[House Report 110-231]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]





110th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    110-231

======================================================================


  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2008

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                     MINORITY AND ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [to accompany h.r. 3043]




 July 13, 2007.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed




    DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION,
             AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2008





110th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    110-231

======================================================================



 
  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2008

                                _______
                                

 July 13, 2007.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Obey, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                     MINORITY AND ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 3043]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services (except the Food and Drug Administration, the Agency 
for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry and the Indian Health 
Service), and Education, Committee for Purchase from People Who 
Are Blind or Severely Disabled, Corporation for National and 
Community Service, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Federal 
Mediation and Conciliation Service, Federal Mine Safety and 
Health Review Commission, Institute of Museum and Library 
Services, Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, National 
Council on Disability, National Labor Relations Board, National 
Mediation Board, Occupational Safety and Health Review 
Commission, Railroad Retirement Board, and the Social Security 
Administration for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2008, 
and for other purposes.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

_______________________________________________________________________


                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Summary of Estimates and Appropriations....................
                                                                      3
General Summary of the Bill................................
                                                                      3
Administration-Directed Spending...........................
                                                                      4
Crosscutting Initiatives...................................
                                                                      6
Title I--Department of Labor:
        Employment and Training Administration.............     2
                                                                     34
        Employee Benefits Security Administration..........    12
                                                                     45
        Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation...............    12
                                                                     46
        Employment Standards Administration................    13
                                                                     47
        Occupational Safety and Health Administration......    19
                                                                     51
        Mine Safety and Health Administration..............    23
                                                                     54
        Bureau of Labor Statistics.........................    24
                                                                     55
        Office of Disability Employment Policy.............    25
                                                                     56
        Departmental Management............................    25
                                                                     56
                Veterans Employment and Training...........    27
                                                                     61
                Office of the Inspector General............    28
                                                                     61
        General provisions.................................    28
                                                                     62
Title II--Department of Health and Human Services:
        Health Resources and Services Administration.......    33
                                                                     63
        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.........    38
                                                                     96
        National Institutes of Health......................    41
                                                                    125
        Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
            Administration.................................    48
                                                                    174
        Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.........    50
                                                                    183
        Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.........    50
                                                                    185
        Administration for Children and Families...........    54
                                                                    189
        Administration on Aging............................    62
                                                                    204
        Office of the Secretary............................    62
                                                                    208
                Office of the Inspector General............    64
                                                                    214
        Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund...    65
                                                                    215
        General provisions.................................    67
                                                                    219
Title III--Department of Education:
        Education for the Disadvantaged....................    77
                                                                    221
        Impact Aid.........................................    78
                                                                    228
        School Improvement Programs........................    79
                                                                    229
        Indian Education...................................    81
                                                                    234
        Innovation and Improvement.........................    81
                                                                    235
        Safe Schools and Citizenship Education.............    83
                                                                    244
        English Language Acquisition.......................    84
                                                                    247
        Special Education..................................    84
                                                                    248
        Rehabilitation Services and Disability Research....    85
                                                                    250
        Special Institutions for Persons With Disabilities.    86
                                                                    253
        Career and Technical Education and Adult Education.    86
                                                                    254
        Student Financial Assistance.......................    89
                                                                    257
        Student Aid Administration.........................    89
                                                                    259
        Higher Education...................................    90
                                                                    259
        Howard University..................................    91
                                                                    270
        College Housing and Academic Facilities Loans......    91
                                                                    270
        Historically Black College and University Capital 
            Financing......................................    91
                                                                    270
        Institute of Education Sciences....................    92
                                                                    271
        Departmental Management............................    92
                                                                    274
        Office for Civil Rights............................    92
                                                                    275
        Office of the Inspector General....................    93
                                                                    275
        General provisions.................................    93
                                                                    275
Title IV--Related agencies:
        Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or 
            Severely Disabled..............................    97
                                                                    276
        Corporation for National and Community Service.....    97
                                                                    276
        Corporation for Public Broadcasting................   103
                                                                    279
        Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service.........   104
                                                                    280
        Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission...   106
                                                                    280
        Institute of Museum and Library Services...........   106
                                                                    280
        Medicare Payment Advisory Commission...............   106
                                                                    282
        National Commission on Libraries and Information 
            Science........................................
                                                                    283
        National Council on Disability.....................   107
                                                                    283
        National Labor Relations Board.....................   107
                                                                    283
        National Mediation Board...........................   108
                                                                    284
        Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission...   108
                                                                    284
        Railroad Retirement Board..........................   108
                                                                    284
        Social Security Administration.....................   110
                                                                    285
Title V--General Provisions:
        House of Representatives Report Requirements.......
                                                                    289

                Summary of Estimates and Appropriations

    The following table compares on a summary basis the 
appropriations including trust funds for fiscal year 2007, the 
budget request for fiscal year 2008 and the Committee 
recommendation for fiscal year 2008 in the accompanying bill.

                                 2008 LABOR, HHS, EDUCATION APPROPRIATIONS BILL
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year--                 2008 committee compared
                                            -----------------------------------------            to--
                                                                                     ---------------------------
                                                 2007       2008 budget      2008         2007
                                              comparable                  committee    comparable    2008 budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor........................      $14,691       $13,942       $14,891        +$200         +$949
    Advances...............................        2,531         2,525         2,525           -6             0
Department of Health and Human Services....      422,185       472,056       477,406      +55,221        +5,350
    Advances...............................       69,456        71,457        71,457       +2,001             0
Department of Education....................       60,310        59,099        62,971       +2,661        +3,872
    Advances...............................       15,034        15,034        17,004       +1,970        +1,970
Related Agencies...........................       48,774        52,492        52,659       +3,885          +167
    Advances...............................       17,210        14,800        15,220       -1,990          +420
Grand Total, current year..................      545,960       597,589       607,927      +61,967       +10,338
    Advances...............................      104,231       103,816       106,206       +1,975        +2,390
Current year total using 302(b)                  545,834       596,394       607,428      +61,594       +11,034
 scorekeeping..............................
    Mandatory..............................      401,224       455,478       455,680      +54,456          +202
    Discretionary..........................      144,610       140,916       151,748       +7,138       +10,832
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                           PROGRAM LEVEL DISCRETIONARY
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year--                 2008 committee compared
                                            -----------------------------------------            to--
                                                                                     ---------------------------
                                                 2007       2008 budget      2008         2007
                                              comparable                  committee    comparable    2008 budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor........................      $11,686       $10,964       $11,913        +$227         +$949
Department of Health and Human Services....       64,054        63,195        68,344       +4,290        +5,149
Department of Education....................       57,473        56,225        62,068       +4,595        +5,843
Related Agencies...........................       11,522        11,326        11,913         +391          +587
    Subtotal Program Level.................     $144,735      $141,710      $154,238      +$9,503      +$12,528
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      General Summary of the Bill

    Funding levels in the fiscal year 2008 appropriation bill 
for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, 
Education and Related Agencies reflect the Committee's efforts 
to understand the challenges that the nation faces over the 
next ten years and what the nation must do to address them. 
While reducing the Federal deficit is a worthy goal, the nation 
has a number of other deficits that are equally important--
deficits in worker development, safety and protection; deficits 
in health access, affordability and quality; and deficits in 
educational access and opportunity. In this bill, theCommittee 
makes crucial investments in priority programs that will help to begin 
the process of erasing these deficits over the next several years.
    Bill total.--Total funding, including offsets, for the 
Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2008 is $607,428,474,000.
    Discretionary programs.--For Discretionary accounts for 
fiscal year 2008 the bill provides $151,748,000,000, including 
offsets. This is $7,137,515,000 and 4.9 percent above the 
fiscal year 2007 comparable level.
    Mandatory programs.--The bill provides $455,680,474,000 for 
entitlement programs in fiscal year 2008. This is 
$54,456,359,000 above the fiscal year 2007 comparable level. 
Funding requirements for entitlement programs are determined by 
the basic authorizing statutes. Mandatory programs include 
general fund support for the Medicare and Medicaid programs, 
Supplemental Security Income, Trade Adjustment Assistance and 
Black Lung payments. The following chart indicates the funding 
levels for the major mandatory programs in fiscal years 2007 
and 2008.

                                                    MANDATORY
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                           Fiscal year 2007   Fiscal year 2008        Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor:
    Federal Unemployment Benefits and Allowances.......           $837,600           $888,700           +$51,100
    Advances to the UI and other trust funds...........            465,000            437,000            -28,000
    Special Benefits...................................            227,000            203,000            -24,000
    Special Benefits for Disabled Coal Miners..........            229,373            208,221            -21,152
    Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation             102,307            104,745             +2,438
     Fund..............................................
    Black Lung Disability Trust Fund...................          1,069,546          1,068,000             -1,546
Department of Health and Human Services:
    Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund.............             55,871             57,547             +1,676
    Medicaid current law benefits......................        155,467,869        194,109,000        +38,641,131
    Medicaid State and local administration............          9,881,583         10,014,716           +133,133
    CMS Vaccines for Children..........................          2,905,330          2,763,957           -141,373
    Medicare Payments to Healthcare Trust Funds........        176,298,480        188,828,000        +12,529,520
    Welfare Payments...................................             39,000             39,000                  0
    Child Support Enforcement..........................          4,424,678          3,910,713           -513,965
    Social Services Block Grant........................          1,700,000          1,700,000                  0
    Promoting Safe and Stable Families.................            345,000            345,000                  0
    Payments to States for Foster Care and Adoption....          4,912,000          5,082,000           +170,000
    Medical Benefits for Commissioned Officers.........            370,698            402,542            +31,844
Department of Education:
    Vocational Rehabilitation..........................          2,837,160          2,837,160                  0
Related Agencies:
    Federal Payments to the Railroad Retirement Account                150                150                  0
    Payments to Social Security Trust Funds............             20,470             28,140             +7,670
    Supplemental Security Income.......................         37,231,000         40,738,000         +3,507,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    Administration-Directed Spending

    Directed spending.--The Committee notes that Congress has 
made significant reforms in the way it reviews funding for the 
Federal government; reforms which the Committee takes very 
seriously as it executes its constitutional authority. For 
example, the Committee has committed to reducing the number of 
earmarks in order to ensure that these projects are adequately 
vetted and evaluated. Nonetheless, earmarking or directed 
spending of Federal dollars does not begin with Congress. It 
begins with the Executive Branch.
    For example, the Administration's own fiscal year 2008 
request for this bill includes a number of requests to earmark 
funds to certain organizations. These earmark requests include: 
$10,000,000 for Reach Out and Read; $10,000,000 for Teach for 
America; $8,900,000 for the Points of Light Foundation; 
$4,450,000 for America's Promise; $1,774,000 for the Mind-Body 
Institute; and, $1,429,000 for the YMCA of America.
    The Executive Branch also engages in another practice which 
steers or directs money to specific entities or purposes 
through a process of providing grants or contracts to support 
various activities and services. The practice of contracting 
has increased significantly in the past five years. For 
example, Department of Health and Human Services contract 
obligations have more than doubled from $4,970,200,000 in 
fiscal year 2001 to $13,199,400,000 in fiscal year 2006. The 
number of contract employees at HHS exceeds 32,000, about half 
the number of civil service employees. A significant share of 
these contracts was awarded on a non-competitive basis. In 
fiscal year 2006 alone, HHS awarded nearly 21,000 contracts 
worth $1,954,600,000 with less than full and open competition. 
In contrast, this bill is expected to limit Congressionally-
directed earmarks by Members of the House of Representatives to 
approximately one quarter of that amount.
    The Committee also notes recent audits and reports that 
have revealed egregious, potentially extralegal activities, 
which were aimed at steering funding to specific individuals 
and entities through non-competitive grants and contracts.
    For example, between September 2006 and March 2007, the 
Department of Education Office of Inspector General (OIG) 
completed one of its most exhaustive investigations, which 
resulted in six separate audits of the reading first program. 
These audits documented efforts by the Department of Education 
to steer billions in reading first funds for the purchase of 
certain reading textbooks and assessments in order to benefit 
favored publishers and individuals.
    In September 2006, the Department of Education OIG found 
that the Department's program officials strongarmed States and 
school districts until they selected the reading textbooks and 
assessments favored by Administration officials. (Office of 
Inspector General, U.S. Department of Education, Final 
Inspection Report, The Reading First Program's Grant 
Application Process (2006)). After further investigation of 
reading first, the OIG found that Department of Education 
administrators improperly promoted commercial reading programs 
in potential violation of Federal law (Office of Inspector 
General, U.S. Department of Education, Final Inspection Report, 
The Department's Administration of Selected Aspects of the 
Reading First Program (2007)). For example, the Madison School 
District in Wisconsin had substantial data demonstrating that 
its students were learning at the rate that reading first was 
aiming for. Nonetheless, the district lost its $2,000,000 
reading first grant when the district would not purchase the 
unproven commercial reading program promoted by the Department 
of Education's contractors. Across the country, including in 
Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maine and New Jersey, States 
and districts with programs that were not on the Department's 
preferential list were either rejected for grants or pressured 
to change their methods even though some argued, as did 
Wisconsin, that their programs met the law's standard. This is 
the type of pressure that the OIG found to be in potential 
violation of Federal law.
    Finally, the OIG found significant bias and conflicts of 
interest on the part of contractors and their subcontractors 
who were hired to provide unbiased technical assistance to 
States and school districts, potentially in violation of 
Federal law (Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of 
Education, Final Inspection Report, RMC Research Corporation's 
Administration of Reading First Program Contracts (2007)).
    Recently, ABC News reported that, after receiving millions 
of dollars in reading first contracts, one publisher with 
political connections to the Administration sold his company--
once valued at $5,000,000--for $360,000,000. (ABC World News 
With Charles Gibson (May 2007)). Some of these same publishers 
and individuals continue to reap financial gains under reading 
first because the Administration has failed to address ongoing 
conflicts of interest.
    The seriousness of the OIG's findings is underscored by 
reports that the OIG has made criminal referrals to the Justice 
Department as a result of these investigations.
    At the same time that the Department of Education was 
promoting certain reading products that lacked evidence of 
their validity, reading programs such as Reading Recovery and 
Success for All with strong evidence of effectiveness, 
according to the Department's own what works clearinghouse, 
were virtually shut out of reading first. In fact, Department 
of Education data show that schools without Reading first funds 
were more likely to use Reading Recovery and Success for All--
proven approaches--than were schools receiving reading first 
grants.
    The Committee finds, however, that efforts to steer funding 
to favored entities are not limited to the Department of 
Education. Recently, the Congressional Research Service 
documented an unusually large number of sole source grants 
issued by the Employment and Training Administration within the 
Department of Labor, which resulted in 90 percent of 
discretionary funds for the High Growth Job Training Initiative 
being awarded on a non-competitive basis over a five-year 
period.
    Finally, the Committee notes that this bill contains more 
than $68,000,000,000 for discretionary grant programs under 
which all or a portion of the funds are allocated on a 
discretionary basis to grantees selected by the Administration. 
Altogether, the Administration steers or directs far greater 
spending to specific projects, individuals, and companies than 
is directed or earmarked by Congress.

                        CROSSCUTTING INITIATIVES

    The following section of the report highlights nine 
initiatives within the bill that target various needs of the 
American people--access to different types of health care and 
public health preparedness, biomedical research to inform and 
improve that health care, education for kindergarteners through 
twelfth graders and post-secondary students, and training and 
protecting adult workers. A number of programs supported by the 
bill appear more than once in the initiatives, appropriately so 
because some of the programs have broad, multi-layered 
missions. For example, community health centers are an 
important source of primary care for the uninsured. They also 
provide dental care in many communities, as well as pre-natal 
care to mothers considering how to manage their pregnancy. All 
these programs stand on their own, but also participate in 
individual or multiple cross-cutting initiatives that serve 
those most in need.

           INCREASING ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE FOR THE UNINSURED

    The Committee includes a $622,875,000 increase over fiscal 
year 2007 and $645,302,000 over the request for critical safety 
net health programs in order to respond to the nation's 
healthcare crisis.
    Twenty years ago, fewer than 30 million Americans lacked 
health care insurance. Today, Census Bureau data show that 
there are approximately 46.6 million uninsured Americans. This 
means life-saving care is out of reach for almost 16 percent or 
one in six Americans. If current trends continue, the ranks of 
the uninsured will balloon to 56 million by 2013.
    To date, the Federal government has responded to the health 
insurance crisis by patching the frayed safety net of health 
programs, chiefly through Medicaid and the State Children's 
Health Insurance Program (SCHIP).
    Nationally, 50 million Americans, including 24 million 
children, will be enrolled in Medicaid during fiscal year 2008. 
An average of 4.4 million children were enrolled in the SCHIP 
program at a particular point in time last year. However, these 
programs do not generally cover adults without children or 
those with incomes above $20,420, which is 200 percent of the 
Federal poverty level for one person. In addition, 1.8 million 
eligible children are not yet enrolled in either Medicaid or 
SCHIP.
    The Committee first addressed the problem of the uninsured 
by funding State planning grants during fiscal years 2000 to 
2005. States used these grants to collect data about the 
characteristics of the uninsured within their State and to 
develop proposals to offer affordable health insurance 
coverage.
    Planning grants were the genesis of some of the 
comprehensive programs States like Massachusetts, Maine, 
Vermont, and California are now putting in place. These 
programs rely on a mix of State, Federal, participant, and 
provider/insurer contributions. Other States were not able, for 
fiscal or political reasons, to move beyond initial planning 
activities but are now ready to undertake more serious health 
system reform efforts.
    The Committee believes that now is the time to build on the 
earlier State planning grants program to help States make 
further advances in covering uninsured Americans. Due to the 
considerable differences in the share of the population that 
has access to employer-based health insurance, the share 
covered by government benefit programs, and the geographic 
distribution of health care providers, these new State grants 
will be able to target programs in a way that is specific to 
their particular needs.
    State health access grants.--The Committee bill provides 
$75,000,000 for a State health access initiative to be 
administered by the Health Resources and Services 
Administration. Grants would be awarded competitively to States 
that demonstrate they have a program design ready to implement 
and that they have achieved the necessary State and local 
statutory or regulatory changes to permit their project to move 
forward. The types of activities that could be supported 
through the Federal grant include ``three share'' community 
coverage (State/Federal, employer and beneficiary), reinsurance 
plans, subsidized high risk insurance pools, health insurance 
premium assistance, creation of a state insurance ``connector'' 
authority to develop benefit packages for small employers, 
development of statewide or automated enrollment systems for 
public assistance programs and innovative strategies to insure 
low-income childless adults.
    State high risk insurance pools.--The Committee provides 
funding for a second important health care access program--
$50,000,000 to support State high risk insurance pools. This 
program was not funded in fiscal year 2007. The Administration 
did not request funding for fiscal year 2008.
    The Committee feels it is important to provide a Federal 
contribution to this health care safety net program. 33 States 
currently operate high-risk pools that act as the health 
insurers of last resort for almost 200,000 individuals who have 
lost or are ineligible for group insurance coverage, and who 
are medically high-risk and unable to purchase individual 
health insurance in the commercial market. The program also 
produces the side benefit of reducing costs for insured people 
by providing coverage to individuals who would otherwise be 
uninsured and very costly to care for--thus reducing the cost-
shifting that results in higher premiums to those with 
coverage. High-risk pools are a successful public/private 
partnership. All risk pool participants pay a monthly premium, 
capped at 125 to 200 percent of the average market premium. 
Insurers and health care providers support the program through 
assessments, and some States contribute to their pools. Federal 
funding allows States with high risk pools to reduce premiums 
charged to participants and to improve benefits.
    The Committee has also tried to deal with the problem of 
the uninsured by expanding existing safety net programs that 
provide health care to uninsured and disadvantaged populations:

                               ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE FOR THE UNINSURED INITIATIVE
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                2008 Committee compared to--
                     Agency/Program                       Fiscal Year 2008 -------------------------------------
                                                             Committee       Fiscal Year 2007     2008 Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Health and Human Services................          6,423,769           +602,875           +625,302
    Health Resources and Services Administration:
        State Health Access Grants.....................             75,000            +75,000            +75,000
        State High Risk Insurance Pools................             50,000            +50,000            +50,000
        Community Health Centers.......................          2,188,000           +199,961           +199,533
        Ryan White AIDS Programs.......................          2,237,086            +99,291            +79,174
        Maternal & Child Health Block Grant............            750,000            +57,000            +57,000
        Healthy Start..................................            120,000            +18,482            +19,497
        Family Planning................................            310,910            +27,764            +27,807
        National Health Service Corps..................            131,500             +5,827            +15,541
        CDC Childhood Immunization.....................            516,273            +58,750            +91,150
        Medicare SHIP Programs.........................             45,000            +10,800            +10,600
Department of Labor....................................             20,000            +20,000            +20,000
    Gap Filler Grants for TAA Health Coverage Tax                   20,000            +20,000            +20,000
     Credit\1\
                                                        ========================================================
Total..................................................          6,443,769           +622,875          +645,302
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Funding for these grants comes from H1B fee revenues under the American Competitiveness and Workforce
  Improvement Act.

