confinement for one year, the following advice should be 
          given.]''.

          HANGE O HE 
          MAIMM PNIHMEN 
          HA OF HE MANAL 
          FO O-
          MAIAL, NIED 
          AE

          Appendix 12, the Maximum Punishment Chart, is amended--
          a. by striking the item relating to Article 103 and inserting:
          ``103 Captured, abandoned property; failure to secure, etc. Of 
          value of $500.00 or less . . . . . BCD 6 mos. Total
          Of value of more than $500.00 . DD, BCD 5 yrs. Total
          Any firearm or explosive . . . . . . DD, BCD 5 yrs. Total

[[Page 222]]

          Looting, pillaging . . . . . . . . . . . . DD, BCD Life4 
          Total''; and
          b. in the items relating to Articles 108, 109, 121, 123a, 126, 
          132, and 134 (False Pretenses, obtaining services under; and 
          Stolen Property, knowingly receiving, buying, concealing), by 
          striking ``100.00'' each place it appears and inserting 
          ``$500.00''.

          HANGE O HE GIDE 
          FO PEPAAION OF 
          EOD OF IAL 
          HEN A EBAIM 
          EOD I NO 
          EQIED, MANAL FO 
          O-
          MAIAL, NIED 
          AE

          Appendix 13 is amended--
           a. in the third subparagraph of paragraph a, by replacing 
          ``1-inch margin'' with ``one-inch margin'' and replacing 
          ``left hand'' with ``left-hand''.

          HANGE O HE GIDE 
          FO PEPAAION OF 
          EOD OF IAL 
          HEN A EBAIM 
          EOD I 
          EQIED, MANAL FO 
          O-
          MAIAL, NIED 
          AE

          Appendix 14, is amended--
          a. at page A14-6, by amending the second bracketed format 
          under the third note to read as follows:
          ``[The (court-martial) (session) was (adjourned) (recessed) at 
          -------- hours, ----------------.]''.

          HANGE O APPENDI 17, 
          FOM FO 
          O-MAIAL 
          ODE, MANAL FO 
          O-
          MAIAL, NIED 
          AE
          The first note to paragraph d of Appendix 17 is amended to 
          read as follows:
          ``[Note. Orders promulgating the vacation of the suspension of 
          a dismissal will be published by departmental orders of the 
          Secretary concerned. Vacations of any other suspension of a 
          general court-martial sentence, or of a special court-martial 
          sentence that as approved and affirmed includes a bad-conduct 
          discharge or confinement for one year, will be promulgated by 
          the officer exercising general court-martial jurisdiction over 
          the probationer (Article 72(b)). The vacation of suspension of 
          any other sentence may be promulgated by an appropriate 
          convening authority under Article 72(c). See R.C.M. 1109.]''

          HANGE O APPENDI 18, 
          EPO OF 
          POEEDING O 
          AAE 
          PENION OF A 
          GENEAL O-
          MAIAL O OF A 
          PEIAL 
          O-MAIAL 
          ENENE INLDING A 
          BAD-OND 
          DIHAGE NDE 
          AILE 72, MJ, AND 
          ..M. 1109 (DD FOM 455), MANAL 
          FO O-
          MAIAL, NIED 
          AE

          The title to Appendix 18 is amended to read as follows:
          ``eport of Proeedins to 
          aate uspension of a General 
          ourt-Martial or of a peial 
          ourt-Martial entene 
          Inludin a Bad-ondut 
          Dishare or onfinement for One 
          ear nder Artile 72, MJ, 
          and ..M. 1109 (DD Form 455).''.

          HANGE O HE 
          ANALI 
          AOMPANING HE MANAL 
          FO O-
          MAIAL, NIED 
          AE.


[[Page 223]]


          1. Changes to Appendix 21, the Analysis Accompanying the Rules 
          for Courts- Martial, United States (Part II, MCM).
          a. The Analysis to R.C.M. 201(f) is amended by inserting after 
          the second paragraph the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsections (f)(2)(B)(i) and (f)(2)(B)(ii) 
          were amended to remove previous limitations and thereby 
          implement the amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, 
          UCMJ) contained in section 577 of the National Defense 
          Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106-65, 113 
          Stat. 512 (1999). Subject to limitations prescribed by the 
          President, the amendment increased the jurisdictional maximum 
          punishment at special courts-martial to confinement for one 
          year and forfeitures not exceeding two-thirds pay per month 
          for one year, vice the previous six-month jurisdictional 
          limitation.''.
          b. The Analysis to R.C.M. 701(b) is amended by inserting after 
          the discussion of the 1991 Amendment to subsection (b)(2) the 
          following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (b)(4) was amended to take into 
          consideration the protections afforded by the new 
          psychotherapist-patient privilege under Mil. R. Evid. 513.''
          c. The Analysis to R.C.M. 707(a) is amended by inserting after 
          the second paragraph the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Burton and its progeny were re-examined in 
          United States v. Kossman, 38 M.J. 258 (C.M.A. 1993), where the 
          Court of Military Appeals specifically overruled Burton and 
          reinstated the earlier rule from United States v. Tibbs, 15 
          C.M.A. 350, 353, 35 C.M.R. 322, 325 (1965). See Kossman, 38 
          M.J. at 262. In Kossman, the Court reinstated the ``reasonable 
          diligence'' standard in determining whether the prosecution's 
          progress toward trial for a confined accused was sufficient to 
          satisfy the speedy trial requirement of Article 10, UCMJ.''
          d. The Analysis accompanying R.C.M. 806 is amended by adding 
          at the end the following new paragraphs:
          ``2002 Amendment: Section (d) was added to codify the military 
          judge's power to issue orders limiting trial participants' 
          extrajudicial statements in appropriate cases. See United 
          States v. Garwood, 16 M.J. 863, 868 (N-M.C.M.R. 1983) (finding 
          military judge was justified in issuing restrictive order 
          prohibiting extrajudicial statements by trial participants), 
          aff'd on other grounds, 20 M.J. 148 (C.M.A. 1985), cert. 
          denied, 474 U.S. 1005 (1985); United States v. Clark, 31 M.J. 
          721, 724 (A.F.C.M.R. 1990) (suggesting, but not deciding, that 
          the military judge properly limited trial participants' 
          extrajudicial statements).
          ``The public has a legitimate interest in the conduct of 
          military justice proceedings. Informing the public about the 
          operations of the criminal justice system is one of the ``core 
          purposes'' of the First Amendment. In the appropriate case 
          where the military judge is considering issuing a protective 
          order, absent exigent circumstances, the military judge must 
          conduct a hearing prior to issuing such an order. Prior to 
          such a hearing the parties will have been provided notice. At 
          the hearing, all parties will be provided an opportunity to be 
          heard. The opportunity to be heard may be extended to 
          representatives of the media in the appropriate case.

[[Page 224]]

          ``Section (d) is based on the first Recommendation Relating to 
          the Conduct of Judicial Proceedings in Criminal Cases, 
          included in the Revised Report of the Judicial Conference 
          Committee on the Operation of the Jury System on the ``Free 
          Press--Fair Trial'' Issue, 87 F.R.D. 519, 529 (1980), which 
          was approved by the Judicial Conference of the United States 
          on September 25, 1980. The requirement that the protective 
          order be issued in writing is based on Rule for Courts-Martial 
          405(g)(6). Section (d) adopts a ``substantial likelihood of 
          material prejudice'' standard in place of the Judicial 
          Conference recommendation of a ``likely to interfere'' 
          standard. The Judicial Conference's recommendation was issued 
          before the Supreme Court's decision in Gentile v. State Bar of 
          Nev., 501 U.S. 1030 (1991). Gentile, which dealt with a Rule 
          of Professional Conduct governing extrajudicial statements, 
          indicates that a lawyer may be disciplined for making 
          statements that present a substantial likelihood of material 
          prejudice to an accused's right to a fair trial. While the use 
          of protective orders is distinguishable from limitations 
          imposed by a bar's ethics rule, the Gentile decision expressly 
          recognized that the ``speech of lawyers representing clients 
          in pending cases may be regulated under a less demanding 
          standard than that established for regulation of the press in 
          Nebraska Press Ass'n v. Stuart, 427 U.S. 539 (1976), and the 
          cases which preceded it.'' 501 U.S. at 1074. The Court 
          concluded that ``the `substantial likelihood of material 
          prejudice' standard constitutes a constitutionally permissible 
          balance between the First Amendment rights of attorneys in 
          pending cases and the State's interest in fair trials.'' Id. 
          at 1075. Gentile also supports the constitutionality of 
          restricting communications of non-lawyer participants in a 
          court case. Id. at 1072-73 (citing Seattle Times Co. v. 
          Rhinehart, 467 U.S. 20, 32-33 (1984)). Accordingly, a 
          protective order issued under the ``substantial likelihood of 
          material prejudice'' standard is constitutionally permissible.
          ``The first sentence of the discussion is based on the 
          committee comment to the Recommendations Relating to the 
          Conduct of Judicial Proceedings in Criminal Cases. See 87 
          F.R.D. at 530. For a definition of ``party,'' see R.C.M. 
          103(16). The second sentence of the discussion is based on the 
          first of the Judicial Conference's recommendations concerning 
          special orders. See 87 F.R.D. at 529. The third sentence of 
          the discussion is based on the second of the Judicial 
          Conference's recommendations, id. at 532, and on United States 
          v. Salameh, 992 F.2d 445, 447 (2d Cir. 1993) (per curiam), and 
          In re Application of Dow Jones & Co., 842 F.2d 603, 611 & n.1 
          (2d Cir.), cert. denied, 488 U.S. 946 (1988). The fourth 
          sentence is based on Salameh, 992 F.2d at 447. The fifth 
          sentence is based on Rule for Courts-Martial 905(d).''.
          e. The Analysis accompanying R.C.M. 1001(b)(3)(A) is amended 
          by inserting the following at the end thereof:
          ``2002 Amendment: As previously written, R.C.M. 1001(b)(3)(A) 
          offered little guidance about what it meant by ``civilian 
          convictions.'' See, e.g., United States v. White, 47 M.J. 139, 
          140 (C.A.A.F. 1997); United States v. Barnes, 33 M.J. 468, 
          472-73 (C.M.A. 1992); United States v. Slovacek, 24 M.J. 140, 
          141 (CMA), cert. denied, 484 U.S. 855 (1987). The present rule 
          addresses this void and intends to give the sentencing 
          authority as much information as the military judge determines 
          is relevant in order to craft an appropriate sentence for the 
          accused.
          ``Unlike most civilian courts, this rule does not allow 
          admission of more extensive criminal history information, such 
          as arrests. Use of such additional information is not 
          appropriate in the military setting where court-

[[Page 225]]

          martial members, not a military judge, often decide the 
          sentence. Such information risks unnecessarily confusing the 
          members.
          ``The present rule clarifies the term ``conviction'' in light 
          of the complex and varying ways civilian jurisdictions treat 
          the subject. The military judge may admit relevant evidence of 
          civilian convictions without necessarily being bound by the 
          action, procedure, or nomenclature of civilian jurisdictions. 
          Examples of judicial determinations admissible as convictions 
          under this rule include accepted pleas of nolo contendere, 
          pleas accepted under North Carolina v. Alford, 400 U.S. 25 
          (1970), or deferred sentences. If relevant, evidence of 
          forfeiture of bail that results in a judicial determination of 
          guilt is also admissible, as recognized in United States v. 
          Eady, 35 M.J. 15, 16 (C.M.A. 1992). While no time limit is 
          placed upon the admissibility of prior convictions, the 
          military judge should conduct a balancing test to determine 
          whether convictions older than ten years should be admitted or 
          excluded on the basis of relevance and fundamental fairness.
          ``The two central factors in this rule are (1) judicial 
          determination of guilt and (2) assumption of guilt. Assumption 
          of guilt is an all-inclusive term meaning any act by the 
          accused in a judicial proceeding accepting, acknowledging, or 
          admitting guilt. As long as either factor is present, the 
          ``conviction'' is admissible, if relevant. Consequently, this 
          rule departs from the holding in United States v. Hughes, 26 
          M.J. 119, 120 (C.M.A. 1988), where the accused pleaded guilty 
          in a Texas court, but the judge did not enter a finding of 
          guilty under state law allowing ``deferred adjudications.'' 
          Under the present rule, the ``conviction'' would be admissible 
          because the accused pleaded guilty in a judicial proceeding, 
          notwithstanding the fact that the state judge did not enter a 
          finding of guilty.
          ``In contrast, ``deferred prosecutions,'' where there is 
          neither an admission of guilt in a judicial proceeding nor a 
          finding of guilty, would be excluded. The rule also excludes 
          expunged convictions, juvenile adjudications, minor traffic 
          violations, foreign convictions, and tribal court convictions 
          as matters inappropriate for or unnecessarily confusing to 
          courts-martial members. What constitutes a ``minor traffic 
          violation'' within the meaning of this rule is to be decided 
          with reference only to federal law, and not to the laws of 
          individual states. See U.S. Sentencing Guidelines Manual Sec.  
          4A1.2(c)(2); ``What Constitutes `Minor Traffic Infraction' 
          Excludable From Calculation of Defendant's Criminal History 
          under United States Sentencing Guideline Sec.  4A1.2(c)(2),'' 
          113 A.L.R. Fed. 561 (1993).
          ``Additionally, because of the lack of clarity in the previous 
          rule, courts sometimes turned to Mil. R. Evid. 609 for 
          guidance. See, e.g., Slovacek, 24 M.J. at 141. We note that 
          because the policies behind Mil. R. Evid. 609 and the present 
          rule differ greatly, a conviction that may not be appropriate 
          for impeachment purposes under Mil. R. Evid. 609, may 
          nevertheless be admissible under the present rule.
          ``The Federal Sentencing Guidelines were consulted when 
          drafting the present rule. Although informed by those 
          guidelines, the present rule departs from them in many 
          respects because of the wide differences between the courts-
          martial process and practice in federal district court.''.
          f. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1003(b)(3) is amended by adding at 
          the end the following new paragraph:

[[Page 226]]

          ``2002 Amendment: The amendment clearly defines the authority 
          of special and summary courts-martial to adjudge both fines 
          and forfeitures. See generally United States v. Tualla, 52 
          M.J. 228 (2000).''
          g. The Analysis accompanying R.C.M. 1003(b)(7) is amended by 
          adding at the end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: This change resulted from the enactment of 
          Article 56a, UCMJ, in section 581 of the National Defense 
          Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998, Pub. L. No. 105-85, 
          111 Stat. 1629, 1759 (1997).''.
          h. The Analysis accompanying R.C.M. 1004(e) is amended by 
          adding at the end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: This change resulted from the enactment of 
          Article 56a, UCMJ, in section 581 of the National Defense 
          Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998, Pub. L. No. 105-85, 
          111 Stat. 1629, 1759 (1997).''.
          i. The Analysis accompanying R.C.M. 1006(c) is amended by 
          adding at the end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: This change to the discussion resulted from 
          the enactment of Article 56a, UCMJ, in section 581 of the 
          National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998, Pub. 
          L. No. 105-85, 111 Stat. 1629, 1759 (1997).''.
          j. The Analysis accompanying R.C.M. 1006(d) is amended by 
          inserting after the analysis of subsection 3(A) following 
          paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (d)(4)(B) was amended as a result 
          of the enactment of Article 56a, UCMJ, in section 581 of the 
          National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998, Pub. 
          L. No. 105-85, 111 Stat. 1629, 1759 (1997).''.
          k. The Analysis accompanying R.C.M. 1009 is amended by adding 
          at the end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (e)(3)(B)(ii) was amended as a 
          result of the enactment of Article 56a, UCMJ, in section 581 
          of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
          1998, Pub. L. No. 105-85, 111 Stat. 1629, 1759 (1997).''.
          l. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1103 (b)(2) is amended by adding at 
          the end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (b)(2)(B) was amended to 
          implement the amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, 
          UCMJ) contained in section 577 of the National Defense 
          Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106-65, 113 
          Stat. 512 (1999) increasing the jurisdictional maximum 
          punishment at special courts-martial. R.C.M. 1103(b)(2)(B) was 
          amended to prevent an inconsistent requirement for a verbatim 
          transcript between a general court-martial and a special 
          court-martial when the adjudged sentence of a general court-
          martial does not include a punitive discharge or confinement 
          greater than six months, but does include forfeiture of two-
          thirds pay per month for more than six months but not more 
          than 12 months.''.
          m. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1103(c) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (c) was amended to implement the 
          amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, UCMJ) contained 
          in section 577 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
          Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106-65, 113 Stat. 512 (1999) 
          increasing the jurisdictional maximum pun

[[Page 227]]

          ishment at special courts-martial. R.C.M. 1103(c) was amended 
          to conform the requirements for a verbatim transcript with the 
          requirements of Article 19 for a 'complete record' in cases 
          where the adjudged sentence includes a bad-conduct discharge, 
          confinement for more than six months, or forfeiture of pay for 
          more than six months.''.
          n. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1103(f) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (f)(1) was amended to implement 
          the amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, UCMJ) 
          contained in section 577 of the National Defense Authorization 
          Act for Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106Sec. 65, 113 Stat. 512 
          (1999) increasing the jurisdictional maximum punishment at 
          special courts-martial. R.C.M. 1103(f)(1) was amended to 
          include the additional limitations on sentence contained in 
          Article 19, UCMJ.''.
          o. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1104(a) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (a)(2)(A) was amended to 
          implement the amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, 
          UCMJ) contained in section 577 of the National Defense 
          Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106-65, 113 
          Stat. 512 (1999) increasing the jurisdictional maximum 
          punishment at special courts-martial. R.C.M. 1104(a)(2)(A) was 
          amended to ensure that the military judge authenticates all 
          verbatim records of trial at special courts-martial.''.
          p. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1104(e) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (e) was amended to implement the 
          amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, UCMJ) contained 
          in section 577 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
          Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106-65, 113 Stat. 512 (1999) 
          increasing the jurisdictional maximum punishment at special 
          courts-martial. This amendment reflects the change to R.C.M. 
          1106 for special court- martial with an adjudged sentence that 
          includes confinement for one year.''.
          q. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1106(a) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (a) was amended to implement the 
          amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, UCMJ) contained 
          in section 577 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
          Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106-65, 113 Stat. 512 (1999) 
          increasing the jurisdictional maximum punishment at special 
          courts-martial. This amendment requires all special courts-
          martial cases subject to appellate review to comply with this 
          rule.''.
          r. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1107(d) is amended by inserting 
          after the first paragraph the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: The Discussion accompanying subsection 
          (d)(1) was amended to implement the amendment to 10 U.S.C. 
          Sec.  819 (Article 19, UCMJ) contained in section 577 of the 
          National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. 
          No. 106-65, 113 Stat. 512 (1999) increasing the jurisdictional 
          maximum punishment at special courts-martial. R.C.M. 
          1107(d)(4) was amended to include the additional limitations 
          on sentence contained in Article 19, UCMJ.''.
          s. The Analysis accompanying R.C.M. 1107(d) is amended by 
          adding at the end the following new paragraphs:

[[Page 228]]

          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (d)(4) was amended as a result of 
          the enactment of Article 56a, UCMJ, in section 581 of the 
          National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998, Pub. 
          L. No. 105-85, 111 Stat. 1629, 1759 (1997).
          ``Subsection (d)(5) is new. The amendment addresses the impact 
          of Article 58b, UCMJ. In special courts-martial, where the 
          cumulative impact of a fine and forfeitures, whether adjudged 
          or by operation of Article 58b, would otherwise exceed the 
          total dollar amount of forfeitures that could be adjudged at 
          the special court-martial, the fine and/or adjudged 
          forfeitures should be disapproved or decreased accordingly. 
          See generally United States v. Tualla, 52 M.J. 228, 231-32 
          (2000).''
          t. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1109 is amended by adding at the end 
          the following new paragraphs:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (e) was amended to implement the 
          amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, UCMJ) contained 
          in section 577 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
          Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106-65, 113 Stat. 512 (1999) 
          increasing the jurisdictional maximum punishment at special 
          courts-martial.
          ``(f) Vacation of a suspended special court-martial sentence 
          that includes a bad-conduct discharge or confinement for one 
          year. Subsection (f) was amended to implement the amendment to 
          10 U.S.C. Sec. thnsp;819 (Article 19, UCMJ) contained in 
          section 577 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
          Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106-65, 113 Stat. 512 (1999) 
          increasing the jurisdictional maximum punishment at special 
          courts-martial. This amendment reflects the decision to treat 
          an approved sentence of confinement for one year, regardless 
          of whether any period of confinement is suspended, as a 
          serious offense, in the same manner as a suspended approved 
          bad-conduct discharge at special courts-martial under Article 
          72, UCMJ, and R.C.M. 1109.''.
          u. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1110(a) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subsection (a) was amended to implement the 
          amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, UCMJ) contained 
          in section 577 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
          Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106-65, 113 Stat. 512 (1999) 
          increasing the jurisdictional maximum punishment at special 
          courts-martial.''.
          v. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1111 is amended by adding at the end 
          the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: R.C.M. 1111(b) was amended to implement the 
          amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, UCMJ) contained 
          in section 577 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
          Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No. 106-65, 113 Stat. 512 (1999) 
          increasing the jurisdictional maximum punishment at special 
          courts-martial. The amendment ensures all special courts-
          martial not requiring appellate review are reviewed by a judge 
          advocate under R.C.M. 1112.''.
          w. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1112 is amended by adding at the end 
          the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: R.C.M. 1112(a)(2) was amended to implement 
          the amendment to 10 U.S.C. Sec.  819 (Article 19, UCMJ) 
          contained in section 577 of the National Defense Authorization 
          Act for Fiscal Year 2000, P. L. No.

[[Page 229]]

          106-65, 113 Stat. 512 (1999) increasing the jurisdictional 
          maximum punishment at special courts-martial. The amendment 
          ensures all special courts-martial not requiring appellate 
          review are reviewed by a judge advocate under R.C.M. 1112.''.
          x. The Analysis to R.C.M. 1305 (d) is amended to read as 
          follows:
          ``(d) Forwarding copies of the record. Subsection (1) is based 
          on Article 60(b)(2). Subsection (2) is based on the third 
          paragraph of paragraph 91c of MCM, 1969 (Rev.). Subsection (3) 
          is self- explanatory.
          ``2001 Amendment: Subsection (d)(2) was amended to strike the 
          reference to ``subsection (e)(1)'' and insert a reference to 
          ``subsection (d)(1)'' to reflect the 1995 amendment that 
          redesignated R.C.M. 1305(e) as R.C.M. 1305(d).''.
          2. Changes to Appendix 22, the Analysis Accompanying the 
          Military Rules of Evidence (Part III, MCM).
          a. The Analysis to Mil. R. Evid. 413 is amended by adding at 
          the end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Federal Rule of Evidence 415 which created a 
          similar character evidence rule for civil cases, became 
          applicable to the Military Rules of Evidence on January 6, 
          1996, pursuant to Rule 1102. Federal Rule 415, however, is no 
          longer applicable to the Military Rules of Evidence, as stated 
          in Section 1 of Executive Order , 2002 Amendments to the 
          Manual for Court-Martial, United States, (date) Rule 415 was 
          deleted because it applies only to federal civil 
          proceedings.''.
          b. The Analysis to Mil. R. Evid. 414 is amended by adding at 
          the end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Federal Rule of Evidence 415 which created a 
          similar character evidence rule for civil cases, became 
          applicable to the Military Rules of Evidence on January 6, 
          1996, pursuant to Rule 1102. Federal Rule 415, however, is no 
          longer applicable to the Military Rules of Evidence, as stated 
          in Section 1 of Executive Order , 2002 Amendments to the 
          Manual for Court-Martial, United States, (date) Rule 415 was 
          deleted because it applies only to federal civil 
          proceedings.''
          c. The analysis to Mil. R. Evid. 615 is amended by adding at 
          the end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: These changes are intended to extend to 
          victims at courts-martial the same rights granted to victims 
          by the Victims' Rights and Restitution Act of 1990, 42 U.S.C. 
          Sec.  10606(b)(4), giving crime victims '[t]he right to be 
          present at all public court proceedings related to the 
          offense, unless the court determines that testimony by the 
          victim would be materially affected if the victim heard other 
          testimony at trial,' and the Victim Rights Clarification Act 
          of 1997, 18 U.S.C. Sec.  3510, which is restated in subsection 
          (5). For the purposes of this rule, the term 'victim' includes 
          all persons defined as victims in 42 U.S.C. Sec.  10607(e)(2), 
          which means 'a person that has suffered direct physical, 
          emotional, or pecuniary harm as a result of the commission of 
          a crime, including'--(A) in the case of a victim that is an 
          institutional entity, an authorized representative of the 
          entity; and (B) in the case of a victim who is under 18 years 
          of age, incompetent, incapacitated, or deceased, one of the 
          following (in order of preference): (i) a spouse; (ii) a legal 
          guardian; (iii) a parent; (iv) a child; (v) a sibling; (vi) 
          another family member; or (vii) another person designated by 
          the court.

[[Page 230]]

          'The victim's right to remain in the courtroom remains subject 
          to other rules, such as those regarding classified 
          information, witness deportment, and conduct in the courtroom. 
          Subsection (4) is intended to capture only those statutes 
          applicable to courts-martial.''.
          3. Changes to Appendix 23, the Analysis accompanying the 
          Punitive Articles (Part IV, MCM).
          a. The Analysis to paragraph 27(e) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: The monetary amount affecting the maximum 
          punishments has been revised from $100 to $500 to account for 
          inflation. The last change was in 1969 raising the amount to 
          $100. The value has also been readjusted to realign it more 
          closely with the division between felony and misdemeanor 
          penalties in civilian jurisdictions. See generally American 
          Law Institute, Model Penal Code and Commentaries Sec.  223.1 
          (1980) (suggesting $500 as the value). The amendment also adds 
          the phrase 'or any firearm or explosive' as an additional 
          criterion. This is because, regardless of the intrinsic value 
          of such items, the threat to the community is substantial when 
          such items are wrongfully bought, sold, traded, dealt in or 
          disposed.''.
          b. The Analysis to paragraph 31(c)(6) is amended to read as 
          follows:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subparagraph c(6), 'Statements made during 
          an interrogation,' was removed in light of questions raised by 
          the Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces in United States v. 
          Solis, 46 M.J. 31, 35 (C.A.A.F. 1997). In Solis, the court 
          said subparagraph c(6) could be viewed as serving at least 
          three different purposes. It could be (1) an expansive 
          description of dicta with no intent to limit prosecutions; (2) 
          protection for an accused against overcharging; or (3) 
          guidance for the conduct of investigations. Subparagraph c(6) 
          was never intended to establish either procedural rights for 
          an accused or internal guidelines to regulate government 
          conduct. Subparagraph (c)(6) was based upon United States v. 
          Aronson, 8 U.S.C.M.A. 525, 25 C.M.R. 29 (1957); United States 
          v. Washington, 9 U.S.C.M.A. 131, 25 C.M.R. 393 (1958) and 
          United States v. Davenport, 9 M.J. 364 (C.M.A. 1980) and was 
          intended merely to describe the rule developed in those cases 
          that a false statement to a law enforcement agent, when made 
          by a servicemember without an independent duty to speak, was 
          not 'official' and therefore not within the purview of Article 
          107. The subparagraph is removed because the position of the 
          Court of Military Appeals in the three decisions noted above 
          was abandoned in United States v. Jackson, 26 M.J. 377 (C.M.A. 
          1988) and the deleted paragraph no longer accurately describes 
          the current state of the law.''.
          c. The Analysis to paragraph 32(e) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: The monetary amount affecting the maximum 
          punishments has been revised from $100 to $500 to account for 
          inflation. The last change was in 1969 raising the amount to 
          $100. The value has also been readjusted to realign it more 
          closely with the division between felony and misdemeanor 
          penalties in civilian jurisdictions. See generally American 
          Law Institute, Model Penal Code and Commentaries Sec.  223.1 
          (1980) (suggesting $500 as the value). Although the monetary 
          amount affecting punishment in 18 U.S.C. Sec.  1361, 
          Government property or contracts, and 18 U.S.C. Sec.  641, 
          Public money, property or records, was increased from $100

[[Page 231]]

          to $1000 pursuant to section 606 of the Economic Espionage Act 
          of 1996, P. L. No. 104-294, 110 Stat. 3488 (1996), a value of 
          $500 was chosen to maintain deterrence, simplicity, and 
          uniformity for the Manual's property offenses.''.
          d. The Analysis to paragraph 33(e) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: The monetary amount affecting the maximum 
          punishments has been revised from $100 to $500 to account for 
          inflation. The last change was in 1969 raising the amount to 
          $100. The value has also been readjusted to realign it more 
          closely with the division between felony and misdemeanor 
          penalties in civilian jurisdictions. See generally American 
          Law Institute, Model Penal Code and Commentaries Sec.  223.1 
          (1980) (suggesting $500 as the value).''.
          e. The Analysis to paragraph 46(c) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: Subparagraph c(1)(h)(vi) is new. It was 
          added to provide guidance on how unauthorized credit, debit, 
          or electronic transactions should usually be charged. See 
          United States v. Duncan, 30 M.J. 1284, 289 (N.M.C.M.R. 1990) 
          (citing United States v. Jones, 29 C.M.R. 651 (A.B.R. 1960), 
          petition denied, 30 C.M.R. 417 (C.M.A. 1960)) (regarding 
          thefts from ATM machines). Alternative charging theories are 
          also available, see United States v. Leslie, 13 M.J. 170 
          (C.M.A. 1982); United States v. Ragins, 11 M.J. 42 (C.M.A. 
          1981); United States v. Schaper, 42 M.J. 737 (A.F. Ct. Crim. 
          App. 1995); and United States v. Christy, 18 M.J. 688 
          (N.M.C.M.R. 1984). The key under Article 121 is that the 
          accused wrongfully obtained goods or money from a person or 
          entity with a superior possessory interest.''.
          f. The Analysis to paragraph 46(e) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: The monetary amount affecting the maximum 
          punishments has been revised from $100 to $500 to account for 
          inflation. The last change was in 1969 raising the amount to 
          $100. The value has also been readjusted to realign it more 
          closely with the division between felony and misdemeanor 
          penalties in civilian jurisdictions. See generally American 
          Law Institute, Model Penal Code and Commentaries Sec.  223.1 
          (1980) (suggesting $500 as the value). Although the monetary 
          amount effecting punishment in 18 U.S.C. Sec.  1361, 
          Government property or contracts, and 18 U.S.C. Sec.  641, 
          Public money, property or records, was increased from $100 to 
          $1000 pursuant to section 606 of the Economic Espionage Act of 
          1996, P. L. No. 104-294, 110 Stat. 3488 (1996), a value of 
          $500 was chosen to maintain deterrence, simplicity, and 
          uniformity for the Manual's property offenses.''.
          g. The Analysis to paragraph 49(e) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: The monetary amount affecting the maximum 
          punishments has been revised from $100 to $500 to account for 
          inflation. The last change was in 1969 raising the amount to 
          $100. The value has also been readjusted to realign it more 
          closely with the division between felony and misdemeanor 
          penalties in civilian jurisdictions. See generally American 
          Law Institute, Model Penal Code and Commentaries Sec.  223.1 
          (1980) (suggesting $500 as the value).''.

[[Page 232]]

          h. The Analysis to paragraph 52(e) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: The monetary amount affecting the maximum 
          punishments has been revised from $100 to $500 to account for 
          inflation. The last change was in 1969 raising the amount to 
          $100. The value has also been readjusted to realign it more 
          closely with the division between felony and misdemeanor 
          penalties in civilian jurisdictions. See generally American 
          Law Institute, Model Penal Code and Commentaries Sec.  223.1 
          (1980) (suggesting $500 as the value). A value of $500 was 
          chosen to maintain deterrence, simplicity, and uniformity for 
          the Manual's property offenses. 18 U.S.C. Sec.  81, Arson 
          within special maritime and territorial jurisdiction, no 
          longer grades the offense on the basis of value.''.
          i. The Analysis to paragraph 58(e) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: The monetary amount affecting the maximum 
          punishments has been revised from $100 to $500 to account for 
          inflation. The last change was in 1969 raising the amount to 
          $100. The value has also been readjusted to realign it more 
          closely with the division between felony and misdemeanor 
          penalties in civilian jurisdictions. See generally American 
          Law Institute, Model Penal Code and Commentaries Sec.  223.1 
          (1980) (suggesting $500 as the value).''.
          j. The Analysis to paragraph 62. Article 134 ' (Adultery) is 
          amended to read as follows:
          ``c. Explanation. (1) Subparagraph c(2) is based on United 
          States. v. Snyder, 4 C.M.R. 15 (1952); United States v. Ruiz, 
          46 M.J. 503 (A. F. Ct. Crim. App. 1997); United States v. 
          Green, 39 M.J. 606 (A.C.M.R. 1994); United States v. Collier, 
          36 M.J. 501 (A.F.C.M.R. 1992); United States v. Perez, 33 M.J. 
          1050 (A.C.M.R. 1991); United States v. Linnear, 16 M.J. 628 
          (A.F.C.M.R. 1983); Part IV, paragraph 60c(2)(a) of MCM. 
          Subparagraph c(3) is based on United States v. Poole, 39 M.J. 
          819 (A.C.M.R. 1994). Subparagraph c(4) is based on United 
          States v. Fogarty, 35 M.J. 885 (A.C.M.R. 1992); Military 
          Judges' Benchbook, DA PAM 27-9, paragraph 3-62-1 and 5-11-2 
          (30 Sep. 1996). See R.C.M. 916(j) and (l)(1) for a general 
          discussion of mistake of fact and ignorance, which cannot be 
          based on a negligent failure to discover the true facts.
          ``(2) When determining whether adulterous acts constitute the 
          offense of adultery under Article 134, commanders should 
          consider the listed factors. Each commander has discretion to 
          dispose of offenses by members of the command. As with any 
          alleged offense, however, under R.C.M. 306(b) commanders 
          should dispose of an allegation of adultery at the lowest 
          appropriate level. As the R.C.M. 306(b) discussion states, 
          many factors must be taken into consideration and balanced, 
          including, to the extent practicable, the nature of the 
          offense, any mitigating or extenuating circumstances, the 
          character and military service of the military member, any 
          recommendations made by subordinate commanders, the interests 
          of justice, military exigencies, and the effect of the 
          decision on the military member and the command. The goal 
          should be a disposition that is warranted, appropriate, and 
          fair. In the case of officers, also consult the explanation to 
          paragraph 59 in deciding how to dispose of an allegation of 
          adultery.''.
          k. The Analysis to paragraph 78(e) is amended by adding at the 
          end the following new paragraph:

[[Page 233]]

          ``2002 Amendment: The monetary amount affecting the maximum 
          punishments has been revised from $100 to $500 to account for 
          inflation. The last change was in 1969 raising the amount to 
          $100. The value has also been readjusted to realign it more 
          closely with the division between felony and misdemeanor 
          penalties in civilian jurisdictions. See generally American 
          Law Institute, Model Penal Code and Commentaries Sec.  223.1 
          (1980) (suggesting $500 as the value).''.
          l. The Analysis to paragraph 106(e) is amended by adding at 
          the end the following new paragraph:
          ``2002 Amendment: The monetary amount affecting the maximum 
          punishments has been revised from $100 to $500 to account for 
          inflation. The last change was in 1969 raising the amount to 
          $100. The value has also been readjusted to realign it more 
          closely with the division between felony and misdemeanor 
          penalties in civilian jurisdictions. See generally American 
          Law Institute, Model Penal Code and Commentaries Sec.  223.1 
          (1980) (suggesting $500 as the value).''.

EO 13263

Executive Order 13263 of April 29, 2002

President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and to improve 
          America's mental health service delivery system for 
          individuals with serious mental illness and children with 
          serious emotional disturbances, it is hereby ordered as 
          follows:
          etion 1. Establishment. There is hereby 
          established the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental 
          Health (Commission).
          e. 2. Membership. (a) The Commission's 
          membership shall be composed of:

  (i) Not more than fifteen members appointed by the President, including 
providers, payers, administrators, and consumers of mental health services 
and family members of consumers; and

  (ii) Not more than seven ex officio members, four of whom shall be 
designated by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, and the remaining 
three of whom shall be designated--one each--by the Secretaries of the 
Departments of Labor, Education, and Veterans Affairs.

          (b) The President shall designate a Chair from among the 
          fifteen members of the Commission appointed by the President.
          e. 3. Mission. The mission of the 
          Commission shall be to conduct a comprehensive study of the 
          United States mental health service delivery system, including 
          public and private sector providers, and to advise the 
          President on methods of improving the system. The Commission's 
          goal shall be to recommend improvements to enable adults with 
          serious mental illness and children with serious emotional 
          disturbances to live, work, learn, and participate fully in 
          their communities. In carrying out its mission, the Commission 
          shall, at a minimum:
          (a) Review the current quality and effectiveness of public and 
          private providers and Federal, State, and local government 
          involvement in the de

[[Page 234]]

          livery of services to individuals with serious mental 
          illnesses and children with serious emotional disturbances, 
          and identify unmet needs and barriers to services.
          (b) Identify innovative mental health treatments, services, 
          and technologies that are demonstrably effective and can be 
          widely replicated in different settings.
          (c) Formulate policy options that could be implemented by 
          public and private providers, and Federal, State, and local 
          governments to integrate the use of effective treatments and 
          services, improve coordination among service providers, and 
          improve community integration for adults with serious mental 
          illnesses and children with serious emotional disturbances.
          e. 4. Principles. In conducting its 
          mission, the Commission shall adhere to the following 
          principles:
          (a) The Commission shall focus on the desired outcomes of 
          mental health care, which are to attain each individual's 
          maximum level of employment, self-care, interpersonal 
          relationships, and community participation;
          (b) The Commission shall focus on community-level models of 
          care that efficiently coordinate the multiple health and human 
          service providers and public and private payers involved in 
          mental health treatment and delivery of services;
          (c) The Commission shall focus on those policies that maximize 
          the utility of existing resources by increasing cost 
          effectiveness and reducing unnecessary and burdensome 
          regulatory barriers;
          (d) The Commission shall consider how mental health research 
          findings can be used most effectively to influence the 
          delivery of services; and
          (e) The Commission shall follow the principles of Federalism, 
          and ensure that its recommendations promote innovation, 
          flexibility, and accountability at all levels of government 
          and respect the constitutional role of the States and Indian 
          tribes.
          e. 5. Administration. (a) The Department 
          of Health and Human Services, to the extent permitted by law, 
          shall provide funding and administrative support for the 
          Commission.
          (b) To the extent funds are available and as authorized by law 
          for persons serving intermittently in Government service (5 
          U.S.C. 5701-5707), members of the Commission appointed from 
          among private citizens of the United States may be allowed 
          travel expenses while engaged in the work of the Commission, 
          including per diem in lieu of subsistence. All members of the 
          Commission who are officers or employees of the United States 
          shall serve without compensation in addition to that received 
          for their services as officers or employees of the United 
          States.
          (c) The Commission shall have a staff headed by an Executive 
          Director, who shall be selected by the President. To the 
          extent permitted by law, office space, analytical support, and 
          additional staff support for the Commission shall be provided 
          by executive branch departments and agencies.
          (d) Insofar as the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended, 
          may apply to the Commission, any functions of the President 
          under that Act, except for those in section 6 of that Act, 
          shall be performed by the Depart

[[Page 235]]

          ment of Health and Human Services, in accordance with the 
          guidelines that have been issued by the Administrator of 
          General Services.
          e. 6. Reports. The Commission shall 
          submit reports to the President as follows:
          (a) Interim Report. Within 6 months from the date of this 
          order, an interim report shall describe the extent of unmet 
          needs and barriers to care within the mental health system and 
          provide examples of community-based care models with success 
          in coordination of services and providing desired outcomes.
          (b) Final Report. The final report will set forth the 
          Commission's recommendations, in accordance with its mission 
          as stated in section 3 of this order. The submission date 
          shall be determined by the Chair in consultation with the 
          President.
          e. 7. Termination. The Commission shall 
          terminate 1 year from the date of this order, unless extended 
          by the President prior to that date.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

April 29, 2002.