    Community health centers.--A $199,961,000 or 10.1 percent 
increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for community health 
centers (CHCs). CHCs now provide primary and dental care for 
over 16 million patients, 75 percent of whom are either 
uninsured or on Medicaid. This increase will expand services to 
an additional one million patients in the neediest and most 
underserved areas, providing a critical point of primary care 
for many uninsured Americans.
    Ryan White AIDS Act.--A $99,291,000 or 4.7 percent increase 
over the fiscal year 2007 level is provided for the Ryan White 
AIDS programs. The Committee provides the maximum authorized 
level for the Ryan White Act. These programs provide vital 
health services to over 500,000 people with HIV or AIDS, 
including medications, primary care, dental services, mental 
health care, home health care and health insurance continuation 
grants.
    Maternal and child health (MCH) block grant.--A $57,000,000 
or 8.2 percent increase over the fiscal year 2007 level is 
provided for the maternal and child health block grant. States 
use the block grant to improve access to care for mothers, 
children, and their families; reduce infant mortality; provide 
pre- and post-natal care; support screening and health 
assessments for children; and provide systems of care for 
children with special health care needs. Approximately 28 
million children are served by MCH block grant funding.
    Healthy start.--A $18,482,000 or 18.2 percent increase over 
the fiscal year 2007 level is provided for the Healthy Start 
program. Healthy Start provides discretionary grants to 
communities with high rates of infant mortality to provide 
ongoing sources of primary and preventive health care to 
mothers and their infants. The increase provided will support 
almost 20 new grants to communities. Healthy Start is a 
significant source of health care for uninsured mothers who 
have extensive need for the costly medical care associated with 
their pregnancies.
    Family planning.--A $27,764,000 increase over fiscal year 
2007 is recommended for the family planning program. The 
program provides grants to public and private non-profit 
agencies to support a range of family planning and reproductive 
services, as well as related preventive health services such as 
patient education and counseling, breast and cervical cancer 
examinations, STD and HIV prevention education, counseling and 
testing and referral, and pregnancy diagnosis and counseling. 
More than five million people receive services from Title X 
each year.
    National health service corps.--A $5,827,000 or 4.6 percent 
increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for the national 
health service corps (NHSC). The NHSC supports 4,600 clinicians 
across the country who provide medical and dental services to 
four million people in low-income and underserved communities. 
NHSC clinicians provide services in underserved areas as 
repayment for loan repayments or scholarships.
    CDC childhood immunization.--A $58,750,000 or 13 percent 
increase above the fiscal year 2007 level is provided for the 
discretionary CDC immunization program, which provides vaccines 
to children, adolescents, and adults who are not eligible for 
the vaccines for children mandatory program and cannot 
otherwise afford the cost of immunization. In 1999, 747,000 
children were fully vaccinated through this program. However, 
by 2006, only an estimated 279,000 children were served--a 63 
percent reduction. The resources provided in the bill will 
enable an additional 42,000 children and adults to receive 
recommended vaccinations. The Committee intends this to be an 
initial step toward restoring services under this important 
safety net program.
    Medicare SHIP program.--An $10,800,000 or 32 percent 
increase above the fiscal year 2007 funding level is provided 
for the State Health Insurance program (SHIP). The program 
operates in every State to provide health insurance counseling 
to help the 45 million Medicare beneficiaries understand and 
utilize their Medicare benefits, including Medicare preventive 
benefits.
    TAA health coverage tax credit.--The bill provides that 
$20,000,000 of funds available to the Department of Labor under 
the American Competitiveness and Workforce Improvement Act of 
1998 may be used for ``gap filler'' grants to help more trade-
impacted workers take advantage of the Health Coverage Tax 
Credit. Various studies show that as few as 10-12 percent of 
Trade Assistance Act participants currently take advantage of 
the Health Coverage Tax Credit that was authorized by the Trade 
Adjustment Assistance Reform Act of 2002.

                    IMPROVING ACCESS TO DENTAL CARE

    The Committee bill includes a $264,288,000 or 9.0 percent 
increase over the fiscal year 2007 level for several programs 
and new initiatives to expand urgently needed dental health 
services. The increase over the Administration's request is 
$367,280,000.
    Oral disease is a ``silent epidemic'' impacting the most 
vulnerable Americans--poor children, the elderly, and many 
members of racial and ethnic minorities. Lack of dental care is 
not a minor problem. Children have died because of infections 
brought on by the absence of dental services.
    More Americans are without dental insurance than health 
insurance. For every child without health insurance there are 
at least 2.6 children without dental insurance. For adults, 
there are at least three lacking dental insurance for every one 
without medical coverage.
    Since oral health is progressive and becomes more complex 
over time, a prolonged lack of dental care can threaten an 
individual's overall health status.
    This bill expands critical dental services to these 
underserved populations and takes a first step toward 
alleviating the crisis in dental health.

                                             DENTAL CARE INITIATIVE
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                2008 Committee compared to--
                     Agency/Program                       Fiscal Year 2008 -------------------------------------
                                                             Committee       Fiscal Year 2007     2008 Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Health Resources and Services Administration:
    Community Health Centers...........................          2,188,000           +199,961           +199,533
    Maternal and Child Health Block Grant..............            750,000            +57,000            +57,000
        Pediatric Dentistry Leadership Training                        610                  0                  0
         Programs [nonadd].............................
        Oral Health Service Grants [nonadd]............             12,000             +7,000              +7000
    National Health Service Corps......................            131,500             +5,827            +15,541
    Ryan White AIDS Programs AIDS Dental Services......             13,086                  0                  0
    Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students............             46,657                  0            +36,924
    Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry....             48,851                  0            +48,851
    Public health, preventive med. & dental pgms.......              7,920                  0             +7,920
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:
    Oral Health........................................             13,140             +1,500             +1,511
                                                        ========================================================
    Total..............................................          3,199,154           +264,288           +367,280
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Community health centers.--A $199,961,000 or 10.1 percent 
increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for community health 
centers (CHCs), which provide access to high quality, family 
oriented care for at-risk, low-income Americans. In calendar 
year 2005, 17 percent of all CHC patients were receiving dental 
services and 73 percent of all CHCs offered on-site dental 
services. All new CHCs are required to provide primary oral 
health care services in order to expand access to low-income 
individuals. The funding increase for the program will also 
permit existing centers to initiate or expand dental services.
    Maternal and child health block grant.--A $57,000,000 or 
8.2 percent increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for the 
maternal and child health (MCH) block grant. Within the MCH 
special projects demonstration authority, $12,000,000 is 
provided for up to 25 competitive State grants to help expand 
access to oral health services. These grants can be used to: 
encourage more dentists to practice in shortage areas through 
existing mechanisms or new demonstrations of loan forgiveness 
and repayment; provide grants to establish or expand oral 
health services in community-based facilities; expand dental 
residency programs; integrate oral health services into the 
medical home concept for children with special health care 
needs; and provide grants to ensure low-income pregnant women 
and women of child-bearing age have access to appropriate oral 
health services. The block grant also provides approximately 
$1,000,000 for pediatric dentistry leadership training 
programs. These programs fund a variety of oral health grants 
that support the infrastructure of State and local oral health 
programs and facilitate training in general pediatric dentistry 
to serve the population served by the maternal and child health 
block grant.
    National health service corps.--A $5,827,000 or 4.6 percent 
increase is provided for the national health service corps 
(NHSC). The Corps provides physicians, dentists, nurses and 
other clinicians who serve in health professional shortage 
areas in every State. The NHSC provides access to primary care 
and dental services for underserved populations who are not 
able to get care because of the costs of services, the small 
share of clinicians who pursue primary care or dentistry, and 
the geographic misdistribution of health professionals. More 
than 10 percent of the current 4,600 NHSC assignees are 
dentists.
    AIDS dental services.--$13,086,000 is provided for AIDS 
dental services. The program includes two components: the 
dental reimbursement program, which reimburses dental education 
programs for non-reimbursed costs incurred in providing care to 
AIDS patients; and the community-based dental partnership, 
which increases access for AIDS patients to oral health 
services and provider training in community settings. This 
program provides dental services to 31,000 HIV positive 
patients.
    Scholarships for disadvantaged students.--$46,657,000 is 
provided for the scholarships for disadvantaged students 
program, the same as fiscal year 2007 and a $36,924,000 
increase over the President's request. This program includes 
scholarships to disadvantaged dental and dental hygiene 
students. In 2006, 653 dental students and 110 dental hygiene 
students received scholarships.
    Training in primary care medicine and dentistry.--
$48,851,000 is provided for training in primary care medicine 
and dentistry, which includes both general dentistry programs 
and pediatric dentistry programs. The Administration's request 
did not include funding for this program.
    Public health, preventive medicine and dental programs.--
$7,920,000 is provided for the public health, preventive 
medicine and dental programs. The President did not request 
funding for this program. The dental public health programs 
support the education and training of the public health 
workforce, with an emphasis on placing public health dentists 
in medically underserved areas. These programs support students 
with traineeships and fellowships in programs that have 
demonstrated they serve underrepresented minorities and those 
entering practice in underserved areas.
    Oral health.--A $1,500,000 or 13 percent increase over the 
fiscal year 2007 level is provided for the oral health program 
within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The oral 
health program supports leadership and staff of State oral 
health programs in monitoring, improving, and evaluating oral 
health programs. The CDC works with all States to develop 
programs to reach children at high risk for oral disease, to 
expand the fluoridation of community water systems, and to 
track oral diseases. In addition to these activities, the CDC 
also provides funds to States to support their oral health 
programs.

                     ADVANCING BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH

    The knowledge foundation that underlies the treatments 
provided by virtually every doctor in the nation is the result 
of advances in biomedical research conducted in large part by 
the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In fiscal year 1999, 
Congress made a commitment to double the NIH budget over five 
years in order to capitalize on scientific advances so that 
they could be translated into treatment and cures for 
debilitating diseases like Parkinson's, cancer, Alzheimer's and 
diabetes. This investment has helped NIH to lead the way toward 
important medical discoveries that improve people's health and 
save lives. For example, the first map of the human genome has 
been completed, much more is known about the links between 
genetics, molecular processes and diseases, and new techniques 
have been developed in biomedical imaging.
    Since the completion of the doubling period, however, 
Congress has reversed direction. The NIH enterprise has 
languished with inadequate budget increases since fiscal year 
2003, and even received a funding cut in fiscal year 2006, the 
first cut in 36 years. As a result of shrinking resources in 
real terms, young researchers drawn to the field during the 
expansion and even their senior mentors are now seeing their 
research applications being rejected. Universities who have 
made investments in their research enterprise now wonder if 
they took on a bad risk.
    The Committee has made the difficult choices necessary to 
provide a $750,000,000 increase over fiscal year 2007 for NIH. 
This level is $1,028,646,000, over the President's request and 
the largest increase in four years. The Committee hopes to put 
NIH on a path of stable, sustainable funding rather than the 
feast or famine approach of the last decade.
    The sizeable investment the Committee makes in biomedical 
research for fiscal year 2008 will accomplish a number of 
important goals. First, it will increase the number of new and 
competing research grants by approximately 545 new grants over 
last year for a total of 10,666. Total new and continuing 
grants will rise to 39,003. The Committee also funds a two 
percent increase in the average cost of new research grants, 
which has been frozen for two years.
    In addition, the Committee reaffirms its strong support for 
the National Children's Study by providing $110,900,000 for 
this critical investment for which the Administration proposed 
no funds. The study will examine important health issues, 
including: birth defects and pregnancy-related problems, 
injuries, asthma, obesity and diabetes, and behavior, learning, 
and mental health disorders. By establishing links between 
children's environments and their health, and charting their 
development through infancy, childhood, and early adulthood, 
the study hopes to determine the root causes of many childhood 
and adult diseases. The Committee also provides $300,000,000 
for the global fund for AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. 
Consistent with the new NIH authorization, the bill provides 
$495,153,000 for the Common Fund, which will be the incubator 
for the promising cross-disciplinary research of the future.
    The Committee believes the next generation of medical 
advances will depend, in part, on the next generation of new 
researchers. The bill continues funding for several 
initiatives--Bridge awards, New Innovator awards, and Pathways 
to Independence--to ensure that new, talented researchers in 
the pipeline are sustained and supported. The Committee also 
provides an average two percent increase for research training 
stipends, which have been frozen since 2004. Support for high-
risk, high reward research will be maintained through Pioneer 
awards. In addition, the bill increases funding for NIH's 
research infrastructure to ensure adequate facilities for NIH-
supported scientists.

                    Reducing the Need for Abortions

    The Committee bill includes a $647,021,000, increase over 
the fiscal year 2007 level, and $1,374,882,000 over the 
request, for several programs and new initiatives that are 
intended to help reduce the number of abortions in America by 
alleviating the economic pressures and other real life 
conditions that can sometimes cause women to decide not to 
carry their pregnancies to term.
    Nearly half of all pregnancies in the United States are 
unintended, and of these four in ten end in abortion. Women 
living below the federal poverty level are more than four times 
more likely to have an abortion than those with incomes above 
300 percent of the federal poverty level.
    Over the last several years, Federal investments aimed at 
preventing unintended pregnancies and providing critical health 
and social support services that can help vulnerable women and 
families overcome economic pressures and other life challenges 
have been significantly curtailed. This bill provides a first 
installment toward restoring and expanding prevention and 
support services to address this important issue.

                                   REDUCING THE NEED FOR ABORTIONS INITIATIVE
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                2008 Committee compared to--
                     Agency/Program                       Fiscal Year 2008 -------------------------------------
                                                             Committee       Fiscal Year 2007     2008 Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor....................................             15,000            +15,000            +15,000
    Job Corps\1\.......................................              5,000             +5,000             +5,000
    Young Parents Training Pilot Projects..............             10,000            +10,000            +10,000
Department of Health and Human Services................         13,569,700           +553,171         +1,246,382
    Community Health Centers...........................          2,188,000           +199,961           +199,533
    Maternal and Child Health Block Grant..............            750,000            +57,000            +57,000
        Increasing Public Awareness and Resources for               15,000            +15,000            +15,000
         Women Preparing for Birth [nonadd]............
    Healthy Start......................................            120,000            +18,482            +19,497
    Family Planning....................................            310,910            +27,764            +27,807
    CDC Teen Pregnancy Prevention Demos................             10,000            +10,000            +10,000
    CDC National Survey of Family Growth...............              1,000               +200               +120
    Child Care Development Block Grant.................          2,137,081            +75,000            +75,000
    Head Start.........................................          6,963,571            +75,000           +175,000
    Runaway and Homeless Youth.........................             97,837            +10,000            +10,000
    ACF Home Visits for Mothers........................             10,000            +10,000                  0
    ACF Infant Adoption Awareness......................             14,674             +2,000             +2,000
    Community Services Block Grant.....................            660,425            +30,000           +660,425
    Domestic Violence Program..........................            134,731            +10,000            +10,000
    Abstinence Education...............................            141,164            +27,764                  0
    Adolescent Family Life (Title XX)..................             30,307                  0                  0
Department of Education................................            129,310            +78,850           +113,500
    21st Century After-School Centers\2\...............             50,000            +50,000            +50,000
    Elementary and Secondary School Counselors.........             61,500            +26,850            +61,500
    Child Care Access for Student Parents..............             17,810             +2,000             +2,000
                                                        ========================================================
        Total..........................................         13,714,010           +647,021         +1,374,882
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\This $5,000,000 is part of a larger $42.6 million increase provided by the Committee for the Job Corps.
\2\This $50,000,000 is part of a larger $125 million increase provided by the Committee for 21st Century After-
  School Centers.

    Job Corps child centers.--$5,000,000 is recommended for the 
development of new child care centers at Job Corps centers 
within the $42,621,000 or 2.7 percent increase over the 
comparable fiscal 2007 level provided for Job Corps. The new 
child care centers will support single parent families and help 
recruit women into the program. The Job Corps program provides 
intensive occupational skills training, academic tutoring, and 
mentoring that can help young women achieve economic self-
sufficiency, addressing the most often cited reason for women 
having abortions--the inability to financially support a child.
    Young parents demonstration program.--A new $10,000,000 
initiative is recommended for a young parents demonstration 
program in order to target educational and occupational skills 
training that fosters family economic self-sufficiency to young 
parents (both mothers and fathers) and expectant mothers ages 
16 to 24. Projects funded under this new initiative will be 
encouraged to serve young parents in high-risk categories, 
including those under the jurisdiction of the justice system, 
in the child welfare or foster care system, homeless 
individuals, or victims of child abuse.
    Community health centers.--A $199,961,000 or 10.1 percent 
increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for community health 
centers (CHCs), which are important sources of access to high 
quality, family oriented, and comprehensive primary and 
preventive health care for at risk, low-income patients. In 
fiscal year 2005, 59 percent of the patients served by CHCs 
were female and 25 percent were children under 12 years of age. 
These additional resources will help centers serve additional 
pregnant women and mothers and expand the types of services for 
that population, such as ultrasound scans.
    Increasing public awareness of resources available to women 
preparing for birth.--A $57,000,000 or 8.2 percent increase 
over fiscal year 2007 is provided for the maternal and child 
health (MCH) block grant, of which $15,000,000 is provided for 
new competitive grants to States to increase public awareness 
of resources available to women and new parents preparing for 
childbirth through advertising campaigns and toll-free 
hotlines. The remainder of MCH block grant resources will 
provide assistance to States to: assure access to care, 
especially for those with low incomes or limited availability 
of care; reduce infant mortality; provide and ensure access to 
comprehensive prenatal and postnatal care to women; and, 
provide preventive and treatment services for children, 
especially children with special health care needs.
    Healthy start.--A $18,482,000 or 18.2 percent increase over 
fiscal year 2007 is provided for Healthy Start, which provides 
discretionary grants to communities with high rates of infant 
mortality to provide ongoing sources of primary and preventive 
health care to mothers and their infants. The increase provided 
will support approximately 20 new grants to communities. The 
availability of services through the Healthy Start program, 
including the counseling and home visits, encourages young 
women to follow through with their pregnancies and avoid the 
choices sometimes made in the absence of supportive services.
    Family planning.--A $27,764,000 increase over fiscal year 
2007 is recommended for the family planning program. This 
increase will allow clinics to serve an additional 98,000 
clients, expand access to contraceptive services that prevent 
pregnancy, and offer related preventive health services. The 
$27,764,000 increase for family planning is identical to that 
recommended for the community-based abstinence education 
program. The funds provided are expected to prevent more than 
one million unintended pregnancies.
    Teen pregnancy prevention demonstration grants.--A new 
$10,000,000 initiative is recommended within the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention for grants to support factually 
and medically accurate, complete, and age-appropriate 
approaches to preventing teen pregnancies, including 
information about both abstinence and contraception, and 
dissemination of science-based tools and strategies to prevent 
HIV, STD, and teen pregnancy. The Secretary of Health and Human 
Services shall require each applicant for financial assistance 
under this program to certify that all materials proposed in 
the application and funded during the project period of the 
grant are medically accurate. The Secretary of Health and Human 
Services shall require a panel of medical experts to review all 
grant applications and assess whether the materials proposed 
are medically accurate. These demonstration projects shall be 
evaluated based on their success in reducing the rate of teen 
pregnancies in their respective communities.
    National survey of family growth.--$1,000,000 is provided 
for the National Survey of Family Growth, within the 
$10,979,000 or 10.1 percent increase over fiscal year 2007 that 
is provided for national health statistics within the Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention, which collects statistical 
data that informs public health interventions and policies. 
These funds will improve the timeliness and reliability of the 
National Survey of Family Growth, which collects national data 
on pregnancy and birth rates and information on the 
characteristics of women who choose to end their pregnancies 
and their reasons for choosing abortion.
    Child care development block grant.--A $75,000,000 or 3.6 
percent increase over fiscal year 2007 is included for the 
child care development block grant, which provides support to 
States to assist low-income families who are working or 
receiving education or training. This increase will expand 
Federally funded quality child care to vulnerable families, 
making it easier for them to raise their children. 
Approximately 13,000 additional children and their families 
will be served in fiscal year 2008.
    Head start.--A $75,000,000 or 1.1 percent increase over 
fiscal year 2007, and a $175,000,000 or 2.6 percent increase 
over the President's request, is provided for Head Start, which 
supports comprehensive educational, health, nutritional, 
social, and other child development services to low-income 
children and families. This increase will ensure that 
vulnerable parents gain access to high quality preschool 
services for their children.
    Runaway and homeless youth.--A $10,000,000 or 11.4 percent 
increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for the runaway and 
homeless youth activities. These funds will support programs 
that provide homeless youth a safe environment while teaching 
them essential life-skills and connecting them to education and 
workforce assistance, as well as other support. The increased 
funding will also allow the program to provide expanded 
services to pregnant women and young parents.
    Home visitation initiative.--A new $10,000,000 home 
visitation initiative for mothers is included under the child 
abuse discretionary program. These funds will be used for 
evidence-based home visitation projects designed to help 
mothers improve prenatal health, teach them to become better 
parents, and improve their quality of life by assisting them 
with education services and employment opportunities. Research 
has shown that home visitation can reduce incidents of child 
abuse and neglect and improve other important outcomes for 
mothers and their children.
    Infant adoption awareness.--A $2,000,000 or 15.8 percent 
increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for the infant 
adoption awareness program. This increase will expand training 
activities for adoption agency staff, resulting in enhanced 
information to, and counseling of, young pregnant women about 
adoption, as well as expanded referrals to adoption agencies. 
Funds will also be used to develop best practice guidelines in 
adoption counseling.
    Community services block grant.--A $30,000,000 or 4.8 
percent increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for the 
community services block grant, which provides housing, child 
care, job training and job placement, home weatherization, 
parenting education, adult literacy classes, domestic violence 
prevention, and emergency food assistance in over 1,000 
counties across the country. The increase will enable States to 
expand these critical services that help struggling, low-income 
families raise their children.
    Domestic violence prevention services program.--A 
$10,000,000 or 8.0 percent increase over fiscal year 2007 is 
included for the domestic violence program, which provides 
immediate shelter and related assistance for victims of family 
violence and their children. It also supports prevention and 
intervention services for families in abusive situations that 
include shelter, counseling, self-help, and substance-abuse 
referral. Four million women experience a serious violent 
assault by their partner in an average year and for 30 percent 
of these women that abuse begins during pregnancy. The 
recommended $10,000,000 increase will permit States to expand 
domestic violence prevention services to more at-risk women.
    Community-based abstinence education.--A $27,764,000 
increase over fiscal year 2007 is included for the community-
based abstinence education program, which provides support for 
the development and implementation of community-based 
abstinence-until-marriage education programs. The $27,764,000 
increase for the community-based abstinence education program 
is identical to that recommended for the family planning 
program.
    Adolescent family life.--$30,307,000 is included for the 
adolescent family life program, the same amount as fiscal year 
2007. This program supports projects that provide integrated 
health, education, family, and social services (including life 
and career planning, education, job training, safe housing, and 
home visitation services) to pregnant women and mothers. It 
also supports demonstration projects that encourage students 
between the ages of 9 and 14 to postpone sexual activity until 
marriage. These funds will serve approximately 92,000 teenagers 
and their families in fiscal year 2008.
    After-school centers.--A $50,000,000 increase over fiscal 
year 2007 is provided for the 21st century after-school centers 
program to serve middle and high school students, as part of a 
total $125,000,000 increase in the bill for after-school 
centers. The after-school program offers extended learning 
opportunities before and after school for children, 
particularly in communities with a high percentage of low-
income families. The additional resources will help serve an 
additional 65,000 teenagers who are unsupervised in the after 
school hours. A recent study found that youth who do not spend 
time in structured activities are 37 percent more likely to 
become teen parents than those enrolled in after-school 
programs. The recommended increase will expand after-school 
services to middle and high school girls who are at risk of 
unintended pregnancies and help working families obtain 
affordable after school child care.
    School counseling services.--A $26,850,000 or 77.5 percent 
increase above the fiscal year 2007 level is provided for the 
elementary and secondary education school counseling program. 
These funds enable school districts to hire academic 
counselors, psychologists, and social workers. The additional 
resources will be targeted to improving and expanding academic 
and mental health counseling to middle- and high-school 
adolescents. These counselors are trained to provide critical 
prevention and early identification and intervention services. 
They also work in close collaboration with mental health 
providers in the community to ensure students and their 
families receive appropriate care.
    Child care for college parents.--A $2,000,000 or 12.7 
percent increase over fiscal year 2007 is included for the 
child care access means parents in school program, which helps 
low-income parents who qualify for Pell grants attend college 
by supporting campus-based child care services. This increase 
will expand the number of low-income parents receiving 
convenient and high quality child care services, enhancing 
their ability to earn a college degree and, ultimately, achieve 
economic self-sufficiency for themselves and their children.