EO 13264

Executive Order 13264 of June 4, 2002

Amendment to Executive Order 13180, Air Traffic Performance-Based 
Organization

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered that Executive Order 13180 of December 7, 2000, is 
          amended as follows:
          etion 1. The first sentence of that order 
          is amended by deleting ``, an inherently governmental 
          function,''.
          et. 2. Section 6 of that order is amended 
          to read as follows: ``This order is intended only to improve 
          the internal management of the executive branch and is not 
          intended to, nor does it, create any right to administrative 
          or judicial review, or any right, whether substantive or 
          procedural, enforceable by any party against the United 
          States, its agencies or instrumentalities, its officers or 
          employees, or any other person.''

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

June 4, 2002.

EO 13265

Executive Order 13265 of June 6, 2002

President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and to expand 
          the executive branch's pro

[[Page 236]]

          gram for physical fitness and sports and establish the 
          President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports (the 
          ``Council''), it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Purpose. The Secretary of Health 
          and Human Services (Secretary) shall, in carrying out his 
          responsibilities for public health and human services, develop 
          and coordinate a national program to enhance physical activity 
          and sports participation. Through this program, the Secretary 
          shall seek to:
          (a) expand national interest in and awareness of the benefits 
          of regular physical activity and active sports participation;
          (b) stimulate and enhance coordination of programs within and 
          among the private and public sectors that promote 
          participation in, and safe and easy access to, physical 
          activity and sports;
          (c) expand availability of quality information and guidance 
          regarding physical activity and sports participation;
          (d) integrate physical activity into a broader health-
          promotion and disease-prevention effort through Federal 
          agencies and the private sector; and
          (e) target all Americans, with particular emphasis on children 
          and adolescents, as well as populations or communities in 
          which specific risks or disparities in participation in, 
          access to, or knowledge about the benefits of physical 
          activity have been identified.
          e. 2. The President's Council on Physical 
          Fitness and Sports.
          (a) There is hereby established the President's Council on 
          Physical Fitness and Sports.
          (b) The Council shall be composed of up to 20 members 
          appointed by the President. The President may designate one or 
          more members to be Chair or Vice Chair. Each member shall 
          serve for a term of 2 years and may continue to serve after 
          the expiration of that term until a successor is appointed.
          e. 3. Functions of the Council.
          (a) The Council shall advise the President, through the 
          Secretary, concerning progress made in carrying out the 
          provisions of this order and shall recommend to the President, 
          through the Secretary, actions to accelerate progress.
          (b) The Council shall advise the Secretary on ways to enhance 
          opportunities for participation in physical fitness and 
          sports. Recommendations may address, but are not necessarily 
          limited to, public awareness campaigns, Federal, State, and 
          local physical activity initiatives, and partnership 
          opportunities between public- and private-sector health-
          promotion entities.
          (c) The Council shall function as a liaison to relevant State, 
          local, and private entities in order to advise the Secretary 
          regarding opportunities to extend and improve physical 
          activity programs and services at both the local and national 
          levels.
          (d) The Council shall monitor the need for the enhancement of 
          programs and educational and promotional materials sponsored, 
          overseen, or disseminated by the Council, and shall advise the 
          Secretary as necessary concerning such need.

[[Page 237]]

          e. 4. Administration.
          (a) Each Federal agency shall, to the extent permitted by law 
          and subject to available funds, furnish such information and 
          assistance to the Secretary and the Council as they may 
          request.
          (b) The members of the Council shall serve without 
          compensation for their work on the Council. Members of the 
          Council may, however, receive travel expenses, including per 
          diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by law for persons 
          serving intermittently in the Government (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707).
          (c) To the extent permitted by law, the Secretary shall 
          furnish the Council with necessary staff, supplies, 
          facilities, and other administrative services. The expenses of 
          the Council shall be paid from funds available to the 
          Secretary.
          (d) The Secretary shall appoint an Executive Director of the 
          Council who shall serve as a liaison to the Secretary and the 
          White House on matters and activities pertaining to the 
          Council.
          (e) The Council may establish subcommittees as appropriate to 
          aid in its work. Such subcommittees shall meet on a voluntary 
          basis and be defined by objectives established in coordination 
          with and agreed upon by the Secretary and the President.
          (f) The seal prescribed by Executive Order 10830 of July 24, 
          1959, as amended, shall be the seal of the President's Council 
          on Physical Fitness and Sports established by this order.
          e. 5. General Provisions.
          (a) Insofar as the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended 
          (5 U.S.C. App.) (Act), may apply to the Administration of any 
          portion of this order, any functions of the President under 
          the Act, except that of reporting to the Congress, shall be 
          performed by the Secretary in accordance with the guidelines 
          and procedures issued by the Administrator of General 
          Services.
          (b) In accordance with the Act, the Council shall terminate 2 
          years from the date of this order, unless extended by the 
          President.
          (c) Executive Order 12345 of February 2, 1982, as amended, is 
          revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 June 6, 2002.

EO 13266

Executive Order 13266 of June 20, 2002

Activities To Promote Personal Fitness

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          improve the efficiency and coordination of Federal policies 
          related to personal fitness of the general public, it is 
          hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Policy. This order is issued 
          consistent with the following findings and principles:

[[Page 238]]

          (a) Growing scientific evidence indicates that an increasing 
          number of Americans are suffering from negligible physical 
          activity, poor dietary habits, insufficient utilization of 
          preventive health screenings, and engaging in risky behaviors 
          such as abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs.
          (b) Existing information on the importance of appropriate 
          physical activity, diet, preventive health screenings, and 
          avoiding harmful substances is often not received by the 
          public, or, if received, is not acted on sufficiently.
          (c) Individuals of all ages, locations, and levels of personal 
          fitness can benefit from some level of appropriate physical 
          activity, dietary guidance, preventive health screening, and 
          making healthy choices.
          (d) While personal fitness is an individual responsibility, 
          the Federal Government may, within the authority and funds 
          otherwise available, expand the opportunities for individuals 
          to empower themselves to improve their general health. Such 
          opportunities may include improving the flow of information 
          about personal fitness, assisting in the utilization of that 
          information, increasing the accessibility of resources for 
          physical activity, and reducing barriers to achieving good 
          personal fitness.
          e. 2. Agency Responsibilities in 
          Promoting Personal Fitness.
          (a) The Secretaries of Agriculture, Education, Health and 
          Human Services (HHS), Housing and Urban Development, Interior, 
          Labor, Transportation, and Veterans Affairs, and the Director 
          of the Office of National Drug Policy shall review and 
          evaluate the policies, programs, and regulations of their 
          respective departments and offices that in any way relate to 
          the personal fitness of the general public. Based on that 
          review, the Secretaries and the Director shall determine 
          whether existing policies, programs, and regulations of their 
          respective departments and offices should be modified or 
          whether new policies or programs could be implemented. These 
          new policies and programs shall be consistent with otherwise 
          available authority and appropriated funds, and shall improve 
          the Federal Government's assistance of individuals, private 
          organizations, and State and local governments to (i) increase 
          physical activity; (ii) promote responsible dietary habits; 
          (iii) increase utilization of preventive health screenings; 
          and (iv) encourage healthy choices concerning alcohol, 
          tobacco, drugs, and safety among the general public.
          (b) Each department and office included in section 2(a) shall 
          report to the President, through the Secretary of Health and 
          Human Services, its proposed actions within 90 days of the 
          date of this order.
          (c) There shall be a Personal Fitness Interagency Working 
          Group (Working Group), composed of the Secretaries or Director 
          of the departments and office included in section 2(a) (or 
          their designees) and chaired by the Secretary of HHS or his 
          designee. In order to improve efficiency through information 
          sharing and to eliminate waste and overlap, the Working Group 
          shall work to ensure the cooperation of Federal agencies in 
          coordinating Federal personal fitness activities. The Working 
          Group shall meet subject to the call of the Chair, but not 
          less than twice a year. The Department of Health and Human 
          Services shall provide such administrative support to the 
          Working Group as the Secretary of HHS deems necessary. Each 
          member of the Working Group shall be a full-time or permanent 
          part-time officer or employee of the Federal Government.

[[Page 239]]

          e. 3. General Provisions. This order is 
          intended only to improve the internal management of the 
          executive branch and it is not intended to, and does not, 
          create any right, benefit, trust, or responsibility, 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity by a 
          party against the United States, its departments, agencies or 
          entities, its officers or employees, or any person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 June 20, 2002.

EO 13267

Executive Order 13267 of June 20, 2002

Establishing a Transition Planning Office for the Department of Homeland 
Security Within the Office of Management and Budget

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment. I hereby 
          establish within the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a 
          Transition Planning Office for the Department of Homeland 
          Security (the ``Transition Planning Office''), to be headed by 
          the Director of the Transition Planning Office for the 
          Department of Homeland Security (the ``Director for Transition 
          Planning'').
          e. 2. Missions. The missions of the 
          Transition Planning Office shall be to:
          (a) coordinate, guide, and conduct transition and related 
          planning throughout the executive branch of the United States 
          Government in preparation for establishment of the proposed 
          Department of Homeland Security; and
          (b) consistent with Presidential guidance, work with the 
          Congress as it considers legislation to establish that 
          Department.
          e. 3. Administration. (a) The Director of 
          OMB shall ensure that the Transition Planning Office receives 
          appropriate personnel (including detailees and assignees, as 
          appropriate), funding, and administrative support for the 
          Office, subject to the availability of appropriations. The 
          Director of OMB is authorized to make expenditures under 
          section 522 of title 31, United States Code, as may be 
          appropriate to carry out this order.
          (b) If an individual who is an Assistant to the President is 
          appointed to serve simultaneously as Director for Transition 
          Planning, the functioning, personnel, funds, records, and 
          property of the office of the Assistant to the President and 
          the office of the Director for Transition Planning shall be 
          kept separate in the same manner as if the two offices were 
          headed by two different individuals.
          e. 4. Other Departments and Agencies. 
          This order does not alter the existing authorities of United 
          States Government departments and agencies. In carrying out 
          the missions set forth in section 2 of this order, all 
          executive departments and agencies are directed to assist the 
          Director for Transi

[[Page 240]]

          tion Planning and the Transition Planning Office to the extent 
          permitted by law.
          e. 5. Termination. The Transition 
          Planning Office, and all the authorities of this order, shall 
          terminate within 90 days after the date on which legislation 
          creating the Department of Homeland Security is enacted, or 
          within 1 year of the date of this order, whichever occurs 
          first.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 June 20, 2002.

EO 13268

Executive Order 13268 of July 2, 2002

Termination of Emergency With Respect to the Taliban and Amendment of 
Executive Order 13224 of September 23, 2001

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et 
          seq.), the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.) 
          (NEA), section 5 of the United Nations Participation Act of 
          1945, as amended (22 U.S.C. 287c), and section 301 of title 3, 
          United States Code,
          I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, 
          find that the situation that gave rise to the declaration of a 
          national emergency in Executive Order 13129 of July 4, 1999, 
          with respect to the Taliban, in allowing territory under its 
          control in Afghanistan to be used as a safe haven and base of 
          operations for Usama bin Ladin and the Al-Qaida organization, 
          has been significantly altered given the success of the 
          military campaign in Afghanistan, and hereby revoke that order 
          and terminate the national emergency declared in that order 
          with respect to the Taliban. At the same time, and in order to 
          take additional steps with respect to the grave acts of 
          terrorism and threats of terrorism committed by foreign 
          terrorists, the continuing and immediate threat of further 
          attacks on United States nationals or the United States, and 
          the national emergency described and declared in Executive 
          Order 13224 of September 23, 2001, I hereby order:
          etion 1. The Annex to Executive Order 
          13224 of September 23, 2001, is amended by adding thereto the 
          following persons in appropriate alphabetical order:
           Mohammed Omar (aka, Amir al-Mumineen [Commander of the 
          Faithful])
          The Taliban.
          e. 2. For the purposes of this order and 
          Executive Order 13224 of September 23, 2001, the term ``the 
          Taliban'' is also known as the ``Taleban,'' ``Islamic Movement 
          of Taliban,'' ``the Taliban Islamic Movement,'' ``Talibano 
          Islami Tahrik,'' and ``Tahrike Islami'a Taliban''. The 
          Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of the 
          Treasury, is hereby authorized to modify the definition of the 
          term ``the Taliban,'' as appropriate.
          e. 3. Nothing contained in this order 
          shall create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable by any party against the United

[[Page 241]]

          States, its agencies or instrumentalities, its officers or 
          employees, or any other person.
          e. 4. Pursuant to section 202 of the NEA 
          (50 U.S.C. 1622), termination of the national emergency with 
          respect to the Taliban shall not affect any action taken or 
          proceeding pending not finally concluded or determined as of 
          the date of this order, or any action or proceeding based on 
          any act committed prior to the date of this order, or any 
          rights or duties that matured or penalties that were incurred 
          prior to the date of this order.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 July 2, 2002.

EO 13269

Executive Order 13269 of July 3, 2002

Expedited Naturalization of Aliens and Noncitizen Nationals Serving in an 
Active-Duty Status During the War on Terrorism

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          section 329 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
          1440) (the ``Act''), and solely in order to provide expedited 
          naturalization for aliens and noncitizen nationals serving in 
          an active-duty status in the Armed Forces of the United States 
          during the period of the war against terrorists of global 
          reach, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          For the purpose of determining qualification for the exception 
          from the usual requirements for naturalization, I designate as 
          a period in which the Armed Forces of the United States were 
          engaged in armed conflict with a hostile foreign force the 
          period beginning on September 11, 2001. Such period will be 
          deemed to terminate on a date designated by future Executive 
          Order. Those persons serving honorably in active-duty status 
          in the Armed Forces of the United States, during the period 
          beginning on September 11, 2001, and terminating on the date 
          to be so designated, are eligible for naturalization in 
          accordance with the statutory exception to the naturalization 
          requirements, as provided in section 329 of the Act. Nothing 
          contained in this order is intended to affect, nor does it 
          affect, any other power, right, or obligation of the United 
          States, its agencies, officers, employees, or any other person 
          under Federal law or the law of nations.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 July 3, 2002.

EO 13270

[[Page 242]]

Executive Order 13270 of July 3, 2002

Tribal Colleges and Universities

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Policy. There is a unique 
          relationship between the United States and Indian tribes, and 
          a special relationship between the United States and Alaska 
          Native entities. It is the policy of the Federal Government 
          that this Nation's commitment to educational excellence and 
          opportunity must extend as well to the tribal colleges and 
          universities (tribal colleges) that serve Indian tribes and 
          Alaska Native entities. The President's Board of Advisors on 
          Tribal Colleges and Universities (the ``Board'') and the White 
          House Initiative on Tribal Colleges and Universities (WHITCU) 
          established by this order shall ensure that this national 
          policy regarding tribal colleges is carried out with direct 
          accountability at the highest levels of the Federal 
          Government.
          Tribal colleges are both integral and essential to their 
          communities. Often they are the only postsecondary 
          institutions within some of our Nation's poorest rural areas. 
          They fulfill a vital role: in maintaining and preserving 
          irreplaceable languages and cultural traditions; in offering a 
          high-quality college education to younger students; and in 
          providing job training and other career-building programs to 
          adults and senior citizens. Tribal colleges provide crucial 
          services in communities that continue to suffer high rates of 
          unemployment and the resulting social and economic distress.
          The Federal Government's commitment to tribal colleges is 
          reaffirmed and the private sector can and should contribute to 
          the colleges' educational and cultural missions.
          Finally, postsecondary institutions can play a vital role in 
          promoting excellence in early childhood, elementary, and 
          secondary education. The Federal Government will therefore 
          work to implement the innovations and reforms of the No Child 
          Left Behind Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-110) in partnership 
          with tribal colleges and their American Indian and Alaska 
          Native communities.
          e. 2. Definition of Tribal Colleges and 
          Universities. Tribal colleges are those institutions cited in 
          section 532 of the Equity in Educational Land-Grant Status Act 
          of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 301 note), any other institution that 
          qualifies for funding under the Tribally Controlled Community 
          College Assistance Act of 1978 (25 U.S.C. 1801 et seq.), and 
          Din[eacute] College, authorized in the Navajo Community 
          College Assistance Act of 1978, Public Law 95-471, title II 
          (25 U.S.C. 640a note).
          e. 3. Board of Advisors. (a) 
          Establishment. There shall be established in the Department of 
          Education a Presidential advisory committee entitled the 
          President's Board of Advisors on Tribal Colleges and 
          Universities (the ``Board'').
          (b) Membership. The Board shall consist of not more than 15 
          members who shall be appointed by the President, one of whom 
          shall be designated by the President as Chair. The Board shall 
          include representatives of tribal colleges and may also 
          include representatives of the higher, early childhood, 
          elementary, and secondary education communities; tribal 
          officials;

[[Page 243]]

          health, business, and financial institutions; private 
          foundations; and such other persons as the President deems 
          appropriate.
          (c) Functions. The Board shall provide advice regarding the 
          progress made by Federal agencies toward fulfilling the 
          purposes and objectives of this order. The Board also shall 
          provide recommendations to the President, through the 
          Secretary of Education (Secretary), on ways the Federal 
          Government can help tribal colleges:

  (1) use long-term development, endowment building, and planning to 
strengthen institutional viability;

  (2) improve financial management and security, obtain private-sector 
funding support, and expand and complement Federal education initiatives;

  (3) develop institutional capacity through the use of new and emerging 
technologies offered by both the Federal and private sectors;

  (4) enhance physical infrastructure to facilitate more efficient 
operation and effective recruitment and retention of students and faculty; 
and

  (5) help implement the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and meet other 
high standards of educational achievement.

          (d) Meetings. The Board shall meet at least annually, at the 
          request of the Secretary, to provide advice and consultation 
          on tribal colleges and relevant Federal and private-sector 
          activities, and to transmit reports and present 
          recommendations.
          e. 4. White House Initiative on Tribal 
          Colleges and Universities. There shall be established in the 
          Department of Education, Office of the Secretary, the White 
          House Initiative on Tribal Colleges and Universities (WHITCU). 
          The WHITCU shall:
          (a) provide the staff support for the Board;
          (b) assist the Secretary in the role of liaison between the 
          executive branch and tribal colleges; and
          (c) serve the Secretary in carrying out the Secretary's 
          responsibilities under this order.
           e. 5. Department and Agency 
          Participation. Each participating executive department and 
          agency (agency), as determined by the Secretary, shall appoint 
          a senior official who is a full-time officer of the Federal 
          Government and who is responsible for management or program 
          administration. The official shall report directly to the 
          agency head, or to the agency head's designee, on agency 
          activity under this order and serve as liaison to the WHITCU. 
          To the extent permitted by law and regulation, each agency 
          shall provide appropriate information as requested by the 
          WHITCU staff pursuant to this order.
          e. 6. Three-Year Federal Plan.
          (a) Content. Each agency identified by the Secretary shall 
          develop and implement a Three-Year Plan of the agency's 
          efforts to fulfill the purposes of this order. These Three-
          Year Plans shall include annual performance indicators and 
          appropriate measurable objectives for the agency. Among other 
          relevant issues, the plans shall address how the agency 
          intends to increase the capacity of tribal colleges to compete 
          effectively for any available grants, contracts, cooperative 
          agreements, and any other Federal resources,

[[Page 244]]

          and to encourage tribal colleges to participate in Federal 
          programs. The plans also may emphasize access to high-quality 
          educational opportunities for economically disadvantaged 
          Indian students, consistent with requirements of the No Child 
          Left Behind Act of 2001; the preservation and revitalization 
          of tribal languages and cultural traditions; and innovative 
          approaches to better link tribal colleges with early 
          childhood, elementary, and secondary education programs. The 
          agency's performance indicators and objectives should be 
          clearly reflected in the agency's annual budget submission to 
          the Office of Management and Budget. To facilitate the 
          attainment of these performance indicators and objectives, the 
          head of each agency identified by the Secretary, shall 
          provide, as appropriate, technical assistance and information 
          to tribal colleges regarding the program activities of the 
          agency and the preparation of applications or proposals for 
          grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements.
          (b) Submission. Each agency shall submit its Three-Year Plan 
          to the WHITCU. In consultation with the Board, the WHITCU 
          shall then review these Three-Year Plans and develop an 
          integrated Three-Year Plan for Assistance to Tribal Colleges, 
          which the Secretary shall review and submit to the President. 
          Agencies may revise their Three-Year Plans within the three-
          year period.
          (c) Annual Performance Reports. Each agency shall submit to 
          the WHITCU an Annual Performance Report that measures the 
          agency's performance against the objectives set forth in its 
          Three-Year Plan. In consultation with the Board, the WHITCU 
          shall review and combine Annual Performance Reports into one 
          annual report, which shall be submitted to the Secretary for 
          review, in consultation with the Office of Management and 
          Budget.
          e. 7. Private Sector. In cooperation with 
          the Board, the WHITCU shall encourage the private sector to 
          assist tribal colleges through increased use of such 
          strategies as:
          (a) matching funds to support increased endowments;
          (b) developing expertise and more effective ways to manage 
          finances, improve information systems, build facilities, and 
          improve course offerings; and
          (c) increasing resources for and training of faculty.
          e. 8. Termination. The Board shall 
          terminate 2 years after the date of this order unless the 
          Board is renewed by the President prior to the end of that 2-
          year period.
          e. 9. Administration. (a) Compensation. 
          Members of the Board shall serve without compensation, but 
          shall be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu 
          of subsistence, as authorized by law for persons serving 
          intermittently in Government service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707).
          (b) Funding. The Board and the WHITCU shall be funded by the 
          Department of Education.
          (c) Administrative Support. The Department of Education shall 
          provide appropriate administrative services and staff support 
          for the Board and the WHITCU. With the consent of the 
          Department of Education, other agencies participating in the 
          WHITCU shall provide administrative support (includ- ing 
          detailees) to the WHITCU consistent with statutory authority. 
          The

[[Page 245]]

          Board and the WHITCU each shall have a staff and shall be 
          supported at appropriate levels commensurate with that of 
          similar White House Initiative Offices.
          (d) General Provisions. Insofar as the Federal Advisory 
          Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.) (the ``Act''), may 
          apply to the administration of any portion of this order, any 
          functions of the President under the Act, except that of 
          reporting to the Congress, shall be performed by the Secretary 
          of Education in accordance with the guidelines issued by the 
          Administrator of General Services.
          e. 10. Revocation. Executive Order 13021 
          of October 19, 1996, as amended, is revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 July 3, 2002.

EO 13271

Executive Order 13271 of July 9, 2002

Establishment of the Corporate Fraud Task Force

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          strengthen the efforts of the Department of Justice and 
          Federal, State, and local agencies to investigate and 
          prosecute significant financial crimes, recover the proceeds 
          of such crimes, and ensure just and effective punishment of 
          those who perpetrate financial crimes, it is hereby ordered as 
          follows:
          etion 1. Establishment. The Attorney 
          General shall immediately establish within the Department of 
          Justice a Corporate Fraud Task Force (Task Force). Without 
          regard to any other provision of this order, the Task Force 
          shall be subject to the authority of the Attorney General 
          under applicable law.
          e. 2. Membership and Operation. Subject 
          to section 4 of this order, the Task Force shall have the 
          following members:
          (a) the Deputy Attorney General, who shall serve as Chair;
          (b) the Assistant Attorney General (Criminal Division);
          (c) the Assistant Attorney General (Tax Division);
          (d) the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation;
          (e) the United States Attorney for the Southern District of 
          New York;
          (f) the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New 
          York;
          (g) the United States Attorney for the Northern District of 
          Illinois;
          (h) the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of 
          Pennsylvania;
          (i) the United States Attorney for the Central District of 
          California;
          (j) the United States Attorney for the Northern District of 
          California;
          (k) the United States Attorney for the Southern District of 
          Texas; and

[[Page 246]]

          (l) such other officers or employees of the Department of 
          Justice as the Attorney General may from time to time 
          designate.
          The Deputy Attorney General shall convene and direct the work 
          of the Task Force in fulfilling all its functions under this 
          order. The Deputy Attorney General may permit, when he deems 
          it appropriate, the designee of a member of the Task Force, 
          including those designated under section 4 of this order, to 
          participate in lieu of the member. The Deputy Attorney General 
          shall convene the first meeting of the Task Force within 10 
          days of the date of this order and shall thereafter convene 
          the Task Force at such times as he deems appropriate.
          e. 3. Functions. Consistent with the 
          constitutional authority of the President, the authorities 
          assigned to the Attorney General by law, and other applicable 
          law, the Task Force shall:
          (a) provide direction for the investigation and prosecution of 
          cases of securities fraud, accounting fraud, mail and wire 
          fraud, money laundering, tax fraud based on such predicate 
          offenses, and other related financial crimes committed by 
          commercial entities and directors, officers, professional 
          advisers, and employees thereof (hereinafter ``financial 
          crimes''), when such cases are determined by the Deputy 
          Attorney General, for purposes of this order, to be 
          significant;
          (b) provide recommendations to the Attorney General for 
          allocation and reallocation of resources of the Department of 
          Justice for investigation and prosecution of significant 
          financial crimes, recovery of proceeds from such crimes to the 
          extent permitted by law, and other matters determined by the 
          Task Force from time to time to be of the highest priority in 
          the investigation and prosecution of such crimes; and
          (c) make recommendations to the President, through the 
          Attorney General, from time to time for:

  (i) action to enhance cooperation among departments, agencies, and 
entities of the Federal Government in the investigation and prosecution of 
significant financial crimes;

  (ii) action to enhance cooperation among Federal, State, and local 
authorities responsible for the investigation and prosecution of 
significant financial crimes;

  (iii) changes in rules, regulations, or policy to improve the effective 
investigation and prosecution of significant financial crimes; and

  (iv) recommendations to the Congress regarding such measures as the 
President may judge necessary and expedient relating to significant 
financial crimes, or the investigation or prosecution thereof.

          e. 4. Additional Participation for 
          Specified Functions. In the Task Force's performance of the 
          functions set forth in subsection 3(c) of this order, and to 
          the extent permitted by law, the following officers of the 
          executive branch shall be members of the Task Force in 
          addition to such other officers of the Federal Government as 
          the Deputy Attorney General deems appropriate:
          (a) the Secretary of the Treasury;
          (b) the Chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission;
          (c) the Chairman of the Commodities Futures Trading 
          Commission;

[[Page 247]]

          (d) the Chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; 
          and
          (e) the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.
          e. 5. Internal Management Purpose. This 
          order is intended to improve the internal management of the 
          Federal Government. This order is not intended to, and does 
          not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or equity or otherwise against the United 
          States, its departments, agencies, entities, 
          instrumentalities, officers, or employees, or any other 
          person.
          e. 6. Termination. The Task Force shall 
          terminate when directed by the President or, with the approval 
          of the President, by the Attorney General.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 July 9, 2002.

EO 13272

Executive Order 13272 of August 13, 2002

Proper Consideration of Small Entities in Agency Rulemaking

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. General Requirements. Each 
          agency shall establish procedures and policies to promote 
          compliance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act, as amended (5 
          U.S.C. 601 et seq.) (the ``Act''). Agencies shall thoroughly 
          review draft rules to assess and take appropriate account of 
          the potential impact on small businesses, small governmental 
          jurisdictions, and small organizations, as provided by the 
          Act. The Chief Counsel for Advocacy of the Small Business 
          Administration (Advocacy) shall remain available to advise 
          agencies in performing that review consistent with the 
          provisions of the Act.
          e. 2. Responsibilities of Advocacy. 
          Consistent with the requirements of the Act, other applicable 
          law, and Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, as 
          amended, Advocacy:
          (a) shall notify agency heads from time to time of the 
          requirements of the Act, including by issuing notifications 
          with respect to the basic requirements of the Act within 90 
          days of the date of this order;
          (b) shall provide training to agencies on compliance with the 
          Act; and
          (c) may provide comment on draft rules to the agency that has 
          proposed or intends to propose the rules and to the Office of 
          Information and Regulatory Affairs of the Office of Management 
          and Budget (OIRA).
          e. 3. Responsibilities of Federal 
          Agencies. Consistent with the requirements of the Act and 
          applicable law, agencies shall:
          (a) Within 180 days of the date of this order, issue written 
          procedures and policies, consistent with the Act, to ensure 
          that the potential impacts of agencies' draft rules on small 
          businesses, small governmental jurisdictions, and small 
          organizations are properly considered during the rule

[[Page 248]]

          making process. Agency heads shall submit, no later than 90 
          days from the date of this order, their written procedures and 
          policies to Advocacy for comment. Prior to issuing final 
          procedures and policies, agencies shall consider any such 
          comments received within 60 days from the date of the 
          submission of the agencies' procedures and policies to 
          Advocacy. Except to the extent otherwise specifically provided 
          by statute or Executive Order, agencies shall make the final 
          procedures and policies available to the public through the 
          Internet or other easily accessible means;
          (b) Notify Advocacy of any draft rules that may have a 
          significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
          entities under the Act. Such notifications shall be made (i) 
          when the agency submits a draft rule to OIRA under Executive 
          Order 12866 if that order requires such submission, or (ii) if 
          no submission to OIRA is so required, at a reasonable time 
          prior to publication of the rule by the agency; and
          (c) Give every appropriate consideration to any comments 
          provided by Advocacy regarding a draft rule. Consistent with 
          applicable law and appropriate protection of executive 
          deliberations and legal privileges, an agency shall include, 
          in any explanation or discussion accompanying publication in 
          the Federal eister of a final rule, the 
          agency's response to any written comments submitted by 
          Advocacy on the proposed rule that preceded the final rule; 
          provided, however, that such inclusion is not required if the 
          head of the agency certifies that the public interest is not 
          served thereby.
          Agencies and Advocacy may, to the extent permitted by law, 
          engage in an exchange of data and research, as appropriate, to 
          foster the purposes of the Act.
          e. 4. Definitions. Terms defined in 
          section 601 of title 5, United States Code, including the term 
          ``agency,'' shall have the same meaning in this order.
          e. 5. Preservation of Authority. Nothing 
          in this order shall be construed to impair or affect the 
          authority of the Administrator of the Small Business 
          Administration to supervise the Small Business Administration 
          as provided in the first sentence of section 2(b)(1) of Public 
          Law 85-09536 (15 U.S.C. 633(b)(1)).
          e. 6. Reporting. For the purpose of 
          promoting compliance with this order, Advocacy shall submit a 
          report not less than annually to the Director of the Office of 
          Management and Budget on the extent of compliance with this 
          order by agencies.
          e. 7. Confidentiality. Consistent with 
          existing law, Advocacy may publicly disclose information that 
          it receives from the agencies in the course of carrying out 
          this order only to the extent that such information already 
          has been lawfully and publicly disclosed by OIRA or the 
          relevant rulemaking agency.
          e. 8. Judicial Review. This order is 
          intended only to improve the internal management of the 
          Federal Government. This order is not intended to, and does 
          not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable

[[Page 249]]

          at law or equity, against the United States, its departments, 
          agencies, or other entities, its officers or employees, or any 
          other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 August 13, 2002.

EO 13273

Executive Order 13273 of August 21, 2002

Further Amending Executive Order 10173, as Amended, Prescribing Regulations 
Relating to the Safeguarding of Vessels, Harbors, Ports, and Waterfront 
Facilities of the United States

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          section 1 of title II of the Act of June 15, 1917, as amended 
          (50 U.S.C. 191) (the ``Act''), and in addition to the finding 
          in Executive Order 10173 of October 18, 1950, and any other 
          declaration or finding in force under section 1 of the Act, I 
          find that the security of the United States is endangered by 
          reason of disturbances in the international relations of the 
          United States that have existed since the terrorist attacks on 
          the United States of September 11, 2001, and that such 
          disturbances continue to endanger such relations, and hereby 
          order that:
          Part 6 of Title 33 of the Code of Federal Regulations is 
          amended by:
          (a) Adding after section 6.01-5 the following new section:
          ``6.01-6 Area Commander. ``Area Commander,'' as used in this 
          part, means the officer of the Coast Guard designated by the 
          Commandant to command a Coast Guard Area.''; and
          (b) Amending section 6.04-1 to read as follows:
          ``6.04-1 Enforcement. (a) The rules and regulations in this 
          part shall be enforced by the Captain of the Port under the 
          supervision and general direction of the District Commander, 
          Area Commander, and the Commandant. All authority and power 
          vested in the Captain of the Port by the regulations in this 
          part shall be deemed vested in and may be exercised by the 
          District Commander, Area Commander, and the Commandant.
           (b) The rules and regulations in this part may be enforced by 
          any other officer or petty officer of the Coast Guard 
          designated by the District Commander, Area Commander, or the 
          Commandant.
           (c) Any authority or power under this part vested in, 
          delegated to, or exercised by a member of the Coast Guard 
          shall be subject to the direction of the Secretary of the 
          Department in which the Coast Guard is operating.''.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 August 21, 2002.

EO 13274

[[Page 250]]

Executive Order 13274 of September 18, 2002

Environmental Stewardship and Transportation Infrastructure Project Reviews

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and to enhance 
          environmental stewardship and streamline the environmental 
          review and development of transportation infrastructure 
          projects, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Policy. The development and 
          implementation of transportation infrastructure projects in an 
          efficient and environmentally sound manner is essential to the 
          well-being of the American people and a strong American 
          economy. Executive departments and agencies (agencies) shall 
          take appropriate actions, to the extent consistent with 
          applicable law and available resources, to promote 
          environmental stewardship in the Nation's transportation 
          system and expedite environmental reviews of high-priority 
          transportation infrastructure projects.
          e. 2. Actions. (a) For transportation 
          infrastructure projects, agencies shall, in support of the 
          Department of Transportation, formulate and implement 
          administrative, policy, and procedural mechanisms that enable 
          each agency required by law to conduct environmental reviews 
          (reviews) with respect to such projects to ensure completion 
          of such reviews in a timely and environmentally responsible 
          manner.
          (b) In furtherance of the policy set forth in section 1 of 
          this order, the Secretary of Transportation, in coordination 
          with agencies as appropriate, shall advance environmental 
          stewardship through cooperative actions with project sponsors 
          to promote protection and enhancement of the natural and human 
          environment in the planning, development, operation, and 
          maintenance of transportation facilities and services.
          (c) The Secretary of Transportation shall designate for the 
          purposes of this order a list of high-priority transportation 
          infrastructure projects that should receive expedited agency 
          reviews and shall amend such list from time to time as the 
          Secretary deems appropriate. For projects on the Secretary's 
          list, agencies shall to the maximum extent practicable 
          expedite their reviews for relevant permits or other 
          approvals, and take related actions as necessary, consistent 
          with available resources and applicable laws, including those 
          relating to safety, public health, and environmental 
          protection.
          e. 3. Interagency Task Force. (a) 
          Establishment. There is established, within the Department of 
          Transportation for administrative purposes, the interagency 
          ``Transportation Infrastructure Streamlining Task Force'' 
          (Task Force) to: (i) monitor and assist agencies in their 
          efforts to expedite a review of transportation infrastructure 
          projects and issue permits or similar actions, as necessary; 
          (ii) review projects, at least quarterly, on the list of 
          priority projects pursuant to section 2(c) of this order; and 
          (iii) identify and promote policies that can effectively 
          streamline the process required to provide approvals for 
          transportation infrastructure projects, in compliance with 
          applicable law, while maintaining safety, public health, and 
          environmental protection.
          (b) Membership and Operation. The Task Force shall promote 
          interagency cooperation and the establishment of appropriate 
          mechanisms to

[[Page 251]]

          coordinate Federal, State, tribal, and local agency 
          consultation, review, approval, and permitting of 
          transportation infrastructure projects. The Task Force shall 
          consist exclusively of the following officers of the United 
          States: the Secretary of Agriculture, Secretary of Commerce, 
          Secretary of Transportation (who shall chair the Task Force), 
          Secretary of the Interior, Secretary of Defense, Administrator 
          of the Environmental Protection Agency, Chairman of the 
          Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Chairman of the 
          Council on Environmental Quality. A member of the Task Force 
          may designate, to perform the Task Force functions of the 
          member, any person who is part of the member's department, 
          agency, or office and who is either an officer of the United 
          States appointed by the President with the advice and consent 
          of the Senate or a member of the Senior Executive Service. The 
          Task Force shall report to the President through the Chairman 
          of the Council on Environmental Quality.
          e. 4. Report. At least once each year, 
          the Task Force shall submit to the President a report that: 
          (a) Describes the results of the coordinated and expedited 
          reviews on a project-by-project basis, and identifies those 
          procedures and actions that proved to be most useful and 
          appropriate in coordinating and expediting the review of the 
          projects.
          (b) Identifies substantive and procedural requirements of 
          Federal, State, tribal, and local laws, regulations, and 
          Executive Orders that are inconsistent with, duplicative of, 
          or are structured so as to restrict their efficient 
          implementation with other applicable requirements.
          (c) Makes recommendations regarding those additional actions 
          that could be taken to: (i) address the coordination and 
          expediting of reviews of transportation infrastructure 
          projects by simplifying and harmonizing applicable substantive 
          and procedural requirements; and (ii) elevate and resolve 
          controversies among Federal, State, tribal, and local agencies 
          related to the review or impacts of transportation 
          infrastructure projects in a timely manner.
          (d) Provides any other recommendations that would, in the 
          judgement of the Task Force, advance the policy set forth in 
          section 1 of this order.
          e. 5. Preservation of Authority. Nothing 
          in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect 
          the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and 
          Budget relating to budget, administrative, and legislative 
          proposals.
          e. 6. Judicial Review. This order is 
          intended only to improve the internal management of the 
          Federal Government and is not intended to, and does not, 
          create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or equity by a party against the United 
          States, its departments, agencies, instrumentalities or 
          entities, its officers or employees, or any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 September 18, 2002.

EO 13275

[[Page 252]]

Executive Order 13275 of October 7, 2002

Creating a Board of Inquiry To Report on Certain Labor Disputes Affecting 
the Maritime Industry of the United States

          WHEREAS, there exists a labor dispute between, on the one 
          hand, employees represented by the International Longshore and 
          Warehouse Union and, on the other hand, employers and the 
          bargaining association of employers who are (1) U.S. and 
          foreign steamship companies operating ships or employed as 
          agents for ships engaged in service to or from the Pacific 
          Coast ports in California, Oregon, and Washington, and (2) 
          stevedore and terminal companies operating at ports in 
          California, Oregon, and Washington; and
          WHEREAS, such dispute has resulted in a lock-out that affects 
          a substantial part of the maritime industry, an industry 
          engaged in trade, commerce, transportation (including the 
          transportation of military supplies), transmission, and 
          communication among the several States and with foreign 
          nations; and
          WHEREAS, a continuation of this lock-out, if permitted to 
          continue, will imperil the national health and safety;
          NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          section 206 of the Labor Management Relations Act, 1947 (61 
          Stat. 155; 29 U.S.C. 176) (the ``Act''), I hereby create a 
          Board of Inquiry consisting of such members as I shall appoint 
          to inquire into the issues involved in such dispute.
          The Board shall have powers and duties as set forth in title 
          II of the Act. The Board shall report to me in accordance with 
          the provisions of section 206 of the Act no later than October 
          8, 2002.
          Upon the submission of its report, the Board shall continue in 
          existence in order to perform any additional functions under 
          the Act, including those functions set forth in section 
          209(b), but shall terminate no later than upon completion of 
          such functions.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 October 7, 2002.

EO 13276

Executive Order 13276 of November 15, 2002

Delegation of Responsibilities Concerning Undocumented Aliens Interdicted 
or Intercepted in the Caribbean Region

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          sections 212(f) and 215(a)(1) of the Immigration and 
          Nationality Act, as amended (8 U.S.C. 1182(f) and 1185(a)(1)), 
          and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and in order 
          to delegate appropriate responsibilities to Federal agencies 
          for responding to migration of undocumented aliens in the 
          Caribbean region, it is hereby ordered:

[[Page 253]]

          etion 1. Duties and Authorities of Agency 
          Heads. Consistent with applicable law,
          (a)(i) The Attorney General may maintain custody, at any 
          location he deems appropriate, of any undocumented aliens he 
          has reason to believe are seeking to enter the United States 
          and who are interdicted or intercepted in the Caribbean 
          region. In this regard, the Attorney General shall provide and 
          operate a facility, or facilities, to house and provide for 
          the needs of any such aliens. Such a facility may be located 
          at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base or any other appropriate 
          location.
          (ii) The Attorney General may conduct any screening of such 
          aliens that he deems appropriate, including screening to 
          determine whether such aliens should be returned to their 
          country of origin or transit, or whether they are persons in 
          need of protection who should not be returned without their 
          consent. If the Attorney General institutes such screening, 
          then until a determination is made, the Attorney General shall 
          provide for the custody, care, safety, transportation, and 
          other needs of the aliens. The Attorney General shall continue 
          to provide for the custody, care, safety, transportation, and 
          other needs of aliens who are determined not to be persons in 
          need of protection until such time as they are returned to 
          their country of origin or transit.
          (b) The Secretary of State shall provide for the custody, 
          care, safety, transportation, and other needs of undocumented 
          aliens interdicted or intercepted in the Caribbean region whom 
          the Attorney General has identified as persons in need of 
          protection. The Secretary of State shall provide for and 
          execute a process for resettling such persons in need of 
          protection, as appropriate, in countries other than their 
          country of origin, and shall also undertake such diplomatic 
          efforts as may be necessary to address the problem of illegal 
          migration of aliens in the Caribbean region and to facilitate 
          the return of those aliens who are determined not to be 
          persons in need of protection.
          (c)(i) The Secretary of Defense shall make available to the 
          Attorney General and the Secretary of State, for the housing 
          and care of any undocumented aliens interdicted or intercepted 
          in the Caribbean region and taken into their custody, any 
          facilities at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base that are excess to 
          current military needs and the provision of which does not 
          interfere with the operation and security of the base. The 
          Secretary of Defense shall be responsible for providing access 
          to such facilities and perimeter security. The Attorney 
          General and the Secretary of State, respectively, shall be 
          responsible for reimbursement for necessary supporting 
          utilities.
          (ii) In the event of a mass migration in the Caribbean region, 
          the Secretary of Defense shall provide support to the Attorney 
          General and the Secretary of State in carrying out the duties 
          described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section regarding 
          the custody, care, safety, transportation, and other needs of 
          the aliens, and shall assume primary responsibility for these 
          duties on a nonreimbursable basis as necessary to contain the 
          threat to national security posed by the migration. The 
          Secretary of Defense shall also provide support to the Coast 
          Guard in carrying out the duties described in Executive Order 
          12807 of May 24, 1992, regarding interdiction of migrants.
          e. 2. Definitions. For purposes of this 
          order, the term ``mass migration'' means a migration of 
          undocumented aliens that is of such magnitude and

[[Page 254]]

          duration that it poses a threat to the national security of 
          the United States, as determined by the President.
          e. 3. Scope.
          (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or 
          otherwise affect the authorities and responsibilities set 
          forth in Executive Order 12807 of May 24, 1992.
          (b) Nothing in this order shall be construed to make 
          reviewable in any judicial or administrative proceeding, or 
          otherwise, any action, omission, or matter that otherwise 
          would not be reviewable.
          (c) This order is intended only to improve the management of 
          the executive branch. This order is not intended to, and does 
          not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or equity or otherwise against the United 
          States, its departments, agencies, entities, 
          instrumentalities, officers, employees, or any other person.
          (d) Any agency assigned any duties by this order may use the 
          provisions of the Economy Act, 31 U.S.C. 1535 and 1536, to 
          carry out such duties, to the extent permitted by such Act.
          (e) This order shall not be construed to require any procedure 
          to determine whether a person is a refugee or otherwise in 
          need of protection.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 November 15, 2002.

EO 13277

Executive Order 13277 of November 19, 2002

Delegation of Certain Authorities and Assignment of Certain Functions Under 
the Trade Act of 2002

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States, including the Trade Act of 
          2002 (the ``Act'') (Public Law 107-210) and section 301 of 
          title 3, United States Code, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Trade Promotion. (a) Except as 
          provided in subsections (b) and (c) of this section, the 
          authorities granted to and functions specifically assigned to 
          the President under Division B of the Act are delegated and 
          assigned, respectively, to the United States Trade 
          Representative (U.S. Trade Representative).
          (b) The exercise of the following authorities of, and 
          functions specifically assigned to the President, under 
          Division B of the Act are reserved to the President:
          (1) Section 2102(c)(1), (c)(6), (c)(10) and (e) of the Act;
          (2) Section 2103(a)(1), (a)(4), (a)(6), b(1), (c)(1)(B)(i), 
          and (c)(2) of the Act;
          (3) Section 2105(a)(1) of the Act; and
          (4) Section 2108(b) of the Act.

[[Page 255]]

          (c) (i) The Secretary of State, in consultation with the 
          Secretary of Labor and the U.S. Trade Representative, shall 
          carry out the functions of section 2102(c)(2) of the Act with 
          respect to establishing consultative mechanisms. The U.S. 
          Trade Representative, in consultation with the Secretary of 
          State and the Secretary of Labor, shall carry out the 
          reporting function under section 2102(c)(2).

   (ii) The Secretary of State, in consultation with the U.S. Trade 
Representative, shall carry out the functions under section 2102(c)(3) of 
the Act with respect to establishing consultative mechanisms, with the 
advice and assistance of the Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of 
Health and Human Services, the Administrator of the Environmental 
Protection Agency, the Secretary of Commerce and, as the Secretary of State 
determines appropriate, the heads of such other departments and agencies. 
The U.S. Trade Representative, in consultation with the Secretary of State, 
shall carry out the reporting function under section 2103(c)(3).

   (iii) The U.S. Trade Representative shall carry out the functions under 
section 2102(c)(5) of the Act. The U.S. Trade Representative shall, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Labor, carry out the reporting function 
and the function of making a report available under section 2102(c)(5).

   (iv) The Secretary of Labor shall carry out section 2102(c)(7) of the 
Act, in consultation with the Secretary of State.

   (v) The Secretary of Labor, in consultation with the Secretary of State 
and the U.S. Trade Representative, shall carry out the functions under 
section 2102(c)(8) and (c)(9).

   (vi) The Secretary of the Treasury shall carry out section 2102(c)(12) 
of the Act, including any appropriate consultations with the Congress 
relating thereto.

          e. 2. Andean Trade. (a) Except as 
          provided in subsection (b) of this section, the authorities 
          granted and the functions specifically assigned to the 
          President under Division C of the Act are delegated and 
          assigned respectively, to the U.S. Trade Representative, in 
          consultation with the Secretaries of State, Commerce, the 
          Treasury, and Labor.
          (b) The exercise of the following authorities of, and 
          functions specifically assigned to, the President under 
          Division C of the Act are reserved to the President:

   (i) The authority to proclaim under sections 204(b)(1) and 
204(b)(3)(B)(ii), and the authority to designate beneficiary countries 
under section 204(b)(6)(B), of the Andean Trade Preference Act as amended 
by section 3103(a)(2) of the Act; and

   (ii) The authority to make determinations under section 203(e)(1)(B) of 
the Andean Trade Preference Act as amended by section 3103(b) of the Act.

          (c) The head of the executive department of which the United 
          States Customs Service is a part shall take such actions to 
          carry out determinations and actions pursuant to the Andean 
          Trade Preference Act, as amended, as directed pursuant to the 
          authority delegated to the U.S. Trade Representative under 
          this order.
          e. 3. Guidance for Exercising Authority 
          and Performing Duties. (a) Nothing in this order shall be 
          construed to impair or otherwise affect the func

[[Page 256]]

          tions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget 
          relating to budget, administrative, or legislative proposals.
          (b) In exercising authority delegated by, or performing 
          functions assigned in, this order, and in performing duties 
          related to the trade agreements program as defined in 
          Executive Order 11846, officers of the United States:

   (i) Shall ensure that all actions taken by them are consistent with the 
President's constitutional authority to (A) conduct the foreign affairs of 
the United States, including the commencement, conduct, and termination of 
negotiations with foreign countries and international organizations, (B) 
withhold information the disclosure of which could impair the foreign 
relations, the national security, the deliberative processes of the 
Executive, or the performance of the Executive's constitutional duties, (C) 
recommend for congressional consideration such measures as the President 
may judge necessary or expedient, and (D) supervise the unitary executive 
branch;

   (ii) May redelegate authority delegated by this order and may further 
assign functions assigned by this order to officers of any other department 
or agency within the executive branch to the extent permitted by law and 
such redelegation or further assignment shall be published in the Federal 
Register; and

   (iii) Shall consult the Attorney General as appropriate in implementing 
this subsection.

          e. 4. Amendment to Executive Order 11846. 
          Section 1 of Executive Order 11846 of March 27, 1975, as 
          amended, is further amended by inserting ``, Divisions B and C 
          of the Trade Act of 2002,'' after ``Trade Expansion Act of 
          1962, as amended''.
          e. 5. Judicial Review. This order is 
          intended only to improve the internal management of the 
          Federal Government and is not intended to, and does not, 
          create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or equity by a party against the United 
          States, its departments, agencies, instrumentalities or 
          entities, its officers or employees, or any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 November 19, 2002.

EO 13278

Executive Order 13278 of December 11, 2002

President's Commission on the United States Postal Service

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and to ensure 
          the efficient operation of the United States Postal Service 
          while minimizing the financial exposure of the American 
          taxpayers, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment. There is 
          established the President's Commission on the United States 
          Postal Service (Commission).

[[Page 257]]

          e. 2. Membership. Commission shall be 
          composed of nine members appointed by the President. The 
          President shall designate two members of the Commission to 
          serve as Co-Chairs.
          e. 3. Mission. (a) The mission of the 
          Commission shall be to examine the state of the United States 
          Postal Service, and to prepare and submit to the President a 
          report articulating a proposed vision for the future of the 
          United States Postal Service and recommending the legislative 
          and administrative reforms needed to ensure the viability of 
          postal services.
          (b) In fulfilling its mission, the Commission shall consider 
          the following issues and such other issues relating to the 
          Postal Service as the Commission determines appropriate:

  (i) the role of the Postal Service in the 21st century and beyond;

  (ii) the flexibility that the Postal Service should have to change 
prices, control costs, and adjust service in response to financial, 
competitive, or market pressures;

  (iii) the rigidities in cost or service that limit the efficiency of the 
postal system;

  (iv) the ability of the Postal Service, over the long term, to maintain 
universal mail delivery at affordable rates and cover its unfunded 
liabilities with minimum exposure to the American taxpayers;

  (v) the extent to which postal monopoly restrictions continue to advance 
the public interest under evolving market conditions, and the extent to 
which the Postal Service competes with private sector services; and

  (vi) the most appropriate governance and oversight structure for the 
Postal Service.

          e. 4. Administration. (a) The Department 
          of the Treasury or any organizational entity subject to the 
          direction of the Secretary of the Treasury shall, to the 
          extent permitted by law, provide administrative support and 
          funding for the Commission. The Commission is established 
          within the Department of the Treasury for administrative 
          purposes only.
          (b) Members of the Commission shall serve without any 
          compensation for their work on the Commission. Members 
          appointed from among private citizens of the United States, 
          however, while engaged in the work of the Commission, may be 
          allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of 
          subsistence, as authorized by law for persons serving 
          intermittently in Government service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707), to 
          the extent funds are available.
          (c) The Commission shall have a staff headed by an Executive 
          Director.
          (d) The Commission, with the concurrence of the Secretary of 
          the Treasury, may establish subcommittees, consisting of 
          Commission members, as appropriate, to aid in its work.
          (e) Consistent with such guidance as the President or, on the 
          President's behalf, the Secretary of the Treasury, may 
          provide, the Commission shall exchange information with and 
          obtain advice from Members of Congress; Federal, State, local, 
          and tribal officials; commercial, nonprofit, and residential 
          users of the United States Postal Service; and others, as 
          appropriate, including through public hearings.

[[Page 258]]

          (f) Insofar as the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended, 
          may apply to the Commission, any functions of the President 
          under that Act, except for those in section 6 of that Act, 
          shall be performed by the Secretary of the Treasury, in 
          accordance with the guidelines that have been issued by the 
          Administrator of General Services.
          (g) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or 
          otherwise affect the functions of the Director of the Office 
          of Management and Budget relating to budget, administrative, 
          or legislative proposals.
          e. 5. Report. The Commission shall submit 
          its report, consistent with its mission set forth in section 3 
          of this order, to the President, through the Secretary of the 
          Treasury, not later than July 31, 2003.
          e. 6. General Provisions. (a) This order 
          is intended only to improve the internal management of the 
          Federal Government and it is not intended to, and does not 
          create, any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or in equity by a party against the United 
          States, its departments, agencies, instrumentalities or 
          entities, its officers or employees, or any other person.
          (b) The Commission shall terminate 30 days after submitting 
          its report and in no event later than August 30, 2003.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 11, 2002.

EO 13279

Executive Order 13279 of December 12, 2002

Equal Protection of the Laws for Faith-Based and Community Organizations

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          section 121(a) of title 40, United States Code, and section 
          301 of title 3, United States Code, and in order to guide 
          Federal agencies in formulating and developing policies with 
          implications for faith-based organizations and other community 
          organizations, to ensure equal protection of the laws for 
          faith-based and community organizations, to further the 
          national effort to expand opportunities for, and strengthen 
          the capacity of, faith-based and other community organizations 
          so that they may better meet social needs in America's 
          communities, and to ensure the economical and efficient 
          administration and completion of Government contracts, it is 
          hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Definitions. For purposes of 
          this order:
          (a) ``Federal financial assistance'' means assistance that 
          non-Federal entities receive or administer in the form of 
          grants, contracts, loans, loan guarantees, property, 
          cooperative agreements, food commodities, direct 
          appropriations, or other assistance, but does not include a 
          tax credit, deduction, or exemption.
          (b) ``Social service program'' means a program that is 
          administered by the Federal Government, or by a State or local 
          government using Federal

[[Page 259]]

          financial assistance, and that provides services directed at 
          reducing poverty, improving opportunities for low-income 
          children, revitalizing low-income communities, empowering low-
          income families and low-income individuals to become self-
          sufficient, or otherwise helping people in need. Such programs 
          include, but are not limited to, the following:

  (i) child care services, protective services for children and adults, 
services for children and adults in foster care, adoption services, 
services related to the management and maintenance of the home, day care 
services for adults, and services to meet the special needs of children, 
older individuals, and individuals with disabilities (including physical, 
mental, or emotional disabilities);

  (ii) transportation services;

  (iii) job training and related services, and employment services;

  (iv) information, referral, and counseling services;

  (v) the preparation and delivery of meals and services related to soup 
kitchens or food banks;

  (vi) health support services;

  (vii) literacy and mentoring programs;

  (viii) services for the prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency 
and substance abuse, services for the prevention of crime and the provision 
of assistance to the victims and the families of criminal offenders, and 
services related to intervention in, and prevention of, domestic violence; 
and

  (ix) services related to the provision of assistance for housing under 
Federal law.

          (c) ``Policies that have implications for faith-based and 
          community organizations'' refers to all policies, programs, 
          and regulations, including official guidance and internal 
          agency procedures, that have significant effects on faith-
          based organizations participating in or seeking to participate 
          in social service programs supported with Federal financial 
          assistance.
          (d) ``Agency'' means a department or agency in the executive 
          branch.
          (e) ``Specified agency heads'' mean the Attorney General, the 
          Secretaries of Agriculture, Education, Health and Human 
          Services, Housing and Urban Development, and Labor, and the 
          Administrator of the Agency for International Development.
          e. 2. Fundamental Principles and 
          Policymaking Criteria.
          In formulating and implementing policies that have 
          implications for faith-based and community organizations, 
          agencies that administer social service programs supported 
          with Federal financial assistance shall, to the extent 
          permitted by law, be guided by the following fundamental 
          principles:
          (a) Federal financial assistance for social service programs 
          should be distributed in the most effective and efficient 
          manner possible;
          (b) The Nation's social service capacity will benefit if all 
          eligible organizations, including faith-based and other 
          community organizations, are able to compete on an equal 
          footing for Federal financial assistance used to support 
          social service programs;

[[Page 260]]

          (c) No organization should be discriminated against on the 
          basis of religion or religious belief in the administration or 
          distribution of Federal financial assistance under social 
          service programs;
          (d) All organizations that receive Federal financial 
          assistance under social services programs should be prohibited 
          from discriminating against beneficiaries or potential 
          beneficiaries of the social services programs on the basis of 
          religion or religious belief. Accordingly, organizations, in 
          providing services supported in whole or in part with Federal 
          financial assistance, and in their outreach activities related 
          to such services, should not be allowed to discriminate 
          against current or prospective program beneficiaries on the 
          basis of religion, a religious belief, a refusal to hold a 
          religious belief, or a refusal to actively participate in a 
          religious practice;
          (e) The Federal Government must implement Federal programs in 
          accordance with the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise 
          Clause of the First Amendment to the Constitution. Therefore, 
          organizations that engage in inherently religious activities, 
          such as worship, religious instruction, and proselytization, 
          must offer those services separately in time or location from 
          any programs or services supported with direct Federal 
          financial assistance, and participation in any such inherently 
          religious activities must be voluntary for the beneficiaries 
          of the social service program supported with such Federal 
          financial assistance; and
          (f) Consistent with the Free Exercise Clause and the Free 
          Speech Clause of the Constitution, faith-based organizations 
          should be eligible to compete for Federal financial assistance 
          used to support social service programs and to participate 
          fully in the social service programs supported with Federal 
          financial assistance without impairing their independence, 
          autonomy, expression, or religious character. Accordingly, a 
          faith-based organization that applies for or participates in a 
          social service program supported with Federal financial 
          assistance may retain its independence and may continue to 
          carry out its mission, including the definition, development, 
          practice, and expression of its religious beliefs, provided 
          that it does not use direct Federal financial assistance to 
          support any inherently religious activities, such as worship, 
          religious instruction, or proselytization. Among other things, 
          faith-based organizations that receive Federal financial 
          assistance may use their facilities to provide social services 
          supported with Federal financial assistance, without removing 
          or altering religious art, icons, scriptures, or other symbols 
          from these facilities. In addition, a faith-based organization 
          that applies for or participates in a social service program 
          supported with Federal financial assistance may retain 
          religious terms in its organization's name, select its board 
          members on a religious basis, and include religious references 
          in its organization's mission statements and other chartering 
          or governing documents.
          e. 3. Agency Implementation.
          (a) Specified agency heads shall, in coordination with the 
          White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives 
          (White House OFBCI), review and evaluate existing policies 
          that have implications for faith-based and community 
          organizations in order to assess the consistency of such 
          policies with the fundamental principles and policymaking 
          criteria articulated in section 2 of this order.
          (b) Specified agency heads shall ensure that all policies that 
          have implications for faith-based and community organizations 
          are consistent with the

[[Page 261]]

          fundamental principles and policymaking criteria articulated 
          in section 2 of this order. Therefore, specified agency heads 
          shall, to the extent permitted by law:

  (i) amend all such existing policies of their respective agencies to 
ensure that they are consistent with the fundamental principles and 
policymaking criteria articulated in section 2 of this order;

  (ii) where appropriate, implement new policies for their respective 
agencies that are consistent with and necessary to further the fundamental 
principles and policymaking criteria set forth in section 2 of this order; 
and

  (iii) implement new policies that are necessary to ensure that their 
respective agencies collect data regarding the participation of faith-based 
and community organizations in social service programs that receive Federal 
financial assistance.

          (c) Within 90 days after the date of this order, each 
          specified agency head shall report to the President, through 
          the Director of the White House OFBCI, the actions it proposes 
          to undertake to accomplish the activities set forth in 
          sections 3(a) and (b) of this order.
          e. 4. Amendment of Executive Order 11246.
          Pursuant to section 121(a) of title 40, United States Code, 
          and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and in order 
          to further the strong Federal interest in ensuring that the 
          cost and progress of Federal procurement contracts are not 
          adversely affected by an artificial restriction of the labor 
          pool caused by the unwarranted exclusion of faith-based 
          organizations from such contracts, section 204 of Executive 
          Order 11246 of September 24, 1965, as amended, is hereby 
          further amended to read as follows:
          ``SEC. 204 (a) The Secretary of Labor may, when the Secretary 
          deems that special circumstances in the national interest so 
          require, exempt a contracting agency from the requirement of 
          including any or all of the provisions of Section 202 of this 
          Order in any specific contract, subcontract, or purchase 
          order.
          (b) The Secretary of Labor may, by rule or regulation, exempt 
          certain classes of contracts, subcontracts, or purchase orders 
          (1) whenever work is to be or has been performed outside the 
          United States and no recruitment of workers within the limits 
          of the United States is involved; (2) for standard commercial 
          supplies or raw materials; (3) involving less than specified 
          amounts of money or specified numbers of workers; or (4) to 
          the extent that they involve subcontracts below a specified 
          tier.
          (c) Section 202 of this Order shall not apply to a Government 
          contractor or subcontractor that is a religious corporation, 
          association, educational institution, or society, with respect 
          to the employment of individuals of a particular religion to 
          perform work connected with the carrying on by such 
          corporation, association, educational institution, or society 
          of its activities. Such contractors and subcontractors are not 
          exempted or excused from complying with the other requirements 
          contained in this Order.
          (d) The Secretary of Labor may also provide, by rule, 
          regulation, or order, for the exemption of facilities of a 
          contractor that are in all respects separate and distinct from 
          activities of the contractor related to the performance of the 
          contract: provided, that such an exemption will not interfere 
          with

[[Page 262]]

          or impede the effectuation of the purposes of this Order: and 
          provided further, that in the absence of such an exemption all 
          facilities shall be covered by the provisions of this Order.''
          e. 5. General Provisions.
          (a) This order supplements but does not supersede the 
          requirements contained in Executive Orders 13198 and 13199 of 
          January 29, 2001.
          (b) The agencies shall coordinate with the White House OFBCI 
          concerning the implementation of this order.
          (c) Nothing in this order shall be construed to require an 
          agency to take any action that would impair the conduct of 
          foreign affairs or the national security.
          e. 6. Responsibilities of Executive 
          Departments and Agencies. All executive departments and 
          agencies (agencies) shall:
          (a) designate an agency employee to serve as the liaison and 
          point of contact with the White House OFBCI; and
          (b) cooperate with the White House OFBCI and provide such 
          information, support, and assistance to the White House OFBCI 
          as it may request, to the extent permitted by law.
          e. 7. Judicial Review.
          This order is intended only to improve the internal management 
          of the executive branch, and it is not intended to, and does 
          not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or in equity by a party against the United 
          States, its agencies, or entities, its officers, employees or 
          agents, or any person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 12, 2002.

EO 13280

Executive Order 13280 of December 12, 2002

Responsibilities of the Department of Agriculture and the Agency for 
International Development With Respect to Faith-Based and Community 
Initiatives

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          help the Federal Government coordinate a national effort to 
          expand opportunities for faith-based and other community 
          organizations and to strengthen their capacity to better meet 
          social needs in America's communities, it is hereby ordered as 
          follows:
          etion 1. Establishment of Centers for 
          Faith-Based and Community Initiatives at the Department of 
          Agriculture and the Agency for International Development. (a) 
          The Secretary of Agriculture and the Administrator of the 
          Agency for International Development shall each establish 
          within their respective agencies a Center for Faith-Based and 
          Community Initiatives (Center).

[[Page 263]]

          (b) Each of these Centers shall be supervised by a Director, 
          appointed by the agency head in consultation with the White 
          House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives (White 
          House OFBCI).
          (c) Each agency shall provide its Center with appropriate 
          staff, administrative support, and other resources to meet its 
          responsibilities under this order.
          (d) Each Center shall begin operations no later than 45 days 
          from the date of this order.
          e. 2. Purpose of Executive Branch Centers 
          for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. The purpose of the 
          agency Centers will be to coordinate agency efforts to 
          eliminate regulatory, contracting, and other programmatic 
          obstacles to the participation of faith-based and other 
          community organizations in the provision of social services.
          e. 3. Responsibilities of the Centers for 
          Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. Each Center shall, to 
          the extent permitted by law:
          (a) conduct, in coordination with the White House OFBCI, an 
          agency-wide audit to identify all existing barriers to the 
          participation of faith-based and other community organizations 
          in the delivery of social services by the agency, including 
          but not limited to regulations, rules, orders, procurement, 
          and other internal policies and practices, and outreach 
          activities that either facially discriminate against or 
          otherwise discourage or disadvantage the participation of 
          faith-based and other community organizations in Federal 
          programs;
          (b) coordinate a comprehensive agency effort to incorporate 
          faith-based and other community organizations in agency 
          programs and initiatives to the greatest extent possible;
          (c) propose initiatives to remove barriers identified pursuant 
          to section 3(a) of this order, including but not limited to 
          reform of regulations, procurement, and other internal 
          policies and practices, and outreach activities;
          (d) propose the development of innovative pilot and 
          demonstration programs to increase the participation of faith- 
          based and other community organizations in Federal as well as 
          State and local initiatives; and
          (e) develop and coordinate agency outreach efforts to 
          disseminate information more effectively to faith-based and 
          other community organizations with respect to programming 
          changes, contracting opportunities, and other agency 
          initiatives, including but not limited to Web and Internet 
          resources.
          e. 4. Reporting Requirements.
          (a) Report. Not later than 180 days from the date of this 
          order and annually thereafter, each of the two Centers 
          described in section 1 of this order shall prepare and submit 
          a report to the White House OFBCI.
          (b) Contents. The report shall include a description of the 
          agency's efforts in carrying out its responsibilities under 
          this order, including but not limited to:

  (i) a comprehensive analysis of the barriers to the full participation of 
faith-based and other community organizations in the delivery of social 
services identified pursuant to section 3(a) of this order and the proposed 
strategies to eliminate those barriers; and

[[Page 264]]

  (ii) a summary of the technical assistance and other information that 
will be available to faith-based and other community organizations 
regarding the program activities of the agency and the preparation of 
applications or proposals for grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, 
and procurement.

          (c) Performance Indicators. The first report, filed 180 days 
          after the date of this order, shall include annual performance 
          indicators and measurable objectives for agency action. Each 
          report filed thereafter shall measure the agency's performance 
          against the objectives set forth in the initial report.
          e. 5. Responsibilities of the Secretary 
          of Agriculture and the Administrator of the Agency for 
          International Development. The Secretary and the Administrator 
          shall:
          (a) designate an employee within their respective agencies to 
          serve as the liaison and point of contact with the White House 
          OFBCI; and
          (b) cooperate with the White House OFBCI and provide such 
          information, support, and assistance to the White House OFBCI 
          as it may request, to the extent permitted by law.
          e. 6. Administration and Judicial Review. 
          (a) The agency actions directed by this executive order shall 
          be carried out subject to the availability of appropriations 
          and to the extent permitted by law.
          (b) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any 
          right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at 
          law or equity by a party against the United States, its 
          agencies, or entities, its officers, employees or agents, or 
          any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 12, 2002.

EO 13281

Executive Order 13281 of December 19, 2002

Half-Day Closing of Executive Departments and Agencies of the Federal 
Government on Tuesday, December 24, 2002

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. All executive branch departments 
          and agencies of the Federal Government shall be closed and 
          their employees excused from duty for the last half of the 
          scheduled workday on Tuesday, December 24, 2002, the day 
          before Christmas Day, except as provided in section 2 below.
          e. 2. The heads of executive branch 
          departments and agencies may determine that certain offices 
          and installations of their organizations, or parts thereof, 
          must remain open and that certain employees must report for 
          duty for the full scheduled workday on December 24, 2002, for 
          reasons of national security or defense or other public 
          reasons.
          e. 3. Tuesday, December 24, 2002, shall 
          be considered as falling within the scope of Executive Order 
          11582 of February 11, 1971, and of 5 U.S.C.

[[Page 265]]

          5546 and 6103(b) and other similar statutes insofar as they 
          relate to the pay and leave of employees of the United States.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 19, 2002.

EO 13282

Executive Order 13282 of December 31, 2002

Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          laws cited herein, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Statutory Pay Systems. The rates 
          of basic pay or salaries of the statutory pay systems (as 
          defined in 5 U.S.C. 5302(1)), as adjusted under 5 U.S.C. 
          5303(a), are set forth on the schedules attached hereto and 
          made a part hereof:
          (a) The General Schedule (5 U.S.C. 5332(a)) at Schedule 1;
          (b) The Foreign Service Schedule (22 U.S.C. 3963) at Schedule 
          2; and
          (c) The schedules for the Veterans Health Administration of 
          the Department of Veterans Affairs (38 U.S.C. 7306, 7404; 
          section 301(a) of Public Law 102-40) at Schedule 3.
          e. 2. Senior Executive Service. The rates 
          of basic pay for senior executives in the Senior Executive 
          Service, as adjusted under 5 U.S.C. 5382, are set forth on 
          Schedule 4 attached hereto and made a part hereof.
          e. 3. Executive Salaries. The rates of 
          basic pay or salaries for the following offices and positions 
          are set forth on the schedules attached hereto and made a part 
          hereof:
          (a) The Executive Schedule (5 U.S.C. 5311-5318) at Schedule 5;
          (b) The Vice President (3 U.S.C. 104) and the Congress (2 
          U.S.C. 31) at Schedule 6; and
          (c) Justices and judges (28 U.S.C. 5, 44(d), 135, 252, and 
          461(a), and section 140 of Public Law 97-92) at Schedule 7.
          e. 4. Uniformed Services. Pursuant to 
          section 601(a)-(b) of Public Law 107-314, the rates of monthly 
          basic pay (37 U.S.C. 203(a)) for members of the uniformed 
          services and the rate of monthly cadet or midshipman pay (37 
          U.S.C. 203(c)) are set forth on Schedule 8 attached hereto and 
          made a part hereof.
          e. 5. Locality-Based Comparability 
          Payments.
          (a) Pursuant to sections 5304 and 5304a of title 5, United 
          States Code, locality-based comparability payments shall be 
          paid in accordance with Schedule 9 attached hereto and made a 
          part hereof.
          (b) The Director of the Office of Personnel Management shall 
          take such actions as may be necessary to implement these 
          payments and to publish appropriate notice of such payments in 
          the Federal eister.

[[Page 266]]

          e. 6. Administrative Law Judges. The 
          rates of basic pay for administrative law judges, as adjusted 
          under 5 U.S.C. 5372(b)(4), are set forth on Schedule 10 
          attached hereto and made a part hereof.
          e. 7. Effective Dates. Schedule 8 is 
          effective on January 1, 2003. The other schedules contained 
          herein are effective on the first day of the first applicable 
          pay period beginning on or after January 1, 2003.
          e. 8. Prior Order Superseded. Executive 
          Order 13249 of December 28, 2001, is superseded.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 31, 2002.

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Title 3--The President

Other Presidential Documents




                              OTHER PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS




Page

          Subchapter A--[Reserved]

Subchapter B--Administrative Orders

275

Subchapter C--Reorganization Plans

[None]

Subchapter D--Designations

[None]

Appendix A--List of Messages to Congress Transmitting Budget Rescissions 
and Deferrals

339

Appendix B--List of Presidential Determinations

339

Appendix C--List of Final Rule Documents

339

  




                         Subchapter B--Administrative Orders




Notice of January 3, 2002

Continuation of Libya Emergency

          On January 7, 1986, by Executive Order 12543, President Reagan 
          declared a national emergency to deal with the unusual and 
          extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign 
          policy of the United States constituted by the actions and 
          policies of the Government of Libya. On January 8, 1986, by 
          Executive Order 12544, the President took additional measures 
          to block Libyan assets in the United States. The President has 
          transmitted a notice continuing this emergency to the Congress 
          and the Federal eister every year since 1986.
          The crisis between the United States and Libya that led to the 
          declaration of a national emergency on January 7, 1986, has 
          not been resolved. Despite the United Nations Security 
          Council's suspension of U.N. sanctions against Libya upon the 
          Libyan government's hand over of the Pan Am 103 bombing 
          suspects, Libya has not yet complied with its obligations 
          under U.N. Security Council Resolutions 731 (1992), 748 
          (1992), and 883 (1993), which include Libya's obligation to 
          accept responsibility for the actions of its officials and pay 
          compensation.

[[Page 276]]

          Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the National 
          Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 
          year the national emergency with respect to Libya. This notice 
          shall be published in the Federal eister and 
          transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 3, 2002.

Notice of January 15, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Sierra Leone and 
Liberia

          On January 18, 2001, by Executive Order 13194, the President 
          declared a national emergency with respect to Sierra Leone 
          pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act 
          (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706) to deal with the unusual and 
          extraordinary threat to the foreign policy of the United 
          States constituted by the actions and policies of the 
          insurgent Revolutionary United Front (RUF) in Sierra Leone and 
          pursuant to which the United States imposed a general ban on 
          the direct and indirect importation of all rough diamonds from 
          Sierra Leone to the United States, except those imports 
          controlled through the Certificate of Origin regime of the 
          Government of Sierra Leone. On May 22, 2001, I issued 
          Executive Order 13213, which expanded the scope of the 
          national emergency to include actions of the Government of 
          Liberia in support of the RUF and prohibited the importation 
          of all rough diamonds from Liberia.
          Because the actions and policies of the RUF continue to pose 
          an unusual and extraordinary threat to the foreign policy of 
          the United States, the national emergency declared on January 
          18, 2001, as expanded on May 22, 2001, and the measures 
          adopted on those dates to deal with that emergency must 
          continue in effect beyond January 18, 2002. Therefore, in 
          accordance with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act 
          (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national 
          emergency with respect to Sierra Leone and Liberia.
          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 15, 2002.

[[Page 277]]

Notice of January 18, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Terrorists who 
Threaten To Disrupt the Middle East Peace Process

          On January 23, 1995, by Executive Order 12947, the President 
          declared a national emergency pursuant to the International 
          Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706) to deal 
          with the unusual and extraordinary threat to the national 
          security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States 
          posed by grave acts of violence committed by foreign 
          terrorists who threaten to disrupt the Middle East peace 
          process. On August 20, 1998, by Executive Order 13099, the 
          President identified four additional persons, including Usama 
          bin Laden, who threaten to disrupt the Middle East peace 
          process.
          Because these terrorist activities continue to threaten the 
          Middle East peace process and continue to pose an unusual and 
          extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, 
          and economy of the United States, the national emergency 
          declared on January 23, 1995, as expanded on August 20, 1998, 
          and the measures adopted on those dates to deal with that 
          emergency, must continue in effect beyond January 23, 2002. 
          Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the National 
          Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 
          year the national emergency with respect to foreign terrorists 
          who threaten to disrupt the Middle East peace process.
          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 18, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-06 of January 25, 2002

Waiver of Section 907 of the FREEDOM Support Act With Respect to Assistance 
to the Government of Azerbaijan

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority contained in Title II of the 
          ``Kenneth M. Ludden Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and 
          Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2002'' (Public Law 107-
          115), I hereby determine and certify that a waiver of section 
          907 of the FREEDOM Support Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-511):
          [bull] is necessary to support U.S. efforts to counter 
          international terrorism;
          [bull] is necessary to support the operational readiness of 
          U.S. Armed Forces or coalition partners to counter 
          international terrorism;
          [bull] is important to Azerbaijan's border security; and

[[Page 278]]

          [bull] will not undermine or hamper ongoing efforts to 
          negotiate a peaceful settlement between Armenia and Azerbaijan 
          or be used for offensive purposes against Armenia.
          Accordingly, I hereby waive section 907 of the FREEDOM Support 
          Act.
          You are authorized and directed to notify the Congress of this 
          determination and to arrange for its publication in the 
          Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, January 25, 2002.