                   PREPARING FOR A PANDEMIC INFLUENZA

    The Committee includes $1,146,172,000 for activities to 
prepare for and respond to an influenza pandemic. This amount 
is an increase of $1,041,336,000 over fiscal year 2007 and 
$5,000,000 over the request. In fiscal year 2006, the Committee 
included $5,637,000,000 in supplemental appropriations for 
pandemic influenza activities throughout the Department of 
Health and Human Services. The funding included in this bill 
fulfills the Administration's original emergency request to 
begin protecting the United States against a potential 
pandemic.
    The Committee believes that the avian flu is a ticking time 
bomb with potentially devastating consequences for the country 
and the world. Leading scientists and public health researchers 
estimate that 90 million people in the United States could 
become ill, nearly 10 million people could require 
hospitalization, and 1.9 million Americans could die if a 
pandemic flu similar to the 1918 pandemic occurs. Some 
scientists have estimated that the global death toll from a flu 
pandemic could reach 62 million people.
    In order to ensure sufficient and sustained resources to 
prepare and protect the United States and other countries in 
the event of an influenza pandemic, the Committee has included 
the following amounts:

                             PANDEMIC INFLUENZA PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE INITIATIVE
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                2008 Committee compared to--
                     Agency/program                       Fiscal year 2008 -------------------------------------
                                                             committee       Fiscal year 2007     2008 Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Health and Human Services:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.........            158,245            +88,245                  0
    National Institutes of Health......................             34,836                  0                  0
    Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund...            948,091           +948,091                  0
    Covered Countermeasure Process Fund................              5,000             +5,000             +5,000
                                                        ========================================================
        Total..........................................          1,146,172         +1,041,336             +5,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).--An 
$88,245,000 increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided so that 
CDC can take significant steps to help the nation prepare for a 
pandemic influenza.
    The pandemic influenza activities within CDC's coordinating 
center for infectious diseases will be used to prepare the U.S. 
health and public health systems, including laboratories. Funds 
will be used to increase demand for influenza vaccine with the 
intention that by doing so, U.S. vaccine production capacity 
also will be stimulated; develop a repository of pandemic virus 
reference strains, which will improve laboratory capacity to 
analyze large quantities of viral samples to identify suitable 
vaccine candidates; and increase the stock of diagnostic 
reagents for influenza to improve rapid testing capacity.
    Within CDC's coordinating center for health information and 
service, funds will be used to develop a vaccine registry to 
monitor vaccine use and distribution to ensure that vaccines 
and other countermeasures are administered appropriately and 
for real-time assessment and evaluation of influenza 
interventions to improve decision makers' situational 
capabilities.
    To protect the U.S. population, it is imperative that CDC 
continue to improve its global outreach. Within the 
coordinating office for global health, funds will be used for 
rapid outbreak response for high-priority countries, which will 
allow CDC in-country teams to take swift and decisive action 
once a pandemic influenza strain is identified; enhance human-
animal interface studies to analyze epidemiological studies of 
risk factors in high risk populations; and for international 
surveillance, diagnosis, and epidemic investigations.
    Additionally, funds are provided within CDC's coordinating 
office of terrorism preparedness and emergency response to 
increase border security through the establishment of 
additional quarantine stations at airports and other major 
sites of entry into the U.S. These funds will support up to 25 
quarantine stations by the end of fiscal year 2008, up from 
only eight stations in fiscal year 2004.
    National Institutes of Health (NIH).--Included in this bill 
is $34,836,000 to continue NIH's pandemic influenza research 
activities. These funds will support clinical trials in 
Southeast Asia, research studies on antibody prevalence, and 
studies on the rapid characterization of influenza viruses. NIH 
is also supporting research leading to the development of new 
vaccines and therapeutics. This pandemic influenza funding is 
in addition to more than $200,000,000 NIH supports in general 
influenza research.
    Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund.--A 
$948,091,000 increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for 
pandemic influenza preparedness and response activities that 
are coordinated by the Office of the Secretary of Health and 
Human Services.
    Of the funds provided, $870,000,000 is for critical 
activities to implement the national strategy for pandemic flu. 
These activities include the development and purchase of the 
H5N1 influenza vaccine, antivirals, necessary medical supplies, 
diagnostics, and other surveillance tools. The majority of the 
funding will be used to procure egg-based vaccines and 
accelerate development of next-generation vaccines to address 
the goal that the entire U.S. population has access to vaccines 
within six months of the start of a pandemic. Additionally, a 
significant portion of funds will be allocated to increasing 
the U.S. supply of antivirals in order to protect no less than 
25 percent of the U.S. population.
    The remaining $78,091,000 within the Office of the 
Secretary will help ensure effective communications to educate 
the public, including the maintenance of the U.S. government's 
pandemic flu website and the release of public service 
announcements; support international in-country advanced 
development and industrialization of human pandemic influenza 
vaccines; and spur the advanced development of rapid tests and 
detection techniques.
    Covered Countermeasure Process Fund.--A total of $5,000,000 
is provided for a new fund to compensate individuals that may 
be harmed by the administration or use of the H5N1 influenza 
vaccine.
    Department of Labor.--The Committee is dissatisfied with 
the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) lack 
of action to ensure that health care workers and emergency 
responders will be adequately protected in the event of a flu 
pandemic. The Committee asks that the Department reconsider its 
denial of a petition requesting the issuance of an emergency 
standard, and directs the Department to, at a minimum, develop 
a permanent standard on an expedited basis to ensure that 
measures to protect health care workers and responders from an 
outbreak of pandemic influenza are in place as soon as 
possible, and requires a timeline and quarterly progress report 
on developing this standard. The Committee also requests that 
the Secretary of Labor submit a report addressing the full 
range of policy and regulatory issues under the Department's 
jurisdiction, including those that relate to the economic 
impacts identified in the national strategy for pandemic 
influenza implementation plan, such as the application of 
workplace regulations for family and medical leave.

               FULFILLING PROMISES TO AMERICA'S CHILDREN

    The Committee recommends a $2,544,855,000 increase over 
fiscal year 2007 for education programs authorized under the No 
Child Left Behind Act and the Individuals with Disabilities 
Education Act, which is a $1,845,797,000 increase over the 
Administration's request.
    The Committee believes that the nation faces immense 
challenges in raising the academic performance of America's 
students in an increasingly competitive global economy. 
America's students are not achieving at the levels needed to be 
competitive with our international competitors, particularly in 
math, science, and technology.
    In 2005, only 48 percent of low-income 4th graders and 37 
percent of low-income 8th graders performed at a basic level in 
science. Among 17-year olds, math scores have been flat over 
the past 15 years, while reading scores have actually gone 
down. The rest of the world is implementing aggressive 
education improvements, while the United States, at best, is 
making only modest gains.
    These challenges also extend to providing meaningful 
educational opportunities for low-income and minority children. 
The Subcommittee on Labor-HHS-Education-Related Agencies heard 
testimony concerning the unconscionably large achievement gaps 
that exist between white students and racial and ethnic 
minorities. By the end of 12th grade, African American and 
Latino students perform at about the same level as white 8th 
graders in both reading and math. The picture is even worse for 
students with disabilities. Only 6 percent of 8th graders with 
disabilities are proficient in reading, compared with 33 
percent of students without disabilities.
    The country and our schools face fast-changing demographics 
that will make the job of erasing the nation's education 
deficits even more difficult. Over the next decade, public 
school enrollments will continue to swell to new record 
levels--more than 58 million students by 2015. That means 2.6 
million new students will be in the nation's classrooms. By 
2020, nearly half of these school children will be minorities.
    During the Subcommittee's Overview Hearing: America's 
Workers and Education for the 21st Century, the Subcommittee 
heard testimony that the nation's education and achievement 
gaps can only be surmounted by a full scale assault starting 
with broad-based access to early childhood education and 
continuing with expanded higher education opportunity.
    In this bill, the Committee begins to chart a path to a 
better future for millions of America's children by investing 
significant new resources in the No Child Left Behind Act 
(NCLB) and the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). These 
laws are the cornerstone of the Federal commitment to America's 
children. The additional resources in the bill will help to pay 
for the extra instructional time, high quality teachers, 
technology, and enrichment programs that special needs children 
require in order to succeed. By providing this assistance, the 
Committee takes another step toward fulfilling our promises to 
America's children. This action will help to ensure that they 
are adequately prepared to compete with students around the 
world for college and careers of the 21st century.

                                     K-12 EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY INITIATIVE
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                2008 Committee compared to--
                     Agency/program                       Fiscal year 2008 -------------------------------------
                                                             committee       Fiscal year 2007     2008 Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Education:
    No Child Left Behind (NCLB), Total.................         25,686,557         +2,036,891         +1,020,113
    Key NCLB Programs:
        Title I Grants to School Districts [nonadd]....         14,362,824         +1,524,699           +452,924
        Title I School Improvement Fund [nonadd].......            500,000           +375,000                  0
        Improving Teacher Quality [nonadd].............          3,187,439           +300,000           +399,951
        Educational Technology [nonadd]................            272,250                  0           +272,250
        21st Century After-School Centers [nonadd].....          1,106,166           +125,000           +124,986
        English Language Acquisition [nonadd]..........            774,614           +105,607           +103,795
    Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA),         12,310,831           +507,964           +825,684
     Total.............................................
    Key IDEA Program:
        IDEA (Part B) State Grants [nonadd]............         11,292,425           +509,464           +800,484
                                                        ========================================================
        NCLB and IDEA, Total...........................         37,997,388         +2,544,855         +1,845,797
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    No Child Left Behind.--A $2,036,891,000 or 8.6 percent 
increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for the No Child 
Left Behind Act (NCLB). This amount is $1,020,113,000 more than 
the Administration's request. The bill's significant increase 
for NCLB reflects the Committee's recognition that States and 
school districts will need substantially greater assistance to 
achieve the law's goal that every child reaches high academic 
standards by 2014.
    Funding levels in the bill for key NCLB programs are listed 
below.
    Title I assistance.--A $1,899,699,000 or 14.7 percent 
increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for title I 
assistance for low-income children--the largest increase in the 
history of the title I program. This increase will provide a 
total of $14,362,824,000 for title I grants to school districts 
and $500,000,000 for the title I school improvement fund in 
fiscal year 2008.
    Title I grants, which help support schools in high-poverty 
areas, are the engine behind NCLB reforms. Nonetheless, in the 
last two school years, two-thirds of the nation's school 
districts have received flat or reduced title I grants, 
hampering their ability to assist low-performing students. The 
2007 Continuing Appropriations Resolution provided a 
$250,000,000 increase for title I grants to school districts 
and the title I school improvement fund to begin to reverse 
title I funding shortfalls. The Committee's recommendation is 
another step toward reversing these funding shortfalls.
    The $1,899,699,000 increase over fiscal year 2007 will 
benefit nearly 55,000 title I schools and fully fund an 
additional 161,000 low-income students who must make the 
greatest educational progress in order to meet NCLB's rigorous 
academic achievement standards. Within this total increase, the 
additional $375,000,000 recommended for the title I school 
improvement fund will direct targeted assistance to a rising 
number of schools identified for improvement. These additional 
resources demonstrate the Committee's commitment to ensuring 
that low-performing schools--which tend to have the greatest 
academic challenges but less experienced teachers, lower 
teacher salaries, and higher teacher turnover--have the 
financial means to pay for high quality instruction, teacher 
professional development, and extended learning opportunities 
that can boost student academic performance.
    Improving teacher quality.--A $300,000,000 or 10.4 percent 
increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for teacher quality 
grants, which provide States and school districts with flexible 
funding to ensure that teachers receive the support and 
training they need to be effective in the classroom. Under the 
Committee recommendation, an additional 51,000 teachers will 
receive high quality professional development than in fiscal 
year 2007. The Committee provides $399,951,000 more than the 
Administration's request for these teacher quality grants 
because research shows that teacher quality is the most 
important school-related factor in determining student 
achievement growth.
    Education technology.--The bill includes $272,250,000 for 
education technology grants to States and school districts, 
which support teacher professional development, well-equipped 
classrooms, technology-based communication, effective software, 
and a curriculum that recognizes the role technology plays in 
all disciplines. The Committee provides the same level as in 
fiscal year 2007, and rejects the Administration's proposal to 
terminate this program.
    21st century after-school centers.--A $125,000,000 or 12.7 
percent increase over the fiscal year 2007 level is provided 
for the 21st century after-school program, with a particular 
focus on expanding after school opportunities for students in 
middle and high schools. The Committee's recommendation 
reflects its concern that, between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., the rate 
of juvenile crime triples, as well as the likelihood that 
teenagers will become victims of crime. Self-care and boredom 
can increase the likelihood that a young person will experiment 
with drugs and alcohol. Under the bill, an additional 163,000 
students (including 65,000 teenagers) will benefit from 
supervised after school activities, including academic 
assistance, athletic programs, career exploration, skills 
development and internships, and cultural enrichment.
    English language acquisition.--A $105,607,000 or 15.5 
percent increase over the fiscal year 2007 level is included 
for assistance to States and school districts to address 
dramatic increases in the number of children who need 
assistance to learn to read and speak English. According to the 
U.S. Census Bureau, the number of limited English proficient 
students has risen from less than 1 million in 1980 to more 
than 4.6 million in 2004. These funds will also help to 
increase the pool of teachers prepared to serve limited English 
proficient students through professional development 
activities.
    Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part B 
grants.--A $509,464,000 or 4.72 percent increase over the 
fiscal year 2007 level, and a $800,484,000 increase over the 
Administration's request, is provided for IDEA Part B State 
grants. These grants help States and localities pay for the 
rising costs of special education for 6.9 million children with 
disabilities. Almost 14 percent of public school students 
receive special education because they have a disability. 
Nearly every general education classroom across the country 
includes students with disabilities. Over the past 10 years, 
the number of students enrolled in special education programs 
has risen 18 percent. The Committee's recommendation rejects 
the deep cut in IDEA proposed by the Administration, and stops 
the decline in the Federal percentage share of special 
education costs, in order to sustain educational and related 
services for these special needs children who are most at risk 
of being left behind.

                EXPANDING COLLEGE ACCESS AND OPPORTUNITY

    The Committee recommends a $2,029,752,000 increase over 
fiscal year 2007 and a $3,250,322,000 increase over the 
President's request for Federal student financial assistance 
programs.
    On February 15, 2007, the Subcommittee on Labor-HHS-
Education-Related Agencies held an Overview Hearing on 
America's Workers and Education for the 21st Century, during 
which the Subcommittee heard from a panel of national experts 
on the critical importance of postsecondary education to the 
nation's economic well being.
    Today, the economic, social, and civic value of a college 
education has never been higher. Over a lifetime, a person who 
completes a college degree will earn one million dollars more 
than someone with just a high school diploma. A college degree 
is associated with greater earnings, less unemployment, lower 
poverty, better health benefits and better health, and larger 
pensions.
    Despite the obvious benefits for Americans as individuals 
and to the country as a whole, financial barriers continue to 
prevent many talented students from achieving their college 
dreams.
    According to one witness who testified before the 
Subcommittee, each year approximately 400,000 students are 
priced out of attending a four-year college and 170,000 
students are unable to afford community college. This will 
cause the nation to lose between 1.4 and 2.4 million bachelor's 
degrees, a blow that will undermine America's competitiveness 
in the increasingly global economy.
    Another witness pointed out the disturbing fact that 
students from high-income families who have low test scores are 
more likely to complete college than high-testing students from 
lower-income families.
    By 2015, college enrollments are expected to rise by an 
additional 2.2 million students or 12.6 percent. Most of this 
growth will be among students--minority, low-income, and first-
generation--who most need Federal financial assistance in order 
to enter and complete college.
    In the 21st century, a nation that fails to fully develop 
its intellectual capital consigns itself to a future of 
economic decline. Therefore, the Committee aims to invest 
robustly in college access and opportunity by providing 
significant increases across a wide range of financial aid 
programs. In total, the Committee recommendations will benefit 
more than 8.5 million students who deserve the chance at a 
college education.