Memorandum of February 1, 2002

Report to the Congress Regarding Conditions in Burma and U.S. Policy Toward 
Burma

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the requirements set forth under the heading 
          ``Policy Toward Burma'' in section 570(d) of the Fiscal Year 
          1997 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act, as contained in 
          the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act (Public Law 104-
          208), a report is required every 6 months following enactment 
          concerning:
          1) progress toward democratization in Burma;
          2) progress on improving the quality of life of the Burmese 
          people, including progress on market reforms, living 
          standards, labor standards, use of forced labor in the tourism 
          industry, and environmental quality; and
          3) progress made in developing a comprehensive, multilateral 
          strategy to bring democracy to and improve human rights 
          practices and the quality of life in Burma, including the 
          development of a dialogue between the State Peace and 
          Development Council and democratic opposition groups in Burma.
          You are hereby authorized and directed to transmit the 
          attached report fulfilling these requirements to the 
          appropriate committees of the Congress and to arrange for 
          publication of this memorandum in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 Washington, February 1, 2002.

[[Page 279]]

Presidential Determination No. 2002-07 of February 23, 2002

President's Report to Congress on Major Drug Transit or Major Illicit Drug 
Producing Countries under the FY 2002 Modification to the Annual Drug 
Certification Procedures

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          This report is submitted under section 591 of the Kenneth H. 
          Ludden Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related 
          Programs Appropriations Act, 2002 (P.L. 107-115) (the ``FY 
          2002 FOAA''). Pursuant to section 591 of the FY 2002 FOAA, I 
          hereby identify the following countries as major drug-transit 
          or major illicit drug producing countries: Afghanistan, The 
          Bahamas, Bolivia, Brazil, Burma, China, Colombia, Dominican 
          Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Laos, 
          Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Thailand, 
          Venezuela, and Vietnam. I previously identified these same 
          countries as major drug-transit or major illicit drug 
          producing countries on November 1, 2001, pursuant to section 
          490(h) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (the 
          ``FAA'').
          Pursuant to section 591 of the FY 2002 FOAA, I hereby 
          designate Afghanistan, Burma and Haiti as countries that 
          failed demonstrably, during the previous 12 months, to adhere 
          to their obligations under international counternarcotics 
          agreements and to take the counternarcotics measures set forth 
          in section 489(a) (1) of the FAA. I have attached a 
          justification for each of the countries so designated, as 
          required by section 591.
          Pursuant to section 591(3), I hereby also determine that 
          provision of United States assistance to Afghanistan and Haiti 
          in FY 2002 under the FY 2002 FOAA is vital to the national 
          interests of the United States.
          You are hereby authorized and directed to transmit this report 
          to the Congress and to publish it in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, February 23, 2002.

 STATEMENT OF EXPLANATION

          Afhanistan

          Afghanistan has failed demonstrably during the previous 12 
          months to make significant efforts to adhere to its 
          obligations under international counternarcotics agreements 
          and to take the counternarcotics measures set forth in section 
          489(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended. 
          Provision of United States assistance to Afghanistan in Fiscal 
          Year 2002 under the Kenneth M. Ludden Foreign Operations, 
          Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 
          2002 (P.L. 107-115) is vital to the national interests of the 
          United States.
          After the Taliban began enforcing a ban on the cultivation of 
          opium poppy in September 2000, the total production of opium 
          in Afghanistan dropped

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          by 94 percent, thereby reducing the global annual supply by 
          nearly 75 percent. Although the Taliban successfully prevented 
          cultivation, opium trafficking and heroin processing continued 
          unabated through 2001, indicating the existence of large 
          stockpiles of opium in the region used to control the opium 
          market. At no point did the Taliban take any steps to adhere 
          to its international obligations to interrupt opium 
          trafficking or trade. In addition, cultivation and opium 
          production increased in former Northern Alliance territory of 
          Afghanistan. Drug traffickers in Afghanistan have switched 
          allegiances from the Taliban to local commanders and warlords 
          and available information indicates that poppy cultivation has 
          resumed in several areas of Afghanistan since last fall.
          Although the new Afghan Interim Authority led by Hamid Karzai 
          has made a commitment to fight the production and trafficking 
          of drugs in Afghanistan consistent with the Bonn Agreement of 
          December 2001, it will take several months and significant 
          assistance from the international community before the Interim 
          Authority can take concrete measures to eradicate poppy and 
          counter drug trafficking in Afghanistan. In the coming months, 
          I will continue to monitor the Interim Authority's 
          counternarcotics efforts closely. In the meantime, it is in 
          the vital national interest of the United States to provide 
          the full range of U.S. assistance to support the 
          reconstruction of Afghanistan. Afghanistan poppy farmers must 
          have viable alternatives to poppy cultivation that provide a 
          sustainable income. The Afghan Interim Authority will need to 
          establish rule of law and a basic law enforcement capacity at 
          the local and regional level for its counternarcotics strategy 
          to succeed. More broadly, although the United States' military 
          campaign in Afghanistan has been successful, it is essential 
          to ensure that Afghanistan does not again become a haven for 
          terrorists. Stabilizing Afghanistan by providing various forms 
          of assistance, including economic and military assistance in 
          addition to counternarcotics, anti-crime, and humanitarian 
          assistance is essential.

          AEMEN OF 
          EPLANAION

          Burma

          Burma has failed demonstrably during the last 12 months to 
          make substantial efforts to adhere to its obligations under 
          international counternarcotics agreements and to take the 
          counternarcotics measures set forth in section 489(a)(1) of 
          the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended. With the ban 
          on opium production in Afghanistan imposed by the Taliban in 
          2001, Burma returned to its position as the world's largest 
          producer of illicit opium. Burma is also the primary source of 
          methamphetamines trafficked throughout Southeast Asia and has 
          done little to stop the production of an estimated 800 million 
          tablets annually and trafficking of these drugs.
          Burma has taken some useful counternarcotics measures in the 
          last year, but these measures are too limited in duration and 
          scope to constitute a substantial effort to meet the standards 
          set forth under U.S. law.
          Burma's 1993 Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Law 
          conforms to the 1988 UN Drug Convention and contains useful 
          legal tools for addressing money laundering, seizing drug-
          related assets, and prosecuting drug conspiracy cases, but the 
          Government of Burma (GOB) has been slow to implement the law. 
          Burma has not enforced its existing money-laundering laws. In 
          2001, Burma was placed on the Financial Action Task

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          Force's List of Non-Cooperating Countries and Territories. To 
          its credit Burma responded by drafting new anti-money-
          laundering legislation, but its passage has been delayed until 
          sometime in 2002.
          In 2001, the GOB took stronger, more aggressive law-
          enforcement actions against some ethnic groups, notably the 
          Kokang Chinese, engaged in drug production and trafficking and 
          considerably improved counternarcotics cooperation with China 
          and Thailand. In areas controlled by the United Wa State Army 
          (the principal drug-producing and drug-trafficking 
          organization in Burma) the government has been very cautious, 
          only slowly expanding its administrative presence, but not yet 
          attempting any aggressive law-enforcement operations 
          comparable to those it has staged elsewhere. Although 
          unwilling to risk confronting the Wa, a potent organization 
          with a well-manned and well-trained military force, the GOB 
          did take the modest steps of establishing a police presence in 
          the Wa territories in 2001 and, in December 2001, opening its 
          first military intelligence office in the Wa territories.
          Seizures of opium in 2001 modestly exceeded the amounts seized 
          last year, but seizures of heroin declined for the fourth 
          straight year. Burmese law-enforcement agencies seized 
          approximately 1,629 kilograms of raw opium and 98 kilograms of 
          heroin during 2001. Heroin seized in 2000 totaled 159 
          kilograms compared to 273 kilograms in 1999 and 404 kilograms 
          in 1998.
          The GOB has not yet taken effective action against 
          methamphetamine production and trafficking. Considering that 
          an estimated 800 million methamphetamine tablets are produced 
          in Burma each year, the amounts seized in each of the past two 
          years represent only small fraction of the total produced and 
          have no real effect on the overall scope of the problem. In 
          2001, Burma seized 32.4 million methamphetamine pills, 
          compared to 26.7 million pills seized during 2000.
          The GOB continued to refuse to transfer to U.S. custody drug 
          lord Chang Qifu (Khun Sa), who resides in Rangoon, on grounds 
          that he had not violated his 1996 surrender agreement. The 
          1988 UN Drug Convention obligates parties, including Burma, to 
          prosecute such traffickers.
          While recognizing that Burma has intensified its 
          counternarcotics efforts in 2001, particularly during the 
          second half of the year, those efforts must be sustained and 
          expanded, if they are to have a significant impact on the 
          overall scope of the production and trafficking problem. Burma 
          has not yet curbed involvement in illicit narcotics 
          perpetrated by the largest, most powerful and most important 
          trafficking organization within its borders, the United Wa 
          State Army.
          On balance, the United States Government remains concerned 
          that the GOB's efforts are not commensurate with the extent of 
          Burma's illicit drug problem and believes that Burma has 
          failed demonstrably to make substantial efforts to adhere to 
          its obligations under international counternarcotics 
          agreements and to take the counternarcotics measures set forth 
          in section 489(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act. Large-
          scale poppy cultivation and opium production continue and 
          enormous quantities of methamphetamines are produced in and 
          trafficked from Burma, having serious adverse effects on 
          neighboring countries and throughout the region. Its 
          toleration of money laundering, its unwillingness to implement 
          fully its counterdrug laws, and its failure to transfer 
          notorious trafficker Chang Qifu (Khun Sa) under indictment in 
          the United States are all serious concerns.

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          Although the GOB's actions in 2001, particularly in 
          cooperation with China and Thailand, demonstrated a new 
          commitment to effective counternarcotics measures; the GOB has 
          failed to enforce its narcotics laws, to eradicate 
          systematically all forms of illicit drugs, including 
          methamphetamines, and to address meaningfully the growing 
          problem of drug abuse and HIV/AIDS.
          The GOB must aggressively pursue drug traffickers, including 
          the most prominent trafficking groups and organizations, most 
          particularly the United Wa State Army. The GOB should continue 
          and expand its cooperation with other countries in the region, 
          particularly those most seriously affected by drugs trafficked 
          from Burma. Although Burma's counternarcotics record in 2001 
          is noticeably improved over that of prior years, its efforts 
          need to be sustained, expanded, and intensified over the next 
          year.

          AEMEN OF 
          EPLANAION

          Haiti

          Haiti has failed demonstrably during the last 12 months to 
          make substantial efforts to adhere to its obligations under 
          international counternarcotics agreements and to take the 
          counternarcotics measures set forth in section 489(a)(1) of 
          the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended. However, it is 
          in the vital national interests of the United States to 
          continue to provide assistance to the Government of Haiti 
          (GOH) under the Kenneth M. Ludden, Foreign Operations, Export 
          Financing, and Related Programs Act, 2002 (P.L. 107-115). 
          Haiti remains a significant transshipment point for drugs, 
          primarily cocaine, moving through the Caribbean from South 
          America to the United States.
          Although tactical cooperation by the GOH modestly improved, 
          Haiti's overall counterdrug commitment remined weak, in part 
          due to political instability and low levels of assistance. 
          Such instability coupled with economic degradation has led to 
          an increase in criminal and political violence and compromised 
          internal security. Aristide has attempted to shore up his 
          personal and political security by politicizing the police. 
          Continued politicization of the Haitian National Police, in 
          contravention to one of President Aristide's commitments to 
          the United States Government, bodes ill for an effective 
          counternarcotics effort.
          Amid political and economic instability and in spite of 
          limited resources, the GOH made some efforts to cooperate with 
          counternarcotics initiatives. Due largely to the efforts of 
          the Haitian Minister of Justice, the GOH made efforts to curb 
          corruption in the judiciary, joined the Caribbean Financial 
          Action Task Force (CFATF), and formed a Financial Intelligence 
          Unit to combat money laundering. The GOH also, with the 
          assistance of U.S. law enforcement, increased the amount of 
          cocaine seized in 2001 over that seized in 2000. The GOH 
          honored all United States Government requests for expulsion 
          and extradition in 2001 by expelling two non-Haitian drug 
          traffickers. The GOH cooperated with U.S. and Dominician 
          Republic law enforcement by participating in a two-week 
          counternarcotics operation and maintaining subsequent contact 
          with U.S. and Dominican anti-drug units. Finally, the GOH 
          honored the terms of a Bilateral Maritime Counternarcotics 
          Interdiction Agreement pending formal official acceptance by 
          the GOH since 1997.

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          However, Haiti failed to take many other significant 
          counterdrug actions. These actions can be categorized into the 
          areas of anti-corruption, anti-money laundering, law 
          enforcement, prosecution, and international cooperation: the 
          GOH did not deposit an instrument of ratification of the OAS 
          Inter-American Convention Against Corruption; introduce anti-
          corruption legislation; prosecute drug-related public 
          (including police) corruption; put into force the anti-money 
          laundering law passed in January 2001; enforce existing anti-
          money laundering guidelines issued by the Central Bank; 
          require cross-border currency declarations and provide 
          penalties for noncompliance; increase the number of arrests of 
          major traffickers; increase the size of the antidrug squad 
          (BLTS) to 75 officers; establish a permanent BLTS office 
          outside Port au Prince; take steps to ensure the integrity of 
          the BLTS; provide training to judges, prosecutors, and law 
          enforcement officials; waive Haiti's primary right to exercise 
          prosecutorial jurisdiction over non-Haitian flag vessels 
          interdicted by the U.S. Coast Guard in Haitian waters; or put 
          into force the 1997 U.S.-Haiti Bilateral Maritime 
          Counternarcotics Interdiction Agreement. The GOH did not sign 
          a counterdrug Letter of Agreement with the United States 
          Government.
          Despite Haiti's demonstrable failure on counternarcotics 
          issues, U.S. vital national interests require that U.S. 
          assistance to Haiti continue. Because Haiti is the 
          hemisphere's poorest country, there is need for continued 
          assistance to programs that alleviate hunger, increase access 
          to education, combat environmental degradation, fight the 
          spread of HIV/AIDS, and foster the development of civil 
          society. These programs create an environment conductive to 
          building democracy and reducing illegal migration. They also 
          address the root causes of poverty and hopelessness in Haiti, 
          which are important contributing factors behind Haitian 
          involvement in the drug trade. Additionally, suspension of 
          assistance to Haiti would result in the further deterioration 
          of Haitian institutions essential to combat increasing 
          criminality.

Notice of February 26, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency Relating to Cuba and of the 
Emergency Authority Relating to the Regulation of the Anchorage and 
Movement of Vessels

          On March 1, 1996, by Proclamation 6867, President Clinton 
          declared a national emergency to address the disturbance or 
          threatened disturbance of international relations caused by 
          the February 24, 1996, destruction by the Government of Cuba 
          of two unarmed U.S.-registered civilian aircraft in interna 
          tional airspace north of Cuba. In July 1996 and on subsequent 
          occasions, the Government of Cuba stated its intent to 
          forcefully defend its sovereignty against any U.S.-registered 
          vessels or aircraft that might enter Cuban territorial waters 
          or airspace while involved in a flotilla and peaceful protest. 
          Since these events, the Government of Cuba has not 
          demonstrated that it will refrain from the future use of 
          reckless and excessive force against U.S. vessels or aircraft 
          that may engage in memorial activities or peaceful protest 
          north of Cuba. Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of 
          the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am con

[[Page 284]]

          tinuing the national emergency with respect to Cuba and the 
          emergency authority relating to the regulation of the 
          anchorage and movement of vessels set out in Proclamation 
          6867.
          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

February 26, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-08 of March 4, 2002

Determination Pursuant to Section 523 of the Foreign Operations, Export 
Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2002, (Public Law 107-
115)

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to section 523 of the Foreign Operations, Export 
          Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2002, 
          (Public Law 107-115), I hereby certify that withholding from 
          international financial institutions and other international 
          organizations and programs funds appropriated or otherwise 
          made available pursuant to that Act is contrary to the 
          national interest.
          You are authorized and directed to publish this determination 
          in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 Washington, March 4, 2002.

Memorandum of March 5, 2002

Action Under Section 203 of the Trade Act of 1974 Concerning Certain Steel 
Products

Memorandum for the Secretary of the Treasury[,] the Secretary of Commerce[, 
and the] United States Trade Representative

           On December 19, 2001, the United States International Trade 
          Commission (ITC) submitted a report to me that contained 
          determinations pursuant to section 202 of the Trade Act of 
          1974, as amended (the ``Trade Act''), that (a) certain carbon 
          flat rolled steel, including carbon and alloy steel slabs, 
          plate (including cut-to-length plate and clad plate), hot-
          rolled steel (includ- ing plate in coils), cold-rolled steel 
          (other than grain-oriented electrical steel), and corrosion-
          resistant and other coated steel (collectively, ``certain flat 
          steel''); (b) carbon and alloy hot-rolled bar and light shapes 
          (``hot-rolled bar''); (c) carbon and alloy cold-finished bar 
          (``cold-finished bar''); (d) carbon and alloy rebar 
          (``rebar''); (e) carbon and alloy welded tubular products 
          (other than oil country tubular goods) (``certain tubular 
          products''); (f) car

[[Page 285]]

          bon and alloy flanges, fittings, and tool joints (``carbon and 
          alloy fittings''); (g) stainless steel bar and light shapes 
          (``stainless steel bar''); and (h) stainless steel rod are 
          being imported into the United States in such increased 
          quantities as to be a substantial cause of serious injury, or 
          the threat thereof, to the domestic industries producing like 
          or directly competitive articles. The ITC commissioners were 
          equally divided with respect to the determination required 
          under section 202(b) regarding whether (i) carbon and alloy 
          tin mill products (``tin mill products''); (j) stainless steel 
          wire; (k) tool steel, all forms; and (l) stainless steel 
          flanges and fittings (``stainless steel fittings'') are being 
          imported into the United States in such increased quantities 
          as to be a substantial cause of serious injury, or threat of 
          serious injury, to the domestic industries producing like or 
          directly competitive articles. The ITC provided detailed 
          definitions of the products included in categories (a) through 
          (l) and their corresponding subheadings under the Harmonized 
          Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS) in Appendix A to 
          its determination, set out at 66 Fed. Reg. 67304, 67308-67311 
          (December 28, 2001).
           The report of the ITC also contained findings pursuant to 
          section 311(a) of the North American Free Trade Agreement 
          Implementation Act (the ``NAFTA Implementation Act'') as to 
          whether imports from Canada and Mexico, considered 
          individually, account for a substantial share of total imports 
          and contribute importantly to the serious injury, or threat 
          thereof, caused by imports. The ITC made negative findings 
          with respect to imports from Canada of certain flat steel, tin 
          mill products, rebar, stainless steel rod, and stainless steel 
          wire; and also made negative findings with respect to imports 
          from Mexico of tin mill products, hot-rolled bar, cold-
          finished bar, rebar, certain tubular products, stainless steel 
          bar, stainless steel rod, and stainless steel wire. The ITC 
          made affirmative findings with respect to imports from Canada 
          of hot-rolled bar, cold-finished bar, carbon and alloy 
          fittings, and stainless steel bar; and also made affirmative 
          findings with respect to imports from Mexico of certain flat 
          steel, and carbon and alloy steel fittings. The ITC 
          commissioners were equally divided with respect to imports 
          from Canada of certain tubular products. By February 4, 2002, 
          the ITC provided additional information in response to a 
          request under section 203(a)(5) of the Trade Act 
          (``supplemental report'') made by the United States Trade 
          Representative (the ``USTR'') on January 3, 2002.
           Having considered the determinations of both groups of 
          commissioners with regard to tin mill products, tool steel, 
          stainless steel wire, and stainless steel fittings, I have 
          determined, pursuant to section 330(d)(1) of the Tariff Act of 
          1930, as amended, to consider the determinations of the groups 
          of commissioners voting in the affirmative with regard to tin 
          mill products and stainless steel wire to be the determination 
          of the ITC, and the determinations of the groups of 
          commissioners voting in the negative with regard to tool steel 
          and stainless steel fittings to be the determination of the 
          ITC.
           By Proclamation signed today (the ``Proclamation'') and after 
          considering all relevant aspects of the investigation, 
          including the factors set forth in section 203(a)(2) of the 
          Trade Act and the supplemental report, I have implemented 
          actions of a type described in section 203(a)(3). I have 
          determined that the most appropriate actions are safeguard 
          measures in the form of an increase in duties on imports of 
          certain flat steel, other than slabs (including plate, hot-
          rolled steel, cold-rolled steel, and coated steel), hot-

[[Page 286]]

          rolled bar, cold-finished bar, rebar, certain welded tubular 
          products, carbon and alloy fittings, stainless steel bar, 
          stainless steel rod, tin mill products, and stainless steel 
          wire, as defined in paragraph 7 of the Proclamation, and in 
          the form of a tariff rate quota (TRQ) on imports of slabs, 
          with an increase in currently scheduled rates of duties for 
          imports over the TRQ limits. I have implemented these 
          safeguard measures for a period of 3 years plus 1 day.
           Specifically, I have established the following safeguard 
          measures:
           (a) certain flat steel: with regard to slabs, a TRQ of 4.90 
          million metric tons in the first year of the measure, 5.35 
          million metric tons in the second year, and 5.81 million 
          metric tons in the third year, with no increase in duties for 
          imports below the within-quota level and an increase in duties 
          of 30% ad valorem for imports above the within-quota level in 
          the first year of the measure, 24% in the second year, and 18% 
          in the third year; and with regard to certain flat steel, 
          other than slab (including plate, hot-rolled steel, cold-
          rolled steel and coated steel), an increase in duties of 30% 
          ad valorem in the first year, 24% in the second year, and 18% 
          in the third year;
           (b) hot-rolled bar: an increase in duties of 30% ad valorem 
          in the first year of the measure, 24% in the second year, and 
          18% in the third year;
           (c) cold-finished bar: a increase in duties of 30% ad valorem 
          in the first year of the measure, 24% in the second year, and 
          18% in the third year;
           (d) rebar: an increase in duties of 15% ad valorem in the 
          first year of the measure, 12% in the second year, and 9% in 
          the third year;
           (e) certain welded tubular products: an increase in duties of 
          15% ad valorem in the first year of the measure, 12% in the 
          second year, and 9% in the third year;
           (f) carbon and alloy fittings: an increase in duties of 13% 
          ad valorem in the first year of the measure, 10% in the second 
          year, and 7% in the third year;
           (g) stainless steel bar: an increase in duties of 15% ad 
          valorem in the first year of the measure, 12% in the second 
          year, and 9% in the third year;
           (h) stainless steel rod: an increase in duties of 15% ad 
          valorem in the first year of the measure, 12% in the second 
          year, and 9% in the third year;
           (i) tin mill products: an increase in duties of 30% ad 
          valorem in the first year of the measure, 24% in the second 
          year, and 18% in the third year; and
           (j) stainless steel wire: an increase in duties of 8% ad 
          valorem in the first year of the measure, 7% in the second 
          year, and 6% in the third year.
           Pursuant to section 312(a) of the NAFTA Implementation Act, 
          after consideration of the report and supplemental reports of 
          the ITC, I further determine that imports of certain flat 
          steel, hot-rolled bar, cold-finished bar, rebar, certain 
          tubular products, carbon and alloy fittings, stainless steel 
          bar, stainless steel rod, tin mill products, and stainless 
          steel wire that are products of Canada and Mexico either do 
          not account for a substantial share of total imports of these 
          products, or are not contributing importantly to serious 
          injury or the threat of serious injury. Therefore, pursuant to 
          section 312(b) of the NAFTA Implementation Act, the safeguard 
          measure will not apply to imports of certain flat steel, hot-
          rolled bar, cold-finished bar, rebar,

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          certain tubular products, carbon and alloy fittings, stainless 
          steel bar, stainless steel rod, tin mill products, and 
          stainless steel wire that are the product of Canada or Mexico. 
          Similarly, the safeguard measures will not apply to imports of 
          these products that are the product of Israel or Jordan.
           The safeguard measures also will not apply to imports of 
          certain flat steel, tin mill products, hot-rolled bar, cold-
          finished bar, rebar, certain tubular products, carbon and 
          alloy fittings, stainless steel bar, stainless steel rod, or 
          stainless steel wire that are the product of a developing 
          country that is a member of the World Trade Organization 
          (WTO), as long as that country's share of imports into the 
          United States of the product, based on a recent representative 
          period, does not exceed 3 percent, provided that all such 
          developing country WTO members collectively account for not 
          more than 9 percent of total imports of that product. For 
          purposes of the safeguard measures established under the 
          Proclamation, I determine that the beneficiary countries under 
          the Generalized System of Preferences are developing 
          countries. Subdivision (d)(i) of U.S. Note 11 to subchapter 
          III of chapter 99 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the 
          United States (Note 11) in the Annex to the Proclamation 
          identifies those developing countries that are WTO members, 
          and subdivision (d)(ii) identifies the products of such 
          countries to which the safeguard measures shall not apply.
           I instruct the USTR to review data on imports of products 
          listed in paragraph 7 of the Proclamation from countries 
          listed in subdivision (d)(i) of Note 11 on a quarterly basis. 
          If imports of such a product from such a country increase by a 
          material amount, I instruct the USTR to initiate consultations 
          with the country regarding the circumstances under which the 
          increase occurred and whether the country plans to take action 
          to reduce imports to historical levels. If, on the basis of 
          the information exchanged during consultations, data on 
          imports, domestic steel demand, growth in the U.S. economy, 
          shifts in other countries' trade patterns, and any other 
          relevant factors, the USTR determines that the increase in 
          imports of such product from such country undermines the 
          effectiveness of the pertinent safeguard measure, he is 
          authorized, upon publication of a notice of such determination 
          in the Federal eister, to modify subdivision 
          (d)(ii) of Note 11 in the Annex to the Proclamation to include 
          such product from such country. I also authorize the USTR, 
          upon publication of a notice in the Federal 
          eister, to change the list of developing 
          countries to which the safeguard measures do not apply.
           The steel products listed in clauses (i) through (ix) of 
          subdivision (b) of Note 11 in the Annex to the Proclamation 
          were excluded from the determinations of the ITC described in 
          paragraph 2 of that Proclamation, and are excluded from these 
          safeguard measures. I have also determined to exclude from 
          these safeguard measures the steel products listed in the 
          subsequent clauses of subdivision (b) of Note 11 in the Annex 
          to the Proclamation. The Trade Policy Staff Committee (TPSC) 
          is currently evaluating requests, submitted in response to 66 
          Fed. Reg. 54321, 54322-54323 (October 26, 2001), that 
          particular products be excluded from any safeguard measure 
          with regard to certain steel products. I instruct the USTR to 
          determine whether these particular products should be excluded 
          and, if so, within 120 days of the date of the Proclamation, 
          to publish in the Federal eister a notice to 
          modify subchapter III of chapter 99 to exclude them from the 
          safeguard measures. In making this determination, the USTR 
          shall consider any advice rendered by the TPSC.

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           Similarly, I instruct the USTR, after receiving advice from 
          the TPSC, to determine whether any particular products should 
          be added to the list of those excluded from the safeguard 
          measures and, if so, to publish a notice in the Federal 
          eister in March of any year in which he 
          receives such a recommendation to modify subchapter III of 
          chapter 99 to exclude such particular products from the 
          measures. I further instruct the USTR, no later than 90 days 
          from today, to publish in the Federal eister a 
          notice of the procedures by which interested persons may 
          request the TPSC to recommend whether to exclude a particular 
          product.
           I also instruct the USTR, prior to the effective date of the 
          safeguard measures established in the Proclamation, to conduct 
          consultations under Article 12.3 of the Agreement on 
          Safeguards with any WTO member having a substantial interest 
          as an exporter of a product subject to such safeguard 
          measures, provided that the WTO member requests such 
          consultations in a timely fashion. I instruct the USTR to 
          report to me on the results of such consultations. I instruct 
          the Secretary of the Treasury, pursuant to section 505(a) of 
          the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1505(a)), to prescribe by 
          regulation a date no later than 45 days after today at which 
          estimated duties for merchandise entered, or withdrawn from 
          warehouse for consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m., EST, March 
          20, 2002, and up to the 30th day after today, shall be 
          deposited.
           I instruct the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of 
          Commerce to establish a system of import licensing to 
          facilitate the monitoring of imports of certain steel 
          products. Pursuant to the authority granted me by section 
          203(g) of the Trade Act to provide for the efficient and fair 
          administration of all actions taken for the purpose of 
          providing import relief under section 203, I further instruct 
          the Secretary of Commerce, within 120 days of the effective 
          date of the safeguard measures established by the 
          Proclamation, to publish regulations in the Federal 
          eister establishing such a system of import 
          licensing.
           I have determined that the safeguard measures will facilitate 
          efforts by the domestic industries to make a positive 
          adjustment to import competition and will provide greater 
          economic and social benefits than costs. If I determine that 
          further action is appropriate and feasible to facilitate 
          efforts by the pertinent domestic industry to make a positive 
          adjustment to import competition and to provide greater 
          economic and social benefits than costs, or if I determine 
          that the conditions under section 204(b)(1) of the Trade Act 
          are met, I shall reduce, modify, or terminate the safeguard 
          measures. In making this determination, I shall consider the 
          pertinent factors set out in section 203(a)(2) of the Trade 
          Act and, in particular, changes in capital and labor 
          productivity in the domestic industries; actual and planned 
          permanent closures of inefficient steel production facilities 
          in the United States and in other countries; consolidation of 
          United States steel producers; capital expenditures in the 
          domestic industries; prices for certain steel products in the 
          United States; and the overall effect that maintaining the 
          measure will have on consuming industries, workers, and the 
          United States economy as a whole.

[[Page 289]]

           The United States Trade Representative is authorized and 
          directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 Washington, March 5, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-09 of March 12, 2002

Eligibility of Palau, Kiribati, and Tuvalu to Receive Defense Articles and 
Services Under the Foreign Assistance Act and the Arms Export Control Act

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 503(a) of 
          the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and section 
          3(a)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, I hereby find that the 
          furnishing of defense articles and services to the Governments 
          of Palau, Kiribati, and Tuvalu will strengthen the security of 
          the United States and promote world peace.
          You are authorized and directed to report this finding to the 
          Congress and to publish this memorandum in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, March 12, 2002.

Notice of March 13, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency with Respect to Iran

          On March 15, 1995, by Executive Order 12957, the President 
          declared a national emergency with respect to Iran pursuant to 
          the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 
          1701-1706) to deal with the unusual and extraordinary threat 
          to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the 
          United States constituted by the actions and policies of the 
          Government of Iran, including its support for international 
          terrorism, efforts to undermine the Middle East peace process, 
          and acquisition of weapons of mass destruction and the means 
          to deliver them. On May 6, 1995, the President issued 
          Executive Order 12959 imposing more comprehensive sanctions to 
          further respond to this threat, and on August 19, 1997, the 
          President issued Executive Order 13059 consolidating and 
          clarifying the previous orders.
          Because the actions and policies of the Government of Iran 
          continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the 
          national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United 
          States, the national emergency declared

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          on March 15, 1995, must continue in effect beyond March 15, 
          2002. Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the 
          National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing 
          for 1 year the national emergency with respect to Iran. 
          Because the emergency declared by Executive Order 12957 
          constitutes an emergency separate from that declared on 
          November 14, 1979, by Executive Order 12170, this renewal is 
          distinct from the emergency renewal of November 2001. This 
          notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

March 13, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-10 of March 14, 2002

Designation of Bahrain as a Major Non-NATO Ally

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me, by section 517 of the 
          Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (the ``Act''), I 
          hereby designate the Kingdom of Bahrain as a major non-NATO 
          ally of the United States for the purposes of the Act and the 
          Arms Export Control Act.
          You are authorized and directed to publish this determination 
          in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 Washington, March 14, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-11 of March 20, 2002

Cooperation by Vietnam in Accounting for United States Prisoners of War and 
Missing in Action

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          As provided in section 610 of the Departments of Commerce, 
          Justice, and State, the Judiciary and Related Agencies 
          Appropriations Act, 2002, Public Law 107-77, and laws 
          referenced therein, I hereby determine, based on all 
          information available to the United States Government, that 
          the Government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam is fully 
          cooperating in good faith with the United States in the 
          following four areas related to achieving the fullest possible 
          accounting for Americans unaccounted for as a result of the 
          Vietnam War:

1)

resolving discrepancy cases, live sightings, and field activities;

2)

recovering and repatriating American remains;

3)

accelerating efforts to provide documents that will help lead to the 
fullest possible accounting of prisoners of war and missing in action (POW/
MIAs); and

[[Page 291]]

4)

providing further assistance in implementing trilateral investigations with 
Laos.

          I further determine that the appropriate laboratories 
          associated with POW/MIA accounting are thoroughly analyzing 
          remains, material, and other information and fulfilling their 
          responsibilities as set forth in subsection (B) of section 609 
          of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the 
          Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1999, 
          which is incorporated by reference in section 610.
          The Department of Justice has advised that section 610 is 
          unconstitutional because it purports to use a condition on 
          appropriations as a means to direct my execution of 
          responsibilities that the Constitution commits exclusively to 
          the President. I am providing this determination as a matter 
          of comity, while reserving the position that the condition 
          enacted in section 610 is unconstitutional.
          In making this determination, I have taken into account all 
          information available to the United States Government as 
          reported to me, the full range of ongoing accounting 
          activities in Vietnam, including joint and unilateral 
          Vietnamese efforts, and the concrete results we have attained 
          as a result. As we look to further strengthen cooperation, 
          Vietnam's unilateral provision of POW/MIA-related documents 
          and records should be improved, focused initially on archival 
          data pertaining to Americans captured, missing, or killed in 
          areas of Laos and Cambodia under wartime Vietnamese control. 
          Vietnam should also focus greater attention on locating and 
          providing information on discrepancy cases, with priority on 
          those last known alive in captivity or in immediate proximity 
          to capture, and to locating and repatriating the remains of 
          those who died while in Vietnamese control that have not yet 
          been returned.
          Finally, in making this determination, I wish to reaffirm my 
          continuing personal commitment to the entire POW/MIA 
          community, especially to the immediate families, relatives, 
          friends, and supporters of these brave individuals, and to 
          reconfirm that achieving the fullest possible accounting of 
          our prisoners of war and missing in action remains one of the 
          most important priorities in our relations with Vietnam.
          You are authorized and directed to report this determination 
          to the appropriate committees of the Congress and to publish 
          it in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, March 20, 2002.

[[Page 292]]

Presidential Determination No. 2002-12 of April 1, 2002

U.S. Contribution to the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization 
(KEDO): Determination Regarding Funds Under the Heading ``Nonproliferation, 
Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related Programs'' in Title II of the Foreign 
Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2002 
(Public Law 107-115)

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 565(c) of 
          the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs 
          Appropriations Act, 2002 (Public Law 107-115) (the ``Act''), I 
          hereby determine that it is vital to the national security 
          interests of the United States to furnish up to $95 million in 
          funds made available under the heading ``Nonproliferation, 
          Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related Programs'' of that Act, 
          for assistance to KEDO, and, therefore, I hereby waive the 
          requirement in section 565(b) to certify that:
          (1) The parties to the Agreed Framework have taken and 
          continue to take demonstrable steps to implement the Joint 
          Declaration on Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula;
          (2) North Korea is complying with all provisions of the Agreed 
          Framework; and
          (3) The United States is continuing to make significant 
          progress on eliminating the North Korean ballistic missile 
          threat, including further missile tests and its ballistic 
          missile exports.
          You are hereby authorized and directed to report this 
          determination and the accompanying Memorandum of Justification 
          to the Congress, and to arrange for publication of this 
          determination in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, April 1, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-13 of April 12, 2002

Determination Pursuant to Section 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee 
Assistance Act of 1962, as Amended

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to section (2)(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee 
          Assistance Act of 1962, as amended, 22 U.S.C. 2601(c)(1), I 
          hereby determine that it is important to the national interest 
          that up to $20 million be made available from the U.S. 
          Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund for a 
          contribution to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for 
          Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) to meet unexpected 
          urgent refugee needs due to the crisis in the West Bank and 
          Gaza.

[[Page 293]]

          You are authorized and directed to inform the appropriate 
          committees of the Congress of this determination and the 
          obligation of funds under this authority, and to arrange for 
          the publication of this memorandum in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, April 12, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-14 of April 16, 2002

Waiver and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine 
Liberation Organization

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me under section 534(d) of 
          the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs 
          Appropriations Act, 2002, Public Law 107-115, I hereby 
          determine and certify that it is important to the national 
          security interests of the United States to waive the 
          provisions of section 1003 of the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1987, 
          Public Law 100-204.
          This waiver shall be effective for a period of 6 months from 
          the date hereof. You are hereby authorized and directed to 
          transmit this determination to the Congress and to publish it 
          in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, April 16, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-15 of April 18, 2002

Eligibility of Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Tajikistan to Receive Defense 
Articles and Services under the Foreign Assistance Act and the Arms Export 
Control Act

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 503(a) of 
          the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and section 
          3(a)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, I hereby find that the 
          furnishing of defense articles and services to the Governments 
          of Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Tajikistan will strengthen the 
          security of the United States and promote world peace.
          You are hereby authorized and directed to report this 
          determination to the Congress and to arrange for its 
          publication in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, April 18, 2002.

[[Page 294]]

Presidential Determination No. 2002-16 of April 18, 2002

Determination to Authorize the Furnishing of Emergency Military Assistance 
to the Government of Nigeria

Memorandum for the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Defense

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 506(a)(1) of 
          the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, 22 U.S.C. 
          2318(a)(1) (the ``Act''), I hereby determine that:
          (1) an unforeseen emergency exists that requires immediate 
          military assistance to the Government of Nigeria; and
          (2) the emergency requirement cannot be met under the 
          authority of the Arms Export Control Act or any other law 
          except section 506(a) of the Act.
          I therefore direct the drawdown of defense articles and 
          defense services from the Department of Defense, and military 
          education and training, of an aggregate value not to exceed $4 
          million, to provide assistance to the Government of Nigeria.
          The Secretary of State is authorized and directed to report 
          this determination to the Congress and to arrange for its 
          publication in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, April 18, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-17 of April 24, 2002

Military Drawdown for Georgia

Memorandum for the Secretary of State [and] the Secretary of Defense

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
          laws of the United States, including title III (Foreign 
          Military Financing) of the Foreign Operations, Export 
          Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2001 
          (Public Law 106-429), as amended by title III (Foreign 
          Military Financing) of the Kenneth M. Ludden Foreign 
          Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs 
          Appropriations Act, Fiscal Year 2002 (Public Law 107-115), I 
          hereby direct the drawdown of defense articles from the stocks 
          of the Department of Defense, defense services from the 
          Department of Defense, and military education and training of 
          an aggregate value of $4 million for Georgia, for the purposes 
          of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended.
          The Secretary of State is authorized and directed to report 
          this determination to the Congress and to publish it in the 
          Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, April 24, 2002.

[[Page 295]]

Presidential Determination No. 2002-18 of April 27, 2001

Determination to (1) Waive Section 512 of the Foreign Operations, Export 
Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2002 (Public Law 107-
115) and Section 620(q) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended 
to Provide Assistance to Afghanistan and (2) Authorize a Drawdown Under 
Section 506(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as Amended, to 
Provide Emergency Military Assistance to Afghanistan

Memorandum for the Secretary of State [and] the Secretary of Defense

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
          laws of the United States, including section 512 of the 
          Kenneth M. Ludden Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and 
          Related Programs Appropriations Act, Fiscal Year 2002 (Public 
          Law 107-115) (FOAA) and sections 506(a)(1) and 620(q) of the 
          Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, 22 U.S.C. 
          2318(a)(1) (FAA), I hereby determine that:

(1)

 assistance to Afghanistan is in the national interest of the United 
States; and

(2)

 an unforeseen emergency exists that requires immediate military assistance 
to the Government of Afghanistan for purposes of training and equipping the 
Afghan national armed forces; and the emergency requirement cannot be met 
under the authority of the Arms Export Control Act or any other law except 
section 506(a)(1) of the FAA.

          Accordingly, I hereby waive section 512 of the FOAA and 
          section 620(q) of the FAA with respect to assistance to 
          Afghanistan. Further, I hereby direct the drawdown of up to $2 
          million of defense articles, services, and training from the 
          inventory and resources of the Department of Defense for 
          military assistance for Afghanistan.
          The Secretary of State is authorized and directed to report 
          this determination to the Congress and to arrange for its 
          publication in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, April 27, 2001.

Order of May 6, 2002

Designation Under Executive Order 12958

          In accordance with the provisions of section 1.4 of Executive 
          Order 12958 of April 17, 1995, entitled ``Classified National 
          Security Information,'' I hereby designate the Administrator 
          of the Environmental Protection Agency to classify information 
          originally as ``Secret.''

[[Page 296]]

          Any delegation of this authority shall be in accordance with 
          section 1.4(c) of Executive Order 12958.
          This order shall be published in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

May 6, 2002.

Notice of May 16, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Burma

          On May 20, 1997, the President issued Executive Order 13047, 
          certifying to the Congress under section 570(b) of the Foreign 
          Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs 
          Appropriations Act, 1997 (Public Law 104-208) that the 
          Government of Burma had committed large-scale repression of 
          the democratic opposition in Burma after September 30, 1996, 
          thereby invoking the prohibition on new investment in Burma by 
          United States persons contained in that section. The President 
          also declared a national emergency to deal with the threat 
          posed to the national security and foreign policy of the 
          United States by the actions and policies of the Government of 
          Burma, invoking the authority, inter alia, of the 
          International Emergency Economic Powers Act, 50 U.S.C. 
          1703(c).
          Because actions and policies of the Government of Burma 
          continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the 
          national security and foreign policy of the United States, the 
          national emergency declared on May 20, 1997, and the measures 
          adopted on that date to deal with that emergency must continue 
          in effect beyond May 20, 2002. Therefore, in accordance with 
          section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 
          1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency 
          with respect to Burma. This notice shall be published in the 
          Federal eister and transmitted to the 
          Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

May 16, 2002.

Notice of May 27, 2002

Continuation of Emergency With Respect to the Federal Republic of 
Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro)

          In accordance with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies 
          Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the 
          national emergency declared on May 30, 1992, with respect to 
          the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Ser- bia and Montenegro) 
          (the ``FRY (S&M)''), as expanded on October 25, 1994, in 
          response to the actions and policies of the Bosnian Serbs. In 
          addition,

[[Page 297]]

          I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency declared on 
          June 9, 1998, with respect to the FRY (S&M)'s policies and 
          actions in Kosovo. This notice shall be published in the 
          Federal eister and transmitted to the 
          Congress.
          On May 30, 1992, by Executive Order 12808, President Bush 
          declared a national emergency to deal with the unusual and 
          extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, 
          and economy of the United States constituted by the actions 
          and policies of the Governments of Serbia and Montenegro. 
          Under this emergency, President Bush first blocked all 
          property and interests in property of the Governments of the 
          FRY (S&M), Serbia, and Montenegro and subsequently prohibited 
          trade and other transactions with the FRY (S&M).
          On October 25, 1994, President Clinton expanded the scope of 
          the national emergency by issuing Executive Order 12934 to 
          address the unusual and extraordinary threat to the national 
          security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States 
          posed by the actions and policies of the Bosnian Serb forces 
          and the authorities in the territory that they controlled 
          within Bosnia and Herzegovina.
          On December 27, 1995, President Clinton issued Presidential 
          Determination 96-7, directing the Secretary of the Treasury, 
          inter alia, to suspend the application of sanctions imposed on 
          the FRY (S&M) pursuant to the above-referenced Executive 
          Orders and to continue to block property previously blocked 
          until provision is made to address claims or encumbrances, 
          including the claims of the other successor states of the 
          former Yugoslavia. This sanctions relief, in conformity with 
          United Nations Security Council Resolution 1022 of November 
          22, 1995, was an essential factor motivating the FRY (S&M)'s 
          acceptance of a peace agreement initialed by the parties in 
          Dayton on November 21, 1995, and signed in Paris on December 
          14, 1995 (hereinafter the ``Peace Agreement''). Sanctions 
          against both the FRY (S&M) and the Bosnian Serb forces were 
          terminated in conjunction with United Nations Security Council 
          Resolution 1074 of October 1, 1996. This termination, however, 
          did not end a requirement that those blocked funds and assets 
          that are subject to claims or encumbrances remain blocked, 
          until unblocked in accordance with applicable law.
          Until the status of all remaining blocked property is 
          resolved, the Peace Agreement implemented, and the terms of 
          the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1022 met, the 
          national emergency declared on May 30, 1992, and the measures 
          adopted pursuant thereto to deal with that emergency, must 
          continue beyond May 30, 2002.
          On June 9, 1998, by Executive Order 13088, President Clinton 
          found that the actions and policies of the FRY (S&M) and the 
          Republic of Serbia with respect to Kosovo, constituted an 
          unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and 
          foreign policy of the United States. President Clinton 
          therefore declared a national emergency to deal with that 
          threat.
          On January 17, 2001, President Clinton issued Executive Order 
          13192 amending Executive Order 13088 to lift and modify, with 
          respect to future transactions, most of the economic sanctions 
          imposed against the FRY (S&M). At the same time, Executive 
          Order 13192 imposes restrictions on transactions with certain 
          persons described in section 1(a) of the order, namely persons 
          under open indictment for war crimes by the International 
          Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). It also 
          provides for the

[[Page 298]]

          continued blocking of property or interests in property 
          blocked prior to the order's effective date due to the need to 
          address claims or encumbrances involving such property.
          Because the crisis with respect to the situation in Kosovo and 
          with respect to Slobodan Milosevic, his close associates and 
          supporters and persons under open indictment for war crimes by 
          the ICTY has not been resolved, and because the status of all 
          previously blocked property has yet to be resolved, I have 
          determined that the national emergency declared on June 9, 
          1998, and the measures adopted pursuant thereto to deal with 
          that emergency, must continue beyond June 9, 2002.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

May 27, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-19 of May 27, 2002

Presidential Determination on Eligibility of East Timor to Receive Defense 
Articles and Services Under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, 
and the Arms Export Control Act

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the laws and 
          Constitution of the United States, including section 503(a) of 
          the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and section 
          3(a)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, I hereby find that the 
          furnishing of Defense articles and services to East Timor will 
          strengthen the security of the United States and promote world 
          peace.
          You are authorized and directed to report this finding to the 
          Congress and to publish it in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, May 27, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-20 of May 30, 2002

Provision of $25.5 Million to Support a Train and Equip Program in Georgia

Memorandum for the Secretary of State [and] the Secretary of Defense

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the laws and 
          Constitution of the United States, including sections 
          614(a)(2) and 506(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, 
          as amended, I hereby determine that it is vital to the 
          national security interests of the United States to provide up 
          to $4.5 million in fiscal year 1997 and 1998 Foreign Military 
          Financing Funds for as

[[Page 299]]

          sistance to Georgia under section 23 of the Arms Export 
          Control Act without regard to any provision of law that might 
          otherwise restrict provision of such funds. I further 
          determine that an unforeseen emergency exists requiring 
          immediate military assistance for Georgia that cannot be met 
          under the Arms Control Export Act or any other law, and hereby 
          direct the drawdown of defense articles and services from the 
          stocks of the Department of Defense, and military education 
          and training of the aggregate value of $21 million to meet 
          that emergency requirement. I hereby authorize the furnishing 
          of this assistance.
          The Secretary of State is authorized and directed to report 
          this determination to the Congress and to publish it in the 
          Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, May 30, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-21 of June 3, 2002

Presidential Determination Under Subsection 402(d)(1) of the Trade Act of 
1974, as Amended--Continuation of Waiver Authority for the Republic of 
Belarus

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me under the Trade Act of 
          1974, as amended, Public Law 93-618, 88 Stat. 1978 
          (hereinafter the ``Act''), I determine, pursuant to section 
          402(d)(1) of the waiver authority granted by section 402 of 
          the Act will substantially promote the objectives of section 
          402 of the Act. I further determine that continuation of the 
          waiver applicable to the Republic of Belarus will 
          substantially promote the objectives of section 402 of the 
          Act.
          On my behalf, please transmit this determination to the 
          Speaker of the House of Representatives and to the President 
          of the Senate.
          You are authorized and directed to publish this determination 
          in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, June 3, 2002.

[[Page 300]]

Presidential Determination No. 2002-22 of June 3, 2002

Presidential Determination Under Subsection 402(d)(1) of the Trade Act of 
1974, as Amended--Continuation of Waiver Authority for Vietnam

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me under the Trade Act of 
          1974, as amended, Public Law 93-618, 88 Stat. 1978 
          (hereinafter the ``Act''), I determine, pursuant to section 
          402(d)(1) of the waiver authority granted by section 402 of 
          the Act will substantially promote the objectives of section 
          402 of the Act. I further determine that continuation of the 
          waiver applicable to Vietnam will substantially promote the 
          objectives of section 402 of the Act.
          On my behalf, please transmit this determination to the 
          Speaker of the House of Representatives and to the President 
          of the Senate.
          You are authorized and directed to publish this determination 
          in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, June 3, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-23 of June 14, 2002

Suspension of Limitations Under the Jerusalem Embassy Act

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me as President by the 
          Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          section 7(a) of the Jerusalem Embassy Act of 1995 (Public Law 
          104-45) (the ``Act''), I hereby determine that it is necessary 
          to protect the national security interests of the United 
          States to suspend for a period of 6 months the limitations set 
          forth in sections 3(b) and 7(b) of the Act. My Administration 
          remains committed to beginning the process of moving our 
          embassy to Jerusalem.
          You are hereby authorized and directed to transmit this 
          determination to the Congress, accompanied by a report in 
          accordance with section 7(a) of the Act, and to publish the 
          determination in the Federal eister.
          This suspension shall take effect after transmission of this 
          determination and report to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, June 14, 2002.

[[Page 301]]

Notice of June 18, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency with Respect to the Risk of Nuclear 
Proliferation Created by the Accumulation of Weapons-Usable Fissile 
Material in the Territory of the Russian Federation

          On June 21, 2000, the President issued Executive Order 13159 
          (the ``Order'') blocking property and interests in property of 
          the Government of the Russian Federation that are in the 
          United States, that hereafter come within the United States, 
          or that are or hereinafter come within the possession or 
          control of United States persons that are directly related to 
          the implementation of the Agreement Between the Government of 
          the United States of America and the Government of the Russian 
          Federation Concerning the Disposition of Highly Enriched 
          Uranium Extracted from Nuclear Weapons, dated February 18, 
          1993, and related contracts and agreements (collectively, the 
          ``HEU Agreements''). The HEU Agreements allow for the 
          downblending of highly enriched uranium derived from nuclear 
          weapons to low enriched uranium for peaceful commercial 
          purposes. The Order invoked the authority, inter alia, of the 
          International Emergency Economic Powers Act, 50 U.S.C. 1701 et 
          seq., and declared a national emergency to deal with the 
          unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and 
          foreign policy of the United States posed by the risk of 
          nuclear proliferation created by the accumulation of a large 
          volume of weapons-usable fissile material in the territory of 
          the Russian Federation.
          A major national security goal of the United States is to 
          ensure that fissile material removed from Russian nuclear 
          weapons pursuant to various arms control and disarmament 
          agreements is dedicated to peaceful uses (such as downblended 
          to low enriched uranium for peaceful commercial uses), subject 
          to transparency measures, and protected from diversion to 
          activities of proliferation concern. Pursuant to the HEU 
          Agreements, weapons-grade uranium extracted from Russian 
          nuclear weapons is converted to low enriched uranium for use 
          as fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. The Order blocks and 
          protects from attachment, judgment, decree, lien, execution, 
          garnishment, or other judicial process the property and 
          interests in property of the Government of the Russian 
          Federation that are directly related to the implementation of 
          the HEU Agreements and that are in the United States, that 
          hereafter come within the United States, or that are or 
          hereafter come within the possession or control of United 
          States persons.
          The national emergency declared on June 21, 2000, must 
          continue beyond June 21, 2002, to provide continued protection 
          from attachment, judgment, decree, lien, execution, 
          garnishment, or other judicial process for the property and 
          interests in property of the Government of the Russian 
          Federation that are directly related to the implementation of 
          the HEU Agreements and subject to U.S. jurisdiction. 
          Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the National 
          Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 
          year the national emergency with respect to weapons-usable 
          fissile material

[[Page 302]]

          in the territory of the Russian Federation. This notice shall 
          be published in the Federal eister and 
          transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

June 18, 2002.

Notice of June 21, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Western Balkans

          On June 26, 2001, by Executive Order 13219, I declared a 
          national emergency with respect to the Western Balkans 
          pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act 
          (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706) to deal with the unusual and 
          extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign 
          policy of the United States constituted by the actions of 
          persons engaged in, or assisting, sponsoring, or supporting, 
          (i) extremist violence in the former Yugoslav Republic of 
          Macedonia, and elsewhere in the Western Balkans region, or 
          (ii) acts obstructing implementation of the Dayton Accords in 
          Bosnia or United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 of 
          June 10, 1999, in Kosovo. Because the actions of these 
          persons, which threaten the peace and international 
          stabilization efforts in the Western Balkans, continue to pose 
          an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security 
          and foreign policy of the United States, the national 
          emergency declared on June 26, 2001, and the measures adopted 
          on that date to deal with that emergency must continue in 
          effect beyond June 26, 2002. Therefore, in accordance with 
          section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 
          1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency 
          with respect to the Western Balkans.
          This Notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

June 21, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-24 of June 28, 2002

Presidential Determination to Authorize the Furnishing of Emergency 
Military Counterterrorism Assistance to the Armed Forces of the Philippines

Memorandum for the Secretary of State [and] the Secretary of Defense

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 506(a)(1) of 
          the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, 22 U.S.C. 
          2318(a)(1) (the ``Act''), I hereby determine that:

[[Page 303]]

          (1) an unforeseen emergency exists that requires immediate 
          military counterterrorism assistance to the Armed Forces of 
          the Philippines; and
          (2) the emergency requirement cannot be met under the 
          authority of the Arms Export Control Act or any other law 
          except 506(a) of the Act.
          I therefore direct the drawdown of up to $10 million of 
          defense articles and services from the inventory and resources 
          of the Department of Defense to the Philippines for 
          counterterrorism assistance.
          The Secretary of State is authorized and directed to report 
          this determination to the Congress and to arrange for its 
          publication in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

June 28, 2002.

Memorandum of July 2, 2002

Delegation of Authority Under Section 124 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001

Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense

          By the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of 
          the United States of America, you are delegated the authority 
          and assigned the responsibility of the President under section 
          124(b) of the Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization 
          Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (Public Law 106-398).
          The authority delegated by this memorandum may be redelegated, 
          in writing, not lower than the Under Secretary of Defense 
          level.
          You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in 
          the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, July 2, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-25 of July 9, 2002

Delegation of Authority Under Sections 2(d) and 2(f) of the Migration and 
Refugee Assistance Act of 1962, as Amended

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution 
          and laws of the United States, including section 301 of title 
          3 of the United States Code, I hereby delegate the functions 
          and authorities conferred upon the Presi

[[Page 304]]

          dent by sections 2(d) and 2(f) of the Migration and Refugee 
          Assistance Act (MRAA) of 1962, as amended, 22 U.S.C. 
          Sec. 2601, insofar as they relate to actions taken under the 
          authority of section 2(b)(2) of the MRAA, to the Secretary of 
          State, who should insure timely performance of any duties and 
          obligations of the delegated authority and who is authorized 
          to redelegate these functions and authorities consistent with 
          applicable law. The Secretary of State, or his or her 
          delegate, is directed to provide notice to the President of 
          any use of the functions and authorities delegated by this 
          determination.
          This delegation of authority supplements Presidential 
          Determination No. 99-6, Delegation of Authority Under Section 
          2(b)(2) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962, 
          as amended (November 30, 1998).
          Any reference in this memorandum to section 2 of the MRAA, as 
          amended, shall be deemed to include references to any 
          hereafter-enacted provision of law that is the same or 
          substantially the same as such provision.
          You are authorized and directed to publish this Determination 
          in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, July 9, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-26 of July 17, 2002

Determination Under Section 610(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, 
as Amended, To Transfer $10.3 million to the Operating Expense 
Appropriation

Memorandum for the Administrator of the United States Agency for 
International Development

          Pursuant to the authorities vested in me by section 610(a) of 
          the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (the ``Act''), 
          I hereby determine that it is necessary for the purposes of 
          the Act that $10.3 million appropriated to carry out chapter 1 
          of part I of the Act be transferred to, and consolidated with, 
          appropriations made to carry out section 667(a) of the Act. I 
          hereby authorize such transfer and consolidation.
          This determination shall be effective immediately and shall be 
          published in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, July 17, 2002.

[[Page 305]]

Memorandum of July 23, 2002

Delegation of Authority With Respect to Concluding Amendments to the July 
12, 1999, Agreement Concerning Trade in Certain Steel Products From the 
Russian Federation

Memorandum for the Secretary of Commerce

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States, including section 301 of 
          title 3, United States Code, it is hereby ordered that the 
          Secretary of Commerce is designated and empowered to exercise, 
          following consultations with the United States Trade 
          Representative and other agencies as appropriate, the 
          authority vested in the President to conclude amendments to 
          the July 12, 1999, Agreement Concerning Trade in Certain Steel 
          Products from the Russian Federation in accordance with 
          Article XI of the 1990 Agreement on Trade Relations between 
          the United States of America and the Russian Federation, and 
          title IV of the Trade Act of 1974. The Secretary may exercise 
          such authority without approval, ratification, or other action 
          of the President.
          As the Secretary of Commerce may direct, the Assistant 
          Secretary for Import Administration is authorized to exercise 
          the authority vested in the Secretary by this memorandum.
          You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in 
          the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, July 23, 2002.

Notice of July 30, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Iraq

          On August 2, 1990, by Executive Order 12722, President Bush 
          declared a national emergency with respect to Iraq pursuant to 
          the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 
          1701-1706) to deal with the unusual and extraordinary threat 
          to the national security and foreign policy of the United 
          States constituted by the actions and polices of the 
          Government of Iraq. By Executive Orders 12722 of August 2, 
          1990, and 12724 of August 9, 1990, the President imposed trade 
          sanctions on Iraq and blocked Iraqi government assets. Because 
          the Government of Iraq has continued to engage in activities 
          hostile to U.S. interests, the national emergency declared on 
          August 2, 1990, and the measures adopted on August 2 and 
          August 9, 1990, to deal with that emergency must continue in 
          effect beyond August 2, 2002. Therefore, in accordance with 
          section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 
          1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency 
          with respect to Iraq.

[[Page 306]]

          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

July 30, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-27 of August 7, 2002

Presidential Determination on Waiver of Restrictions on Assistance to 
Russia under the Cooperative Threat Reduction Act of 1993 and Title V of 
the FREEDOM Support Act

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 302 of the 
          2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from 
          and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States (Public 
          Law 107-206), I hereby certify that waiving the restrictions 
          contained in subsection (d) of 22 U.S.C. 5952 and in section 
          502 of the FREEDOM Support Act (Public Law 102-511) with 
          respect to the Russian Federation is important to the national 
          security interests of the United States.
          You are authorized and directed to transmit this certification 
          to the Congress and to arrange for its publication in the 
          Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, August 7, 2002.

Notice of August 14, 2002

Continuation of Emergency Regarding Export Control Regulations

          On August 17, 2001, consistent with the authority provided me 
          under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 
          U.S.C. 1701 et seq.), I issued Executive Order 13222. In that 
          order, I declared a national emergency with respect to the 
          unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, 
          foreign policy, and economy of the United States in light of 
          the expiration of the Export Administration Act of 1979, as 
          amended (50 U.S.C. App. 2401 et seq.). Because the Export 
          Administration Act has not been renewed by the Congress, the 
          national emergency declared on August 17, 2001, must continue 
          in effect beyond August 17, 2002. Therefore, in accordance 
          with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 
          1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency 
          declared in Executive Order 13222.

[[Page 307]]

          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

August 14, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-28 of August 14, 2002

Presidential Determination on Military Drawdown for Tunisia

Memorandum for the Secretary of State [and] the Secretary of Defense

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
          laws of the United States, including title III (Foreign 
          Military Financing) of the Kenneth M. Ludden Foreign 
          Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs 
          Appropriations Act, 2002 (Public Law 107-115), I hereby direct 
          the drawdown of defense articles and services from the stocks 
          of the Department of Defense, and military education and 
          training of the aggregate value of $5 million for Tunisia, for 
          the purposes of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, 
          as amended.
          The Secretary of State is authorized and directed to publish 
          this determination in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, August 14, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-29 of August 30, 2002

Presidential Determination Pursuant to Section 2(c)(1) of the Migration and 
Refugee Assistance Act of 1962, as Amended

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to section 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee 
          Assistance Act of 1962, as amended, 22 U.S.C. 2601(c)(1), I 
          hereby determine that it is important to the national interest 
          that up to $6.6 million be made available from the U.S. 
          Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund for 
          contributions to the Office of the United Nations High 
          Commissioner for Refugees and to the International Committee 
          of the Red Cross to address unexpected urgent refugee and 
          migration needs arising from the crisis in Liberia and from 
          the return of refugees to Sierra Leone.

[[Page 308]]

          You are authorized and directed to inform the appropriate 
          committees of the Congress of this determination and the 
          obligation of funds under this authority, and to publish this 
          determination in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, August 30, 2002.

Notice of September 12, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency with Respect to Certain Terrorist 
Attacks

          In accordance with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies 
          Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the 
          national emergency I declared on September 14, 2001, in 
          Proclamation 7463, with respect to the terrorist attacks at 
          the World Trade Center, New York, New York, and the Pentagon, 
          and the continuing and immediate threat of further attacks on 
          the United States.
          By Executive Order 13223 of September 14, 2001, and Executive 
          Order 13253 of January 16, 2002, I delegated authority to the 
          Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Transportation to 
          order members of the Reserve Components to active duty and to 
          waive certain statutory military personnel requirements. By 
          Executive Order 13235 of November 16, 2001, I delegated 
          authority to the Secretary of Defense to exercise certain 
          emergency construction authority.
          Because the terrorist threat continues, the national emergency 
          declared on September 14, 2001, and the measures taken on 
          September 14, 2001, November 16, 2001, and January 16, 2002, 
          to deal with that emergency, must continue in effect beyond 
          September 14, 2002. Therefore, I am continuing in effect for 1 
          year the national emergency I declared on September 14, 2001, 
          with respect to the terrorist threat.
          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

September 12, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-31 of September 13, 2002

Continuation of the Exercise of Certain Authorities Under the Trading With 
the Enemy Act

Memorandum for the Secretary of State [and] the Secretary of the Treasury

          Under section 101(b) of Public Law 95-223 (91 Stat. 1625; 50 
          U.S.C. App. 5(b) note), and a previous determination on 
          September 12, 2001 (66 Fed.

[[Page 309]]

          Reg. 47943), the exercise of certain authorities under the 
          Trading with the Enemy Act is scheduled to terminate on 
          September 14, 2002.
          I hereby determine that the continuation for 1 year of the 
          exercise of those authorities with respect to the applicable 
          countries is in the national interest of the United States.
          Therefore, pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 
          101(b) of Public Law 95-223, I continue for 1 year, until 
          September 14, 2003, the exercise of those authorities with 
          respect to countries affected by:
          (1) the Foreign Assets Control Regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 
          500;
          (2) the Transaction Control Regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 505; 
          and
          (3) the Cuban Assets Control Regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 515.
          The Secretary of the Treasury is authorized and directed to 
          publish this determination in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, September 13, 2002.

Notice of September 19, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect To Persons Who Commit, 
Threaten To Commit, Or Support Terrorism

          On September 23, 2001, by Executive Order 13224, I declared a 
          national emergency with respect to persons who commit, 
          threaten to commit, or support terrorism, pursuant to the 
          International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701-
          1706). I took this action to deal with the unusual and 
          extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, 
          and economy of the United States constituted by the grave acts 
          of terrorism and threats of terrorism committed by foreign 
          terrorists, including the terrorist attacks in New York, 
          Pennsylvania, and on the Pentagon committed on September 11, 
          2001, and the continuing and immediate threat of further 
          attacks on United States nationals or the United States. 
          Because the actions of these persons who commit, threaten to 
          commit, or support terrorism continue to pose an unusual and 
          extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, 
          and economy of the United States, the national emergency 
          declared on September 23, 2001, and the measures adopted on 
          that date to deal with that emergency, must continue in effect 
          beyond September 23, 2002. Therefore, in accordance with 
          section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 
          1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency 
          with respect to persons who commit, threaten to commit, or 
          support terrorism.

[[Page 310]]

          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

September 19, 2002.

Notice of September 23, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to UNITA

          In accordance with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies 
          Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the 
          national emergency declared by the President on September 26, 
          1993, by Executive Order 12865, to deal with the unusual and 
          extraordinary threat to the foreign policy of the United 
          States constituted by the actions and policies of the National 
          Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA). The order 
          prohibits the sale or supply by United States persons or from 
          the United States, or using U.S. registered vessels or 
          aircraft, of arms, related materiel of all types, petroleum, 
          and petroleum products to the territory of Angola, other than 
          through designated points of entry. The order also prohibits 
          the sale or supply of such commodities to UNITA.
          The President took additional measures with respect to the 
          national emergency declared in Executive Order 12865 by 
          issuing Executive Orders 13069 and 13098 on December 12, 1997, 
          and August 18, 1998, respectively. Those orders close all 
          UNITA offices in the United States, block all property and 
          interests in property of UNITA and designated UNITA officials 
          and adult members of their immediate families, prohibit the 
          importation of certain diamonds exported from Angola, and 
          impose additional sanctions with respect to the provision of 
          mining and transportation equipment and services.
          Because of our continuing international obligations and 
          because of the prejudicial effect that discontinuation of the 
          sanctions would have on prospects for peace in Angola, the 
          national emergency declared on September 26, 1993, and the 
          measures adopted pursuant thereto to deal with that emergency, 
          must continue in effect beyond September 26, 2002. Therefore, 
          I am continuing the national emergency with respect to UNITA.
          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

September 23, 2002.

[[Page 311]]

Order of September 26, 2002

Designation Under Executive Order 12958

          In accordance with the provisions of section 1.4 of Executive 
          Order 12958 of April 17, 1995, entitled ``Classified National 
          Security Information,'' I hereby designate the Secretary of 
          Agriculture to classify information originally as ``Secret.''
          Any delegation of this authority shall be in accordance with 
          section 1.4(c) of Executive Order 12958.
          This order shall be published in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

September 26, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2002-32 of September 30, 2002

Presidential Determination on the Transfer of Funds from International 
Organizations and Programs Funds to the Child Survival and Health Programs 
Fund

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
          laws of the United States, including section 610 of the 
          Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (FAA), I hereby 
          determine it is necessary for the purposes of the FAA that the 
          $34 million in FY 2002 International Organizations and 
          Programs funds that were allocated for the United Nations 
          Population Fund be transferred to, and consolidated with, the 
          Child Survival and Health Programs Fund, and such funds are 
          hereby transferred and consolidated. The transferred funds 
          will be administered by the U.S. Agency for International 
          Development in support of reproductive health and maternal 
          health and related programs.
          You are authorized and directed to transmit this determination 
          to the Congress and to arrange for its publication in the 
          Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, September 30, 2002.

Memorandum of October 1, 2002

Notification to the Congress of Trade Negotiations

Memorandum for the United States Trade Representative

          You are authorized and directed to notify the Congress 
          pursuant to section 2104(a)(1) of the Trade Act of 2002 (19 
          U.S.C. 3804(a)(1)), of my intention

[[Page 312]]

          to enter into negotiations on a Free Trade Agreement with the 
          Kingdom of Morocco and a Free Trade Agreement with Central 
          American Countries. You are also authorized and directed to 
          notify the Congress, pursuant to section 2106(b)(2) of the 
          Trade Act of 2002 (19 U.S.C. 3806(b)(2)), of the ongoing 
          negotiations on Free Trade Agreements with the Republic of 
          Singapore and the Republic of Chile, negotiations to establish 
          a Free Trade Area for the Americas, and negotiations under the 
          auspices of the World Trade Organization.
          You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in 
          the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, October 1, 2002.

Memorandum of October 16, 2002

Notification to the Congress of Trade Negotiation

Memorandum for the United States Trade Representative

          You are authorized and directed to notify the Congress, 
          pursuant to section 2104(a)(1) of the Trade Act of 2002 (19 
          U.S.C. 3804(a)(1)), of my intention to enter into negotiations 
          on a Free Trade Agreement with the five member countries of 
          the Southern African Customs Union (Botswana, Lesotho, 
          Namibia, South Africa, and Swaziland).
          You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in 
          the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, October 16, 2002.

Notice of October 16, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant 
Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia

          On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President 
          declared a national emergency pursuant to the International 
          Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706) to deal 
          with the unusual and extraordinary threat to the national 
          security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States 
          constituted by the actions of significant narcotics 
          traffickers centered in Colombia, and the unparalleled 
          violence, corruption, and harm such actions cause in the 
          United States and abroad.

[[Page 313]]

          The order blocks all property and interests in property that 
          are in the United States or within the possession or control 
          of United States persons or foreign persons listed in an annex 
          to the order, as well as of foreign persons determined to play 
          a significant role in international narcotics trafficking 
          centered in Colombia. The order similarly blocks all property 
          and interests in property of foreign persons determined to 
          materially assist in, or provide financial or technological 
          support for or goods or services in support of, the narcotics 
          trafficking activities of persons designated in or pursuant to 
          the order, or persons determined to be owned or controlled by, 
          or to act for or on behalf of, persons designated in or 
          pursuant to the order. The order also prohibits any 
          transaction or dealing by United States persons or within the 
          United States in such property or interests in property.
          Because the actions of significant narcotics traffickers 
          centered in Colombia continue to threaten the national 
          security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States and 
          to cause unparalleled violence, corruption, and harm in the 
          United States and abroad, the national emergency declared on 
          October 21, 1995, and the measures adopted pursuant thereto to 
          deal with that emergency, must continue in effect beyond 
          October 21, 2002. Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) 
          of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am 
          continuing for 1 year the national emergency with respect to 
          significant narcotics traffickers centered in Colombia. This 
          notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

October 16, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2003-02 of October 16, 2002

Presidential Determination on FY 2003 Refugee Admissions Numbers and 
Authorizations of In-Country Refugee Status

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          In accordance with section 207 of the Immigration and 
          Nationality Act (the ``Act'') (8 U.S.C. 1157), as amended, and 
          after appropriate consultations with the Congress, I hereby 
          make the following determinations and authorize the following 
          actions:
          The admission of up to 70,000 refugees to the United States 
          during FY 2003 is justified by humanitarian concerns or is 
          otherwise in the national interest; provided, however, that 
          this number shall be understood as including persons admitted 
          to the United States during FY 2003 with Federal refugee 
          resettlement assistance under the Amerasian immigrant 
          admissions program, as provided below.
          The 70,000 admissions numbers shall be allocated among 
          refugees of special humanitarian concern to the United States 
          in accordance with the following regional allocations; 
          provided, however, that the number allocated to the East Asia 
          region shall include persons admitted to the United States 
          during FY 2003 with Federal refugee resettlement assistance 
          under section 584 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, 
          and Related Programs Ap

[[Page 314]]

          propriations Act of 1988, as contained in section 101(e) of 
          Public Law 100-202 (Amerasian immigrants and their family 
          members); provided further that the number allocated to the 
          former Soviet Union shall include persons admitted who were 
          nationals of the former Soviet Union, or in the case of 
          persons having no nationality, who were habitual residents of 
          the former Soviet Union, prior to September 2, 1991:

 
 
 
                      Africa.......................................  20,000                  ...................
                      East Asia....................................  4,000                   ...................
                      Eastern Europe...............................  2,500                   ...................
                      Former Soviet Union..........................  14,000                  ...................
                      Latin America/Caribbean......................  2,500                   ...................
                      Near East/South Asia.........................  7,000                   ...................
                      Unallocated Reserve..........................  20,000                  ...................
 

          The 20,000 unallocated numbers shall be allocated as needed to 
          regional ceilings where shortfalls develop. Unused admissions 
          numbers allocated to a particular region may be transferred to 
          one or more other regions if there is an overriding need for 
          greater numbers for the region or regions to which the numbers 
          are being transferred. You are hereby authorized and directed 
          to consult with the Judiciary Committees of the Congress prior 
          to any such use of the unallocated numbers or reallocation of 
          numbers from one region to another.
          Pursuant to section 2(b)(2) of the Migration and Refugee 
          Assistance Act of 1962, as amended, I hereby determine that 
          assistance to or on behalf of persons applying for admission 
          to the United States as part of the overseas refugee 
          admissions program will contribute to the foreign policy 
          interests of the United States and designate such persons for 
          this purpose.
          An additional 10,000 refugee admissions numbers shall be made 
          available during FY 2003 for the adjustment to permanent 
          resident status under section 209(b) of the Immigration and 
          Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1159(b)) of aliens who have been 
          granted asylum in the United States under section 208 of the 
          Act (8 U.S.C. 1158), as this is justified by humanitarian 
          concerns or is otherwise in the national interest.
          In accordance with section 101(a)(42) of the Act (8 U.S.C. 
          1101(a)(42)) and after appropriate consultation with the 
          Congress, I also specify that, for FY 2003, the following 
          persons may, if otherwise qualified, be considered refugees 
          for the purpose of admission to the United States within their 
          countries of nationality or habitual residence:
          a. Persons in Vietnam
          b. Persons in Cuba
          c. Persons in the former Soviet Union
          You are authorized and directed to report this determination 
          to the Congress immediately and to publish it in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, October 16, 2002.

[[Page 315]]

Presidential Determination No. 2003-03 of October 16, 2002

Waiver and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine 
Liberation Organization

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority and conditions contained in section 
          534(d) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and 
          Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2002, Public Law 107-115, 
          as provided for in the Joint Resolution Making Continuing 
          Appropriations for the Fiscal Year 2003, and for other 
          purposes, Public Law 107-240. I hereby determine and certify 
          that it is important to the national security interests of the 
          United States to waive the provisions of section 1003 of the 
          Anti-Terrorism Act of 1987, Public Law 100-204.
          This waiver shall be effective for a period of 6 months from 
          the date hereof. You are hereby authorized and directed to 
          transmit this determination to the Congress and to publish it 
          in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, October 16, 2002.

Notice of October 29, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Sudan

          On November 3, 1997, by Executive Order 13067, the President 
          declared a national emergency with respect to Sudan pursuant 
          to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 
          1701-1706) to deal with the unusual and extraordinary threat 
          to the national security and foreign policy of the United 
          States constituted by the actions and policies of the 
          Government of Sudan, including continuing concern about the 
          presence and activities of certain terrorist groups, including 
          Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, and the prevalence of 
          human rights violations, including slavery, restrictions on 
          religious freedom, and restrictions on political freedom. 
          Because the actions and policies of the Government of Sudan 
          continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the 
          national security and foreign policy of the United States, the 
          national emergency declared on November 3, 1997, and the 
          measures adopted on that date to deal with that emergency must 
          continue in effect beyond November 3, 2002. Therefore, in 
          accordance with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act 
          (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national 
          emergency with respect to Sudan.

[[Page 316]]

          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

October 29, 2002.

Memorandum of November 6, 2002

Report to the Congress Regarding Conditions in Burma and U.S. Policy Toward 
Burma

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the requirements set forth under the heading 
          ``Policy Toward Burma'' in section 570(d) of the Fiscal Year 
          1997 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act, as contained in 
          the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act (Public Law 104-
          208), a report is required every 6 months following enactment 
          concerning:

1)

progress toward democratization in Burma;

2)

progress on improving the quality of life of the Burmese people, including 
progress on market reforms, living standards, labor standards, use of 
forced labor in the tourism industry, and environmental quality; and

3)

progress made in developing a comprehensive, multilateral strategy to bring 
democracy to and improve human rights practices and the quality of life in 
Burma, including the development of a dialogue between the State Peace and 
Development Council and democratic opposition groups in Burma.

          You are hereby authorized and directed to transmit the 
          attached report fulfilling these requirements to the 
          appropriate committees of the Congress and to arrange for 
          publication in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, November 6, 2002.