                                    COLLEGE ACCESS AND OPPORTUNITY INITIATIVE
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                2008 Committee compared to--
                     Agency/program                       Fiscal Year 2008 -------------------------------------
                                                             committee       Fiscal year 2007     2008 Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Education................................         18,856,407         +1,992,327         +3,184,702
    Pell Grants--Maximum Grant.........................            (4,700)               +390               +650
    Pell Grants........................................         15,583,000         +1,922,289         +2,169,000
    Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants........            770,933                  0           +770,933
    Work Study.........................................            980,492               +138                  0
    Perkins Loan Cancellations.........................             65,471                  0            +65,471
    Leveraging Education Assistance Partnerships.......             64,987                  0            +64,987
    TRIO...............................................            868,178            +40,000            +40,000
    GEAR UP............................................            323,423            +20,000            +20,000
    Title VI Foreign Languages.........................            115,651             +9,900             +9,900
    Byrd Honors Scholarships...........................             40,590                  0            +40,590
    Javits Fellowships.................................              9,699                  0                -98
    Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need......             30,067                  0                 +3
    Olympic Scholarships...............................                970                  0               +970
    Legal education opportunity program................              2,946                  0             +2,946
Department of Health and Human Services................            119,097            +37,425            +65,620
    Health Careers Opportunity Program.................             28,440            +24,480            +28,440
    Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students............             46,657                  0            +36,924
    Nurse Loan Repayment and Scholarship Program.......             44,000            +12,945               +256
                                                        ========================================================
Total..................................................         18,975,504         +2,029,752         +3,250,322
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Pell grants.--A $1,922,289,000 or 14.1 percent increase 
above the fiscal year 2007 level, and $2,169,000,000 above the 
Administration's discretionary request, is included to increase 
the maximum Pell grant to $4,700. The Committee recommendation 
will help nearly 5.5 million low- and middle-income students 
obtain a college degree. Approximately 79 percent of all Pell 
grant recipients have annual family incomes of $30,000 or less.
    Between 2001 and 2006, the cost of attending a four-year 
public college increased by $3,764 or 42 percent; however, the 
maximum Pell grant increased by just $300--only 8 percent of 
the college cost increase.
    The 2007 Continuing Appropriations Resolution raised the 
Pell maximum grant by $260, from $4,050 to $4,310, providing 
the first increase in four years to help disadvantaged students 
pay for rising college costs. This bill will raise the maximum 
Pell award by another $390 to $4,700. Over two years, the 
maximum Pell Grant will have increased by $650--one of the 
largest expansions of the Pell grant program in its history. 
The Committee recommendation is another step forward in 
expanding college access and opportunity for more Americans.
    Federal supplemental educational opportunity grants.--
$770,933,000 is provided for the supplemental educational 
opportunity grants program (SEOG), the same as fiscal year 2007 
level. The Committee strongly disagrees with the 
Administration's proposal to terminate SEOGs, which are need-
based grants of up to $4,000 to undergraduates who demonstrate 
exceptional financial need. Approximately 65 percent of 
dependent SEOG recipients have annual family incomes under 
$30,000 and nearly 80 percent of independent SEOG recipients 
have annual family incomes under $20,000. Institutions must 
contribute a 25 percent match toward their Federal SEOG 
allocations. Thus, the amount recommended will result in nearly 
$1,000,000,000 in need-based student financial aid, benefiting 
more than one million students.
    Federal work study.--$980,492,000 is provided for the work-
study program, which supports part-time employment for students 
who qualify based on financial need. This amount is $138,000 
more than the fiscal year level and the same as the request. 
Work-study jobs must pay at least the Federal minimum wage and 
institutions must provide 25 percent of student earnings. Thus, 
the $980,492,000 provided in the bill will result in more than 
$1,100,000,000 in need-based student aid for approximately 
880,000 undergraduate and graduate students.
    Federal Perkins loan cancellations.--$65,471,000 is 
provided for Federal Perkins loans cancellations, the same as 
the fiscal year 2007 level. The Committee disagrees with the 
Administration's proposal to terminate funding for this 
program, which reimburses college revolving loan funds for 
loans that are forgiven under Federal law. Perkins Loans may be 
forgiven when a student borrower pursues a public service 
career in 1 of 12 statutorily-designated areas, including 
teaching in low-income communities and in shortage subjects, 
Head Start programs, military service in areas of imminent 
danger, Peace Corps and ACTION service, nurses and medical 
technicians providing health care services, and law 
enforcement/corrections.
    LEAP program.--$64,987,000 is provided for the LEAP 
program, the same as the fiscal year 2007 level. The Committee 
disagrees with the Administration's proposal to terminate 
funding for this program, which provides dollar-for-dollar 
matching funds to states for grant and work study assistance to 
eligible postsecondary students who demonstrate financial need. 
Over half of LEAP grants go to students with annual family 
incomes under $20,000. The amount provided in the bill will 
leverage nearly $165,000,000 in need-based aid to nearly 
165,000 students.
    Federal TRIO programs.--A $40,000,000 or 4.8 percent 
increase is provided for the TRIO programs above the fiscal 
year 2007 level and the budget request, of which $10,000,000 is 
dedicated to college completion grant aid for students served 
under the Student Services Support Program. The TRIO programs 
provide a variety of outreach and support services to encourage 
low-income, potential first-generation college students to 
enter and complete college. Under the Committee recommendation, 
over 850,000 students will receive TRIO services, including 
approximately, 14,000 students who will receive new college 
completion grants.
    GEAR UP.--A $20,000,000 or 6.6 percent increase above the 
fiscal year 2007 level and the budget request is provided for 
the GEAR UP program. GEAR UP provides grants to states and 
partnerships of low-income middle and high schools, 
institutions of higher education and community organizations to 
target entire grades of students and give them the skills and 
encouragement to successfully pursue postsecondary education. 
Under the Committee recommendation, approximately 785,000 
students--nearly 46,000 more than last year--will benefit from 
early invention services and financial assistance for college 
in fiscal year 2008.
    Title VI foreign languages.--A $9,900,000 or 9.4 percent 
increase above the fiscal year 2007 level and the budget 
request is provided for the title VI international education 
and foreign languages studies program, which addresses the 
national need for international experts, particularly in 
critical world areas and languages. A portion of these funds 
will support 1,026 graduate academic fellowships and 700 
graduate summer fellowships in foreign language training--about 
10 percent more than last year.
    Byrd honors scholarships.--$40,590,000 is provided for Byrd 
scholarships, the same as the fiscal year 2007 level. The 
President did not propose funding for this program. The Byrd 
scholarship program provides formula grants to States to award 
$1,500 scholarships for up to four years of higher education to 
students who demonstrate academic excellence in high school. 
Under the Committee bill, approximately 27,000 students will 
receive merit scholarships in fiscal year 2008.
    Javits fellowships.--$9,699,000 is provided for Javits 
fellowships for students pursuing doctoral study in the arts, 
humanities, and social sciences. The Committee recommendation 
will support fellowships for approximately 226 students in 
fiscal year 2008.
    Graduate assistance in areas of national need.--$30,067,000 
is provided for the graduate assistance in areas of national 
need (GAANN) program, which is $3,000 more than the budget 
request and the same as the fiscal year 2007 level. The GAANN 
program supports fellowships to economically disadvantaged 
students who have demonstrated academic excellence and who are 
pursuing graduate education in designated areas of national 
need, such as the sciences, mathematics, engineering, and 
nursing. The Committee recommendation will support fellowships 
for approximately 700 students.
    B.J. Stupak Olympic scholarships.--$970,000 is provided for 
B.J. Stupak Olympic scholarships, the same as the fiscal year 
2007 level. The Administration proposed to terminate this 
activity, which provides financial assistance to Olympic 
athletes who are pursuing a postsecondary education. The 
Committee recommendation will provide scholarships to 
approximately 149 student athletes.
    Thurgood Marshall legal education opportunity program.--
$2,946,000 is provided for the Thurgood Marshall legal 
education opportunity program, the same as in fiscal year 2007. 
The Administration proposed to terminate this activity, which 
provides low-income, minority and disadvantaged college 
students with the information, preparation and financial 
assistance needed to gain access to and complete law school 
study. The Committee recommendation will provide financial 
assistance of up to $10,000 for 150 fellows and support 
educational activities for more 1,000 students to improve 
retention, graduation, and bar passage rates.
    Health careers opportunity program.--A $24,480,000 increase 
or six-fold increase of the program from the fiscal year 2007 
level is provided for the health careers opportunity program 
(HCOP), which seeks to increase the number of individuals from 
disadvantaged backgrounds entering and graduating from health 
professions programs. HCOP focuses on early intervention to 
develop a pool of academically prepared students.
    Scholarships for disadvantaged students.--$46,657,000 is 
provided for the scholarships for disadvantaged students 
program, the same as in fiscal year 2007 and a $36,924,000 
increase over the President's request. This program awards 
scholarships to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who 
train in the health professions and in nursing. The bill will 
support scholarships for nearly 16,000 disadvantaged students.
    Nurse loan repayment and scholarship program.--An 
$12,945,000 or 41.7 percent increase over fiscal year 2007 is 
provided for the nurse loan repayment and scholarship program, 
which provides loan forgiveness and scholarships to nurses who 
agree to work in health care facilities with a critical 
shortage of nurses. This funding will support almost 1,300 
students with loan repayment and scholarships.

   INVESTING IN THE SKILLS AND EARNING CAPACITY OF AMERICA'S WORKERS

    The Committee recommends a $148,168,000 increase over 
fiscal year 2007, which is $1,530,280,000 over the President's 
request, for important Federal workforce development programs. 
In making this investment, the Committee rejects 
Administration-proposed cuts in employment and training 
programs that would have left the Departments of Labor and 
Education unprepared to deal with the important challenges 
faced by Americans who want to succeed in the 21st century 
workforce.
    Education and training programs serve to strengthen the 
American workforce and enhance American economic 
competitiveness. Department of Labor projections show that 90 
percent of the fastest growing job fields will require 
education and training beyond high school. These jobs may be 
out of reach for nearly half of workers who have no education 
beyond high school.
    Despite recent improvements in some economic indicators, 
6.8 million Americans remain unemployed--14 percent more than 
in January 2001. This year, the number of Americans who have 
been out of work for 27 weeks or longer rose to 1.1 million--67 
percent more than in January 2001. Unemployment rates for 
African American and Hispanic workers remain significantly 
higher than the national average.
    Wages remain stagnant. Over the past six years, both 
inflation-adjusted hourly and weekly pay rose by less than one 
half of one percent. At the same time, the threat of 
outsourcing has the effect of further depressing pay and 
benefits for American workers--both blue and white collar. 
Economists estimate that half of all U.S. jobs today are in 
industries or occupations that could be outsourced overseas.
    Americans simply are not receiving the benefits of their 
hard work. American workers raised their productivity 17.4 
percent over the last six years but those gains have not flowed 
to workers in the form of wages. Instead, wages have remained 
largely flat while corporate profits have soared by 108 percent 
over this period.
    In a January 31, 2007 ``State of the Economy'' address, 
President Bush noted that ``The fact is that income inequality 
is real; it's been rising for more than 25 years. . . . The 
earnings gap is now twice as wide as it was in 1980--and it 
continues to grow.'' He then proposed a budget that would cut 
employment, training and vocational education programs by $1.5 
billion.
    The Committee rejects the proposed cuts and instead chooses 
to make strategic investments in these areas to help middle and 
low-income Americans acquire the job skills they need to 
compete in the global economy.

                                           WORKER TRAINING INITIATIVE
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                2008 Committee compared to--
                     Agency/program                       Fiscal year 2008 -------------------------------------
                                                             committee       Fiscal year 2007     2008 Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor....................................          6,485,789           +123,168           +923,727
    Training and Employment Services1,2................          3,579,530            +23,258           +607,491
        Migrant Workers [nonadd].......................             83,740             +3,988            +83,740
        Native Americans [nonadd]......................             56,381             +2,685            +11,381
        Reintegration of Ex-Offender2 [nonadd].........             68,746                  0            +29,146
        Young Parents Training [nonadd]................             10,000            +10,000            +10,000
        YouthBuild [nonadd]............................             60,000            +10,500            +10,000
    Employment Service State Grants....................            725,883            +10,000            +37,104
    Community Service Employment for Older Americans...            530,900            +47,289           +180,900
    Job Corps1.........................................          1,649,476            +42,621            +98,232
Department of Education................................          1,206,553             25,000           +606,553
    Career & Technical Education State Grants..........          1,206,553            +25,000           +606,553
                                                        ========================================================
Total..................................................          7,692,342           +148,168         +1,530,280
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Adjusted for transfer of Job Corps to Departmental Management.
\2\Program consolidation.

    Training and employment services.--$3,579,530,000 is 
provided for training and employment services under the 
Workforce Investment Act (WIA), which is $23,258,000 above the 
comparable fiscal year 2007 level and $607,491,000 above the 
request. Within this amount $3,276,602,000 is to provide 
services for an estimated 10.5 million participants in the WIA 
adult, dislocated and youth programs. In making these resources 
available, the Committee has rejected the Administration's 
proposed cut of $584,233,000 in training and employment 
services for fiscal year 2008. WIA provides for a decentralized 
system of services, delivered primarily through one-stop career 
centers in local communities that serve to increase the 
employment, occupational skills attainment, and retention in 
employment of participants. While further investment is 
deferred as the Workforce Investment Act is awaiting 
reauthorization, the reduction proposed in the President's 
budget in programs that have seen a loss of over $300 million 
in real dollars since fiscal year 2005 is unwarranted.
    Migrant and seasonal farmworkers program.--Within training 
and employment services, a $3,988,000 increase over fiscal year 
2007 is provided for this program, which is designed to serve 
members of economically disadvantaged families whose principal 
livelihood is derived from migratory and other forms of 
seasonal farm work. For the fifth year in a row the budget 
request did not include funds for this program. The fiscal year 
2008 funding level of $83,740,000 will allow for services to an 
estimated 22,800 participants.
    Native Americans.--$56,381,000 is provided for training and 
employment services to Native Americans. The Committee does not 
agree with the budget request that would have cut over 3,000 
participants in this program and has provided a $2,685,000 
increase over the fiscal year 2007 level. This will allow for 
services to an estimated 23,790 participants in fiscal year 
2008.
    Re-integration of ex-offenders.--Within training and 
employment services, $68,746,000 is provided for fiscal year 
2008, which is $29,146,000 above the budget request. While the 
Committee sees merit in a program consolidation of the existing 
adult and youth ex-offender programs, the proposed cut was not 
in line with the need for services to this population. This 
program benefits ex-offenders and their communities by 
providing employment, mentoring, and transitional services 
designed to reduce recidivism. Of the amount provided, not less 
than $48,000,000 is dedicated for activities for youthful 
offenders.
    Young parents demonstration program.--Within training and 
employment services, $10,000,000 is provided under the WIA 
pilots and demonstrations authority for a young parents 
demonstration program, providing competitive grants to 
organizations to provide educational and occupational skills 
training leading to family economic self-sufficiency for young 
parents and expectant mothers ages 16 to 24. This 
recommendation is part of the Committee's initiative to help 
reduce the number of abortions in America by alleviating the 
economic pressures and other real life conditions that can 
sometimes cause women to decide not to carry their pregnancies 
to term.
    YouthBuild.--Within training and employment services, 
$60,000,000 is provided for the YouthBuild program which was 
transferred from the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development in fiscal year 2006. YouthBuild is an approach to 
workforce development that supports at-risk youth aged 16-24 in 
gaining high school credentials and receiving skills training 
by engaging in the construction or rehabilitation of low-income 
housing. The $10,500,000 increase for fiscal year 2008 will 
allow the program to increase participation by 20 percent above 
fiscal year 2007 to over 3,900 youth.
    Employment Service.--A $10,000,000 increase over the fiscal 
year 2007 level for employment service grants to States is 
provided. The budget request would have decreased State grants 
by $27,104,000, and the Administration's legislative proposal 
would have eliminated the Employment Service, which serves 
approximately 13 million people annually who are seeking 
employment, linking them to potential employers. The Committee 
believes that the labor exchange activities provided by State 
employment service agencies should be the primary source of 
core services for local one-stop systems, thus freeing up 
Workforce Investment Act funds to focus on intensive services 
and training, and begins a process of restoring the capacity of 
the Employment Service to provide this key labor exchange role 
through this increase in State grants.
    Community service employment for older Americans.--A 
$47,289,000 increase over fiscal year 2007 is provided for this 
program, which provides subsidies that allow low-income seniors 
to work in community service activities. This amount is 
$180,900,000 above the budget request, which would have reduced 
the number of seniors served by 43 percent below the fiscal 
year 2007 level. The increased funding will allow 103,000 low 
income seniors to participate in the program and to receive an 
anticipated Federal minimum wage increase to $6.55 an hour 
during program year 2008.
    Job Corps.--A $42,621,000 increase over fiscal year 2007 is 
provided for the Job Corps program. Job Corps is a nationwide 
network of residential facilities that provide a comprehensive 
and intensive array of training, job placement and support 
services to at-risk young adults, aged 16 to 24. The 
recommended funding level is $98,232,000 over the budget 
request, which would have decreased the number of student 
training slots by 4,310. The increase in funding will allow the 
program to add an additional 300 student training slots for a 
new center opening during program year 2008.
    Career and technical education State grants.--
$1,181,553,000 is provided for basic grants to States under the 
Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 level. This level is 
$581,553,000 above the budget request, which would have reduced 
funding for State grants nearly in half. State grants support a 
variety of vocational education programs developed in 
accordance with the State plan. In addition to resources to 
institutions serving high concentrations of low-income 
students, this program supports vocational education for adults 
who need retraining to adapt to changing technologies and labor 
markets.

                      PROTECTING AMERICAN WORKERS

    The Committee recommends $45,488,000 over fiscal year 2007, 
and $56,007,000 over the President's budget request, for 
Department of Labor agencies responsible for worker protection 
and worker rights.
    Since the 1970s when the Occupational Safety and Health Act 
(OSHA) and the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act (MSHA) were 
passed, workplace safety and health conditions have improved 
significantly. Yet, as demonstrated by events such as the Sago, 
West Virginia mine disaster and the Texas City, Texas BP 
explosion, too many workers still remain at risk, and face 
death, injury or disease as a result of their jobs.
    Recent progress in protecting workers' safety and health is 
slowing, and for some groups of workers, jobs are becoming more 
dangerous. The most recent job fatality data show 5,734 fatal 
workplace injuries reported in 2005, with significant increases 
in fatalities among Hispanic, African-American, foreign-born 
and young workers. With regulatory action virtually halted at 
the Department of Labor, health and safety rules are not 
keeping up with changes in the economy and the workplace. The 
Committee is deeply concerned that we are failing to protect 
workers from both new and existing workplace hazards.
    Similar concerns extend to the enforcement of employment 
standards. Since 2001, the Wage and Hour Division's 
investigations of low-wage industries have fallen dramatically: 
agriculture industry (including poultry processing) 
investigations are down by 39 percent; health care industry 
(including nursing homes) investigations are down by 32 
percent; and garment manufacturing industry investigations are 
down by 68 percent.
    In these and additional industries, wage theft and overtime 
abuses are prevalent. Uninvestigated overtime violations, the 
misclassification of employees as independent contractors, and 
efforts to undermine family and medical leave all result in 
workers being exploited in ways prohibited under the law. 
Workers are increasingly forced to resort to the courts for 
remedies because the Federal institutions that should be 
protecting them are not.
    Pension and health protections are also a critical 
component of the worker protection agenda. Today, 45 percent of 
workers in the private sector lack health insurance from their 
employer, up from 41 percent in 2000. The share of jobs without 
a pension also rose--from 50 percent in 2000 to 55 percent in 
the most recent year of data (2005).
    Throughout the Department of Labor, worker protection 
staffing levels have declined over the past six years. OSHA 
staffing declined 8.6 percent from fiscal year 2001 to fiscal 
year 2007. Staffing at the Employment Standards Administration 
declined 9.4 percent during the same period. Even after the 
addition of 170 coal inspectors as part of a 2006 emergency 
supplemental appropriation, MSHA staffing declined 2.2 percent 
during that period.
    Creating a level playing field for American workers also 
involves addressing workers' rights abroad, especially among 
our trading partners. The Committee believes that the 
Administration's repeated requests to reduce funding for 
international labor activities, which for fiscal year 2008 
amounts to more than 80 percent, is not in keeping with the 
need for the U.S. to be a leader in promoting international 
worker rights, both because of our leadership role in the world 
and the impact that labor practices in other countries have on 
our own workers due to the global nature of our economy.
    The Department of Labor has established a number of 
strategic goals, and the Committee is pleased that these goals 
include promoting workplaces that are safe, healthful and fair. 
In the past six years, however, the Department's budget has not 
adequately supported the resources necessary to ensure that 
safety, health and fairness are the hallmarks of the American 
workplace. With this budget, the Committee is beginning to 
address the decline in federal enforcement staff, with a goal 
of rebuilding the capacity of the Department of Labor to 
fulfill its mission to protect Americans in the workplace.
    The decline in enforcement is not an issue of staffing 
alone. The Committee is also concerned by the fact that 
constant delays in the issuance of worker protection standards 
have resulted in workplaces that are less safe and less fair. 
Bill language is included to expedite the regulatory process 
and send the clear signal that inaction is not acceptable when 
it jeopardizes the safety and health of American workers. But 
even while the Committee is pursuing improved standards for 
workplace safety and fairness, the Committee can at least take 
action to ensure that current laws and standards are enforced.
    The Committee cannot reverse the damage done over the past 
six years in one year alone, but the Committee can begin the 
job. Within the amounts appropriated for worker protection and 
worker rights for fiscal year 2008, some highlighted 
investments include:
    Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).--A 
$16,591,000 increase above the fiscal year 2007 level is 
provided to the agency responsible for ensuring that 113 
million Americans benefit from safe and healthy workplaces. 
Within the $13,155,000 increase provided for Federal 
enforcement, $7,082,000 is dedicated to adding 47 positions to 
begin to rebuild the enforcement capacity of OSHA, with a 
special emphasis on process safety management inspections and 
the hiring of bilingual inspectors. These additional positions 
are a downpayment toward a goal of restoring the enforcement 
capabilities of OSHA within the next several years. In 
providing these enforcement positions, the Committee moves 
resources from voluntary compliance programs until the 
Department collects the data necessary for a full evaluation of 
the effectiveness of these programs. Also included in the 
recommendation is $10,116,000 for the Susan Harwood training 
grant program that supports worker safety and health training 
and education programs that the Committee believes are an 
important component of a comprehensive approach to worker 
protection. An additional investment of $1,225,000 is also 
provided to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to allow for 
focused research studies on work-related injuries and 
illnesses. These studies were conducted previously by BLS 
through its work injury reports, but were suspended due to lack 
of resources. The studies provided detailed information on the 
causes and means of preventing injuries and illnesses and the 
new funding is designed to help re-establish this series of 
reports, so as to provide important information to employers, 
researchers and policy makers.
    Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).--An 
$11,908,000 increase above the fiscal year 2007 level is 
provided to continue a revitalization of enforcement activities 
to ensure the safety and health of more than 300,000 people who 
work in the mining industry. These resources support the 
retention of 170 coal inspectors that MSHA reports it is on 
target to hire by the end of fiscal year 2007. The initial 
funding for these positions was provided in emergency 
supplemental appropriations for fiscal year 2006 following the 
coal mine tragedies in West Virginia and Kentucky. Because the 
hiring and retention of coal inspectors is of importance to the 
mission of MSHA, quarterly reports on the agency's progress in 
filling all allocated inspector positions and completing the 
training of new inspectors, is required.
    Wage and Hour Division (WHD).--A $12,145,000 increase above 
the fiscal year 2007 level is provided. Included in this amount 
is $5,000,000 to support an additional 36 enforcement positions 
to increase activities in low-wage industries. The new 
resources will allow WHD to increase inspections and 
investigations of industries with high concentrations of low-
wage and other vulnerable workers, and industries with high 
levels of wage and hour violations. The Committee also believes 
it is important to increase the number of front-line 
investigators that are fluent in the languages of the 
workforces in which non-English-speaking workers predominate.
    International Labor Affairs Bureau (ILAB).--In addition to 
enforcing our worker protection laws at home, the Committee 
believes that America must be a leader abroad. For this reason, 
the Committee does not agree with the Administration's budget 
request to eliminate international cooperative agreements and 
grants aimed at eliminating child labor, promoting worker 
rights, and improving labor standards around the world. The 
Committee provides $58,419,000 above the budget request for 
ILAB for a total of $72,516,000. These funds include resources 
to continue the successful program of international grants to 
reduce child labor and $5,000,000 to implement model programs 
to address worker rights issues through technical assistance in 
countries with which the United States has trade preference 
programs.