Plan for Implementation of Section 570 of Public Law 104-208 (Omnibus 
Appropriations Act, Fiscal Year 1997)

Conditions in Burma and U.S. Policy Toward Burma for the Period March 28, 
2002-September 27, 2002

Introduction and Summary

          Progress towards a real dialogue between Burma's military 
          regime and the NLD's Aung San Suu Kyi took a step forward in 
          May with the government's decision to release her from 
          effective house arrest. Since then, Aung

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          San Suu Kyi has been free to carry out her party duties as 
          General Secretary, and, in a change from conditions in her 
          pre-detention days, to travel freely throughout Burma. Since 
          her release, Aung San Suu Kyi has made trips to Moulmein, 
          Mandalay, and Hpa'an. She has also presided over a slow 
          revival of the NLD as a political party. Virtually crushed by 
          the government during the days leading up to Aung San Suu 
          Kyi's detention in September 2000, the NLD has now re-
          assembled most of its party leadership and reopened 62 out of 
          over 300 offices throughout Burma. It has also benefited from 
          the release of more than 300 of its party members who had been 
          held as political prisoners. Unfortunately, the steps the 
          government has taken to rebuild confidence with the NLD have 
          not been matched by equally serious steps towards a political 
          dialogue on constitutional issues. As a result, questions 
          still remain regarding the government's overall commitment to 
          political transition.
          In regard to human rights, the government's record remains 
          poor. The regime has, however, improved its cooperation with 
          international human rights organizations, finally agreeing to 
          allow the ILO to appoint a liaison officer in Rangoon and to 
          conduct on-site surveys in Burma of areas along the Thai/
          Burmese border that have been identified by Amnesty 
          International and others as ``hot spots'' for forced labor. It 
          has also continued to work with the International Committee of 
          the Red Cross on improvements in prison conditions and 
          released almost 400 political prisoners over the past two 
          years. Unfortunately, hundreds remain in prison, several 
          students were arrested for expressing political dissent in 
          recent months and substantive improvements in prison 
          conditions have yet to be realized. We are also deeply 
          concerned by ongoing egregious human rights abuses of 
          civilians in ethnic regions, including killing, torture, rape, 
          forced labor, and forced relocations. The regime has responded 
          to accusations leveled by human rights groups in Thailand of 
          widespread army rapes in Shan State with investigations by 
          three separate teams from the Burmese Army, the Ministry of 
          Home Affairs, and the Myanmar National Women's Cooperative 
          Association, but concluded--incredibly--that there was no 
          evidence that Burmese Army personnel had been involved in any 
          rapes in Shan State between 1996 and 2001. That conclusion, 
          together with the lack of any international involvement in the 
          investigation, has left international observers in serious 
          doubt about the government's willingness to deal effectively 
          with Burmese Army abuses in areas of internal conflict.
          The areas of Burma under effective control of ethnic groups 
          make Burma one of the world's largest producers of opium, 
          heroin, and amphetamine-type stimulants, despite the fact that 
          its overall output of opium and heroin has declined sharply in 
          recent years, partly as a result of improved Burmese 
          government counternarcotics efforts. Opium production in Burma 
          has now declined for five straight years, and, in 2002, Burma 
          produced less than one-quarter the opium and heroin that it 
          did six years before. Unfortunately, as opium production has 
          declined, the production of methamphetamines has increased, 
          particularly in outlying ethnic majority regions governed by 
          former insurgents, areas that are not under firm government 
          control. According to some estimates, as many as 400 to 800 
          million methamphetamine tablets may be produced in Burma each 
          year, although these estimates are difficult to verify.
          In July, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
          conducted a countrywide assessment of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in 
          Burma and con

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          cluded that it had shifted from an epidemic limited to high-
          risk groups to a widespread epidemic affecting the general 
          population. The government continued to downplay the extent of 
          the epidemic in the country; however, both the government and 
          the NLD are very interested in international assistance to 
          combat HIV/AIDS. USAID is initiating a new $1 million HIV/AIDS 
          prevention program in the country; assistance will be provided 
          through international NGOs--no assistance will be directed to 
          the government.
          There are few signs of any government commitment to economic 
          reform, despite rapidly deteriorating economic conditions. Two 
          problems stand out. In the energy sector, a run of disastrous 
          public investment decisions has left the economy largely 
          without fuel for either its electric generating facilities or 
          many of its basic industries. In the fiscal budget the 
          situation is even more desperate. There, the deficits of 
          Burma's state-owned enterprises are estimated to absorb all of 
          the revenues collected by the government, leaving the 
          government proper (i.e., the army, the navy, the health and 
          education services, and all ministerial operations) to run on 
          monies borrowed from the Central Bank. This in turn has 
          produced a rapid expansion in the money supply, a commensurate 
          surge in inflation, and a sharp depreciation in the value of 
          the domestic currency (the kyat). It has also undermined 
          public confidence in the military government's ability to 
          manage the economy over the long run.
          U.S. policy goals in Burma include progress towards democracy 
          and national reconciliation, respect for human rights, a more 
          effective counternarcotics effort, counterterrorism efforts, 
          regional stability, HIV/AIDS mitigation, and accounting for 
          missing servicemen from World War II. We encourage talks 
          between the leader of the National League for Democracy (NLD) 
          Aung San Suu Kyi and the military, recognizing that these are 
          the best hope for meaningful democratic change and protection 
          of human rights. Part of our strategy is to consult regularly, 
          at senior levels, with countries with major interests in Burma 
          and/or major concerns regarding Burma's current human rights 
          practices.
          In coordination with the European Union and other states, the 
          United States has maintained sanctions on Burma. These include 
          an arms embargo, an investment ban, and other measures. Our 
          goal in applying these sanctions is to encourage a transition 
          to democratic rule and greater respect for human rights. 
          Should there be significant progress towards those goals as a 
          result of dialogue between Aung San Suu Kyi and the military 
          government, the United States would look seriously at measures 
          to support this process of constructive change.

Measuring Progress toward Democratization

          At the time of the dramatic release of NLD General Secretary 
          Aung San Suu Kyi on May 6, 2002, the government promised that 
          she would be free to move about the country--a promise it has 
          generally kept in the months since. Initial difficulty in 
          visiting some UN projects appears to have been resolved. Over 
          the past four months Aung San Suu Kyi has traveled to 
          Moulmein, Mandalay, and Hpa'an. On each trip she coordinated 
          travel and security arrangements with the government, but 
          otherwise set her own

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          itinerary. She also met freely with NLD party workers and the 
          general public; however, in line with general restrictions on 
          all political parties in Burma, she was not allowed to hold 
          outdoor rallies or meetings. In Rangoon, similarly, she has 
          resumed her party duties with minimal government interference 
          and has continued to meet with both Burmese and foreign 
          visitors on a regular basis, although the government still 
          limits her access to high-ranking foreigners. Since March, 
          foreign visitors have included UN Special Envoy Razali Ismail, 
          who has facilitated communication between the government and 
          the NLD, Japanese Foreign Minister Kawaguchi, EU Troika 
          representatives, and ambassadors of European and ASEAN 
          countries.
          NLD efforts to rebuild itself as a political party have also 
          accelerated to some degree over the past six months. Badly 
          crippled by government repression during the 1990s, the NLD 
          has now re-assembled most of its national leadership (with the 
          notable exception of senior party adviser U Win Tin, who 
          remains in prison). As of September 27, 2002, 62 of the NLD's 
          party offices have re-opened, including 36 of 40 in Rangoon. 
          All of the party's Central Executive Committee members have 
          been released, as have a majority of the party members who 
          were detained during the government's crackdowns in the 1090s. 
          However, 16 of the party's MPs remain in prison. Altogether, 
          325 NLD party members have been released from prison or house 
          arrest since 2000, leaving about 200 NLD prisoners still in 
          detention.
          The NLD has also resumed some normal party activities, 
          including public meetings on major public holidays. However, 
          outdoor meetings are banned (for both the NLD and all other 
          registered political parties) and party elections remain 
          forbidden under a decree first issued by the Central Election 
          Commission in 1990. The government has refused to grant a 
          publication license to the NLD party's newsletter, despite 
          repeated NLD requests for permission to publish. Two student 
          members of the NLD were also recently arrested for carrying 
          banned political literature. The NLD, for its part, has 
          moderated its public criticism of the regime. While it has 
          called repeatedly for democracy in Burma, it has also stated 
          flatly that it is prepared to work with the government on a 
          process of political transition. Aung San Suu Kyi has 
          indicated recently that humanitarian assistance for Burma's 
          people could be welcome, provided that it is delivered through 
          mechanisms that are transparent, accountable, and beneficial 
          to the Burmese people, as opposed to the government. She told 
          EU representatives that economic sanctions are a matter to be 
          decided by individual foreign states.
          Despite the steps the government has taken to rebuild 
          confidence with the NLD, it has not yet responded to the NLD's 
          calls for a serious dialogue on constitutional issues, nor has 
          it sketched out a roadmap for reform or a timetable for 
          elections. As a result, doubts remain regarding the 
          government's commitment to dialogue. While it has repeatedly 
          asserted that its goal is a restored democracy, it has yet to 
          convince its critics, including the U.S., that it is genuinely 
          committed to that course. The U.S. continues to recognize the 
          results of the 1990 elections and will continue to push for 
          the full restoration of the civil and political rights of the 
          people of Burma.

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Human Rights

          The SPDC's human rights record remains poor with repression of 
          political dissent, forced labor, ethnic persecution, lack of 
          religious freedom and trafficking in persons all figuring 
          prominently. Burma was designated a Country of Particular 
          Concern for particularly severe violations religious freedom 
          in 2001. Burma has been the scene of severe human rights 
          abuses, particularly in ethnic minority areas, where there 
          have been many reports of extrajudicial killings, rapes, and 
          disappearances. Some of these were highlighted during the past 
          six months in publications by Amnesty International and groups 
          based on the Thai border. The Department of State's annual 
          Human Rights Country Report on Burma includes credible reports 
          of rape and other atrocities committed by the Burmese 
          military, especially in ethnic minority areas. In June 2002, 
          the Shan Human Rights Foundation (an organization initially 
          related to the Shan United Army, a narcotics-trafficking 
          organization), together with the Shan Women's Action Network, 
          published a report, based on interviews with displaced 
          persons, which alleged that Burmese Army personnel had been 
          involved in multiple rapes involving hundreds of women between 
          1996 and 2001. The report also argued that the Burmese Army 
          had used rape systematically as a weapon of war in its 
          counter-insurgency operations. The Burmese investigated these 
          charges with three separate teams from the Burmese Army, the 
          Ministry of Home Affairs and the Myanmar National Women's 
          Cooperative Association, but concluded--incredibly--that there 
          was no evidence that Burmese Army personnel had been involved 
          in any rapes in Shan State during the five-year period covered 
          by the SHRF/SWAN report. Following subsequent international 
          pressure, the Burmese have approached both the International 
          Committee of the Red Cross and UN Special Rapporteur Pinheiro 
          for possible involvement in an investigation, but there 
          remains doubt about the Burmese government's willingness to 
          deal effectively with Burmese Army abuses in areas of internal 
          conflict. We are urging that the UN independently investigate 
          the reports.
          The Burmese government dealt more effectively with other 
          allegations of human rights abuses. It has continued to work 
          with the International Committee of the Red Cross on 
          improvements in prison conditions. It has also allowed ICRC to 
          open up five regional offices throughout the country, staffed 
          by 34 international volunteers, to provide protection to 
          ethnic minorities. Similarly, it has allowed the United 
          Nations High Commission on Refugees to maintain a presence in 
          northern Rakhine State, providing support and protection 
          services to more than 230,000 Rohingya Muslims who have 
          returned from Bangladesh. After nearly a decade, however, some 
          22,000 Rohingya refugees still remain in two refugee camps in 
          Bangladesh. In spite of ongoing repatriation efforts, for the 
          last few years repatriations to Burma have not kept up with 
          the camp birthrates and restrictions on movement in Burma have 
          made life exceedingly difficult for this population. 
          Furthermore, nearly 130,000 other Burmese ethnic minority 
          displaced persons live in several camps along the border in 
          Thailand because they do not feel it is safe to return. Given 
          continued insurgent activity among some ethnic groups, 
          associated human rights abuses are likely to continue.
          The government has also made some progress on forced labor, 
          which remains an issue of serious concern to the international 
          community. In No

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          vember 2000, the International Labor Organization (ILO) 
          Governing Body concluded that the Government of Burma had not 
          taken effective action to deal with the use of forced labor in 
          the country and, for the first time in its history, called on 
          all ILO members to review their policies to ensure that those 
          policies did not support forced labor. The United States 
          strongly supported this decision.
          Over the past year, the Government of Burma has slowly begun 
          to work with the ILO on measures to address the problem. In 
          September 2001, it allowed an ILO High Level Team to visit 
          Burma to assess the situation. That team concluded that the 
          GOB had made an ``obvious, but uneven'' effort to curtail the 
          use of forced labor, but that forced labor persisted, 
          particularly in areas where the government was waging active 
          military campaigns against insurgent forces. It also 
          recommended that the ILO establish a permanent presence in 
          Burma. A second ILO team visited Burma in February 2002 to 
          follow up on this recommendation, and eventually agreement was 
          reached with the ILO in Geneva regarding the appointment of an 
          ILO liaison officer, pending the establishment of a permanent 
          ILO office in Rangoon. That liaison officer has since been 
          appointed. The ILO has also identified a permanent 
          representative to serve in Burma. Perhaps most importantly of 
          all, in August 2002, the ILO began field visits to sites along 
          the Thai/Burmese border which have been identified by Amnesty 
          International and other organizations as ``hot spots'' for 
          forced labor and Burmese Army abuse of ethnic minorities. That 
          said, there were continuing signs that forced labor remains a 
          problem, with reports, even in Rangoon, of laborers being 
          dragooned by the military.
          Finally, the government has continued with the slow release of 
          political prisoners. Altogether, approximately 400 political 
          prisoners have been released from detention since October 
          2000. In response to an appeal from UN Special Rapporteur 
          Pinheiro, the government has also released, on humanitarian 
          grounds, approximately 400 women prisoners who either had 
          small children or were pregnant. To date, releases have 
          included a majority of the NLD members held in prison, all 
          members of the NLDs Central Committee, several major ethnic 
          leaders, several student leaders, and all but 19 of the MPs 
          elected to the 1990 Parliament. Even with these releases, 
          however, hundreds of political prisoners remain in prison or 
          under detention in Burma as of September 2002, including 
          approximately 200 NLD members.
          Burma is a Tier 3 human trafficking country that has not 
          developed prevention, protection or law enforcement programs 
          to address fully the serious trafficking problems that plague 
          the country, but has made some progress in recognizing and 
          publicizing the perils of trafficking in persons. It has 
          signed the 1950 Convention for the Suppression of Traffic in 
          Persons and the Prostitution of Others and is a participant in 
          the UN Inter-Agency Project on the reduction of trafficking in 
          the Mekong sub-region although its other international and 
          regional anti-trafficking cooperation is very limited. In a 
          report delivered to the U.S. Government in August, it also 
          highlighted the recent information activities of Myanmar 
          National Committee for Women's Affairs; the enforcement 
          efforts of a newly formed Working Committee for the Prevention 
          of Trafficking in Persons (which is chaired by the Home 
          Minister); the legislation it has applied to combat 
          trafficking; and the jail sentences that it has handed out to 
          more than 100 traffickers over the past 3 years. However, 
          information on its funding of anti-traf

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          ficking activities and its support for the repatriated victims 
          of trafficking remains scant. The government's cooperation 
          with international NGOs concerned about human trafficking has 
          also been minimal. While it appears that the government has 
          finally begun to recognize the significance of its human 
          trafficking problems, it is equally obvious that it has not 
          yet put together programs that can deal with all aspects of 
          those problems. Given its current economic circumstances, we 
          do not anticipate the emergence of effective programs in the 
          near term.

Counternarcotics

          The ethnic majority areas of Burma make it one of the world's 
          largest producers of illicit opium, heroin, and amphetamine-
          type stimulants, despite the fact that its overall output of 
          opium and heroin has declined sharply in recent years, partly 
          as a result of improved Burmese government counternarcotics 
          efforts. Opium production in Burma has now declined for five 
          straight years and, in 2002, Burma produced an estimated 630 
          metric tons of opium, less than one-quarter of the 2,560 
          metric tons of opium produced six years earlier. 
          Unfortunately, Burma's success in reducing the production of 
          opium and heroin has been partially undercut by rapidly 
          increasing production of amphetamine-type stimulants, 
          particularly in outlying regions governed by former 
          insurgents. According to some estimates, as many as 400 to 800 
          million methamphetamine tablets may be produced in Burma each 
          year, although verification of this estimate is difficult due 
          to the mobile, small-scale nature of the methamphetamine 
          production facilities.
          The policy of the SPDC central government is to end narcotics 
          trafficking, but the SPDC realizes that this will be a long-
          term process as it has been elsewhere. There are reliable 
          reports that individual Burmese officials, particularly in 
          outlying areas, may be involved in narcotics production or 
          trafficking, but we do not have evidence that the government 
          is complicit in the drug trade. While the government has 
          consistently urged former ethnic insurgents to curb narcotics 
          production and trafficking in their self-administered areas 
          along the Chinese border, it has only recently, with the 
          support and assistance of China, begun to crack down on these 
          groups. Since September 2001, it has begun to enforce pledges 
          elicited from each former insurgent group to make their self-
          administered areas opium-free and, in March 2002, pressured 
          each group (including the Wa and the Kokang Chinese) into 
          issuing new decrees outlawing narcotics production and 
          trafficking in areas under their control. However, the Wa have 
          not committed to eliminating narcotics production until 2005.
          The government has improved its cooperation with neighboring 
          states, particularly China. In 2001, Burma signed Memoranda of 
          Understanding on narcotics control with both China and 
          Thailand. The MOU with China established a framework for joint 
          operations, which in turn led to a series of arrests and 
          renditions of major traffickers in 2001 and 2002, many of whom 
          were captured in the former insurgents' self-administered 
          areas. Altogether, over the past 18 months, Burma has returned 
          to China 22 fugitives from Chinese justice, including 
          principals from one group that China described as ``the 
          largest armed drug trafficking gang in the Golden Triangle.'' 
          Burma's MOU with Thailand, similarly, committed both sides to 
          closer police cooperation on narcotics control and to the 
          establishment of three joint

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          ``narcotics suppression coordination stations'' at major 
          crossing points on the border. That cooperation has since been 
          interrupted by tensions on the border, but both governments 
          have made clear that they look forward to resuming cooperation 
          once these tensions have been cleared away.
          Finally, Burma has participated in multilateral efforts to 
          control narcotics trafficking in the Golden Triangle. Since 
          November 2001, Burma has participated in ACCORD, the ASEAN and 
          China Cooperative Operations in Response to Dangerous Drugs, 
          which serves as an umbrella for a variety of global programs 
          aimed at strengthening the rule of law, promoting alternative 
          development, and increasing civic awareness of the dangers of 
          drugs. It also signed UNDCP's 1993 Memorandum of Understanding 
          among the six regional states--Burma, China, Thailand, Laos, 
          Vietnam, and Cambodia--to control narcotics production. 
          Finally, as China and Thailand have become more active 
          multilaterally, Burma has joined the trilateral and 
          quadrilateral programs organized by either to coordinate 
          counternarcotics efforts among the four states of the Golden 
          Triangle (Laos, Burma, China, and Thailand).
          Under pressure from the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), 
          which designated Burma as a ``non-cooperating'' state in June 
          2001, the Government of Burma has also begun to take action on 
          money laundering issues. In June 2002, it enacted a new and 
          potentially powerful money laundering law, which, if properly 
          enforced, should address many of the FATF's concerns. That 
          legislation criminalizes money laundering in connection with 
          virtually every kind of serious criminal activity and levies 
          heavy responsibilities on banks with regard to reporting. 
          Penalties are also substantial. The police, in cooperation 
          with the Central Bank and the Attorney General's office, are 
          now training their first financial investigators and should 
          begin prosecutions under the new law within the next few 
          months.
          Despite these steps, the United States judged earlier this 
          year that Burma's visibly improving counternarcotics efforts 
          were not yet commensurate with the scale of the problem. To 
          encourage further progress, we have sustained a program of 
          operational cooperation between police authorities in Burma 
          and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. We have also 
          continued to work with the GOB on annual opium yield surveys 
          in Burma, and with UNDCP and other donors on opium reduction 
          and crop substitution programs. In September 2001, the United 
          States pledged an additional $1,000,000 to support UNDCP's Wa 
          Alternative Development Project, which has helped reduce opium 
          production in the territories of the United Wa State Army. 
          Notwithstanding the lack of Burmese financial resources and 
          capacity, we do not, as a matter of law, provide bilateral 
          narcotics assistance.

HIV/AIDS

          In July, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
          (CDC) conducted an in-depth assessment of the HIV/AIDS 
          epidemic in Burma, including among high-risk groups and 
          pregnant women. The CDC assessed capacity at various levels in 
          preventing the spread of HIV and providing care and treatment 
          for those infected. The CDC concluded that the data, while 
          limited, on HIV/AIDS in Burma indicates a widespread epidemic 
          of

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          greater than two-percent prevalence affecting the general 
          population. Previous estimates by the World Health 
          Organization, UNAIDS, and others had indicated an epidemic of 
          less than two-percent prevalence limited to high-risk 
          populations. CDC observed a limited national HIV/AIDS 
          prevention program run by the government, but that some 
          efforts are underway by non-governmental organizations. 
          Voluntary HIV testing and counseling is extremely limited, and 
          very few people know their HIV status. Programs to prevent 
          mother-to-child transmission of HIV are small and limited and 
          in need of strengthening at all levels. The government has 
          made blood safety a high priority, but quality control is 
          questionable. Availability of care and treatment for those 
          infected with HIV is very limited and trained staffs are few, 
          while some non-governmental organizations provide some care 
          services.
          The government generally denies the extent of the HIV/AIDS 
          epidemic in the country, and their programs do not reflect the 
          latest thinking of the scientific community on prevention, 
          treatment, and care. However, like the NLD, the government is 
          very interested in international assistance to combat the 
          growth of the epidemic. CDC made a number of recommendations 
          to strengthen and improve HIV/AIDS surveillance in the country 
          and change policy and program implementation by the government 
          to improve the effectiveness of the response to HIV/AIDS in 
          the country. Policy recommendations included initiating 
          widespread voluntary HIV testing and counseling, including 
          allowing international non-governmental organizations to 
          conduct testing and counseling. The CDC also recommended that 
          national implementation by the government of a mother-to-child 
          transmission prevention program be accelerated, that a 
          national HIV/AIDS care program be developed, and that programs 
          targeting high risk groups be strengthened and enhanced.
          The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is in 
          the process of providing $1 million to international non-
          governmental organizations operating HIV/AIDS prevention 
          project in the country; none of these resources would be 
          directed to the government.

The Quality of Life in Burma

          The military government's management of the Burmese economy 
          has been catastrophic. The government's ill-thought efforts to 
          maintain discipline and control, and exclude foreign expertise 
          and participation, have had predictably disastrous results.
          Two problems stand out. In the energy sector, a run of 
          disastrous public investment decisions has left the economy 
          without fuel for either its electric generating facilities or 
          many of its basic industries. In January 2002, the nation's 
          peak generating capacity was sufficient to meet only about two 
          thirds of the nation's peak demand and since then the 
          situation has deteriorated further, with no prospect of relief 
          until late 2003 or early 2004 at the very earliest. Until 
          then, at least 30 to 40 percent of the nation's electricity 
          customers will be without power at any given time.
          In the fiscal budget, the situation is even more desperate. 
          There, a failed fiscal concept, in which the GOB attempted to 
          run the entire government mostly on the basis of the profits 
          of the state-owned enterprises, has left

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          the GOB without any basis for running the government over the 
          long term, as profits have turned to losses in one state-owned 
          enterprise after another. In fact, in Burma's fiscal year 
          2001/2002, the reported deficits of the state-owned 
          enterprises actually absorbed all the revenues collected by 
          the government, leaving the government proper (i.e., the army, 
          the navy, the health and education services, and all 
          ministerial operations) to run on monies borrowed from the 
          Central Bank. This has in turn produced a rapid expansion of 
          the money supply, a commensurate increase in inflation and a 
          sharp depreciation in the value of the domestic currency (the 
          kyat). Over the past two years, the kyat's unofficial value 
          has depreciated from a rate of approximately 360/dollar in 
          September 2000 to 1,100/dollar now, while inflation has 
          accelerated to an annualized rate that is now approaching 
          triple digit levels.
          The government has attempted to deal with these pressures with 
          a series of ad hoc restrictions on economic activity that 
          reinforce (at least temporarily) its system of control while 
          punishing private sector trade and investment. Thus far, 
          however, the only consequence has been a crippled private 
          sector and a weakened banking system. Inflation has not ebbed 
          and the kyat, after a brief rally in early June 2002, has 
          resumed its downward slide.
          Looking ahead, there is really no prospect for relief for 
          Burma without foreign financing support. The problems within 
          the economy, and particularly within the fiscal budget, are 
          simply too vast and too deeply entrenched to be treated now on 
          the basis of Burma's own resources. However, access to that 
          foreign financing support will likely depend on progress in 
          regard to structural reforms and political transition.

Development of a Multilateral Strategy

          U.S. policy goals in Burma are progress towards democracy, 
          improved human rights, more effective counternarcotics 
          efforts, counterterrorism efforts, regional stability, HIV/
          AIDS mitigation, and accounting for missing servicemen from 
          World War II. We encourage talks between Aung San Suu Kyi and 
          the military government in the hope that it will lead to 
          meaningful democratic change and national reconciliation in 
          Burma. We also consult regularly, at senior levels, with 
          countries with major interests in Burma and/or major concerns 
          regarding Burma's human rights practices.
          The United States has co-sponsored annual resolutions at the 
          UN General Assembly and the UN Commission on Human Rights that 
          focus on Burma. We have also supported ILO's unprecedented 
          decision on Burma given its failure to deal effectively with 
          its pervasive forced labor problems. Most importantly, we 
          strongly support the mission of the UN Secretary General's 
          Special Representative for Burma, Razali Ismail, whose efforts 
          have been instrumental in facilitating communication between 
          the government and Aung San Suu Kyi.
          In coordination with the European Union and other states, the 
          United States has imposed sanctions on Burma. U.S.-imposed 
          sanctions include an arms embargo, a ban on all new U.S. 
          investment in Burma, the suspension of all bilateral aid, 
          including counternarcotics assistance, the withdrawal of GSP 
          privileges, the denial of OPIC and EXIMBANK programs, visa 
          restrictions on Burma's senior leaders, and a hold on all new 
          lending or grant

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          programs by the World Bank, the IMF, the ADB, and other 
          international financial institutions in which the United 
          States has a major interest. We have maintained our diplomatic 
          representation at the Charg[eacute] d'Affaires level since 
          1990.
          Our goal in applying these sanctions is to encourage a 
          transition to democratic rule and greater respect for human 
          rights. Nevertheless, we remain concerned about the growing 
          humanitarian crisis in Burma and will, during the coming year, 
          initiate a new $1 million program to deal with the growing 
          HIV/AIDS epidemic in Burma. This funding will go directly to 
          international NGOs (including Population Services 
          International) to support programs including condom 
          distribution and educational efforts. We will also use a small 
          portion of the funding from the U.S. Burma earmark to develop 
          programs inside Burma in support of democracy. None of these 
          funds will be disbursed to or through the government. We will 
          also continue to examine the potential for law enforcement 
          cooperation with Burma on terrorism and narcotics issues. 
          Should there be significant progress in Burma in coming months 
          on political transition and human rights, then the United 
          States would look seriously at additional measures that could 
          be applied to support this process of constructive change.

Notice of November 6, 2002

Continuation of Emergency Regarding Weapons of Mass

Destruction

          On November 14, 1994, by Executive Order 12938, President 
          Clinton declared a national emergency with respect to the 
          unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, 
          foreign policy, and economy of the United States posed by the 
          proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons 
          (weapons of mass destruction) and the means of delivering such 
          weapons. On July 28, 1998, the President issued Executive 
          Order 13094 to amend Executive Order 12938 to more effectively 
          respond to the worldwide threat of weapons of mass destruction 
          proliferation activities. Because the proliferation of weapons 
          of mass destruction and the means of delivering them continues 
          to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national 
          security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States, 
          the national emergency first declared on November 14, 1994, 
          and extended on November 14, 1995, November 12, 1996, November 
          13, 1997, November 12, 1998, November 10, 1999, November 12, 
          2000, and November 9, 2001, must continue in effect beyond 
          November 14, 2002. In accordance with section 202(d) of the 
          National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing 
          for 1 year the national emergency declared in Executive Order 
          12938, as amended.
          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

November 6, 2002.

[[Page 327]]

Notice of November 12, 2002

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Iran

          On November 14, 1979, by Executive Order 12170, the President 
          declared a national emergency with respect to Iran pursuant to 
          the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 
          1701-1706) to deal with the unusual and extraordinary threat 
          to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the 
          United States constituted by the situation in Iran. Because 
          our relations with Iran have not yet returned to normal, and 
          the process of implementing the January 19, 1981, agreements 
          with Iran is still underway, the national emergency declared 
          on November 14, 1979, must continue in effect beyond November 
          14, 2002. Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the 
          National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing 
          for 1 year this national emergency with respect to Iran.
          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 November 12, 2002.

Memorandum of November 13, 2002

Notification to Congress of Trade Negotiation

Memorandum for the United States Trade Representative

          You are authorized and directed to notify the Congress, 
          consistent with section 2104(a)(1) of the Trade Act of 2002 
          (19 U.S.C. 3804(a)(1)), of my intention to enter into 
          negotations on a Free Trade Agreement with Australia.
          You are also authorized and directed to publish this 
          memorandum in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, November 13, 2002.

[[Page 328]]

Memorandum of November 26, 2002

Designation of Officers of the Federal Emergency Management Agency To Act 
as Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency

Memorandum for the Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency

          By the authority vested in me as President under the 
          Constitution and laws of the United States of America and 
          pursuant to the Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998, 5 U.S.C. 
          3345 et seq., I hereby order that:
          etion 1. Order of Succession.
          During any period when both the Director of the Federal 
          Emergency Management Agency (Director) and the Deputy Director 
          of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (Deputy Director) 
          have died, resigned, or otherwise become unable to perform the 
          functions and duties of the office of Director, the following 
          officers of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, in the 
          order listed, shall perform the functions and duties of the 
          office of Director, if they are eligible to act as Director 
          under the provisions of the Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 
          1998, until such time as the Director or Deputy Director is 
          able to perform the functions and duties of the office of 
          Director:
          Administrator of the United States Fire Administration;
          Administrator of the Federal Insurance and Mitigation 
          Administration;
          Assistant Director, Administration and Resource Planning 
          Directorate; and
          Regional Director, Region IV.
          etion 2. Exceptions.

(a)

No individual who is serving in an office listed in section 1 in an acting 
capacity, by virtue of so serving, shall act as Director pursuant to this 
memorandum.

(b)

Not withstanding the provisions of this memorandum, the President retains 
discretion, to the extent permitted by the Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 
1998, 5 U.S.C. 3345-3349d, to depart from this order in designating an 
acting Director.

          etion 3. Termination.
          This memorandum shall terminate immediately upon the transfer 
          of the authorities, functions, personnel, and assets of the 
          Federal Emergency Management Agency to the Department of 
          Homeland Security.
          etion 4. Publication.

[[Page 329]]

          The Director is authorized and directed to publish this 
          memorandum in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, November 26, 2002.

Memorandum of November 27, 2002

Determination Under the Interstate Commerce Commission Termination Act of 
1995

Memorandum for the Secretary of Transportation

          Section 6 of the Bus Regulatory Reform Act of 1982, Public Law 
          97-261, 96 Stat. 1103, imposed a moratorium on the issuance of 
          certificates or permits to motor carriers domiciled in, or 
          owned or controlled by persons of, a contiguous foreign 
          country and authorized the President to modify the moratorium. 
          The Interstate Commerce Commission Termination Act of 1995 
          (ICCTA), Public Law 104-88, 109 Stat. 803, maintained these 
          restrictions, subject to modifications made prior to the 
          enactment of the ICCTA, and empowered the President to make 
          further modifications to the moratorium.
          Pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 13902(c)(3), I modified the moratorium 
          on June 5, 2001, to allow motor carriers domiciled in the 
          United States that are owned or controlled by persons of 
          Mexico to obtain operating authority to transport 
          international cargo by truck between points in the United 
          States and to provide bus services between points in the 
          United States.
          The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) established a 
          schedule for liberalizing certain restrictions on the 
          provision of bus and truck services by Mexican-domiciled motor 
          carriers in the United States. Pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 
          13902(c)(3), I hereby determine that the following 
          modifications to the moratorium are consistent with 
          obligations of the United States under NAFTA and with our 
          national transportation policy and that the moratorium shall 
          be modified accordingly.
          First, qualified motor carriers domiciled in Mexico will be 
          allowed to obtain operating authority to transport passengers 
          in cross-border scheduled bus services. Second, qualified 
          motor carriers domiciled in Mexico will be allowed to obtain 
          operating authority to provide cross-border truck services. 
          The moratorium on the issuance of certificates or permits to 
          Mexican-domiciled motor carriers for the provision of truck or 
          bus services between points in the United States will remain 
          in place. These modifications shall be effective on the date 
          of this memorandum.
          Furthermore, pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 13902(c)(5), I hereby 
          determine that expeditious action is required to implement 
          this modification to the moratorium. Effective on the date of 
          this memorandum, the Department of Transportation is 
          authorized to act on applications, submitted by motor carriers 
          domiciled in Mexico, to obtain operating authority to provide 
          cross-border

[[Page 330]]

          scheduled bus services and cross-border truck services. In 
          reviewing such applications, the Department shall continue to 
          work closely with the Department of Justice, the Office of 
          Homeland Security, and other relevant Federal departments, 
          agencies, and offices in order to help ensure the security of 
          the border and to prevent potential threats to national 
          security.
          Motor carriers domiciled in Mexico operating in the United 
          States will be subject to the same Federal and State laws, 
          regulations, and procedures that apply to carriers domiciled 
          in the United States. These include safety regulations, such 
          as drug and alcohol testing requirements; insurance 
          requirements; taxes and fees; and other applicable laws and 
          regulations, including those administered by the United States 
          Customs Service, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 
          the Department of Labor, and Federal and State environmental 
          agencies.
          You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in 
          the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, November 27, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2003-04 of November 29, 2002

Imposition and Waiver of Sanctions Under Section 604 of the Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority contained in section 604 of the 
          Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (``the 
          Act'') (Public Law 107-228), and pursuant to section 603 of 
          that Act, regarding noncompliance by the PLO and the 
          Palestinian Authority with certain commitments, I hereby 
          impose the sanction set out in section 604(a)(2), ``Downgrade 
          in Status of the PLO Office in the United States.'' This 
          sanction is imposed for a period of 180 days from the date 
          hereof or until such time as the next report required by 
          section 603 of the Act is transmitted to the Congress, 
          whichever is later. You are authorized and directed to 
          transmit to the appropriate congressional committees the 
          initial report described in section 603 of the Act.
          Furthermore, I hereby determine that it is in the national 
          security interest of the United States to waive that sanction, 
          pursuant to section 604 of the Act. This waiver shall be 
          effective for a period of 180 days from the date hereof or 
          until such time as the next report required by section 603 of 
          the Act is transmitted to the Congress, whichever is later.
          You are hereby authorized and directed to transmit this 
          determination to the Congress and to publish it in the Federal 
          eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, November 29, 2002.

[[Page 331]]

Presidential Determination No. 2003-05 of December 7, 2002

Presidential Determination of Designations Under the Iraq Liberation Act of 
1998

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me as President of the 
          United States, including under section 5 of the Iraq 
          Liberation Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-338) (``the Act''), I 
          hereby determine that each of the following groups is a 
          democratic oppostion organization and that each satisfies the 
          criteria set forth in section 5(c) of the Act: the Assyrian 
          Democratic Movement; the Iraqi Free Officers and Civilians 
          Movement; the Iraqi National Front; the Iraqi National 
          Movement; the Iraqi Turkmen Front; and the Islamic Accord of 
          Iraq. I hereby designate each of these organizations as 
          eligible to receive assistance under section 4 of the Act.
          You are authorized and directed to report this determination 
          and designation to the Congress and to arrange for its 
          publication in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, December 7, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2003-06 of December 7, 2002

Presidential Determination on Authorization to Furnish Drawdown Assistance 
to the Iraqi Opposition Under the Iraq Liberation Act of 1998

Memorandum for the Secretary of State [and] the Secretary of Defense

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me as President of the 
          United States, including under sections 4(a)(2) and 5(a) of 
          the Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-338) (the 
          ``Act''), and consistent with Presidential Determination 99-
          13, I hereby direct the furnishing of up to $92 million in 
          defense articles from the Department of Defense, defense 
          services from the Department of Defense, and military 
          education and training in order to provide assistance to the 
          following organizations:
          Iraqi National Accord;
          Iraqi National Congress;
          Kurdistan Democratic Party;
          Movement for Constitutional Monarchy;
          Patriotic Union of Kurdistan;
          Supreme Council of the Islamic Revolution in Iraq;
          and to such other Iraqi opposition groups designated by me 
          under the Act before or after this determination. The 
          assistance will be allocated in accordance with plans being 
          developed by the Department of Defense and the Department of 
          State.

[[Page 332]]

          The Secretary of State is authorized and directed to report 
          this determination to the Congress and to arrange for its 
          publication in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, December 7, 2002.

Presidential Determination No. 2003-07 of December 11, 2002

Report to the Congress Regarding Conditions in Burma and U.S. Policy Toward 
Burma

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the requirements set forth under the heading 
          ``Policy toward Burma'' in section 570(d) of the Fiscal Year 
          1997 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act, as contained in 
          the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act (Public Law 104-
          208), a report is required every 6 months following enactment 
          concerning:

(1)

progress toward democratization in Burma;

(2)

progress on improving the quality of life of the Burmese people, including 
progress on market reforms, living standards, labor standards, use of 
forced labor in the tourism industry, and environmental quality; and

(3)

progress made in developing a comprehensive, multilateral strategy to bring 
democracy to and improve human rights practices and the quality of life in 
Burma, including the development of a dialogue between the State Peace and 
Development Council and democratic opposition groups in Burma.

          I understand the attached report was not forwarded due to an 
          administrative error.
          You are hereby authorized and directed now to transmit the 
          attached report fulfilling the above-stated requirements to 
          the appropriate committees of the Congress and to arrange for 
          its publication in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, December 11, 2002.

Conditions in Burma and U.S. Policy Toward Burma for the Period September 
28, 2001-March 27, 2002

Introduction and Summary

          Over the past 6 months, Burma's military government and the 
          National League for Democracy (NLD) General Secretary Aung San 
          Suu Kyi have continued confidence-building measures that are 
          reportedly aimed at supporting a transition to democracy and 
          civilian rule. Both sides have held

[[Page 333]]

          the substance of these talks in strictest confidence, but the 
          past 18 months has seen the release of approximately 250 
          political prisoners, and a halt to the vicious attacks on Aung 
          San Suu Kyi and the NLD by the government-owned press. 
          Unfortunately, the process has moved very slowly. Of 
          particular concern is the continuing house arrest of Aung San 
          Suu Kyi.
          The quality of life in Burma during the past 6 months has 
          deteriorated. Poverty is widespread, and the economy 
          increasingly shows the effects of a growing government 
          deficit, rising inflation, shortfalls in energy supplies and 
          growing foreign exchange shortages. Severe human rights abuses 
          are commonplace, particularly in ethnic minority areas, where 
          there are continuing reports of extrajudicial killings, rape, 
          and disappearances. Due to continuing severe restrictions on 
          religious freedom, Burma was again designated a ``country of 
          particular concern'' in 2001 under the International Religious 
          Freedom Act. Prison conditions are harsh, despite access to 
          the prisons by the International Committee of the Red Cross. 
          One retired university rector was also detained and sentenced 
          to 7 years in prison following his one-man protest calling for 
          new general elections.
          Forced labor remains an issue of serious concern. In September 
          2001, an ILO High Level Team visited Burma to assess the 
          situation and concluded that the SPDC had made an ``obvious, 
          but uneven'' effort to curb the practice; nevertheless, forced 
          labor persisted, particularly in border areas. In March 2002, 
          the government reached agreement with the ILO on appointment 
          of an ILO liaison officer in Burma, pending establishment of a 
          permanent ILO office.
          Burma is also one of the world's largest producers of illicit 
          opium, heroin, and methamphetamines. However, its overall 
          output of opium has declined by two-thirds over the past 5 
          years, in part as a result of bad weather and in part as a 
          result of eradication efforts. It has also stepped up law 
          \enforcement operations against some former insurgent groups 
          (particularly the Kokang Chinese) and considerably improved 
          its counter-narcotics cooperation with China, Thailand, and 
          other neighboring states.
          United States policy goals in Burma include progress towards 
          democracy, improved human rights, a more effective 
          counternarcotics effort, counterterrorist cooperation, 
          resolving MIA cases from WW II, and addressing the HIV/AIDS 
          epidemic which threatens regional stability and prosperity. We 
          hope that the on-going talks between Aung San Suu Kyi and the 
          military will lead to meaningful democratic change and 
          national reconciliation. We consult regularly, at senior 
          levels, with countries interested in Burma that share our 
          goals.
          In coordination with the European Union and other states, the 
          United States maintains sanctions on Burma aimed at 
          encouraging transition to democratic rule and greater respect 
          for human rights. These include an arms embargo, an investment 
          ban, and other measures.

Measuring Progress toward Democratization

          From September 2001 through March 2002, Burma's military 
          regime continued talks with the NLD's General Secretary, Aung 
          San Suu Kyi. Since the talks began 18 months ago, we have seen 
          the release of approximately

[[Page 334]]

          250 political prisoners, including all but 20 of the MPs 
          elected in 1990 and all of the NLD's Central Executive 
          Committee members with the exception of Aung San Suu Kyi. The 
          regime has also halted the virulent attacks on Aung San Suu 
          Kyi and the NLD which had become a staple of newspaper 
          coverage in Burma. In addition, the military government has 
          allowed the NLD to reopen 32 party offices in Rangoon Division 
          and to resume some normal party activities. These included 
          public meetings on Burma's National, Independence and Union 
          Days, all of which were attended by Ambassadors and Chiefs of 
          Mission from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, 
          and other countries. The NLD, in turn, has moderated its 
          public criticism of the regime and announced that it is now 
          prepared to work with the regime on political transition.
          Over the past 6 months, the regime has gradually increased 
          access to Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been under house arrest 
          since the talks began in 2000. Visitors have included U.N. 
          Special Rapporteur for Human Rights Paulo Pinheiro, U.N. 
          Special Envoy Razali Ismail, the ILO's High Level Team, 
          representatives of the European Union and U.S. Deputy 
          Assistant Secretary of State Matthew Daley, among others. Aung 
          San Suu Kyi is also now in daily contact with fellow NLD 
          members, including NLD Chairman U Aung Shwe, and NLD Vice 
          Chairman U Tin Oo. The abrupt postponement of U.N. Special 
          Envoy Razali's planned March 19 visit to Burma is of 
          particular concern, especially in light of approval for other 
          meetings. The connection, if any, between this event and the 
          arrest of members of Ne Win's family is unclear.
          The United States welcomed the confidence-building process 
          between the government and Aung San Suu Kyi and the release of 
          political prisoners and resumption of some NLD activity. 
          However, we have also urged the regime to move beyond 
          confidence building to a genuine political dialogue with Aung 
          San Suu Kyi that would chart the course for a return to 
          democracy and civilian rule. Critical next steps include 
          release of all remaining political prisoners, the 
          unconditional release of Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest 
          and increased political rights and freedom of operation for 
          the NLD and other political parties.

Counternarcotics

          Burma is one of the world's largest producers of illicit 
          opium, heroin, and methamphetamines. However, its overall 
          output of opium has declined sharply in recent years. In 2001, 
          Burma produced an estimated 865 metric tons of opium, barely 
          one-third of the 2,560 metric tons of opium produced in Burma 
          5 years earlier. Unfortunately, as opium production has 
          declined, methamphetamine production has soared, particularly 
          in outlying regions that are governed by former insurgents. 
          According to some estimates, as many as 800 million 
          methamphetamine tablets may be produced in Burma each year.
          There is no evidence that the government is involved on an 
          institutional level in the drug trade. However, there are 
          reliable reports that individual Burmese officials in outlying 
          areas are either directly involved in drug trafficking or 
          provide protection to those who are. In addition, while the 
          government has encouraged ethnic insurgents who have signed 
          cease-fire

[[Page 335]]

          agreements to curb narcotics production and trafficking, it 
          has only recently begun to take aggressive law enforcement 
          actions to control these activities. Over the past 6 months, 
          the Burmese Government has cracked down particularly hard on 
          the Kokang region controlled by Peng Jiasheng's Myanmar 
          National Democratic Alliance Army (MNDAA), which had pledged 
          to be opium free by 2000. With the assistance of the People's 
          Republic of China, the Burmese Government staged a series of 
          arrests of major traffickers in all areas of the Kokang, 
          including Laukkai, the capital of Kokang State.
          In other areas, the SPDC has moved more cautiously. In areas 
          controlled by the United Wa State Army (UWSA), the principal 
          drug-producing and drug-trafficking organization in Burma, the 
          government has slowly expanded its administrative presence, 
          but has not yet attempted any aggressive law enforcement 
          operations comparable to those in the Kokang region. The Wa 
          have pledged to end all opium production in their territories 
          by 2005. The United States has urged the government to take 
          law enforcement action and exact other forms of pressure 
          against the Wa narcotics operations even before that deadline 
          is reached.
          There have also been significant improvements in Burma's 
          cross-border cooperation with neighboring states. In 2001, 
          Burma signed memoranda of understanding on narcotics control 
          with both China and Thailand. The MOU with China established a 
          framework for joint operations, which in turn led to the 
          series of arrests and renditions of major traffickers in 2001 
          and 2002. The MOU with Thailand committed both sides to closer 
          police cooperation on narcotics control and to the 
          establishment of three joint ``narcotics suppression 
          coordination stations'' at major crossing points on the 
          border. Thailand has also provided a grant for a crop 
          substitution project in the Wa-controlled regions of southern 
          Shan State. In addition, Burma participated actively in a 
          series of quadrilateral meetings (China, Burma, Laos, and 
          Thailand) on narcotics control that were held in Thailand, 
          Burma, and China in late 2001 and early 2002.
          Under pressure from the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), 
          which designated Burma as a ``non-cooperating'' state in June 
          2001, the Government of Burma has a draft of a new money 
          laundering law, which will reportedly address many of the 
          FATF's concerns. That law, as well as a new Mutual Legal 
          Assistance Law, facilitating Burmese legal and judicial 
          cooperation with other states, should be enacted in 2002.
          Despite these recent steps, the United States does not believe 
          that Burma's counternarcotics efforts are commensurate with 
          the scale of the narcotics problem in Burma. We work with the 
          GOB on annual opium yield surveys in Burma, and through UNDCP 
          on opium reduction and crop substitution programs. In 
          September 2001, the United States pledged an additional 
          $1,000,000 to support UNDCP's Wa Alternative Development 
          Project, which has helped reduce opium production in the 
          territories of the United Wa State Army, but made utilization 
          of these funds contingent on the mobilization of matching 
          funds from other donors.

[[Page 336]]

The Quality of Life in Burma

          Burma remains one of the world's poorest countries with an 
          average per capita GDP of approximately $300, according to 
          World Bank figures. Primarily an agricultural economy, Burma 
          also has substantial mineral, fishing, and timber resources. 
          However, almost 4 decades of military misrule and 
          mismanagement have produced a chaotic economy characterized by 
          widespread poverty.
          Over the past 2 years, a growing government deficit, 
          shortfalls in energy supplies and continuing foreign exchange 
          shortages have hampered economic activity and contributed to a 
          rapid depreciation in Burma's official currency, the kyat. 
          Valued at approximately 360 kyat to the dollar in September 
          2000, that rate has now risen to approximately 840 kyat per 
          dollar in March 2002 and is expected to rise further over the 
          next 3 months. At the same time, inflation has picked up 
          speed. According to an urban retail price index calculated by 
          the U.S. Embassy, cumulative, point-to-point inflation from 
          January 1, 2001 to January 1, 2002 totaled approximately 52 
          percent.
          Widespread and severe human rights abuses also continued 
          throughout Burma during the reporting period. In ethnic 
          minority areas, in particular, there were many reports of 
          extrajudicial killings, rape, and disappearances. Significant 
          numbers of ethnic minority refugees continue to seek asylum in 
          Thailand. Due to severe restrictions on religious freedom, 
          Burma was again designated a ``country of particular concern'' 
          in 2001 under the International Religious Freedom Act. Prison 
          conditions remained harsh, despite access to prisons by the 
          International Committee of the Red Cross. During the reporting 
          period, only one political activist was detained for the 
          expression of a dissenting political view; in early December, 
          Dr. Salai Tun Than, a retired university rector and graduate 
          of the University of Wisconsin, was arrested and sentenced to 
          7 years in prison for passing out leaflets in front of 
          Rangoon's City Hall which called for a civilian government and 
          general elections.
          Forced labor also remains an issue of serious concern. In 
          November 2000, the International Labor Organization (ILO) 
          Governing Body concluded that the Government of Burma had not 
          taken effective action to deal with the use of forced labor in 
          the country and, for the first time in its history, called on 
          all ILO members to review their policies toward Burma to 
          ensure that they did not support forced labor. The United 
          States strongly supported this decision.
          In recent months, the Government of Burma has indicated that 
          it is more willing to work with the ILO. In September 2001, an 
          ILO High Level Team concluded that the GOB had made an 
          ``obvious, but uneven'' effort to curtail the use of forced 
          labor, but that forced labor persisted, particularly in areas 
          where the government was waging active military campaigns 
          against insurgent forces. It also recommended that the ILO 
          establish a permanent presence in Burma. A second ILO team 
          visited Burma in February 2002 and eventually reached 
          agreement on the appointment of an ILO liaison officer, 
          pending the establishment of a permanent ILO office in 
          Rangoon. However, the government has not been willing to 
          address two other ILO recommendations: appointment of an 
          ombudsman for forced labor issues,

[[Page 337]]

          and an independent investigation of allegations that villagers 
          in Shan State were killed after complaining to the military 
          about forced labor.
          The regime has released approximately 250 political prisoners 
          since the initiation of talks with Aung San Suu Kyi, including 
          approximately 70 over the past 6 months. In response to an 
          appeal from U.N. Special Rapporteur Pinheiro, it has also 
          released, on humanitarian grounds, 318 women prisoners who 
          either had small children or were pregnant. Even with these 
          releases, more than 1,000 political prisoners still remained 
          in prison or under detention in Burma as of March 2002, 
          including over 600 NLD members.
          International monitoring of human rights in Burma also 
          improved to some degree in 2001. For the first time in 6 
          years, the Government of Burma permitted visits (in April and 
          October 2001, and then again in February 2002) by the United 
          Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Burma. It also 
          allowed the International Committee of the Red Cross to visit 
          all prisons in Burma and reportedly has responded to some ICRC 
          recommendations about prison conditions.

Development of a Multilateral Strategy

          United States policy goals in Burma include progress towards 
          democracy, improved human rights, a more effective 
          counternarcotics effort, counterterrorist cooperation, 
          resolving MIA cases from WW II, and addressing the HIV/AIDS 
          epidemic which threatens regional stability and prosperity. We 
          hope that the on-going talks between Aung San Suu Kyi and the 
          military will lead to meaningful democratic change and 
          national reconciliation. We consult regularly, at senior 
          levels, with countries interested in Burma that share our 
          goals.
          The United States has co-sponsored annual resolutions at the 
          U.N. General Assembly and the U.N. Commission on Human Rights 
          concerning Burma. We have also supported ILO's unprecedented 
          decision on Burma given Burma's failure to deal effectively 
          with its pervasive forced labor problems. Most importantly, we 
          strongly support the mission of the U.N. Secretary General's 
          Special Envoy for Burma, Razali bin Ismail, who has helped 
          facilitate the regime's talks with Aung San Suu Kyi. We are 
          increasingly concerned that the Burmese regime is not 
          permitting Mr. Razali to visit Burma with the regularity or 
          frequency needed at this stage of the process.
          In coordination with the European Union and other states, the 
          United States has imposed sanctions on Burma aimed at 
          encouraging democratic transition and greater respect for 
          human rights. These sanctions include an arms embargo, a ban 
          on all new U.S. investment in Burma, the suspension of all 
          bilateral aid, the withdrawal of GSP privileges, the denial of 
          OPIC and EXIMBANK programs, visa restrictions on Burma's 
          senior leaders and opposition to all new lending or grant 
          programs by the World Bank, the IMF, the ADB and other 
          international financial institutions in which the United 
          States has a major interest. We downgraded the level of our 
          diplomatic representation from Ambassador to Charg[eacute] 
          d'Affaires in 1989 and have maintained at that level.

[[Page 338]]

Presidential Determination No. 2003-08 of December 13, 2002

Presidential Determination on Suspension of Limitations Under the Jerusalem 
Embassy Act

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me as President by the 
          Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          section 7(a) of the Jerusalem Embassy Act of 1995 (Public Law 
          104-45) (the ``Act''), I hereby determine that it is necessary 
          to protect the national security interests of the United 
          States to suspend for a period of 6 months the limitations set 
          forth in sections 3(b) and 7(b) of the Act. My Administration 
          remains committed to beginning the process of moving our 
          embassy to Jerusalem.
          You are hereby authorized and directed to transmit this 
          determination to the Congress, accompanied by a report in 
          accordance with section 7(a) of the Act, and to publish the 
          determination in the Federal eister.
          This suspension shall take effect after transmission of this 
          determination and report to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, December 13, 2002.

[[Page 339]]

                Appendices--Other Presidential Documents


________________________________________________________________________


Editorial note: The following tables include documents issued by the 
Executive Office of the President and published in the Federal Register 
but not included in title 3 of the Code of Federal Regulations.


________________________________________________________________________


Appendix A--List of Messages to Congress Transmitting Budget Rescissions 
and Deferrals


________________________________________________________________________



Date of Message                                                    67 FR
                                                                    Page

May 3, 2002........................................................34963


________________________________________________________________________


Appendix B--List of Presidential Determinations


________________________________________________________________________



Date of Presidential Determination                                 67 FR
                                                                    Page

Presidential Determination No. 02-30 of September 13...............78425


________________________________________________________________________


Appendix C--List of Final Rule Documents


________________________________________________________________________



Date                                                               67 FR
                                                                    Page

Jan. 15 (Office of the United States Trade Representative)..........2008


________________________________________________________________________


[[Page 341]]



              CHAPTER I--EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT




  --------------------------------------------------------------------

Part                                                                Page
100             Standards of conduct........................         342
101             Public information provisions of the 
                    Administrative Procedures Act...........         342
102             Enforcement of nondiscrimination on the 
                    basis of handicap in programs or 
                    activities conducted by the Executive 
                    Office of the President.................         342

[[Page 342]]



PART 100--STANDARDS OF CONDUCT--Table of Contents




    Authority: 5 U.S.C. 7301.

    Source: 64 FR 12881, Mar. 16, 1999, unless otherwise noted.



Sec.  100.1  Ethical conduct standards and financial disclosure regulations.

    Employees of the Executive Office of the President are subject to 
the executive branch-wide standards of ethical conduct at 5 CFR part 
2635, and the executive branch-wide financial disclosure regulations at 
5 CFR part 2634.



PART 101--PUBLIC INFORMATION PROVISIONS OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES ACT--Table of Contents




Sec.
101.1 Executive Office of the President.
101.2 Office of Management and Budget.
101.3 Office of Administration.
101.4 National Security Council.
101.5 Council on Environmental Quality.
101.6 Office of National Drug Control Policy.
101.7 Office of Science and Technology Policy.
101.8 Office of the United States Trade Representative.

    Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552.

    Source: 40 FR 8061, Feb. 25, 1975 and 55 FR 46067, November 1, 1990, 
unless otherwise noted.



Sec.  101.1  Executive Office of the President.

    Until further regulations are promulgated, the remainder of the 
entities within the Executive Office of the President, to the extent 
that 5 U.S.C. 552 is applicable, shall follow the procedures set forth 
in the regulations applicable to the Office of Management and Budget (5 
CFR Ch. III). Requests for information from these other entities should 
be submitted directly to such entity.



Sec.  101.2  Office of Management and Budget.

    Freedom of Information regulations for the Office of Management and 
Budget appear at 5 CFR Ch. III.



Sec.  101.3  Office of Administration.

    Freedom of Information regulations for the Office of Administration 
appear at 5 CFR part 2502.

[55 FR 46037, Nov. 1, 1990]



Sec.  101.4  National Security Council.

    Freedom of Information regulations for the National Security Council 
appear at 32 CFR Ch. XXI.



Sec.  101.5  Council on Environmental Quality.

    Freedom of Information regulations for the Council on Environmental 
Quality appear at 40 CFR Ch. V.

[42 FR 65131, Dec. 30, 1977]



Sec.  101.6  Office of National Drug Control Policy.

    Freedom of Information regulations for the Office of National Drug 
Control Policy appear at 21 CFR parts 1400-1499.

[55 FR 46037, Nov. 1, 1990]



Sec.  101.7  Office of Science and Technology Policy.

    Freedom of Information regulations for the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy appear at 32 CFR part 2402.

[55 FR 46037, Nov. 1, 1990]



Sec.  101.8  Office of the United States Trade Representative.

    Freedom of Information regulations for the Office of the United 
States Trade Representative appear at 15 CFR part 2004.

[55 FR 46037, Nov. 1, 1990]



PART 102--ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT--Table of Contents




Sec.
102.101 Purpose.
102.102 Application.
102.103 Definitions.
102.104-102.109 [Reserved]
102.110 Self-evaluation.
102.111 Notice.
102.112-102.129 [Reserved]

[[Page 343]]

102.130 General prohibitions against discrimination.
102.131-102.139 [Reserved]
102.140 Employment.
102.141-102.148 [Reserved]
102.149 Program accessibility: Discrimination prohibited.
102.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities.
102.151 Program accessibility: New construction and alterations.
102.152-102.159 [Reserved]
102.160 Communications.
102.161-102.169 [Reserved]
102.170 Compliance procedures.
102.171-102.999 [Reserved]

    Authority: 29 U.S.C. 794.

    Source: 53 FR 25879, July 8, 1988, unless otherwise noted.



Sec.  102.101  Purpose.

    The purpose of this regulation is to effectuate section 119 of the 
Rehabilitation, Comprehensive Services, and Developmental Disabilities 
Amendments of 1978, which amended section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act 
of 1973 to prohibit discrimination on the basis of handicap in programs 
or activities conducted by Executive agencies or the United States 
Postal Service.



Sec.  102.102  Application.

    This regulation (Sec. Sec.  102.101-102.170) applies to all programs 
or activities conducted by the agency, except for programs or activities 
conducted outside the United States that do not involve individuals with 
handicaps in the United States.



Sec.  102.103  Definitions.

    For purposes of this regulation, the term--
    Agency means, for purposes of this regulation only, the following 
entities in the Executive Office of the President: the White House 
Office, the Office of the Vice President, the Office of Management and 
Budget, the Office of Policy Development, the National Security Council, 
the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Office of the United 
States Trade Representative, the Council on Environmental Quality, the 
Council of Economic Advisers, the Office of Administration, the Office 
of Federal Procurement Policy, and any committee, board, commission, or 
similar group established in the Executive Office of the President.
    Agency head or head of the agency; as used in Sec. Sec.  
102.150(a)(3), 102.160(d) and 102.170 (i) and (j), shall be a three-
member board which will include the Director, Office of Administration, 
the head of the Executive Office of the President, agency in which the 
issue needing resolution or decision arises and one other agency head 
selected by the two other board members. In the event that an issue 
needing resolution or decision arises within the Office of 
Administration, one of the board members shall be the Director of the 
Office of Management and Budget.
    Assistant Attorney General means the Assistant Attorney General, 
Civil Rights Division, United States Department of Justice.
    Auxiliary aids means services or devices that enable persons with 
impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills to have an equal 
opportunity to participate in, and enjoy the benefits of, programs or 
activities conducted by the agency. For example, auxiliary aids useful 
for persons with impaired vision include readers, Brailled materials, 
audio recordings, and other similar services and devices. Auxiliary aids 
useful for persons with impaired hearing include telephone handset 
amplifiers, telephones compatible with hearing aids, telecommunication 
devices for deaf persons (TDD's), interpreters, notetakers, written 
materials, and other similar services and devices.
    Complete complaint means a written statement that contains the 
complainant's name and address and describes the agency's alleged 
discriminatory action in sufficient detail to inform the agency of the 
nature and date of the alleged violation of section 504. It shall be 
signed by the complainant or by someone authorized to do so on his or 
her behalf. Complaints filed on behalf of classes or third parties shall 
describe or identify (by name, if possible) the alleged victims of 
discrimination.
    Facility means all or any portion of buildings, structures, 
equipment, roads, walks, parking lots, rolling stock or other 
conveyances, or other real or personal property.
    Historic preservation programs means programs conducted by the 
agency that

[[Page 344]]

have preservation of historic properties as a primary purpose.
    Historic properties means those properties that are listed or 
eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places or 
properties designated as historic under a statute of the appropriate 
State or local government body.
    Individual with handicaps means any person who has a physical or 
mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life 
activities, has a record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having 
such an impairment.
    As used in this definition, the phrase:
    (1) Physical or mental impairment includes--
    (i) Any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, 
or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: 
Neurological; musculoskeletal; special sense organs; respiratory, 
including speech organs; cardiovascular; reproductive; digestive; 
genitourinary; hemic and lymphatic; skin; and endocrine; or
    (ii) Any mental or psychological disorder, such as mental 
retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and 
specific learning disabilities. The term ``physical or mental 
impairment'' includes, but is not limited to, such diseases and 
conditions as orthopedic, visual, speech, and hearing impairments, 
cerebral palsy, epilepsy, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, 
cancer, heart disease, diabetes, mental retardation, emotional illness, 
and drug addiction and alcoholism.
    (2) Major life activities includes functions such as caring for 
one's self, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, 
breathing, learning, and working.
    (3) Has a record of such an impairment means has a history of, or 
has been misclassified as having, a mental or physical impairment that 
substantially limits one or more major life activities.
    (4) Is regarded as having an impairment means--
    (i) Has a physical or mental impairment that does not substantially 
limit major life activities but is treated by the agency as constituting 
such a limitation;
    (ii) Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits 
major life activities only as a result of the attitudes of others toward 
such impairment; or
    (iii) Has none of the impairments defined in paragraph (1) of this 
definition but is treated by the agency as having such an impairment.
    Qualified individual with handicaps means--
    (1) With respect to preschool, elementary, or secondary education 
services provided by the agency, an individual with handicaps who is a 
member of a class of persons otherwise entitled by statute, regulation, 
or agency policy to receive education services from the agency;
    (2) With respect to any other agency program or activity under which 
a person is required to perform services or to achieve a level of 
accomplishment, an individual with handicaps who meets the essential 
eligibility requirements and who can achieve the purpose of the program 
or activity without modifications in the program or activity that the 
agency can demonstrate would result in a fundamental alteration in its 
nature;
    (3) With respect to any other program or activity, an individual 
with handicaps who meets the essential eligibility requirements for 
participation in, or receipt of benefits from, that program or activity; 
and
    (4) ``Qualified handicapped person'' as that term is defined for 
purposes of employment in 29 CFR 1613.702(f), which is made applicable 
to this regulation by Sec.  102.140.
    Section 504 means section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 
(Pub. L. 93-112, 87 Stat. 394 (29 U.S.C. 794)), as amended by the 
Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1974 (Pub. L. 93-516, 88 Stat. 1617); 
the Rehabilitation, Comprehensive Services, and Developmental 
Disabilities Amendments of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-602, 92 Stat. 2955); and the 
Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1986 (Pub. L. 99-506, 100 Stat. 1810). 
As used in this regulation, section 504 applies only to programs or 
activities conducted by Executive agencies and not to federally assisted 
programs.
    Substantial impairment means a significant loss of the integrity of 
finished

[[Page 345]]

materials, design quality, or special character resulting from a 
permanent alteration.



Sec. Sec.  102.104-102.109  [Reserved]



Sec.  102.110  Self-evaluation.

    (a) The agency shall, by September 6, 1989, evaluate its current 
policies and practices, and the effects thereof, that do not or may not 
meet the requirements of this regulation and, to the extent modification 
of any such policies and practices is required, the agency shall proceed 
to make the necessary modifications.
    (b) The agency shall provide an opportunity to interested persons, 
including individuals with handicaps or organizations representing 
individuals with handicaps, to participate in the self-evaluation 
process by submitting comments (both oral and written).
    (c) The agency shall, for at least three years following completion 
of the self-evaluation, maintain on file and make available for public 
inspection:
    (1) A description of areas examined and any problems identified; and
    (2) A description of any modifications made.



Sec.  102.111  Notice.

    The agency shall make available to employees, applicants, 
participants, beneficiaries, and other interested persons such 
information regarding the provisions of this regulation and its 
applicability to the programs or activities conducted by the agency, and 
make such information available to them in such manner as the head of 
the agency finds necessary to apprise such persons of the protections 
against discrimination assured them by section 504 and this regulation.



Sec. Sec.  102.112-102.129  [Reserved]



Sec.  102.130  General prohibitions against discrimination.

    (a) No qualified individual with handicaps shall, on the basis of 
handicap, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, 
or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or 
activity conducted by the agency.
    (b)(1) The agency, in providing any aid, benefit, or service, may 
not, directly or through contractual, licensing, or other arrangements, 
on the basis of handicap--
    (i) Deny a qualified individual with handicaps the opportunity to 
participate in or benefit from the aid, benefit, or service;
    (ii) Afford a qualified individual with handicaps an opportunity to 
participate in or benefit from the aid, benefit, or service that is not 
equal to that afforded others;
    (iii) Provide a qualified individual with handicaps with an aid, 
benefit, or service that is not as effective in affording equal 
opportunity to obtain the same result, to gain the same benefit, or to 
reach the same level of achievement as that provided to others;
    (iv) Provide different or separate aid, benefits, or services to 
individuals with handicaps or to any class of individuals with handicaps 
than is provided to others unless such action is necessary to provide 
qualified individuals with handicaps with aid, benefits, or services 
that are as effective as those provided to others;
    (v) Deny a qualified individual with handicaps the opportunity to 
participate as a member of planning or advisory boards;
    (vi) Otherwise limit a qualified individual with handicaps in the 
enjoyment of any right, privilege, advantage, or opportunity enjoyed by 
others receiving the aid, benefit, or service.
    (2) The agency may not deny a qualified individual with handicaps 
the opportunity to participate in programs or activities that are not 
separate or different, despite the existence of permissibly separate or 
different programs or activities.
    (3) The agency may not, directly or through contractual or other 
arrangements, utilize criteria or methods of administration the purpose 
or effect of which would--
    (i) Subject qualified individuals with handicaps to discrimination 
on the basis of handicap; or
    (ii) Defeat or substantially impair accomplishment of the objectives 
of a program or activity with respect to individuals with handicaps.

[[Page 346]]

    (4) The agency may not, in determining the site or location of a 
facility, make selections the purpose or effect of which would--
    (i) Exclude individuals with handicaps from, deny them the benefits 
of, or otherwise subject them to discrimination under any program or 
activity conducted by the agency; or
    (ii) Defeat or substantially impair the accomplishment of the 
objectives of a program or activity with respect to individuals with 
handicaps.
    (5) The agency, in the selection of procurement contractors, may not 
use criteria that subject qualified individuals with handicaps to 
discrimination on the basis of handicap.
    (6) The agency may not administer a licensing or certification 
program in a manner that subjects qualified individuals with handicaps 
to discrimination on the basis of handicap, nor may the agency establish 
requirements for the programs or activities of licensees or certified 
entities that subject qualified individuals with handicaps to 
discrimination on the basis of handicap. However, the programs or 
activities of entities that are licensed or certified by the agency are 
not, themselves, covered by this regulation.
    (c) The exclusion of nonhandicapped persons from the benefits of a 
program limited by Federal statute or Executive order to individuals 
with handicaps or the exclusion of a specific class of individuals with 
handicaps from a program limited by Federal statute or Executive order 
to a different class of individuals with handicaps is not prohibited by 
this regulation.
    (d) The agency shall administer programs and activities in the most 
integrated setting appropriate to the needs of qualified individuals 
with handicaps.



Sec. Sec.  102.131-102.139  [Reserved]



Sec.  102.140  Employment.

    No qualified individual with handicaps shall, on the basis of 
handicap, be subject to discrimination in employment under any program 
or activity conducted by the agency. The definitions, requirements, and 
procedures of section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 
791), as established by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 
29 CFR part 1613, shall apply to employment in federally conducted 
programs or activities.



Sec.  102.141-102.148  [Reserved]



Sec.  102.149  Program accessibility: Discrimination prohibited.

    Except as otherwise provided in Sec.  102.150, no qualified 
individual with handicaps shall, because the agency's facilities are 
inaccessible to or unusable by individuals with handicaps, be denied the 
benefits of, be excluded from participation in, or otherwise be 
subjected to discrimination under any program or activity conducted by 
the agency.



Sec.  102.150  Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so 
that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily 
accessible to and usable by individuals with handicaps. This paragraph 
does not--
    (1) Necessarily require the agency to make each of its existing 
facilities accessible to and usable by individuals with handicaps;
    (2) In the case of historic preservation programs, require the 
agency to take any action that would result in a substantial impairment 
of significant historic features of an historic property; or
    (3) Require the agency to take any action that it can demonstrate 
would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or 
activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In those 
circumstances where agency personnel believe that the proposed action 
would fundamentally alter the program or activity or would result in 
undue financial and administrative burdens, the agency has the burden of 
proving that compliance with Sec.  102.150(a) would result in such 
alteration or burdens. The decision that compliance would result in such 
alteration or burdens must be made by the agency head or his or her 
designee after considering all agency resources available for use in the 
funding and operation of the conducted program or activity, and must be 
accompanied by a written statement of the reasons

[[Page 347]]

forreaching that conclusion. If an action would result in such an 
alteration or such burdens, the agency shall take any other action that 
would not result in such an alteration or such burdens but would 
nevertheless ensure that individuals with handicaps receive the benefits 
and services of the program or activity.
    (b) Methods--(1) General. The agency may comply with the 
requirements of this section through such means as redesign of 
equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment 
of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at 
alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and 
construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any 
other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily 
accessible to and usable by individuals with handicaps. The agency is 
not required to make structural changes in existing facilities where 
other methods are effective in achieving compliance with this section. 
The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet 
accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural 
Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and any 
regulations implementing it. In choosing among available methods for 
meeting the requirements of this section, the agency shall give priority 
to those methods that offer programs and activities to qualified 
individuals with handicaps in the most integrated setting appropriate.
    (2) Historic preservation programs. In meeting the requirements of 
Sec.  102.150(a) in historic preservation programs, the agency shall 
give priority to methods that provide physical access to individuals 
with handicaps. In cases where a physical alteration to an historic 
property is not required because of Sec.  102.150(a) (2) or (3), 
alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include--
    (i) Using audio-visual materials and devices to depict those 
portions of an historic property that cannot otherwise be made 
accessible;
    (ii) Assigning persons to guide individuals with handicaps into or 
through portions of historic properties that cannot otherwise be made 
accessible; or
    (iii) Adopting other innovative methods.
    (c) Time period for compliance. The agency shall comply with the 
obligations established under this section by November 7, 1988, except 
that where structural changes in facilities are undertaken, such changes 
shall be made by September 6, 1991, but in any event as expeditiously as 
possible.
    (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to 
facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the 
agency shall develop, by March 6, 1989, a transition plan setting forth 
the steps necessary to complete such changes. The agency shall provide 
an opportunity to interested persons, including individuals with 
handicaps or organizations representing individuals with handicaps, to 
participate in the development of the transition plan by submitting 
comments (both oral and written). A copy of the transition plan shall be 
made available for public inspection. The plan shall, at a minimum--
    (1) Identify physical obstacles in the agency's facilities that 
limit the accessibility of its programs or activities to individuals 
with handicaps;
    (2) Describe in detail the methods that will be used to make the 
facilities accessible;
    (3) Specify the schedule for taking the steps necessary to achieve 
compliance with this section and, if the time period of the transition 
plan is longer than one year, identify steps that will be taken during 
each year of the transition period; and
    (4) Indicate the official responsible for implementation of the 
plan.



Sec.  102.151   Program accessibility: New construction and alterations.

    Each building or part of a building that is constructed or altered 
by, on behalf of, or for the use of the agency shall be designed, 
constructed, or altered so as to be readily accessible to and usable by 
individuals with handicaps. The definitions, requirements, and standards 
of the Architectural Barriers Act (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), as established 
in 41 CFR 101-19.600 to 101-19.607,

[[Page 348]]

apply to buildings covered by this section.



Sec. Sec.  102.152-102.159  [Reserved]



Sec.  102.160  Communications.

    (a) The agency shall take appropriate steps to ensure effective 
communication with applicants, participants, personnel of other Federal 
entities, and members of the public.
    (1) The agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where 
necessary to afford an individual with handicaps an equal opportunity to 
participate in, and enjoy the benefits of, a program or activity 
conducted by the agency.
    (i) In determining what type of auxiliary aid is necessary, the 
agency shall give primary consideration to the requests of the 
individual with handicaps.
    (ii) The agency need not provide individually prescribed devices, 
readers for personal use or study, or other devices of a personal 
nature.
    (2) Where the agency communicates with applicants and beneficiaries 
by telephone, telecommunication devices for deaf persons (TDD's) or 
equally effective telecommunication systems shall be used to communicate 
with persons with impaired hearing.
    (b) The agency shall ensure that interested persons, including 
persons with impaired vision or hearing, can obtain information as to 
the existence and location of accessible services, activities, and 
facilities.
    (c) The agency shall provide signage at a primary entrance to each 
of its inaccessible facilities, directing users to a location at which 
they can obtain information about accessible facilities. The 
international symbol for accessibility shall be used at each primary 
entrance of an accessible facility.
    (d) This section does not require the agency to take any action that 
it can demonstrate would result in a fundamental alteration in the 
nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative 
burdens. In those circumstances where agency personnel believe that the 
proposed action would fundamentally alter the program or activity or 
would result in undue financial and administrative burdens, the agency 
has the burden of proving that compliance with Sec.  102.160 would 
result in such alteration or burdens. The decision that compliance would 
result in such alteration or burdens must be made by the agency head or 
his or her designee after considering all agency resources available for 
use in the funding and operation of the conducted program or activity 
and must be accompanied by a written statement of the reasons for 
reaching that conclusion. If an action required to comply with this 
section would result in such an alteration or such burdens, the agency 
shall take any other action that would not result in such an alteration 
or such burdens but would nevertheless ensure that, to the maximum 
extent possible, individuals with handicaps receive the benefits and 
services of the program or activity.



Sec. Sec.  102.161-102.169  [Reserved]



Sec.  102.170  Compliance procedures.

    (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, this 
section applies to all allegations of discrimination on the basis of 
handicap in programs and activities conducted by the agency.
    (b) The agency shall process complaints alleging violations of 
section 504 with respect to employment according to the procedures 
established by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 29 CFR 
part 1613 pursuant to section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 
U.S.C. 791).
    (c) The Director, Facilities Management, Office of Administration, 
Executive Office of the President, shall be responsible for coordinating 
implementation of this section. Complaints may be sent to the Director 
at the following address: Room 486, Old Executive Office Building, 17th 
and Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20500.
    (d) The agency shall accept and investigate all complete complaints 
for which it has jurisdiction. All complete complaints must be filed 
within 180 days of the alleged act of discrimination. The agency may 
extend this time period for good cause.

[[Page 349]]

    (e) If the agency receives a complaint over which it does not have 
jurisdiction, it shall promptly notify the complainant and shall make 
reasonable efforts to refer the complaint to the appropriate Government 
entity.
    (f) The agency shall notify the Architectural and Transportation 
Barriers Compliance Board upon receipt of any complaint alleging that a 
building or facility that is subject to the Architectural Barriers Act 
of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), is not readily accessible to 
and usable by individuals with handicaps.
    (g) Within 180 days of the receipt of a complete complaint for which 
it has jurisdiction, the agency shall notify the complainant of the 
results of the investigation in a letter containing--
    (1) Findings of fact and conclusions of law;
    (2) A description of a remedy for each violation found; and
    (3) A notice of the right to appeal.
    (h) Appeals of the findings of fact and conclusions of law or 
remedies must be filed by the complainant within 90 days of receipt from 
the agency of the letter required by Sec.  102.170(g). The agency may 
extend this time for good cause.
    (i) Timely appeals shall be accepted and processed by the head of 
the agency.
    (j) The head of the agency shall notify the complainant of the 
results of the appeal within 60 days of the receipt of the request. If 
the head of the agency determines that additional information is needed 
from the complainant, he or she shall have 60 days from the date of 
receipt of the additional information to make his or her determination 
on the appeal.
    (k) The time limits cited in paragraphs (g) and (j) of this section 
may be extended with the permission of the Assistant Attorney General.
    (l) The agency may delegate its authority for conducting complaint 
investigations to other Federal agencies, except that the authority for 
making the final determination may not be delegated to another agency.