                              Comparisons

    The program descriptions that follow, and the detailed 
table at the back of the report, compare the Committee 
recommendations to comparable fiscal year 2007 levels and the 
Administration's budget requests. One-time and emergency 
supplementals are not included for purposes of these 
comparisons.

                            Operating Plans

    The Committee considers the numbers identified in this 
bill, this report and the detailed table accompanying this 
report to be determinative of agency budgets funded in this 
bill. Unless specified otherwise in the bill, the report, or 
the detailed table, the amounts provided for fiscal year 2008 
shall be the amounts included in agency budget requests. Funds 
should be apportioned and allocated accordingly, and any 
changes in funding are subject to reprogramming and 
notification procedures. Within 45 days of enactment each 
Department and related Agency funded by this Act shall submit 
an operating plan to the Committees on Appropriations in the 
House and the Senate for approval. The operating plan should 
detail any reprogramming requests which are based on 
information obtained since the submission of the budget in 
February 2007 or based on the effects of the amounts provided 
in this Act.

                      TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

                 Employment and Training Administration

                    TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

                        (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS)

    The Committee recommends $3,579,530,000 for this account, 
which provides funding authorized primarily by the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998 (WIA). This amount is $23,258,000 above 
the fiscal year 2007 level and $607,491,000 above the budget 
request, after adjusting for the transfer of the Office of Job 
Corps.
    The Training and Employment Services account is comprised 
of programs that enhance the employment and earnings of those 
in need of such services, operated through a decentralized 
system of skill training activities and related services. The 
account is mostly forward-funded on a July to June cycle, with 
funds provided for fiscal year 2008 supporting these activities 
from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009.
    The Committee repeats a provision allowing for local boards 
to transfer of up to 30 percent of funds made available for 
dislocated workers and adult activities between these funding 
streams, upon approval by the Governor. The Administration's 
request was to increase transfer authority to 40 percent, which 
the Committee believes is unnecessary based on current use of 
transfer authority under this language, and the fact that 
waivers of the funds transfer limit have already been granted 
to 35 States who requested such flexibility.
Adult employment and training activities
    For adult employment and training activities, the Committee 
recommends $864,199,000, which is the same amount as the fiscal 
year 2007 level and $152,199,000 above the budget request. Of 
the amount recommended, $712,000,000 will become available on 
October 1, 2008. This program is authorized by the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998. The funds are allocated by formula to 
States and further distributed to local workforce investment 
boards. Services for adults will be provided through the one-
stop career center system and most customers receiving training 
use their individual training accounts to determine which 
programs and providers fit their needs. The Act authorizes core 
services available to all adults with no eligibility 
requirements, and intensive services for unemployed individuals 
who are not able to find jobs through core services alone.
    There is evidence that the core services of the adult, 
dislocated and youth programs at local one-stop career centers 
sometimes overlap with the statewide labor exchange services 
provided with funds in the state unemployment insurance and 
employment services operations account. This diminishes the 
overall effectiveness of the two programs by creating 
unnecessary duplication. Assuring that labor exchange and other 
services provided by State agencies under the Wagner-Peyser Act 
serve as the primary source of those core services within local 
one-stop systems would free up WIA funds to focus on intensive 
services and training. To address this overlap, the Committee 
instructs the Department to establish guidance to require that 
local one-stop career centers have coordination agreements with 
the Employment Service and to ensure that personnel funded out 
employment service allotments to States are the primary 
providers of labor exchange services within one-stop career 
centers. To the maximum extent possible, the Department should 
ensure that adult, dislocated and youth funds primarily support 
the provision of training and more intensive services required 
by individuals who are not able to secure employment through 
core services. The Department should request that State and 
local plans include the establishment of coordination 
agreements and should establish measures to ensure that local 
entities comply with this guidance.
Dislocated worker employment and training activities
    For dislocated worker employment and training activities, 
the Committee recommends $1,471,903,000, which is the same 
amount as the fiscal year 2007 level and $356,964,000 above the 
budget request. Of the amount recommended, $1,060,000,000 will 
become available on October 1, 2008. Of the total, 
$1,189,811,000 is designated for State formula grants that 
support core services, intensive services, training, and 
supportive services. In addition, States use these funds for 
rapid response assistance to help workers affected by mass 
layoffs and plant closures.
    The Committee recommendation includes $282,092,000 for the 
national reserve, which supports national emergency grants to 
respond to mass layoffs, plant and/or military base closings, 
and natural disasters across the country, which cannot 
otherwise be anticipated, and for statewide and multiple sector 
activities, as well as technical assistance and training and 
demonstration projects. The Committee recommends that these 
activities be coordinated with area economic development needs. 
As in prior years, the bill provides that dislocated worker 
funds available under section 171(d) may used for demonstration 
projects that provide assistance to new entrants in the 
workforce and incumbent workers. The bill provides $2,600,000 
of the funds available for national reserve activities shall be 
available on October 1, 2007 for the purpose of a grant to 
continue the work of the National Center on Education and the 
Economy. The Committee is concerned that the Department has 
used dislocated worker assistance national reserve funds, and 
other pilot and demonstration resources, to advance the 
Administration's career advancement account proposal, and its 
predecessor proposal for personal reemployment accounts, and 
directs that no additional grants be made for these activities 
prior to a specific authorization of this approach.
    The Committee supports the efforts of the Department in 
making dislocated worker assistance national reserve funds 
available for grants to the States to provide ``gap filler'' 
services to Trade Adjustment Act (TAA) participants to maximize 
the number of trade-certified workers who will qualify for the 
health coverage tax credit. Nevertheless, the Committee 
believes that increased outreach and support is needed to 
States to provide these ``gap filler'' services, and that 
health care coverage assistance should be extended to 
dislocated workers awaiting TAA certification. A general 
provision in the bill addresses this need by permitting a 
portion of funds under the American Competitiveness and 
Workforce Improvement Act to be used for this purpose.
    Community-based job training grants.--The Committee does 
not include separate funds for this initiative but provides 
that up to $125,000,000 of the amount made available for the 
dislocated worker assistance national reserve shall be 
available for community-based job training grants. This amount 
is the same as provided in fiscal year 2007, and $25,000,000 
less than the budget request. These funds are for competitive 
grants to community colleges and one-stop career centers, and 
the amount provided will fund over 70 new grantees. The 
Committee repeats a request that all applicants describe the 
role area one-stop centers will play in the proposed project in 
their applications. The Committee is interested in programs 
that result in training outcomes and instructs the Department 
to give priority to grant applications that will result in 
participants obtaining industry-recognized credentials. The 
Committee requests that the Secretary provide a report to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by March 1, 2008 
on training outcomes achieved thus far by community college 
grantees.
Youth employment and training activities
    For youth activities, the Committee recommends 
$940,500,000, which is the same amount as the fiscal year 2007 
level and $100,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 consolidated the 
summer youth employment and training program and youth training 
grants under the Job Training Partnership Act into a single 
youth training activity. The funds are allocated by formula to 
States and further distributed to local workforce investment 
boards in accordance with the Workforce Investment Act of 1988. 
These funds are made available one quarter earlier than the 
adult and dislocated worker funds to allow for summer jobs 
programming.

Native Americans

    For Native Americans, the Committee recommends $56,381,000, 
which is $2,685,000 above the fiscal year 2007 level and 
$11,381,000 above the budget request. This program, authorized 
by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, is designed to improve 
the economic well being of Native Americans (Indians, Eskimos, 
Aleuts, and Native Hawaiians) through the provision of 
training, work experience, and other employment-related 
services and opportunities that are intended to aid the 
participants in securing permanent, unsubsidized jobs. The 
Department of Labor allocates formula grants to Indian tribes 
and other Native American groups whose eligibility for such 
grants is established in accordance with Department 
regulations.
    Census data indicates that American Indians and Alaska 
Natives are by far the most impoverished groups in the nation. 
The Committee does not agree with the budget request that would 
have resulted in cutting participation by over 3,000 
individuals.

Migrant and seasonal farmworkers

    The migrant and seasonal farmworkers program, authorized by 
the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, is designed to serve 
members of economically disadvantaged families whose principal 
livelihood is derived from migratory and other forms of 
seasonal farm work, fishing, or logging activities. Enrollees 
and their families are provided with training and related 
services intended to prepare them for stable, year-round 
employment within and outside of the agriculture industry.
    For migrant and seasonal farmworkers, the Committee 
recommends $83,740,000, which is $3,988,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 level. For the fifth year in a row the budget request 
did not include funds for this program. The Committee is 
unwilling to terminate the program, as requested, until the 
Department has demonstrated that mainstream job training 
programs, as well as related health, welfare and housing 
programs, are in place to provide the combination of services 
needed to help secure permanent employment for farm and 
forestry workers. The Committee is concerned that the 
Department believes that the program is not sufficiently 
focused on job training and includes language requiring that 
not less than 70 percent of the funds for the program be spent 
on employment and training services.
    As in prior years, the bill directs that of the amounts 
made available, $5,000,000 is targeted for migrant and seasonal 
farmworker housing grants. The bill further directs that not 
less than 70 percent of this amount be used for permanent 
housing grants. The Committee is concerned about the use of 
funds for temporary housing and the conditions under which 
these funds are used. The Committee directs the Department of 
Labor to report by March 1, 2008 on the use of farmworker 
housing funds. In particular the Department should provide 
information on the amount of funds used for permanent and 
temporary housing activities, respectively, a list of the 
communities served, a list of the grantees and the States in 
which they are located, the total number of individuals or 
families served, and a list of allowable temporary housing 
activities.

YouthBuild

    For the YouthBuild program, the Committee recommends 
$60,000,000, which is $10,500,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
level and $10,000,000 above the request.
    The YouthBuild program was transferred from the Department 
of Housing and Urban Development in fiscal year 2007. 
YouthBuild is an approach to workforce development that 
supports at-risk youth aged 16-24 in gaining high school 
credentials and receiving skills training that leads to 
employment. Training and educational opportunities are provided 
while participants are engaged in constructing or 
rehabilitating affordable housing for low-income or homeless 
families in their communities, with time split between the 
construction site and the classroom.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of skilled trades 
training and education in construction to helping troubled 
youth become members of this high growth industry's workforce. 
The Committee encourages the Department to seek out the 
experience of employer-based groups and labor-management 
partnerships to help students enrolled in the YouthBuild 
program reap the benefits of skilled trades training and career 
opportunities in the building industry.
    YouthBuild grants are awarded on a competitive basis. The 
increase for fiscal year 2008 will allow for the selection of 
YouthBuild projects in approximately 20 additional communities.

Women in apprenticeship

    For the Women in Apprenticeship and Non-Traditional 
Occupations Act of 1992, the Committee recommends $1,000,000 
for grants to employers, unions, and community-based 
organizations for support of activities to train, retrain, and 
place women in non-traditional jobs and occupations so as to 
provide expanded access to careers with family-sustaining 
wages. The Committee is not in agreement with the budget 
request to terminate this program and continues the program at 
the fiscal year 2007 level.

National competitive grant programs

    This activity includes Workforce Investment Act authorized 
programs in support of the workforce system, including 
technical assistance and incentive grants, evaluations, pilots, 
demonstrations, and research.
    Reintegration of ex-offenders.--The Committee recommends 
$68,746,000 for this program, which consolidates two prior 
programs--responsible reintegration of youthful offenders and 
the prisoner re-entry initiative--into a single program. This 
is $29,146,000 above the budget request and the same as the 
combined, comparable fiscal year 2007 level for ex-offender 
reintegration activities. While the Committee sees merit in a 
program consolidation, the budget request does not meet the 
need for reintegration assistance for ex-offenders. The 
Committee notes that nearly 650,000 people are released from 
State and Federal prison yearly. According to the Bureau of 
Justice Statistics (BJS) over 50 percent of those released from 
incarceration will be in some form of legal trouble within 3 
years. Providing job training programs and career counseling 
targeted toward prisoner re-entry is critical to preventing 
recidivism and to promoting the effective reintegration of 
offenders back into communities. The Committee urges the 
Department to include the approach piloted under the 
incarcerated veterans transition program in competitions for 
funding under this program to ensure that the employment needs 
of this population are addressed. Within the combined 
reintegration of ex-offenders program, the bill provides that 
no less than $48,000,000 be utilized for youthful offender 
activities.
    Pilots, demonstrations and research.--The Committee 
recommends $28,140,000 for grants or contracts to conduct 
research, pilots or demonstrations that improve techniques or 
demonstrate the effectiveness of programs. This is $13,440,000 
above the fiscal year 2007 level and $15,140,000 above the 
budget request.
    The bill provides that $10,000,000 be used for a new young 
parents demonstration program in order to provide educational 
and occupational skills training leading to family economic 
self-sufficiency to young parents (both mothers and fathers) 
and expectant mothers ages 16 to 24. The Committee intends that 
competitive awards be made to local workforce investment 
boards, one-stop career centers, community-based organizations 
(CBOs), community colleges, and other applicants that 
demonstrate linkages to the local workforce investment system. 
Eligible projects should provide a range of activities 
including education and training leading to skills and 
credentials valued in the local labor market, career ladder 
programs, paid work experience, supportive services, and 
counseling on self-sufficiency measures particular to the local 
community, as well as post-employment retention and advancement 
supportive services. Projects are to be encouraged to serve 
young parents in high-risk categories, including those under 
the jurisdiction of the justice system, in the child welfare or 
foster care system, homeless individuals, or victims of child 
abuse. The Department should assure that pilot projects adhere 
to common performance measures and be subject to evaluation. 
The Committee directs that the Employment and Training 
Administration administer the pilot program in partnership with 
the Women's Bureau. The Committee's recommendation includes 
this $10,000,000 grant program as part of its initiative to 
help reduce the number of abortions in America by alleviating 
the economic pressures and other real life conditions that can 
sometimes cause women to decide not to carry their pregnancies 
to term.
    For the funds in this account not designated for the young 
parents initiative, the Committee includes the following 
projects in the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Adelante Development Center, Albuquerque, NM for                $200,000
 employment and training services....................
Agudath Israel of America Community Services, Inc.,              300,000
 Brooklyn, NY for its Fresh Start job training and
 counseling program..................................
Arc of Blackstone Valley, Pawtucket, RI for a                    150,000
 workforce development initiative....................
Bellingham Technical College, Bellingham, WA for a               125,000
 Process Technology Workforce Development Project....
Bismarck State College, Bismarck, ND for an                      100,000
 instrumentation and control training program for the
 energy industry.....................................
Brookdale Community College, Lincroft, NJ for                    150,000
 workforce training programs through its Center for
 Excellence in Technology, Telecommunications and
 Economic Development................................
Capital IDEA, Austin, TX for workforce development                50,000
 services for disadvantaged adults...................
Center for Employment Training, San Jose, CA for its             250,000
 building trades program for out-of-school youth.....
Central Carolina Tech College, Sumter, SC for                    350,000
 training in healthcare professions..................
Central Maine Community College, Auburn, ME for a                150,000
 training program in precision metalworking and
 machine tool technology.............................
Chinese-American Planning Council, New York, NY for              200,000
 counseling, vocational training, job placement, and
 ESL services........................................
City College of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA for             300,000
 a health care workforce training initiative through
 the Welcome Back Center.............................
City of Alexandria, VA for an automotive industry                275,000
 workforce development and training initiative.......
City of Baltimore, MD for the Park Heights                       250,000
 Partnership for Jobs................................
City of Milwaukee, WI for a project to train youth in            205,000
 construction trades.................................
City of Palmdale, Palmdale, CA for a business                    150,000
 resource network to enhance worker skills
 development.........................................
City of Suffolk, VA for training programs at the                 250,000
 Suffolk Workforce Development Center................
City of West Palm Beach, FL for training programs for            300,000
 at-risk youth.......................................
Clarian Health Partners, Indianapolis, IN for                    125,000
 workforce development in the health care industry...
College of Southern Maryland, La Plata, MD, for its              300,000
 Partnership for the Advancement of Construction and
 Transportation Training Project.....................
Community Learning Center, Fort Worth, TX for                    350,000
 expansion of the Advanced Manufacturing Training
 Partnership Program.................................
Des Moines Area Community College, Arkeny, IA for                250,000
 workforce recruitment and training to address area
 skill shortages.....................................
Dillard University, New Orleans, LA for recruitment              200,000
 and training of nursing assistants..................
East Los Angeles Community Union, Los Angeles, CA for            300,000
 a workforce training initiative.....................
Easter Seals Arc of Northeast Indiana, Inc., Fort                100,000
 Wayne, IN for the Production and Worker Training
 Services program....................................
Edgar Campbell Foundation, Philadelphia, PA for                  300,000
 counseling, job placement and work readiness
 programs............................................
Employment & Economic Development Department of San              175,000
 Joaquin County, Stockton, CA for a work experience
 program for at-risk youth...........................
Essex County Community Organization, Lynn, MA for its            250,000
 E-Team Machinist Training Program...................
Foundation of the Delaware County Chamber, Media, PA             150,000
 for workforce development and job readiness services
Goodwill of Southern Nevada, North Las Vegas, NV for             300,000
 workforce development programs......................
Greater Akron Chamber, Akron, OH for a summer                    300,000
 apprenticeship program for youth....................
Groden Center, Providence, RI for job readiness                  150,000
 training for adults with Asperger's Syndrome........
Guam Community College, Mangilao, Guam for skilled               250,000
 craft training......................................
Hamilton County Government, Chattanooga, TN for                  440,000
 training activities related to manufacturing
 processes...........................................
Home of Life Community Development Corp., Chicago, IL            150,000
 for a financial services training and placement
 program.............................................
Homecare Workers Training Center, Los Angeles, CA for            100,000
 nurse assistant training............................
International Fellowship of Chaplains, Inc., Saginaw,            200,000
 MI for the Road to Hope training program in Seneca
 County, OH..........................................
Iowa Valley Community College, Marshalltown, IA for              100,000
 job training activities.............................
Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana--Columbus                  150,000
 Region, Indianapolis, IN for the Center for
 Cybersecurity for workforce development.............
Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana Lafayette,                 140,000
 Indianapolis, IN for job training programs at the
 Center for Health Information Technology............
Kansas City Kansas Community College, Kansas City, KS            200,000
 for workforce training and placement for the retail
 and hospitality industries..........................
Kent State University/Trumbull County, Warren, OH for            250,000
 regional training through the Northeast Ohio
 Advanced Manufacturing Institute....................
Louisiana Delta Community College, Monroe, LA for a              200,000
 job training initiative.............................
Louisiana National Guard, Carville, LA for the Job               150,000
 Challenge Program...................................
Manufacturing Association of Central New York,                   250,000
 Syracuse, NY for a workforce training project.......
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health                     150,000
 Sciences, Manchester, NH for training of nurses,
 physician assistants, and pharmacists...............
McHenry County Community College, Woodstock, IL for              375,000
 employer-identified occupational training...........
Minot State University, Minot, ND for the Job Corps              100,000
 Executive Management Program........................
Mission Language and Vocational School, San                      250,000
 Francisco, CA for a training program in health-
 related occupations.................................
Neighborhood First Program, Inc., Bristol, PA for                125,000
 services for at-risk youth..........................
NewLife Academy of Information Technology, East                  150,000
 Liverpool, OH for training for information
 technology careers..................................
North West Pasadena Development Corp., Pasedena, CA              100,000
 for job training for low-income individuals.........
Northcott Neighborhood House, Milwaukee, WI for                   70,000
 construction industry training for youth............
Oakland Community College, Bloomfield Hills, MI to               450,000
 lead a consortium on workforce development for
 emerging business sectors...........................
Opportunity, Inc., Highland Park, IL for workforce               250,000
 development activities..............................
Our Piece of the Pie, Hartford, CT for education and             500,000
 employment services for out-of-school youth.........
Parish of Rapides Career Solutions Center,                       200,000
 Alexandria, LA for a job training initiative........
Philadelphia Shipyard Development Corporation,                   350,000
 Philadelphia, PA for on-the-job training in
 shipbuilding technology.............................
Piedmont Virginia Community College, Charlottesville,            100,000
 VA for the Residential Construction Academy.........
Poder Learning Center, Chicago, IL for immigrant                 200,000
 neighborhood education and job development services.
Precision Manufacturing Institute, Meadville, PA for             100,000
 high-technology training programs...................
Project One Inc., Louisville, KY for summer job                  150,000
 activities for disadvantaged youth..................
Project QUEST, Inc., San Antonio, TX for workforce                75,000
 development services to low-income residents........
PRONTO of Long Island, Inc., Bayshore, NY for a                  100,000
 vocational training initiative......................
Schoenbaum Family Enrichment Center, Charleston, WV              250,000
 for its Enterprise Development Initiative...........
Schuylkill Intermediate Unit 29, Marlin, PA for a                150,000
 workforce training program..........................
South Bay Workforce Investment Board, Hawthorne, CA              260,000
 for its Bridge-to-Work program......................
Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau,             300,000
 MO for equipment and training.......................
Southern University at Shreveport, Shreveport, LA for            100,000
 healthcare worker training activities...............
Southside Virginia Community College, Alberta, VA for            200,000
 the Heavy Equipment Training Program................
Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford,             250,000
 OK for workforce development in the manufacturing
 sector..............................................
St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment, St.                 350,000
 Louis, MO for a summer jobs program for youth.......
Towson University, Towson, MD for education and                  250,000
 training services for careers in homeland security..
United Mine Workers of America, Washington, PA for               750,000
 the UMWA Career Center's mine worker training and
 reemployment programs...............................
University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL to provide             200,000
 teacher training to veterans........................
Veteran Community Initiatives, Inc., Johnstown, PA               500,000
 for employment services and support programs for
 veterans............................................
Vincennes University, Vincennes, IN for heavy                    350,000
 equipment operator training for the mining industry.
Wayne County, NY Planning Department, Lyons, NY for              250,000
 workforce development programs in Central New York..
West Los Angeles College, Culver City, CA for a craft            300,000
 and technican training program......................
Women Work and Community, Augusta, ME for a women's              300,000
 workforce training and development program..........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Evaluation.--The Committee recommends $4,921,000 to provide 
for the continuing evaluation of programs conducted under the 
Workforce Investment Act of 1998, as well as of Federally 
funded employment-related activities under other provisions of 
law. This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 level and 
$2,079,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee directs the Department of Labor to continue 
to submit quarterly reports to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees on the status of grants made from H-
1B fees, national emergency grants (including grants made under 
the up to 10 percent authority for dislocated worker 
demonstration and pilot projects), high-growth job training 
initiative awards from all sources, and awards made for pilot, 
demonstration, multi-service, research, and multi-State 
projects. These reports shall be submitted to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 15 days after 
the end of each quarter and shall summarize by funding source 
all grants awarded. This report shall also include a list of 
all awards made during the quarter and for each award shall 
include the grantee; the amount of the award; the funding 
source of the award; whether the award was made competitively 
or by sole source and, if sole source, the justification; the 
purpose of the award, the number of workers to be trained, and 
other expected outcomes. This will allow for continued 
evaluation of the use of sole-source contracting for those 
remaining grants where the bill does not require competitive 
procurement.
    The bill repeats a provision in the 2007 Continuing 
Appropriations Resolution that requires the Secretary of Labor 
to award grants for training for employment in high growth 
industries on a competitive basis. The bill also includes 
language that requires that funds available to the Department 
under the American Competitiveness and Workforce Improvement 
Act be available only for grants for training in the 
occupations and industries for which employers use the visas 
that generate these funds, and that related activities be 
limited to those necessary to support such training. The 
Committee does not apply this restriction to competitive grant 
awards made in response to solicitations issued prior to April 
15, 2007, or to the grants authorized to assist States in 
addressing the gap in health coverage for trade-impacted 
workers. This permits the Department to fund the obligations 
made in three rounds of Workforce Innovation in Regional 
Economic Development (WIRED) grants to States. To the extent 
possible, however, the Committee urges that WIRED grantees be 
asked to address the training needs in their regions for the 
same target industries and occupations identified in this 
section. The Committee urges that preference for these grants 
be given to sector-based approaches that involve multiple 
employers, including those that involve labor-management 
partnerships, to address skill shortages. The Committee is also 
interested in career ladder approaches in targeted industries, 
including information technology, engineering and advanced 
manufacturing, and health care.
    The Committee includes a provision rescinding $335,000,000 
in prior year unexpended balances from Workforce Investment Act 
programs. The Committee also rescinds $44,000 in unexpended 
funds originally provided for the activities of the National 
Skill Standards Board, as requested.

            COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT FOR OLDER AMERICANS

    The Committee recommends $530,900,000 for community service 
employment for older Americans, which is $47,289,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 level and $180,900,000 above the budget 
request. The community service employment for older Americans 
program provides grants to public and private nonprofit 
organizations that subsidize part-time work in community 
service activities for unemployed persons aged 55 and older, 
whose family's annual income does not exceed 125 percent of the 
poverty level.
    The Committee does not agree with the budget request, which 
would cut the number of seniors served by 44,000 or 43 percent 
below the fiscal year 2007 level, from 103,000 to 59,000 in 
fiscal year 2008. The Committee recommendation will continue 
the current slot level of 103,000 low-income seniors, and 
provides funds for the second anticipated increment of a 
Federal minimum wage increase, from $5.85 to $6.55 an hour, for 
program participants.

              FEDERAL UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS AND ALLOWANCES

    The Committee recommends $888,700,000 for this account, 
which is $51,100,000 above the fiscal year 2007 level and the 
same as the budget request.
    The trade adjustment assistance program (TAA) provides 
assistance to certified workers adversely affected by imports 
or from trade with countries covered by the North America Free 
Trade Agreement, the Andean Trade Preference Act, African 
Growth and Opportunity Act, or the Caribbean Basin Economic 
Recovery Act. The Trade Adjustment Assistance Reform Act of 
2002 expanded eligibility to include secondary workers whose 
layoffs were caused by the loss of business by a supplier of 
component parts, a final assembler, or a finisher, for a firm 
employing a worker group that has received TAA certification. 
Funding will provide for the payment of trade adjustment 
benefit payments; training, job search allowances, relocation 
allowances and associated administrative costs; and alternative 
trade adjustment assistance (ATAA) wage supplements.
    For fiscal year 2006, approximately 120,000 workers were 
potentially eligible to apply for TAA benefits and service. 
However, of these potentially eligible workers, roughly 40,000 
individuals begin receiving TAA-funded benefits or services 
each year, together with another 40,000 individuals who entered 
the program in previous years and continue to receive benefits 
or services. The Committee believes that the Department can do 
more to conduct outreach to trade affected workers to ensure 
that eligible workers learn about the program. The lack of 
outreach is particularly acute in regard to the secondary 
worker populations where take up rates are far below what was 
expected when the new eligibility was established.
    The Committee also is concerned by the fact that only a 
small percentage of TAA participants take advantage of the 
health coverage tax credit (HCTC) that was authorized by the 
Trade Adjustment Assistance Reform Act of 2002. The low take-up 
rate may largely be a function of the high costs of health 
insurance coverage overall, but there is also evidence that 
some eligible workers are affected by the gap in time between 
their application for TAA benefits, their certification for 
those benefits, and the certification by the Internal Revenue 
Service (IRS) for the HCTC itself. The Committee is in 
agreement with the Department's use of dislocated worker 
assistance national reserve funds to help States address this 
issue, but believes that additional outreach and assistance is 
necessary to ensure that workers who can benefit from the HCTC 
do not lose their health care coverage while awaiting 
certification for either TAA by the Department, or the tax 
credit by IRS. To ensure that there are sufficient funds for 
this purpose, the bill includes a general provision providing 
that up to $20,000,000 from funds available to the Department 
under the American Competitiveness and Workforce Improvement 
Act of 1998 may be used for this purpose.

     STATE UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $3,382,614,000 for this account, 
which is $42,264,000 above the fiscal year 2007 level and 
$43,861,000 above the budget request. Included in the total 
available is $3,296,669,000 authorized to be drawn from the 
employment security administration account of the Unemployment 
Trust Fund and $85,945,000 to be provided from the general fund 
of the Treasury. The funds in this account are used to provide 
administrative grants and assistance to State agencies that 
administer Federal and State unemployment compensation laws and 
operate the public Employment Service.
    For unemployment insurance services, the Committee 
recommends $2,561,223,000. This is $53,553,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 level and the same as the budget request. The total 
includes $2,550,723,000 for State operations and $10,500,000 
for national activities. Included in the amount provided for 
State operations is an additional $40,000,000, for a total of 
$50,000,000 for in-person reemployment and eligibility 
assessments in one-stop centers. These reviews are conducted by 
State employment security agency staff. The Committee concurs 
with the budget request, which cites that a number of studies 
have found that attention to eligibility and reemployment needs 
assessments result in relatively shorter claims duration for 
beneficiaries. The Committee also concurs with the 
recommendation in the House report accompanying the fiscal year 
2008 budget resolution, which states that these program 
integrity funds are not intended to finance activities that 
would adversely affect workers who receive unemployment 
benefits. The bill requires the Secretary to submit a report to 
the Congress no later than 180 days following the end of the 
fiscal year containing comprehensive information on the savings 
that result from the assessments of unemployment insurance 
claimants and identifying best practices in program integrity 
and reemployment reviews. The bill provides for contingency 
funding for increased workloads that States may face in the 
administration of unemployment insurance by specifying that an 
additional $28,600,000 be available from the Unemployment 
Insurance Trust Fund for every 100,000 increase in average 
weekly insured claims above 2,786,000.
    For grants to the States for employment service (ES) 
activities, the Committee recommends $725,883,000, which 
includes $23,203,000 in general funds together with an 
authorization to spend $702,680,000 from the employment 
security administration account of the Unemployment Trust Fund. 
This is $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2007 level and 
$37,104,000 above the budget request. This increase represents 
the first enhancement for ES grants to the States in six years. 
The Committee believes that the labor exchange activities 
provided by State employment service agencies should be primary 
source of labor exchange services for the local one-stop 
system, thus freeing up Workforce Investment Act funds to focus 
on intensive services and training.
    The Committee recommends $32,766,000 for ES national 
activities, which is $662,000 below the fiscal year 2007 level 
and the same as the budget request.
    The Committee recommends $52,985,000 for one-stop career 
centers and labor market information, which is $10,870,000 
below the fiscal year 2007 level and $3,000,000 below the 
budget request. This funding supports access for customers in 
labor market transactions and career information, as well as 
supporting performance management systems. The Committee 
believes that the emphasis for these funds should be on the 
workforce information grants to States and directs that these 
grants be funded at not less than $32,430,000, which is the 
average of the prior two fiscal years. The Committee believes 
that funds above this amount should be dedicated to the 
investments needed to sustain the tools and activities that 
provide self-service career information and guidance to youth 
and adults and workforce information and analysis to policy-
makers and counselors, through America's career information 
network, America's service locator, the career voyages system, 
and the occupational information network (O*NET), and 
recommends that these activities be maintained at the fiscal 
year 2007 level. Remaining funds may be applied to other 
elements of the infrastructure of the labor market information 
system, including the wage record interchange system (WRIS) and 
the workforce investment streamlined performance reporting 
system (WISPR). The Committee believes it is inappropriate to 
use these funds for further capacity building grants to parties 
outside the public workforce investment system.
    The Committee recommends $9,757,000 for the work incentive 
grants program, which is $9,757,000 below the fiscal year 2007 
level. The budget request recommended elimination of this 
program. The program has funded grants to the States to 
demonstrate approaches to improving accessibility to one-stop 
career center services for new job seekers with disabilities. 
All States have now had an opportunity to receive grants for 
this purpose. However, due to the fact that workforce 
investment system funding has not been increased during the 
period of these grants, it will be difficult for the one-stop 
system to sustain these activities without continuation 
funding. The Committee provides 50 percent of the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and recommends that the Department use these 
funds to provide matching grants to the States that have hired 
disability navigators to assure that the navigator positions 
and practices are incorporated in the regular operations of 
their workforce system.

        ADVANCES TO THE UNEMPLOYMENT TRUST FUND AND OTHER FUNDS

    The Committee recommends $437,000,000 for this account, 
which is $28,000,000 below the fiscal year 2007 level and the 
same as the budget request. The appropriation is available to 
provide advances to several accounts for purposes authorized 
under various Federal and State unemployment insurance laws and 
the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund, whenever balances in such 
accounts prove insufficient.

                         Program Administration

    General funds in this account provide the Federal staff to 
administer employment and training programs under the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998, the Older Americans Act, the Trade Act, 
and the National Apprenticeship Act. Trust funds provide for 
the Federal administration of employment security functions 
under title III of the Social Security Act and the Immigration 
and Nationality Act.
    The Committee recommends $170,500,000 for fiscal year 2008, 
which is $45,662,000 below the budget request. The total amount 
includes $88,451,000 in general funds and authority to expend 
$82,049,000 from the employment security administration account 
of the Unemployment Trust Fund. The Committee recommendation 
provides $28,872,000 of the amount recommended by the President 
for this account under the Office of Job Corps for its 
administrative expenses. After this transfer is taken into 
account, the Committee recommendation for program 
administration is $630,000 below the comparable fiscal year 
2007 level.

               Employee Benefits Security Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The bill provides $142,925,000 for the Employee Benefits 
Security Administration (EBSA), which is $1,352,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 level and $4,500,000 below the budget request. 
This reduction reflects the funding of the EFAST2 electronic 
filing system in fiscal year 2007, rather than in fiscal year 
2008.
    EBSA is responsible for the enforcement of Title I of the 
Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) in both 
civil and criminal areas. This involves ERISA fiduciary and 
reporting/disclosure requirements. EBSA is also responsible for 
enforcement of sections 8477 and 8478 of the Federal Employees' 
Retirement Security Act of 1986. The agency was also given 
responsibilities under the Health Insurance Portability and 
Accountability Act of 1996.
    Funds were provided in fiscal year 2007 for the Department 
of Labor's EFAST2 electronic Form 5500 filing system and an 
additional $500,000 is included in the Committee recommendation 
for changes in reporting requirements mandated by the Pension 
Protection Act. The Committee expects that EBSA will contribute 
an additional amount of $2,500,000 from its fiscal years 2007 
and 2008 appropriations for this system, generated by one-time 
cost savings proposed in the last two years' budget requests. 
The Committee expects EBSA to minimize any potential negative 
impact of the project's financing on enforcement, compliance 
outreach, and education programs. The Department is directed to 
provide a schedule for completion of the EFAST2 system within 
30 days of enactment and to report monthly on progress relative 
to that schedule to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations.
    The Committee recommends that EBSA devote resources to the 
issuance of regulations that provide understandable and uniform 
reporting of all fees charged to 401(k) plans and participants 
with all fees required to be broken down by identifiable and 
meaningful categories and by source of payment. EBSA should 
also create a national education program to educate pension 
plan administrators and participants of 401(k) investment 
options, fees charged, and prohibitions on conflicts of 
interest. In addition, the Committee is concerned with the 
Department of Labor's lack of statistics on the continuation of 
health care coverage program known as COBRA. The Committee 
requests that the Department of Labor upgrade its data 
collection on participants in the COBRA program with specific 
emphasis on those who utilize COBRA benefits for the full 
extent of the authorized timeframe and subsequently lose health 
insurance coverage.

                  Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation

    The Corporation's budget for fiscal year 2007 is 
$411,151,000, which is $5,761,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The Corporation is a wholly owned government corporation 
established by ERISA. The law places it within the Department 
of Labor and makes the Secretary of Labor the chairperson of 
its board of directors. The Corporation receives its income 
from insurance premiums collected from covered pension plans, 
collection of employer liabilities imposed by ERISA, and 
investment earnings. It is also authorized to borrow up to 
$100,000,000 from the United States Treasury. The primary 
purpose of the Corporation is to guarantee the payment of 
pension plan benefits to participants if covered plans fail or 
go out of existence.
    The bill repeats language that permits workload driven 
increases in obligational authority based on the number of new 
plan participants in plans terminated by the Corporation. In 
addition, the bill includes new language that permits similar 
workload driven increases to cover the investment management 
fees based on increases in assets received by the Corporation 
as a result of new plan terminations, after approval by the 
Office of Management and Budget and notification of the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations.

                  Employment Standards Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                         (INCLUDING RESCISSION)

    The Committee recommends $436,508,000 for this account, 
which is $15,637,000 above the fiscal year 2007 level and 
$11,151,000 below the budget request. The bill includes 
$434,397,000 in general funds for this account and contains 
authority to expend $2,111,000 from the Special Fund 
established by the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation 
Act.
    The Employment Standards Administration (ESA) is involved 
in the administration of numerous laws, including the Fair 
Labor Standards Act, the Immigration and Nationality Act, the 
Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Workers' Protection Act, the 
Davis-Bacon Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Federal 
Employees' Compensation Act, the Longshore and Harbor Workers' 
Compensation Act, and the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act 
(black lung provisions). The agency also administers Executive 
Order 11246 related to affirmative action by Federal 
contractors and the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure 
Act.
    The Committee recommends a $5,000,000 increase for the wage 
and hour division (WHD) to support an additional 36 full time 
equivalents (FTE) for stronger enforcement activities in low-
wage industries and the Gulf Coast region, as requested. Even 
with these new positions, the number of enforcement staff in 
the division will have declined by 12.6 percent from 1,528 in 
fiscal year 2001 to 1,336 in fiscal year 2008. The Committee 
sees this recommendation as a downpayment on a longer-term 
investment in rebuilding enforcement capacity.
    The Committee is particularly concerned that WHD's 
investigations of low-wage industries have fallen 
precipitously, with dramatic declines in industries such as 
garment manufacturing, health care (especially nursing homes), 
and agriculture (especially poultry processing). The Committee 
directs the Department to target the additional resources 
provided to increase inspections and investigations of 
industries with high concentrations of low-wage and other 
vulnerable workers, and industries with high levels of wage and 
hour violations, including overtime violations. In hiring new 
investigators, WHD should frame position qualifications so as 
to increase the number of front-line investigators that are 
fluent in the languages of the workforces in which non-English-
speaking workers predominate.
    Within the agriculture industry, the Committee is concerned 
about the lack of WHD inspections of potential child labor 
violations. Current law permits children as young as 12 to work 
in the fields under very specific limitations, such as non-
hazardous work that occurs beyond school hours. However, WHD 
inspections to ensure that employers adhere to these 
restrictions are inconsistent at best. The Committee therefore 
encourages WHD to use its allocation within the bill to assign 
additional inspectors to monitor child labor law violations 
that occur in the fields. The Committee recommends that the 
Secretary of Labor, in collaboration with the Secretary of 
Agriculture, develop a plan to address child labor violations 
within the agriculture industry in order to increase compliance 
with child labor laws and requests that the plan be submitted 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by March 
1, 2008.
    The misclassification of employees as independent 
contractors undermines enforcement of the nation's worker 
protection laws and has cost the U.S. Treasury an estimated $35 
billion between 1996 and 2004. Misclassification also deprives 
workers of critical benefits such as unemployment insurance, 
workers' compensation, Social Security, and Medicare, and 
important rights such as rights to family and medical leave, 
employee benefits, and a safe and nondiscriminatory workplace. 
The Committee requests that WHD compile a detailed report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by March 1, 
2008, on the Department's enforcement strategy on 
misclassification and the investigation activity to date in 
this area, including recovery of back pay and other 
compensatory measures, assessment of penalties, and policies 
for cross-referral of complaints to the Internal Revenue 
Service.
    The Committee directs WHD to work with the U.S. Forest 
Service, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department 
of State on the issue of fair wages and compliance with safety 
regulations for Federal contractors that employ H-2B forestry 
workers, or ``pineros.'' Of the estimated 66,000 guest workers 
in this country, forest workers are the second-largest group, 
after landscape laborers. Yet Federal forestry contractors 
often are in violation of basic wage and safety standards. The 
Forest Service is taking steps to compile a comprehensive 
database of forestry contractors, current and past violators, 
and registered H-2B forestry workers. As the Forest Service 
develops its database, the Committee directs WHD to populate 
the database with violations of wage disbursements, and to 
coordinate with the Department's Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration (OSHA), so as to include additional safety and 
health enforcement information pertaining to this population in 
the database. The Committee requests that the Department of 
Labor provide a report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations no later than March 1, 2008 on its enforcement 
activities regarding those contractors that employ pineros and 
have violated Federal employment and/or safety standards.
    The Committee does not agree with the budget request to add 
additional positions for the office of labor-management 
standards (OLMS). Since 2001, OLMS staffing has increased by 
over 25 percent while staffing in other Employment Standards 
Administration divisions and other DOL enforcement agencies has 
dramatically declined. For example, the wage and hour division, 
which enforces minimum wage, overtime, and child labor laws, 
will have experienced a drop in staff of 12.6 percent since 
fiscal year 2001, even with the additional resources provided 
for fiscal year 2008. The staff level at the office of federal 
contract compliance programs (OFCCP), which protects workers 
from unfair employment practices by Federal contractors, will 
have dropped by 23 percent from fiscal year 2001 to fiscal 
2008. The Committee is concerned that Department's continued 
budget requests for additional staffing and funding for OLMS 
are at the expense of other priorities to protect workers' 
wages, hours, and working conditions. The Department's budget 
justification states that the acceptability rate for unions in 
meeting Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act (LMRDA) 
reporting requirements is 96 percent. The Committee believes 
that adding resources for LMRDA enforcement is the wrong 
priority when enforcement activities in other areas of the 
Department of Labor have been neglected.
    The Committee rescinds $70,000,000 of the unobligated funds 
collected pursuant to section 286(v) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act. This amount is $20,000,000 more than the 
amount in the budget request, and reflects the Department's 
estimates of the unobligated balance at the end of fiscal year 
2006. This action does not affect anticipated obligations for 
fiscal year 2007, nor does it affect fees to be collected in 
fiscal year 2008. The Department has recommended language to 
expand the authorized use of these funds for wage and hour 
investigations that is more appropriately addressed by the 
authorizing committees.