Sec. Sec.  102.171-102.999  [Reserved]

[[Page 351]]


                          TITLE 3 FINDING AIDS


________________________________________________________________________


Table 1--Proclamations
Table 2--Executive Orders
Table 3--Other Presidential Documents
Table 4--Presidential Documents Affected During 2002
Table 5--Statutes Cited as Authority for Presidential Documents
List of CFR Sections Affected
Index

[[Page 353]]

                         Table 1--PROCLAMATIONS

------------------------------------------------------------------------
        No.           Signature Date          Subject         67 FR Page
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                     2002............
 
7517...............  Jan. 15.........  Religious Freedom            2787
                                        Day, 2002.
7518...............  Jan. 17.........  Martin Luther King,          3575
                                        Jr., Federal
                                        Holiday, 2002.
7519...............  Jan. 18.........  National Mentoring           3577
                                        Month, 2002.
7520...............  Jan. 18.........  National Sanctity of         3579
                                        Human Life Day,
                                        2002.
7521...............  Feb. 1..........  American Heart               5431
                                        Month, 2002.
7522...............  Feb. 1..........  National African             5433
                                        American History
                                        Month, 2002.
7523...............  Feb. 4..........  National Consumer            5919
                                        Protection Week,
                                        2002.
7524...............  Feb. 22.........  Suspension of Entry          8857
                                        as Immigrants and
                                        Nonimmigrants of
                                        Persons Responsible
                                        for Actions That
                                        Threaten Zimbabwe's
                                        Democratic
                                        Institutions and
                                        Transition to a
                                        Multi-Party
                                        Democracy.
7525...............  Mar. 2..........  American Red Cross          10311
                                        Month, 2002.
7526...............  Mar. 2..........  Irish-American              10313
                                        Heritage Month,
                                        2002.
7527...............  Mar. 2..........  National Colorectal         10315
                                        Cancer Awareness
                                        Month, 2002.
7528...............  Mar. 2..........  Save Your Vision            10317
                                        Week, 2002.
7529...............  Mar. 5..........  To Facilitate               10553
                                        Positive Adjustment
                                        to Competition From
                                        Imports of Certain
                                        Steel Products.
7530...............  Mar. 6..........  Women's History             10825
                                        Month, 2002.
7531...............  Mar. 11.........  Bicentennial Day of         11381
                                        the United States
                                        Military Academy at
                                        West Point, 2002.
7532...............  Mar. 14.........  National Poison             12441
                                        Prevention Week,
                                        2002.
7533...............  Mar. 21.........  National Bone and           13703
                                        Joint Decade, 2002-
                                        2011.
7534...............  Mar. 21.........  Education and               13705
                                        Sharing Day,
                                        U.S.A., 2002.
7535...............  Mar. 25.........  Greek Independence          15093
                                        Day: A National Day
                                        of Celebration of
                                        Greek and American
                                        Democracy, 2002.
7536...............  Apr. 1..........  Cancer Control              17599
                                        Month, 2002.
7537...............  Apr. 1..........  National Child Abuse        17601
                                        Prevention Month,
                                        2002.
7538...............  Apr. 4..........  National Former             17905
                                        Prisoner of War
                                        Recognition Day,
                                        2002.
7539...............  Apr. 10.........  National D.A.R.E.           18083
                                        Day, 2002.
7540...............  Apr. 12.........  Pan American Day and        19097
                                        Pan American Week,
                                        2002.
7541...............  Apr. 12.........  Jewish Heritage             19099
                                        Week, 2002.
7542...............  Apr. 17.........  Death of Byron R.           19633
                                        White.
7543...............  Apr. 18.........  National Crime              19635
                                        Victims' Rights
                                        Week, 2002.
7544...............  Apr. 19.........  National Organ and          20005
                                        Tissue Donor
                                        Awareness Week,
                                        2002.
7545...............  Apr. 19.........  National Volunteer          20007
                                        Week, 2002.

[[Page 354]]

 
7546...............  Apr. 23.........  National Park Week,         20605
                                        2002.
7547...............  Apr. 26.........  National Day of             21559
                                        Prayer, 2002.
7548...............  Apr. 30.........  Law Day, U.S.A.,            30307
                                        2002.
7549...............  Apr. 30.........  Loyalty Day, 2002...        30309
7550...............  May 1...........  Asian/Pacific               30311
                                        American Heritage
                                        Month, 2002.
7551...............  May 1...........  Older Americans             30313
                                        Month, 2002.
7552...............  May 2...........  National Charter            30533
                                        Schools Week, 2002.
7553...............  May 3...........  To Restore                  30535
                                        Nondiscriminatory
                                        Trade Treatment
                                        (Normal Trade
                                        Relations
                                        Treatment) to the
                                        Products of
                                        Afghanistan.
7554...............  May 3...........  To Extend Duty-Free         30537
                                        Treatment for
                                        Certain
                                        Agricultural
                                        Products of Israel.
7555...............  May 3...........  Small Business Week,        31105
                                        2002.
7556...............  May 6...........  National Tourism            31107
                                        Week, 2002.
7557...............  May 9...........  Mother's Day, 2002..        34583
7558...............  May 10..........  Peace Officers              34585
                                        Memorial Day and
                                        Police Week, 2002.
7559...............  May 10..........  National Defense            34587
                                        Transportation Day
                                        and National
                                        Transportation
                                        Week, 2002.
7560...............  May 13..........  National Hurricane          34815
                                        Awareness Week,
                                        2002.
7561...............  May 16..........  To Designate the            35705
                                        Republic of
                                        C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire
                                        as a Beneficiary
                                        Sub-Saharan African
                                        Country.
7562...............  May 16..........  Armed Forces Day,           35707
                                        2002.
7563...............  May 17..........  National Safe               35891
                                        Boating Week, 2002.
7564...............  May 17..........  World Trade Week,           35893
                                        2002.
7565...............  May 21..........  National Maritime           36495
                                        Day, 2002.
7566...............  May 21..........  National Missing            36497
                                        Children's Day,
                                        2002.
7567...............  May 21..........  Prayer for Peace,           36499
                                        Memorial Day, 2002.
7568...............  May 31..........  Black Music Month,          38583
                                        2002.
7569...............  May 31..........  National Fishing and        38585
                                        Boating Week, 2002.
7570...............  June 4..........  National                    39241
                                        Homeownership
                                        Month, 2002.
7571...............  June 5..........  National Child's            39595
                                        Day, 2002.
7572...............  June 7..........  Great Outdoors Week,        40137
                                        2002.
7573...............  June 7..........  Flag Day and                40139
                                        National Flag Week,
                                        2002.
7574...............  June 14.........  Father's Day, 2002..        42177
7575...............  June 28.........  Lewis and Clark             44755
                                        Bicentennial.
7576...............  July 3..........  To Provide for the          45285
                                        Efficient and Fair
                                        Administration of
                                        Safeguard Measures
                                        on Imports of
                                        Certain Steel
                                        Products.
7577...............  July 17.........  Captive Nations             47677
                                        Week, 2002.
7578...............  July 26.........  National Korean War         49551
                                        Veterans Armistice
                                        Day, 2002.
7579...............  July 26.........  Anniversary of the          49555
                                        Americans With
                                        Disabilities Act,
                                        2002.
7580...............  July 26.........  Parents' Day, 2002..        49557
7581...............  July 29.........  The Bicentennial of         49559
                                        the United States
                                        Patent and
                                        Trademark Office,
                                        2002.
7582...............  Aug. 14.........  National Airborne           53723
                                        Day, 2002.
7583...............  Aug. 16.........  National Health             53873
                                        Center Week, 2002.
7584...............  Aug. 23.........  Women's Equality            55317
                                        Day, 2002.

[[Page 355]]

 
7585...............  Aug. 28.........  To Implement an             56207
                                        Agreement regarding
                                        Imports of Line
                                        Pipe Under Section
                                        203 of the Trade
                                        Act of 1974.
7586...............  Aug. 28.........  To Modify Duty-Free         56211
                                        Treatment Under the
                                        Generalized System
                                        of Preferences for
                                        Argentina.
7587...............  Aug. 30.........  National Ovarian            56745
                                        Cancer Awareness
                                        Month, 2002.
7588...............  Aug. 31.........  National Days of            56893
                                        Prayer and
                                        Remembrance, 2002.
7589...............  Sept. 4.........  National Alcohol and        57123
                                        Drug Addiction
                                        Recovery Month,
                                        2002.
7590...............  Sept. 4.........  Patriot Day, 2002...        57125
7591...............  Sept. 13........  National Hispanic           58955
                                        Heritage Month,
                                        2002.
7592...............  Sept. 13........  National Farm Safety        58957
                                        and Health Week,
                                        2002.
7593...............  Sept. 13........  National                    58959
                                        Historically Black
                                        Colleges and
                                        Universities Week,
                                        2002.
7594...............  Sept. 16........  Citizenship Day and         59133
                                        Constitution Week,
                                        2002.
7595...............  Sept. 19........  National POW/MIA            60099
                                        Recognition Day,
                                        2002.
7596...............  Sept. 20........  Minority Enterprise         60101
                                        Development Week,
                                        2002.
7597...............  Sept. 20........  Family Day, 2002....        60103
7598...............  Sept. 27........  Gold Star Mother's          62161
                                        Day, 2002.
7599...............  Oct. 1..........  National Breast             62165
                                        Cancer Awareness
                                        Month, 2002.
7600...............  Oct. 1..........  National Disability         62167
                                        Employment
                                        Awareness Month,
                                        2002.
7601...............  Oct. 1..........  National Domestic           62169
                                        Violence Awareness
                                        Month, 2002.
7602...............  Oct. 4..........  Fire Prevention             62863
                                        Week, 2002.
7603...............  Oct. 4..........  Child Health Day,           62865
                                        2002.
7604...............  Oct. 4..........  German-American Day,        62867
                                        2002.
7605...............  Oct. 8..........  Leif Erikson Day,           63527
                                        2002.
7606...............  Oct. 9..........  Columbus Day, 2002..        63811
7607...............  Oct. 10.........  General Pulaski             64025
                                        Memorial Day, 2002.
7608...............  Oct. 11.........  National Cystic             64027
                                        Fibrosis Awareness
                                        Week, 2002.
7609...............  Oct. 11.........  National School             64029
                                        Lunch Week, 2002.
7610...............  Oct. 11.........  White Cane Safety           64031
                                        Day, 2002.
7611...............  Oct. 17.........  Year of Clean Water,        64787
                                        2002 2003.
7612...............  Oct. 18.........  National Character          65281
                                        Counts Week, 2002.
7613...............  Oct. 18.........  National Forest             65283
                                        Products Week, 2002.
7614...............  Oct. 23.........  United Nations Day,         65869
                                        2002.
7615...............  Oct. 29.........  National Family             67087
                                        Caregivers Month,
                                        2002.
7616...............  Oct. 31.........  To Implement the            67283
                                        Andean Trade
                                        Promotion and Drug
                                        Eradication Act.
7617...............  Oct. 31.........  National Alzheimer's        67293
                                        Disease Awareness
                                        Month, 2002.
7618...............  Oct. 31.........  National Diabetes           67295
                                        Month, 2002.
7619...............  Nov. 1..........  National Adoption           67771
                                        Month, 2002.
7620...............  Nov. 1..........  National American           67773
                                        Indian Heritage
                                        Month, 2002.
7621...............  Nov. 1..........  National Hospice            67775
                                        Month, 2002.

[[Page 356]]

 
7622...............  Nov. 5..........  In Celebration of           68017
                                        the Centennial of
                                        the West Wing of
                                        the White House,
                                        2002.
7623...............  Nov. 6..........  Veterans Day, 2002..        68751
7624...............  Nov. 8..........  National Employer           68921
                                        Support of the
                                        Guard and Reserve
                                        Week, 2002.
7625...............  Nov. 8..........  World Freedom Day,          69117
                                        2002.
7626...............  Nov. 13.........  To Implement                69459
                                        Modifications to
                                        the Carribean Basin
                                        Economic Recovery
                                        Act and the African
                                        Growth and
                                        Opportunity Act.
7627...............  Nov. 14.........  America Recycles            69657
                                        Day, 2002.
7628...............  Nov. 21.........  Thanksgiving Day,           70831
                                        2002.
7629...............  Nov. 22.........  National Farm-City          70833
                                        Week, 2002.
7630...............  Nov. 22.........  National Family             71067
                                        Week, 2002.
7631...............  Nov. 27.........  World AIDS Day, 2002        72089
7632...............  Dec. 3..........  National Drunk and          72551
                                        Drugged Driving
                                        Prevention Month,
                                        2002.
7633...............  Dec. 6..........  National Pearl              76103
                                        Harbor Remembrance
                                        Day, 2002.
7634...............  Dec. 9..........  Human Rights Day,           76669
                                        Bill of Rights Day,
                                        and Human Rights
                                        Week, 2002.
7635...............  Dec. 16.........  Wright Brothers Day,        77905
                                        2002.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


[[Page 357]]

                        Table 2--EXECUTIVE ORDERS

------------------------------------------------------------------------
        No.           Signature Date          Subject         67 FR Page
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                     2002............
 
13252..............  Jan. 7..........  Exclusions From the          1601
                                        Federal Labor-
                                        Management
                                        Relations Program.
13253..............  Jan. 16.........  Amendment to                 2791
                                        Executive Order
                                        13223, Ordering the
                                        Ready Reserve of
                                        the Armed Forces to
                                        Active Duty and
                                        Delegating Certain
                                        Authorities to the
                                        Secretary of
                                        Defense and the
                                        Secretary of
                                        Transportation.
13254..............  Jan. 29.........  Establishing the USA         4869
                                        Freedom Corps.
13255..............  Feb. 6..........  Amendment to                 6157
                                        Executive Order
                                        13227, President's
                                        Commission on
                                        Excellence in
                                        Special Education.
13256..............  Feb. 12.........  President's Board of         6823
                                        Advisors on
                                        Historically Black
                                        Colleges and
                                        Universities.
13257..............  Feb. 13.........  President's                  7259
                                        Interagency Task
                                        Force To Monitor
                                        and Combat
                                        Trafficking in
                                        Persons.
13258..............  Feb. 26.........  Amending Executive           9385
                                        Order 12866 on
                                        Regulatory Planning
                                        and Review.
13259..............  Mar. 19.........  Designation of              13239
                                        Public
                                        International
                                        Organizations for
                                        Purposes of the
                                        Securities Exchange
                                        Act of 1934 and the
                                        Foreign Corrupt
                                        Practices Act of
                                        1977.
13260..............  Mar. 19.........  Establishing the            13241
                                        President's
                                        Homeland Security
                                        Advisory Council
                                        and Senior Advisory
                                        Committees for
                                        Homeland Security.
13261..............  Mar. 19.........  Providing an Order          13243
                                        of Succession in
                                        the Environmental
                                        Protection Agency
                                        and Amending
                                        Certain Orders on
                                        Succession.
13262..............  Apr. 11.........  2002 Amendments to          18773
                                        the Manual for
                                        Courts-Martial,
                                        United States.
 
13263..............  Apr. 29.........  President's New             22337
                                        Freedom Commission
                                        on Mental Health.
13264..............  June 4..........  Amendment to                39243
                                        Executive Order
                                        13180, Air Traffic
                                        Performance-Based
                                        Organization.
13265..............  June 6..........  President's Council         39841
                                        on Physical Fitness
                                        and Sports.
13266..............  June 20.........  Activities To               42467
                                        Promote Personal
                                        Fitness.
13267..............  June 20.........  Establishing a              42469
                                        Transition Planning
                                        Office for the
                                        Department of
                                        Homeland Security
                                        Within the Office
                                        of Management and
                                        Budget.

[[Page 358]]

 
13268..............  July 2..........  Termination of              44751
                                        Emergency With
                                        Respect to the
                                        Taliban and
                                        Amendment of
                                        Executive Order
                                        13224 of September
                                        23, 2001.
13269..............  July 3..........  Expedited                   45287
                                        Naturalization of
                                        Aliens and
                                        Noncitizen
                                        Nationals Serving
                                        in an Active-Duty
                                        Status During the
                                        War on Terrorism.
13270..............  July 3..........  Tribal Colleges and         45288
                                        Universities.
13271..............  July 9..........  Establishment of the        46091
                                        Corporate Fraud
                                        Task Force.
13272..............  Aug. 13.........  Proper Consideration        53461
                                        of Small Entities
                                        in Agency
                                        Rulemaking.
13273..............  Aug. 21.........  Further Amending            56215
                                        Executive Order
                                        10173, as Amended,
                                        Prescribing
                                        Regulations
                                        Relating to the
                                        Safeguarding of
                                        Vessels, Harbors,
                                        Ports, and
                                        Waterfront
                                        Facilities of the
                                        United States.
13274..............  Sept. 18........  Environmental               59449
                                        Stewardship and
                                        Transportation
                                        Infrastructure
                                        Project Reviews.
13275..............  Oct. 7..........  Creating a Board of         62869
                                        Inquiry To Report
                                        on Certain Labor
                                        Disputes Affecting
                                        the Maritime
                                        Industry of the
                                        United States.
13276..............  Nov. 15.........  Delegation of               69985
                                        Responsibilities
                                        Concerning
                                        Undocumented Aliens
                                        Interdicted or
                                        Intercepted in the
                                        Caribbean Region.
13277..............  Nov. 19.........  Delegation of               70305
                                        Certain Authorities
                                        and Assignment of
                                        Certain Functions
                                        Under the Trade Act
                                        of 2002.
13278..............  Dec. 11.........  President's                 76671
                                        Commission on the
                                        United States
                                        Postal Service.
13279..............  Dec. 12.........  Equal Protection of         77141
                                        the Laws for Faith-
                                        Based and Community
                                        Organizations.
13280..............  Dec. 12.........  Responsibilities of         77145
                                        the Department of
                                        Agriculture and the
                                        Agency for
                                        International
                                        Development With
                                        Respect to Faith-
                                        Based and Community
                                        Initiatives.
13281..............  Dec. 19.........  Half-Day Closing of         78319
                                        Executive
                                        Departments and
                                        Agencies of the
                                        Federal Government
                                        on Tuesday,
                                        December 24, 2002.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------------------------------------------------
        No.           Signature Date          Subject         68 FR Page
------------------------------------------------------------------------
13282..............  Dec. 31.........  Adjustments of               1133
                                        Certain Rates of
                                        Pay.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


[[Page 359]]

                  Table 3--OTHER PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 67 FR
      Signature Date                     Subject                  Page
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2002
 
Jan. 3...................  Notice: Continuation of Libya             637
                            Emergency.
Jan. 15..................  Notice: Continuation of Emergency        2547
                            With Respect to Sierra Leone and
                            Liberia.
Jan. 18..................  Notice: Continuation of the              3033
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to Terrorists who Threaten To
                            Disrupt the Middle East Peace
                            Process.
Jan. 25..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-       5921
                            06: Waiver of Section 907 of the
                            FREEDOM Support Act With Respect
                            to Assistance to the Government
                            of Azerbaijan.
Feb. 1...................  Memorandum: Report to the Congress       5923
                            Regarding Conditions in Burma and
                            U.S. Policy Toward Burma.
Feb. 23..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-       9889
                            07: President's Report to
                            Congress on Major Drug Transit or
                            Major Illicit Drug Producing
                            Countries Under the FY 2002
                            Modification to the Annual Drug
                            Certification Procedures.
Feb. 26..................  Notice: Continuation of the              9387
                            National Emergency Relating to
                            Cuba and of the Emergency
                            Authority Relating to the
                            Regulation of the Anchorage and
                            Movement of Vessels.
Mar. 4...................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      10599
                            08: Determination Pursuant to
                            Section 523 of the Foreign
                            Operations, Export Financing, and
                            Related Programs Appropriations
                            Act, 2002, (Public Law 107-115).
Mar. 5...................  Memorandum: Action Under Section        10593
                            203 of the Trade Act of 1974
                            Concerning Certain Steel Products.
Mar. 12..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      13245
                            09: Eligibility of Palau,
                            Kiribati, and Tuvalu To Receive
                            Defense Articles and Services
                            Under the Foreign Assistance Act
                            and the Arms Export Control Act.
Mar. 13..................  Notice: Continuation of the             11553
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to Iran.
Mar. 14..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      13247
                            10: Designation of Bahrain as a
                            Major Non-NATO Ally.
Mar. 20..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      15095
                            11: Cooperation by Vietnam in
                            Accounting for United States
                            Prisoners of War and Missing in
                            Action.
Apr. 1...................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      18461
                            12: U.S. Contribution to the
                            Korean Peninsula Energy
                            Development Organization (KEDO):
                            Determination Regarding Funds
                            Under the Heading ``
                            Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism,
                            Demining and Related Programs''
                            in Title II of the Foreign
                            Operations, Export Financing, and
                            Related Programs Appropriations
                            Act, 2002 (Public Law 107-115).
Apr. 12..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      20425
                            13: Determination Pursuant to
                            Section 2(c)(1) of the Migration
                            and Refugee Assistance Act of
                            1962, as Amended.
Apr. 16..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      20427
                            14: Waiver and Certification of
                            Statutory Provisions Regarding
                            the Palestine Liberation
                            Organization.

[[Page 360]]

 
Apr. 18..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      20429
                            15: Eligibility of Armenia,
                            Azerbaijan, and Tajikistan To
                            Receive Defense Articles and
                            Services Under the Foreign
                            Assistance Act and the Arms
                            Export Control Act.
Apr. 18..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      20431
                            16: Determination To Authorize
                            the Furnishing of Emergency
                            Military Assistance to the
                            Government of Nigeria.
Apr. 24..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      31711
                            17: Military Drawdown for Georgia.
Apr. 27..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      31713
                            18: Determination To (1) Waive
                            Section 512 of the Foreign
                            Operations, Export Financing, and
                            Related Programs Appropriations
                            Act, 2002 (Public Law 107-115)
                            and Section 620(q) of the Foreign
                            Assistance Act of 1961, as
                            Amended, To Provide Assistance to
                            Afghanistan and (2) Authorize a
                            Drawdown Under Section 506(a)(1)
                            of the Foreign Assistance Act of
                            1961, as Amended, To Provide
                            Emergency Military Assistance to
                            Afghanistan.
May 6....................  Order: Designation Under Executive      31109
                            Order 12958.
May 16...................  Notice: Continuation of the             35423
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to Burma.
May 27...................  Notice: Continuation of Emergency       37661
                            With Respect to the Federal
                            Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia
                            and Montenegro).
May 27...................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      39245
                            19: Presidential Determination on
                            Eligibility of East Timor To
                            Receive Defense Articles and
                            Services Under the Foreign
                            Assistance Act of 1961, as
                            Amended, and the Arms Export
                            Control Act.
May 30...................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      39247
                            20: Provision of $25.5 Million To
                            Support a Train and Equip Program
                            in Georgia.
June 3...................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      40833
                            21: Presidential Determination
                            Under Subsection 402(d)(1) of the
                            Trade Act of 1974, as Amended--
                            Continuation of Waiver Authority
                            for the Republic of Belarus.
June 3...................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      40835
                            22: Presidential Determination
                            Under Subsection 402(d)(1) of the
                            Trade Act of 1974, as Amended--
                            Continuation of Waiver Authority
                            for Vietnam.
June 14..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      42705
                            23: Suspension of Limitations
                            Under the Jerusalem Embassy Act.
June 18..................  Notice: Continuation of the             42181
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to the Risk of Nuclear
                            Proliferation Created by the
                            Accumulation of Weapons-Usable
                            Fissile Material in the Territory
                            of the Russian Federation.
June 21..................  Notice: Continuation of the             42703
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to the Western Balkans.
June 28..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      46837
                            24: Presidential Determination To
                            Authorize the Furnishing of
                            Emergency Military
                            Counterterrorism Assistance to
                            the Armed Forces of the
                            Philippines.
July 2...................  Memorandum: Delegation of               46575
                            Authority Under Section 124 of
                            the National Defense
                            Authorization Act for Fiscal Year
                            2001.
July 9...................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      47437
                            25: Delegation of Authority Under
                            Sections 2(d) and 2(f) of the
                            Migration and Refugee Assistance
                            Act of 1962, as Amended.

[[Page 361]]

 
July 17..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      50343
                            26: Determination Under Section
                            610(a) of the Foreign Assistance
                            Act of 1961, as Amended, To
                            Transfer $10.3 Million to the
                            Operating Expense Appropriation.
July 23..................  Memorandum: Delegation of               48741
                            Authority With Respect to
                            Concluding Amendments to the July
                            12, 1999, Agreement Concerning
                            Trade in Certain Steel Products
                            From the Russian Federation.
July 30..................  Notice: Continuation of the             50341
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to Iraq.
Aug. 7...................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      53725
                            27: Presidential Determination on
                            Waiver of Restrictions on
                            Assistance to Russia Under the
                            Cooperative Threat Reduction Act
                            of 1993 and Title V of the
                            FREEDOM Support Act.
Aug. 14..................  Notice: Continuation of Emergency       53721
                            Regarding Export Control
                            Regulations.
Aug. 14..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      54325
                            28: Presidential Determination on
                            Military Drawdown for Tunisia.
Aug. 30..................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      57127
                            29: Presidential Determination
                            Pursuant to Section 2(c)(1) of
                            the Migration and Refugee
                            Assistance Act of 1962, as
                            Amended.
Sept. 12.................  Notice: Continuation of the             58317
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to Certain Terrorist Attacks.
Sept. 13.................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      58681
                            31: Continuation of the Exercise
                            of Certain Authorities Under the
                            Trading With the Enemy Act.
Sept. 19.................  Notice: Continuation of the             59447
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to Persons Who Commit, Threaten
                            To Commit, or Support Terrorism.
Sept. 23.................  Notice: Continuation of the             60105
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to UNITA.
Sept. 26.................  Order: Designation Under Executive      61465
                            Order 12958.
Sept. 30.................  Presidential Determination No. 02-      62311
                            32: Presidential Determination on
                            the Transfer of Funds From
                            International Organizations and
                            Programs Funds to the Child
                            Survival and Health Programs Fund.
Oct. 1...................  Memorandum: Notification to the         62163
                            Congress of Trade Negotiations.
Oct. 16..................  Memorandum: Notification to the         64515
                            Congress of Trade Negotiation.
Oct. 16..................  Notice: Continuation of the             64307
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to Significant Narcotics
                            Traffickers Centered in Colombia.
Oct. 16..................  Presidential Determination No. 03-      65469
                            02: Presidential Determination on
                            FY 2003 Refugee Admissions
                            Numbers and Authorizations of In-
                            Country Refugee Status.
Oct. 16..................  Presidential Determination No. 03-      65471
                            03: Waiver and Certification of
                            Statutory Provisions Regarding
                            the Palestine Liberation
                            Organization.
Oct. 29..................  Notice: Continuation of the             66525
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to Sudan.
Nov. 6...................  Memorandum: Report to the Congress      75799
                            Regarding Conditions in Burma and
                            U.S. Policy Toward Burma.
Nov. 6...................  Notice: Continuation of Emergency       68493
                            Regarding Weapons of Mass
                            Destruction.

[[Page 362]]

 
Nov. 12..................  Notice: Continuation of the             68929
                            National Emergency With Respect
                            to Iran.
Nov. 13..................  Memorandum: Notification to             69465
                            Congress of Trade Negotiation.
Nov. 26..................  Memorandum: Designation of              79513
                            Officers of the Federal Emergency
                            Management Agency To Act as
                            Director of the Federal Emergency
                            Management Agency.
Nov. 27..................  Memorandum: Determination Under         71795
                            the Interstate Commerce
                            Commission Termination Act of
                            1995.
Nov. 29..................  Presidential Determination 03-04:       72363
                            Imposition and Waiver of
                            Sanctions Under Section 604 of
                            the Foreign Relations
                            Authorization Act, Fiscal Year
                            2003.
Dec. 7...................  Presidential Determination 03-05:       78121
                            Presidential Determination of
                            Designations Under the Iraq
                            Liberation Act of 1998.
Dec. 7...................  Presidential Determination 03-06:       78123
                            Presidential Determination on
                            Authorization to Furnish Drawdown
                            Assistance to the Iraqi
                            Opposition Under the Iraq
                            Liberation Act of 1998.
Dec. 11..................  Presidential Determination 03-07:       77645
                            Report to the Congress Regarding
                            Conditions in Burma and U.S.
                            Policy Toward Burma.
Dec. 13..................  Presidential Determination 03-08:       78125
                            Presidential Determination on
                            Suspension of Limitations Under
                            the Jerusalem Embassy Act.
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------


[[Page 363]]

                         Title 3--The President


          Table 4--PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS AFFECTED DURING 2002


________________________________________________________________________


Editorial note: The following abbreviations are used in this table:

EO        Executive Order

FR        Federal Register

PLO       Public Land Order (43 CFR, Appendix to Chapter II)

Proc.     Proclamation

Pub. L.   Public Law

Stat.     U.S. Statutes at Large

WCPD      Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents


________________________________________________________________________


                              Proclamations

                             Date or Number

                                         Comment

5437.............See Proc. 7553.........................................
6693.............Superseded by Proc. 7562...............................
6867.............See Notice of Feb. 26, p. 283..........................
6962.............See Proc. 7554.........................................
7274.............See Proc. 7585.........................................
7350.............See Proc. 7561.........................................
7400.............See Proc. 7561.........................................
7463.............See EO 13253; Notice of Sept. 12, p. 308...............
7529.............See Proc. 7576.........................................
                            Executive Orders

                             Date or Number

                                         Comment

January 9, 1838..Amended by PLO 7542 (67 FR 62812)......................
May 24, 1847.....Revoked by PLO 7545....................................
November 13, 1889Revoked by PLO 7523 (67 FR 31367)......................
July 2, 1910.....Revoked in part by PLO 7507 (67 FR 1984)...............
February 1, 1921.Revoked by PLO 7536 (67 FR 56852)......................
April 17, 1926...Revoked in part by PLO 7508 (67 FR 1983)...............

[[Page 364]]

1405.............Revoked in part by PLO 7520 (67 FR 18024)..............
4203.............Revoked in part by PLO 7524 (67 FR 31367)..............
5327.............Revoked in part by PLO 7516 (67 FR 11706)..............
5672.............Revoked in part by PLO 7548 (67 FR 72969)..............
10173............See EO 13273...........................................
11246............Amended by EO 13279....................................
11846............Amended by EO 13277....................................
12170............See Notices of Mar. 13, p. 289; Nov. 12, p. 327........
12171............Amended by EO 13252....................................
12345............Revoked by EO 13265....................................
12473............See EO 13262...........................................
12543............See Notice of Jan. 3, p. 275...........................
12544............See Notice of Jan. 3, p. 275...........................
12722............See Notice of July 30, p. 305..........................
12724............See Notice of July 30, p. 305..........................
12807............See EO 13276...........................................
12808............See Notice of May 27, p. 296...........................
12865............See Notice of Sept. 23, p. 310.........................
12866............Amended by EO 13258; See EO 13272......................
12876............Revoked by EO 13256....................................
12934............See Notice of May 27, p. 296...........................
12938............See Notice of Nov. 6, p. 326...........................
12947............See Notice of Jan. 18, p. 277..........................
12957............See Notice of Mar. 13, p. 289..........................
12958............See Orders of May 6, p. 295; Sept. 26, p. 311..........
12959............See Notice of Mar. 13, p. 289..........................
12978............See Notice of Oct. 16, p. 312..........................
13021............Revoked by EO 13270....................................
13047............See Notice of May 16, p. 296...........................
13059............See Notice of Mar. 13, p. 289..........................
13067............See Notice of Oct. 29, p. 315..........................
13069............See Notice of Sept. 23, p. 310.........................
13088............See Notice of May 27, p. 296...........................
13094............See Notice of Nov. 6, p. 326...........................
13098............See Notice of Sept. 23, p. 310.........................
13099............See Notice of Jan. 18, p. 277..........................
13129............See EO 13268...........................................
13159............See Notice of June 18, p. 301..........................
13180............Amended by EO 13264....................................
13192............See Notice of May 27, p. 296...........................
13194............See Notice of Jan. 15, p. 276..........................
13213............See Notice of Jan. 15, p. 276..........................
13219............See Notice of June 21, p. 302..........................
13222............See Notice of Aug. 14, p. 306..........................

[[Page 365]]

13223............Amended by EO 13253; See Notice of Sept. 12, p. 308....
13224............Amended by EO 13268; See Notice of Sept. 19, p. 309....
13227............Amended by EO 13255....................................
13228............See EO 13257...........................................
13235............See Notice of Sept. 12, p. 308.........................
13241............Amended by: EO 13261...................................
13242............Amended by: EO 13261...................................
13243............Amended by: EO 13261...................................
13244............Amended by: EO 13261...................................
13245............Amended by: EO 13261...................................
13246............Amended by: EO 13261...................................
13247............Amended by: EO 13261...................................
13249............Superseded by: EO 13282................................
13250............Amended by: EO 13261...................................
13251............Amended by: EO 13261...................................
13253............See Notice of Sept. 12, p. 308.........................
                      Other Presidential Documents

                             Date or Number

                                         Comment

Presidential DeteSee Notice of May 27, p. 296...........................
Presidential DeteSee Presidential Determination No. 02-31, p. 308.......

[[Page 367]]

                         Title 3--The President


     Table 5--STATUTES CITED AS AUTHORITY FOR PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS


________________________________________________________________________


Editorial note: Statutes which were cited as authority for the issuance 
of Presidential documents contained in this volume are listed under one 
of these headings. For authority cites for hortatory proclamations, see 
the text of each proclamation:

    United States Code
    United States Statutes at Large
    Public Laws
    Short Title of Act

Citations have been set forth in the style in which they appear in the 
documents. Since the form of citations varies from document to document, 
users of this table should search under all headings for pertinent 
references.


________________________________________________________________________


                           United States Code
 
      U.S. Code Citation                 Presidential Document
 
3 U.S.C. 301.................  EO's 13253, 13268, 13276; Procs. 7524,
                                7529, 7576, 7586; Presidential
                                Determination No. 02-25, p. 303;
                                Memorandum of July 23, p. 305
5 U.S.C. 3345 et. seq........  EO 13261; Memorandum of November 26, p.
                                328
5 U.S.C. 7103(b)(1)..........  EO 13252
8 U.S.C. 1182(f).............  Proc. 7524; EO 13276
8 U.S.C. 1185(a)(1)..........  EO 13276
8 U.S.C. 1440................  EO 13269
10 U.S.C. 801-946............  EO 13262
15 U.S.C. 78dd-1(f)(1)(B)(ii)  EO 13259
15 U.S.C. 78dd-2(h)(2)(B)(ii)  EO 13259
15 U.S.C. 78dd-3(f)(2)(B)(ii)  EO 13259
19 U.S.C. 2122 Note..........  Proc. 7554
19 U.S.C. 2253...............  Proc. 7585
19 U.S.C. 2466a(a)(1)........  Proc. 7561
19 U.S.C. 2483...............  Procs. 7553, 7554, 7616
19 U.S.C. 3706...............  Proc. 7561
22 U.S.C. 287c...............  EO 13268
22 U.S.C. 7103...............  EO 13257
29 U.S.C. 176................  EO 13275
50 U.S.C. App. 5(b) note.....  Presidential Determination No. 02-31, p.
                                308

[[Page 368]]

 
50 U.S.C. 191................  EO 13273
50 U.S.C. 1601 et. seq.......  EO's 13253, 13268
50 U.S.C. 1701 et. seq.......  EO 13268
 


                               Public Laws
 
          Law Number                     Presidential Document
 
99-190, sec. 118.............  Proc. 7553
104-45, sec. 7(a)............  Presidential Determination No. 03-08, p.
                                338
105-338......................  Presidential Determination Nos. 03-05, p.
                                331, 03-06, p. 331
107-206......................  Presidential Determination No. 02-27, p.
                                306
107-210......................  EO 13277
107-228, sec. 604............  Presidential Determination No. 03-04, p.
                                330
 


                           Short Title of Act
 
              Title                        Presidential Document
 
Trade Act of 1974...............  ......................................
 Sec. 203                         Procs. 7529, 7576
 Sec. 604                         Procs. 7529, 7576, 7586, 7626
 Title V                          Proc. 7586
 


[[Page 369]]

                      LIST OF CFR SECTIONS AFFECTED


________________________________________________________________________


Editorial note: All changes in this volume of the Code of Federal 
Regulations which were made by documents published in the Federal 
Register since January 1, 2001, are enumerated in the following list. 
Entries indicate the nature of the changes effected. Page numbers refer 
to Federal Register pages. The user should consult the entries for 
chapters and parts as well as sections for revisions.
  For the period before January 1, 2001, see the ``List of CFR Sections 
Affected, 1949-1963, 1964-1972, 1973-1985, and 1986-2000,'' published in 
11 separate volumes.
  Presidential documents affected during 2002 are set forth in Table 4 
on page 363.


________________________________________________________________________


                                2001-2002
3 CFR

                         (No regulations issued)


Index

[[Page 371]]

A

Adoption Month, National (Proc. 7619)
Afghanistan
     Military assistance (Presidential Determination No. 02-18, p. 295 )
     Narcotics certification (Presidential Determination No. 02-07, p. 279)
     Normal trade relations (Proc. 7553)
     Taliban; termination of national emergency (E.O. 13268)
African American History Month, National (Proc. 7522)
African Growth and Opportunity Act; implementation of modifications (Proc. 
7626)
Agriculture, Department of
     Classification of national security information (Order of Sept. 26, p. 
311)
     Faith-based and community initiatives, responsibilities with respect to 
(E.O. 13280)
Air Traffic Organization; amendment (E.O. 13264)
Airborne Day, National (Proc. 7582)
Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month, National (Proc. 7589)
Aliens. See Immigration and naturalization
Alzheimer's Disease