                            SPECIAL BENEFITS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The bill includes $203,000,000 for special benefits, which 
is $24,000,000 below the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request. This appropriation primarily 
provides benefits under the Federal Employees' Compensation Act 
(FECA). The payments are required by law. In fiscal year 2008, 
an estimated 140,000 injured Federal workers or their survivors 
will file claims; 55,000 will receive long-term wage 
replacement benefits for job-related injuries, diseases, or 
death.

               SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR DISABLED COAL MINERS

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $208,221,000 
for special benefits for disabled coal miners, as requested. 
This amount is in addition to the $68,000,000 appropriated last 
year as an advance for the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. 
These funds are used to provide monthly benefits to coal miners 
disabled by black lung disease and to their widows and certain 
other dependents, as well as to pay related administrative 
costs.
    The Committee recommends an advance appropriation of 
$62,000,000 for the first quarter of fiscal year 2009, which is 
the same as the budget request. These funds will ensure 
uninterrupted benefit payments to coal miners, their widows, 
and dependents.
    The Black Lung Consolidation of Administrative 
Responsibility Act of 2002 amends the Black Lung Benefits Act 
to transfer part B black lung benefits responsibility from the 
Commissioner of Social Security to the Secretary of Labor.

    ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES, ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS 
                           COMPENSATION FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $104,745,000 for the Energy 
Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act 
(EEOICPA) authorized by Title XXXVI of the National Defense 
Authorization Act of 2001. This amount is $2,438,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 level and the same as the budget request. 
Funds will be used to administer the program that provides 
compensation to employees or survivors of employees of the 
Department of Energy (DOE), its contractors and subcontractors, 
companies that provided beryllium to DOE, and atomic weapons 
employees who suffer from a radiation-related cancer, 
beryllium-related disease, or chronic silicosis as a result of 
their work in producing or testing nuclear weapons, and uranium 
workers covered under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act.
    In addition to the $55,358,000 that the budget request 
indicates will be transferred for the National Institute of 
Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) within the Department of 
Health and Human Services for its activities, the bill directs 
that the Secretary provide, within 30 days of enactment, 
$4,500,000 to NIOSH for use by or in support of the advisory 
board on radiation and worker health to carry out its statutory 
responsibilities under EEOICPA, including obtaining audits, 
technical assistance and other support from the Board's audit 
contractor with regard to radiation dose estimation and 
reconstruction efforts, site profiles, procedures, and review 
of special exposure cohort petitions and evaluation reports.

                    BLACK LUNG DISABILITY TRUST FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends such sums as necessary for payment 
of benefits and interest on advances. The Committee estimates 
that $1,068,000,000 will be required for this account, which is 
$1,546,000 below the fiscal year 2007 level and the same as the 
Administration estimate.
    The trust fund pays all black lung compensation/medical and 
survivor benefit expenses when no responsible mine operator can 
be assigned liability for such benefits, or when coal mine 
employment ceased prior to 1970, as well as administrative 
costs which are incurred in administering the benefits program 
and operating the trust fund.
    The basic financing for the trust fund comes from a coal 
excise tax for underground and surface-mined coal. Additional 
funds come from reimbursement payments from mine operators for 
benefit payments made by the trust fund before the mine 
operator is found liable. The advances to the fund assure 
availability of necessary funds when liabilities may exceed 
other income. The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 
continues the current tax structure until 2014.

             Occupational Safety and Health Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $503,516,000 for the Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which is $16,591,000 
above the fiscal year 2007 level and $13,239,000 above the 
budget request. This agency is responsible for enforcing the 
Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 in the nation's 
workplaces.
    For Federal enforcement, the bill provides $190,128,000, an 
increase of $13,155,000 over fiscal year 2007. The Committee is 
concerned that the number of full time equivalents (FTE) 
dedicated to Federal enforcement has declined by 141, or 8.4 
percent, from 1,683 in fiscal year 2001 to 1,542 in fiscal year 
2007. No additional enforcement positions were proposed in the 
budget request. While it is not possible under funding 
constraints to totally erase the deficit of enforcement 
positions in one year, the Committee recommends $7,082,000 
above the budget request to begin to restore the enforcement 
capacity of OSHA over the next several years. These funds will 
support an additional 47 positions in federal enforcement. The 
Committee intends that a portion of these positions be used to 
reestablish the capacity to conduct comprehensive process 
safety management (PSM) inspections. The Committee takes note 
of the Chemical Safety Board recommendations following the BP 
Texas City disaster and believes that OSHA needs to pursue 
comprehensive enforcement of its process safety management 
standard. The additional enforcement positions not dedicated to 
PSM should be used to begin to rebuild and enhance OSHA's 
overall enforcement capacity. The Committee urges OSHA to give 
special emphasis in its hiring and promotion activities to the 
number of bilingual inspectors. This action would allow OSHA to 
better address the disproportionately high number of injury and 
fatalities among immigrant workers. The Committee directs that 
OSHA provide reports to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations not later than 90 days after enactment, and 
quarterly thereafter on OSHA's progress in filling these 
additional enforcement positions.
    The Committee bill provides $75,566,000 for Federal 
compliance assistance, an increase of $2,907,000 over fiscal 
year 2007 and a decrease of $4,041,000 below the request, which 
targeted increased funds for the voluntary protection program. 
The Committee agrees with a March 2004 GAO report that 
recommended that OSHA's voluntary compliance strategies should 
not be expanded until they are fully evaluated. This evaluation 
is not possible until OSHA collects complete, comparable data 
that would enable a comparison of the relative effectiveness of 
these approaches. Therefore, the Committee directs OSHA to 
utilize a portion of the increased funds for federal compliance 
assistance to develop methodologies and to collect the data 
necessary for a full evaluation of the effectiveness of 
voluntary compliance programs.
    The Committee is concerned about OSHA's lack of progress in 
developing and issuing important safety and health standards 
and the repeated failures to meet the agency's timetables for 
action announced in the semi-annual regulatory agendas. Thus, 
the Committee directs the Secretary to provide to the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees detailed timetables for the 
development and issuance of occupational safety and health 
standards on beryllium, silica, cranes and derricks, confined 
space entry in construction, and hazard communication global 
harmonization. Each of these standards has appeared on the 
Department's regulatory agenda over a period of years, yet 
deadlines have consistently slipped. In order to better 
understand the reasons for these delays, the reports, which 
shall be provided within 90 days of the enactment of this Act 
with updates provided every 90 days thereafter, shall include 
an explanation of the reasons for any delays in meeting the 
projected timetables for action.
    The Committee is dissatisfied with OSHA's activities on 
ergonomics and the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders, 
which continue to be the leading cause of workplace injuries. 
The agency's comprehensive plan on ergonomics announced in 2002 
has resulted in the issuance of only three industry guidelines, 
the last one issued in 2004, and only 17 general duty 
citations, the last one issued in 2005. The Committee directs 
the agency to enhance its activities by developing guidelines 
for the 13 other industries recommended by the national 
advisory committee on ergonomics in 2004, and to submit a 
timetable to the Committee specifying when these additional 
guidelines will be completed. The Committee expects the agency 
to step up enforcement on ergonomic hazards through the use of 
the general duty clause, as outlined in the Secretary of 
Labor's 2002 ergonomics plan, and to conduct follow-up 
inspections to determine if ergonomic hazards have been abated.
    For the past four years, the Committee has included 
language in its report expressing disappointment and concern 
about the Department's lack of progress in completing 
rulemaking on the issue of payment for personal protective 
equipment (PPE), and urging OSHA to act expeditiously to issue 
the final rule. The Committee pointed out that the rule is 
particularly important for Hispanic workers who 
disproportionately work in low-wage hazardous jobs, and have a 
much higher fatality rate than other groups of workers. 
However, no action was taken and OSHA repeatedly missed the 
timetable for action set in its regulatory agenda. In response 
to a lawsuit filed in early 2007, OSHA has now announced that 
it will issue a final payment for PPE rule by the end of 
November 2007. However, OSHA has not committed to issue a final 
rule that maintains its longstanding policy that employers have 
the responsibility to pay for all safety equipment, with few 
exceptions. Given the Department of Labor's repeated failure to 
meet its announced deadlines, the bill includes a provision to 
ensure that these protections will finally be put in place.
    The Committee is dissatisfied with OSHA's lack of action to 
ensure that health care workers and emergency responders will 
be adequately protected in the event of an influenza pandemic. 
The Department of Labor has denied a petition for an OSHA 
emergency standard on grounds that a pandemic has not yet 
occurred. Moreover, the guidelines issued by the Department in 
May fail to recognize the urgency of the problem or the 
responsibility of employers to provide adequate protections for 
health care workers. In addition, reliance on guidelines 
instead of standards eliminates the opportunity for public 
review and comment. The Committee believes that it is important 
to plan and put protections in place before a pandemic occurs. 
The Committee asks that the Department reconsider the issuance 
of an emergency standard. The Committee directs the Department 
to, at a minimum, develop a permanent standard on an expedited 
basis to ensure that plans and measures to protect health care 
workers and responders from an outbreak of pandemic influenza 
are in place as soon as possible. The Committee directs that 
OSHA submit a report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations within 90 days of enactment, and quarterly 
thereafter, detailing its anticipated timeline for issuing a 
standard on an emergency or expedited basis, and its progress 
in meeting that timeline.
    The Committee also believes that the OSHA response to 
serious health hazards posed by exposure to the chemical 
diacetyl, a butter flavoring agent used in microwave popcorn 
and other foods is inadequate. Despite urgent warnings from 
NIOSH that exposure to diacetyl poses a risk of a rare and 
fatal lung disease (bronchiolitis obliterans) and should be 
controlled, and a growing number of documented cases of the 
disease, OSHA has failed to act. There has been no response to 
a petition for an emergency standard filed last year by unions 
and health scientists. The Committee believes this matter 
warrants an emergency standard, but at a minimum, OSHA should 
develop a permanent standard on an expedited basis. Only 
recently has OSHA announced it will initiate a special emphasis 
program, but only for those establishments that manufacture 
butter-flavored microwave popcorn. The Committee understands 
that OSHA is also in the process of finalizing a national 
emphasis program that will expand enforcement activities beyond 
microwave popcorn plants to other food manufacturing and 
flavoring plants where diacetyl is used or produced, and that 
both emphasis programs will apply existing standards (including 
personal protective equipment, respiratory protection, and 
hazard communication), as well as OSHA's general duty 
authority, to require that exposures to this very toxic agent 
be controlled. The Committee directs that OSHA submit a report 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations within 90 
days of enactment, and quarterly thereafter, detailing its 
anticipated timeline for issuing a diacetyl standard on an 
emergency or expedited basis, and its progress in meeting that 
timeline. The Committee also requests that a separate report be 
provided no later than March 1, 2008, on the special and 
national emphasis programs, detailing the number of 
establishments inspected, citations issued, and follow-up 
activities taken to ensure that hazardous conditions are 
abated.
    The bill includes $10,116,000 for the Susan Harwood 
training grant program, which is the same as the fiscal 2007 
level. This program was not included in the budget request. The 
Committee is concerned that OSHA has again proposed elimination 
of this program, which supports worker safety and health 
training and education programs that are an important component 
of a comprehensive approach to worker protection. Within these 
funds, the bill provides $3,200,000 to extend funding for the 
institutional competency building training grants which 
commenced in September 2000 for program activities for the 
October 1, 2007, to September 30, 2008, period, provided that 
the grantees demonstrate satisfactory performance.
    The May 12, 2007 incident involving a U.S. citizen with 
drug-resistant tuberculosis traveling via commercial airline 
demonstrates how serious this disease can be. Therefore, the 
bill does not include prior language prohibiting OSHA from 
enforcing the general industry respiratory protection standard 
for the annual fit testing of respirators for occupational 
exposure to tuberculosis (TB). OSHA's respiratory protection 
standard requires that respirators be provided to protect 
workers exposed to chemical and biological hazards. The 
Committee sees no reason to treat exposure to TB differently 
than exposure to all other hazards subject to OSHA's respirator 
standard. Annual fit testing of respirators for health care 
workers exposed to tuberculosis will also help protect these 
workers from other airborne infectious diseases. The Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidelines for 
preventing the transmission of tuberculosis in health care 
settings in December 2005. Those guidelines recommend that 
after a risk assessment is conducted to validate the need for 
respiratory protection, that fit testing should be performed 
during the initial respiratory protection program training, and 
that the period for testing thereafter be in accordance with 
the relevant Federal, State and local regulations. The 
Committee believes that it is appropriate that OSHA's 
respiratory protection standard apply to occupational exposure 
to tuberculosis and that the agency should not be further 
prevented from enforcing the annual fit testing requirements to 
address occupational exposure to tuberculosis in health care 
settings.

                 Mine Safety and Health Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $313,478,000 for this agency, 
which is $11,908,000 above the fiscal year 2007 level and the 
same as the budget request. This agency enforces the Federal 
Mine Safety and Health Act in underground and surface coal and 
metal and non-metal mines.
    The Committee recommendation supports the retention of 170 
inspector positions that MSHA reports it is on target to hire 
by the end of fiscal year 2007. The initial funding for these 
positions was provided in emergency supplemental appropriations 
for fiscal year 2006 following the coal mine tragedies in West 
Virginia and Kentucky. It is critical that MSHA maintain an 
adequate number of compliance inspectors, and the Committee is 
concerned by reports that the agency may be losing senior coal 
inspectors to retirement so swiftly that the plan to increase 
the inspector ranks could be jeopardized.
    The Committee recognizes that passage of the Mine 
Improvement and New Emergency Response (MINER) Act in June 2006 
is the first revision to Federal mine safety law since the 
Federal Mine Safety and Health Act became law in 1977. The 
Committee is concerned that progress on implementation of these 
provisions, which are critical to improving the safety of the 
nation's mines, has been slower than anticipated.
    Thus, the Committee directs that the Secretary provide 
reports to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
not later than 90 days after enactment, and quarterly 
thereafter on: (1) MSHA's progress in filling all allocated 
inspector positions, and completing the training of new 
inspectors, by district office; (2) MSHA's strategic plan for 
dealing with anticipated retirements from all positions during 
fiscal years 2008 through fiscal year 2012; (3) changes in the 
rate of employer contests, with particular regard to whether 
the formula used to determine the ratio of legal counsel to 
inspectors needs to be adjusted to ensure the office of the 
solicitor has resources consistent to ensure effective 
enforcement; (4) MSHA's progress in implementing the MINER Act, 
including the finalization of emergency response plans; and (5) 
information on resources devoted to emergency, ventilation and 
roof control plan reviews and approvals.
    The Committee directs MSHA to provide annual reports on the 
random audits performed each year on mining machines and their 
certified components, starting with a report on fiscal year 
2007 audits that shall be provided to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 90 days after 
enactment. This report should also address agency 
recommendations to increase surveillance and enforcement of the 
misuse of ``2G'' tags, including the activities of repair and 
rebuilding shops.
    The Committee concurs with the Department's plans to 
implement the Brookwood-Sago mine safety training grants and 
directs that no less than $500,000 be provided for the first 
round of these grants, which were authorized by the MINER Act.

                       Bureau of Labor Statistics


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee bill includes $576,118,000 for the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics (BLS), which is $27,995,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 level and $1,675,000 above the budget request. The 
bill includes $497,854,000 in general funds for this account 
and authority to spend $78,264,000 from the employment security 
administration account of the Unemployment Trust Fund. The BLS 
is the principal fact-finding agency in the Federal government 
in the broad field of labor economics. Its principal surveys 
include the Consumer Price Index and the monthly unemployment 
series.
    The bill provides that $5,000,000 may be used for the mass 
layoff statistics program under section 15 of the Wagner-Peyser 
Act. This program provides information on mass layoff actions 
that result in workers being separated from their jobs. This 
information is of assistance in identifying the causes and 
scope of worker dislocation and the characteristics of 
dislocated workers and can be used by the workforce investment 
and economic development systems in assisting employers and/or 
workers at the local level. The bill also continues language 
providing that the Current Employment Survey shall maintain 
content with respect to the collection of data for the women 
worker series.
    The Committee recommends $192,599,000 for prices and cost 
of living, which is $450,000 above the budget request. While 
data are currently collected to measure changes in the cost of 
living by metropolitan area, the Committee sees benefit in 
measuring the differences in the level of the cost of living 
for those areas and for States. The Committee includes $450,000 
to develop a methodology for determining the cost of living by 
State that accounts for the different costs of housing, goods 
and services in each State. The Committee understands that BLS 
requires two years before it is able to transmit this 
methodology to the Congress, and requests that BLS provide an 
interim progress report as part of its fiscal year 2009 budget 
request. In addition, the Committee requests that the final 
report on a State-specific cost of living methodology include 
an estimate of what it would cost to implement the recommended 
methodology. That final report shall be provided to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than September 
30, 2009.
    Within the $86,084,000 provided for compensation and 
working conditions, the additional $1,225,000 above the request 
is to be used to conduct focused research studies on work-
related injuries and illnesses. Such studies provide detailed 
information on the causes and means of preventing injuries and 
illnesses of particular concern, such as amputations, injuries 
and illnesses among truck drivers, and injuries and illnesses 
in high-risk industries. These types of studies were conducted 
previously by BLS through its work injury reports, but were 
largely suspended due to lack of resources. The additional 
funding over the request will help reestablish this useful 
series of reports, and provide important information to 
employers, researchers, and policymakers for their prevention 
activities.

                 Office of Disability Employment Policy


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $27,712,000 for the Office of 
Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2007 level and $9,110,000 above the budget request. 
The Office provides policy guidance and leadership to eliminate 
employment barriers to people with disabilities.
    The Administration only requested the funds necessary for 
the office to focus on its core mission of policy analysis, 
technical assistance, and the dissemination of effective 
practices that increase the employment opportunities for people 
with disabilities. The Committee believes that continuing the 
grant program will enhance the knowledge that will allow ODEP 
to provide optimal policy and technical assistance to the 
workforce investment system and its Federal partner agencies to 
ensure access and improve results for disabled customers.

                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $293,261,000 for departmental 
management activities, which is $5,659,000 below the fiscal 
year 2007 level and $39,025,000 above the budget request. This 
includes $292,943,000 in general funds, along with authority to 
transfer $318,000 from the employment security administration 
account of the Unemployment Trust Fund. The departmental 
management appropriation finances staff responsible for 
formulating and overseeing the implementation of Departmental 
policy and management activities. In addition, this 
appropriation includes a variety of operating programs and 
activities that are not involved in departmental management 
functions, but for which other salaries and expenses 
appropriations are not suitable.
    Departmental management crosscut.--The Committee recommends 
a reduction of $250,000 below the request to eliminate the 
funds requested for competitive sourcing. This account is 
clearly not the only source of funds for this initiative. 
Significant resources have been spent by the Department over 
the last several years on contracting out government jobs. 
While the goal of this government-wide effort has been to make 
the government more efficient, OMB reports that in fiscal year 
2006 government employees won competitions in more than 85 
percent of the cases where competitive sourcing was used. The 
Committee has not seen compelling evidence of cost savings or 
increased efficiency achieved by competitive sourcing and is 
concerned that in some cases the competitions appear to 
encompass functions that could be considered inherently 
governmental or inappropriate for contractor performance. 
Therefore, the bill includes language providing that no funds 
appropriated in this title shall be used to carry out 
competitions under OMB Circular A-76 or any administrative 
directives on competitive sourcing until the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) conducts a study of the 
Department's practices and the Committee has had 60 days to 
review GAO's recommendations. This moratorium does not affect 
the Department's ability to contract with the private sector 
for services not available in-house.
    The Committee requests that GAO review the extent to which 
the Department has established a reliable and comprehensive 
system to track costs, savings, and the quality of work 
performed by contractors, as well as conducting an assessment 
of the Department's adherence to principles adopted in 2002 by 
the commercial activities panel chaired by the Comptroller 
General. Those principles include pursuing other methods to 
achieve a high performing workforce, establishing a fair 
process that would include allowing government employees to 
compete for new work, and the recognition that inherently 
governmental functions should be performed by Federal workers.
    International Labor Affairs Bureau.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $72,516,000 for the international labor 
affairs bureau (ILAB), which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 level and $58,419,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee rejects the Administration's proposal to slash 
funding for ILAB by over 80 percent. In May 2006, the 
International Labor Organization (ILO) issued a report entitled 
``The End of Child Labor: Within Reach''. The report states 
that child labor is in decline worldwide and that if the 
current pace of decline were to be sustained, the global 
commitment to stop child labor could feasibly eliminate most of 
the worst forms of this practice within 10 years. The Committee 
is therefore particularly concerned that the Department's 
budget request eliminates funding for child labor grants, 
including the U.S. contribution to sustain the successful 
efforts of the ILO's international program for the elimination 
of child labor. Withdrawing from these efforts would damage the 
credibility and reputation of the United States in the 
countries whose governments are real partners to the United 
States in this effort.
    The Committee is aware of the ILO garment sector working 
conditions improvement project in Cambodia, and its success in 
improving worker conditions in garment factories, increasing 
worker and employer awareness of, and adherence to, core 
international labor standards and the rights of workers under 
Cambodian labor law. Another model which has not been linked 
directly to trade, but which has helped to address human rights 
issues in Central America, is the ombudsperson model. The 
Committee believes that some combination of these approaches 
could be helpful in other countries. Accordingly, the bill 
designates $5,000,000 within ILAB for activities to adapt these 
model programs to address worker rights in countries with trade 
preference programs with the United States. The Committee 
believes that implementation of this activity should be done in 
consultation with the Department of State.
    Women's Bureau.--The Committee recommends $10,500,000 for 
the women's bureau, which is $834,000 over fiscal year 2007 and 
$668,000 over the request. The Committee encourages the women's 
bureau to continue to support national networks for women's 
employment that advance women in the workplace through 
education and advocacy. The Committee believes that 
organizations that continue to exceed annual performance goals 
and that are strategically aligned with the goals of the 
women's bureau deserve increased support.
    Pandemic influenza preparedness.--The Secretary of Labor's 
role in pandemic influenza preparedness goes beyond the health 
and safety standards for health care workers and emergency 
responders discussed earlier in this report. The national 
strategy for pandemic influenza implementation plan recognizes 
that an influenze pandemic would have a government- and 
society-wide impact. The health and economic impact of a 
pandemic on the U.S. workforce would be profound. The American 
workforce would face illness, death, and significant health 
care expenses, as well as potential job loss due to business 
closures due to breakdowns in the supply chain or due to public 
health measures (such as banning of large public gatherings or 
quarantine orders). In addition, with shortages of workers due 
to absence for illness or to care for family members, or to 
comply with public health orders, some businesses or critical 
industries may face challenges complying with existing 
workplace regulations (e.g., wage and hour rules or staffing 
requirements). The national strategy plan states that ``the 
Secretary of Labor will be responsible for promoting the 
health, safety, and welfare of employees and tracking changes 
in employment, prices, and other economic measurements.'' The 
Committee therefore requests that the Secretary submit a report 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by March 
1, 2008 addressing the policy and regulatory issues under the 
Department's jurisdiction that would require review and 
adaptation in response to a pandemic, including, but not 
limited to, the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Fair 
Labor Standards Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, and 
disaster unemployment assistance.
    Disparity in rates of unemployment.--The Committee notes 
with concern the continuing disparity in rates of unemployment 
for certain minority groups (including African Americans, 
Latinos, and Native Americans) and directs the Secretary to 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by 
March 1, 2008 with a specific plan for addressing this problem.

                          OFFICE OF JOB CORPS

    The Committee recommends $1,649,476,000 for Job Corps, 
which is $42,621,000 over fiscal year 2007 and $98,232,000 
above the request on a comparable basis. The Job Corps, 
authorized by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, is a 
nationwide network of residential facilities chartered by 
Federal law to provide a comprehensive and intensive array of 
training, job placement, and support services to at-risk young 
adults. The mission of Job Corps is to attract eligible young 
adults, teach them the skills they need to become employable 
and independent, and place them in meaningful jobs or further 
education. Participation in the program is open to people in 
the 16 to 24 age range who are unemployed, have dropped out of 
school, or who are at risk of being involved in the criminal 
corrections system.
    The bill includes provisions transferring Job Corps 
operations, construction and renovation funding from the 
training and employment services account to the Office of the 
Secretary to reflect the current organizational status of the 
program. The Committee does not agree with the budget request 
to return Job Corps to the Employment and Training 
Administration. The bill therefore transfers $28,872,000 for 
Job Corps administration from Employment and Training 
Administration program administration to the Office of the 
Secretary. The bill also includes language that provides 
contracting authority to the Office of Job Corps.
    For Job Corps operations the Committee recommends 
$1,507,684,000, which is $37,327,000 above the level for fiscal 
year 2007 and $85,312,000 above the budget request. Of the 
amount recommended, $916,684,000 is available for the period 
July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009, and $591,000,000 is 
available for the period October 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009. 
The Committee does not agree with the budget request to reduce 
Job Corps slots by 4,310, reducing opportunities for 
disadvantaged youth who are left behind by traditional 
education programs to benefit from participation in Job Corps. 
Rather, the Committee's recommended increase in operations 
funding is designed to support 44,791 student training slots, 
reflecting an increase of 300 slots above the fiscal year 2007 
level to accommodate the opening of a new center during fiscal 
year 2008. The bill includes a provision that this new student 
training slot level be achieved by the end of program year 
2008.
    The Committee is concerned that enrollment levels be 
maintained, and believes that an appropriate mix of national, 
regional and facility-specific outreach and recruitment 
strategies is needed to address this issue. Given the fact that 
the Job Corps only has the capacity to serve one percent of the 
over six million youth in our country that have been left 
behind by traditional education programs, the Committee is 
concerned that all available slots be filled. The Committee 
understands that there has been an ongoing assessment of 
outreach and recruitment strategies and directs the Department 
to submit a report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations within 90 days of enactment outlining the 
strategies that the Office of Job Corps believes are necessary 
to address the issue of maintaining enrollment levels. The 
Committee requests that the report address concerns that the 
failure to transfer public affairs and public information staff 
from the Employment and Training Administration to the Office 
of Job Corps may be impeding critical outreach and recruitment 
activities.
    The Committee understands that there is an ongoing need 
within Job Corps to make the salaries of academic and 
vocational instructors competitive with those of comparable 
institutions. The Committee agrees with the Department's plan 
to use $5,000,000 to provide a 5 percent increase in teacher 
salaries, in addition to the 2.5 percent increase in teacher 
salaries provided in fiscal year 2006 and the 2.5 percent 
increase scheduled for fiscal year 2007.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of training and 
education for the construction industry and urges the 
Department to continue its partnerships to train Job Corps 
youth for careers in construction, including the high growth 
residential construction industry. The Committee encourages the 
Department to identify sites for potential expansion of 
construction trades training by employer-based industry groups 
and labor-management partnerships, so as to increase its 
capacity to address the workforce needs of this high growth 
industry. Increasing the number of students benefiting from 
industry-recognized training can help alleviate the shortage of 
skilled workers in this industry and further the goal of 
American homeownership.
    The bill provides $112,920,000 for construction and 
renovation, which is $5,000,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
level and $12,920,000 above the budget request. Of the amount 
recommended, $12,920,000 is available from July 1, 2008 through 
June 30, 2011, and $100,000,000 is available for the period 
October 1, 2008 through June 30, 2011.
    Included in the amount for construction and renovation is 
$5,000,000 for a competitive program for existing Job Corp 
Centers to establish child care development centers. 
Historically, low-income young people with children have been 
the most difficult to serve population in Job Corps. Further 
expanding child care services on Job Corps campuses will enable 
more economically disadvantaged single parents to obtain the 
education, training, and parenting skills needed to make a 
better life for their children and for themselves. The 
Committee's recommendation includes this $5,000,000 as part of 
its initiative to help reduce the number of abortions in 
America by alleviating the economic pressures and other real 
life conditions that can sometimes cause women to decide not to 
carry their pregnancies to term.
    The bill continues a provision to prohibit the use of Job 
Corps funding for compensation of an individual that is not a 
Federal employee at a rate in excess of Executive Level I. The 
Committee bill continues a provision providing that no funds 
from any other appropriation shall be used to provide meal 
services at or for Job Corps centers.

                    VETERANS EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING

    The Committee recommends $228,198,000 for veteran 
employment and training activities, which is $5,009,000 above 
the fiscal year 2007 level and $102,000 above the budget 
request. Within this amount, $197,143,000 is to be expended 
from the employment security administration account of the 
Unemployment Trust Fund for the State and Federal 
administration of veterans' employment and training activities, 
which includes the funding of local veterans' employment 
representatives and disabled veteran's outreach specialists who 
provide services to meet the employment needs of eligible 
veterans.
    Funding for the veterans workforce investment program is 
provided at the fiscal year 2007 level, which is $84,000 more 
than the budget request. For the homeless veteran's 
reintegration program that has shown success in getting 
veterans who are homeless back into the economic mainstream, 
$23,620,000 is provided, which is an increase of $1,181,000 
over fiscal year 2007 and the same as the budget request. The 
Committee supports the efforts within both the homeless 
veterans program and the State grant program to address the 
employment needs of incarcerated veterans to assure their 
successful reintegration into the community.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $78,658,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General (OIG), which is $5,892,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 level and the same as the budget request. This 
includes $72,929,000 in general funds along with the authority 
to transfer $5,729,000 from the employment security 
administration account of the Unemployment Trust Fund.
    The OIG was created by law to protect the integrity of 
Departmental programs as well as the welfare of beneficiaries 
served by those programs. Through a program of audits, 
investigations, and program evaluations, the OIG attempts to 
reduce the incidence of fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement, 
and to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness 
throughout the Department.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

    The Committee includes no direct appropriation for the 
working capital fund (WCF) for fiscal year 2008. For fiscal 
year 2007, $6,168,000 was provided. The Administration 
requested $12,000,000 for fiscal year 2008.
    The Committee understands that the Department has completed 
a cost benefit analysis of options for the new core accounting 
system. The Committee requests that when a decision is made on 
the most viable alternative for implementing a new financial 
management solution for the Department, information on this 
solution be provided to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, together with a revised implementation 
schedule.
    In previous years, the Committee has provided direct 
appropriations for the Department of Labor working capital 
fund. However, other Federal departments have self-sustaining 
working capital funds, and providing direct appropriations is 
inconsistent with the treatment of these entities. The purpose 
of a working capital fund is to generate sufficient revenue to 
cover the full cost of operations, and to finance its 
continuing operations without direct appropriations.

                           General Provisions


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 101. The Committee modifies a prior provision to 
permit transfers of up to one percent between programs, 
projects or activities.
    Sec. 102. The Committee repeats a prohibition on the 
purchase of goods that were in any part produced by indentured 
children.
    Sec. 103. The Committee repeats a provision requiring the 
Secretary to issue a monthly transit subsidy (of not less than 
$110) to each of the Department's eligible employees in the 
National Capital region.
    Sec. 104. The Committee requires the Department to report 
to the Committees on Appropriations on its plan for the use of 
demonstration, pilot, multiservice, research and multi-State 
projects under the Workforce Investment Act, including the up 
to 10 percent set-aside within the dislocated workers 
assistance national reserve, prior to the obligation of funds 
for these activities.
    Sec. 105. The Committee repeats a provision in the 2007 
Continuing Appropriations Resolution that requires the 
Secretary of Labor to award community-based job training 
initiative grants and grants for training and employment in 
high growth industries on a competitive basis.
    Sec. 106. The Committee directs that grants made from funds 
available to the Department under the American Competitiveness 
and Workforce Improvement Act be used only for training 
activities in the occupations and industries for which 
employers use the visas that generate these funds, and that 
related activities be limited to those necessary to support 
such training. The bill does not apply this restriction to 
competitive grant awards made in response to solicitations 
issued prior to April 15, 2007, or to the grants that may be 
made under the provisions of section 107 of this title.
    Sec. 107. The Committee provides that up to $20,000,000 of 
the funds available to the Department under section 414(c) the 
American Competitiveness and Workforce Improvement Act of 1998 
may be used for grants to States for activities that enable 
trade adjustment assistance (TAA) participants and dislocated 
workers awaiting TAA certification to benefit from the health 
coverage tax credit authorized by the Trade Adjustment 
Assistance Reform Act of 2002.
    Sec. 108. The Committee modifies a prior provision 
directing that the Department take no action to amend or to 
modify the definition of administrative costs, or the procedure 
for redesignation of local workforce investment areas until 
such time as legislation reauthorizing the Act is enacted. This 
provision is not intended to permit or require the Secretary of 
Labor to withdraw approval for such redesignation for a State 
that received approval not later than January 2, 2006.
    Sec. 109. The Committee retains language included in the 
2007 Continuing Appropriations Resolution that prohibits use of 
funds to finalize or implement regulations under the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998, the Wagner-Peyser Act of 1933, or the 
Trade Adjustment Assistance Reform Act of 2002, until such time 
as legislation reauthorizing the Workforce Investment Act or 
the Trade Adjustment Act is enacted. The Committee expects that 
while the Congress considers the reauthorization of these Acts, 
the Administration will refrain from unilateral changes to the 
administration, operation, and financing of employment and 
training programs.
    Sec. 110. The Committee has included language requiring the 
Secretary of Labor to issue a final standard on employer 
payment for personal protective equipment (PPE) under the 
Occupational Safety and Health Act by November 30, 2007 that is 
to be no less protective than the proposed rule published on 
March 31, 1999. The bill provides that, in the event this final 
standard is not issued by November 30, 2007, the proposed rule 
shall become effective.
    Sec. 111. The Committee has included language that 
prohibits the use of funds in this title to carry out 
competitive sourcing activities at the Department of Labor 
under OMB Circular A-76 until 60 days after the Committee 
receives a report by the Government Accountability Office.

           TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


              Health Resources and Services Administration


                     HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES

    The Committee includes a program level total of 
$7,080,709,000 for health resources and services programs, 
which is $665,007,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
for these activities and $1,259,904,000 above the budget 
request. The Health Resources and Services Administration 
(HRSA) supports programs which provide health services to 
disadvantaged, medically underserved, and special populations; 
decrease infant mortality rates; assist in the education of 
health professionals; and provide technical assistance 
regarding the utilization of health resources and facilities.

Community health centers

    As described in the ``Increasing Access to Health Care for 
the Uninsured'' initiative in the front of the report, the 
Committee provides $2,188,000,000 for community health centers 
(CHC), which is $199,961,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $199,533,000 above the budget request. These funds 
support programs which include community health centers, 
migrant health centers, health care for the homeless, and 
public housing health service grants. The increase provided in 
the bill will support the care of approximately one million 
additional patients, a 5.7 percent increase over the 16 million 
patients currently served in over 4,000 sites nationwide.
    The Committee supports continued efforts to expand the 
health centers program into those areas of the country without 
current access to a health center. The Committee urges HRSA to 
implement such an expansion to address the lack of access in 
the neediest communities of the country, and not to limit new 
funding to certain geographic areas, such as counties. The 
Committee has rejected bill language requested by the 
Administration setting aside $26,000,000 for high-poverty 
counties. Further, the Committee urges HRSA to make funding 
available to increase capacity at existing centers, and for 
service expansion awards adding or expanding mental health 
services, dental services, and pharmacy services at community 
health centers. HRSA should also use a portion of the increased 
funding to provide planning grants to help communities develop 
their plans for future applications. The Committee expects HRSA 
to implement any new expansion initiative using the existing, 
and statutorily-required, proportionality for urban and rural 
communities, as well as migrant, homeless, and public housing 
health centers.
    Within the amount provided, $35,000,000 is included in bill 
language for base grant adjustments. These funds are intended 
to graphic the rising cost of health care at existing centers 
and to resolve specific financial situations beyond the control 
of the local health center, such as unusual increases in the 
number of uninsured patients seeking care. While the Committee 
fully supports the expansion of the CHC program, it recognizes 
the narrow operating margins of most health centers.
    The Committee rejects the Administration's budget proposal 
to cancel the funding in the health centers loan guarantee 
program. This loan authority is important to give centers 
access to capital for infrastructure improvements.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of increasing the 
use of health information technology (IT) at health centers. 
Health centers have demonstrated improved access to services, 
improved quality of care and improved patient outcomes by 
utilizing electronic health records and other health 
information technology (HIT) tools through their participation 
in health center controlled network initiatives, and other 
quality improvement initiatives such as the health disparities 
collaboratives. Given this success, the Committee urges HRSA to 
ensure that health centers have adequate resources to establish 
and expand health IT systems in order to further enhance the 
delivery of cost-effective, quality health care services.
    The Committee recognizes the important role of CHCs in 
caring for people living with or at risk for hepatitis C (HCV). 
The Committee encourages the Bureau of Primary Care to increase 
health centers' capacity for delivery of medical management and 
treatment of HCV by implementing training and technical 
assistance initiatives, so that health centers are able to 
increase hepatitis C counseling, testing, medical management, 
and treatment services to meet the healthcare priorities of 
their respective communities.
    The Committee encourages HRSA to continue its support of 
the National Center for Frontier Communities.

State health access grants

    As described in the ``Increasing Access to Health Care for 
the Uninsured'' initiative section in the front of the report, 
the Committee bill provides $75,000,000 for State health access 
grants to begin to address the problems faced by the 46.6 
million uninsured in our country. Grants would be awarded 
competitively to States that demonstrate they have a program 
design ready to implement and that they have achieved the 
necessary State and local statutory or regulatory changes. 
States that have already developed a comprehensive health 
insurance access program would not be eligible to apply. The 
types of activities that could be supported through this grant 
include:
           ``three share'' community coverage 
        (employer, State or local government, and the 
        individual);
           reinsurance plans that subsidize a certain 
        share of carrier losses within a certain risk corridor;
           subsidized high risk insurance pools;
           health insurance premium assistance;
           creation of a state insurance ``connector'' 
        authority to develop new, less expensive, portable 
        benefit packages for small employers and part-time and 
        seasonal workers;
           development of statewide or automated 
        enrollment systems for public assistance programs; and
           innovative strategies to insure low-income 
        childless adults
    Two types of State grants would be available: target grants 
($2,000,000-4,000,000 annually per State) for States that 
choose to target particular populations such as uninsured 
children, small business employees, or uninsured seniors; or 
comprehensive grants ($7,000,000-10,000,000 annually per State) 
for large States or those that are planning more extensive 
coverage initiatives. The Committee intends that each grant be 
awarded based on a three-year grant period, subject to the 
availability of funds, with funding distributed each year based 
on attaining benchmarks that would be designated in the grant 
award. States shall be required to demonstrate their 
seriousness of intent by matching twenty percent of the Federal 
grant through non-Federal resources, which could be a 
combination of State, local, and private dollars from insurers 
and providers. Waiver of the matching requirement shall be 
possible if financial hardship is demonstrated. States shall 
also be required to demonstrate their ability to sustain the 
program without Federal funding after the end of the three-year 
grant period. HRSA should consider geographic diversity in the 
allocation of these awards.
    States shall be required to report to HRSA the impact and 
results of their demonstration project at the conclusion of the 
three-year grant period. HRSA is encouraged to convene grantees 
periodically throughout the period of their award to share 
information with each other about their program experiences and 
gain ideas for refinement of their programs. The Committee 
directs that HRSA submit a comprehensive report to the 
Appropriations Committees of the House and Senate about the 
outcomes and lessons learned from each of the State 
demonstrations eighteen months after the three-year grant 
period ends.

Free clinics medical malpractice

    The Committee provides $40,000 for payments of claims under 
the Federal Tort Claims Act to be made available for volunteer 
free clinic health care professionals, which is $1,000 below 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $60,000 below the budget 
request. The program extends Federal Tort Claims Act coverage 
to health care professional volunteers in free clinics in order 
to expand access to health care services to low-income 
individuals in medically underserved areas. A free clinic must 
apply, consistent with the provisions applicable to community 
health centers, to have each health care professional 
``deemed'' an employee of the Public Health Service, and 
therefore eligible for coverage under the Federal Tort Claims 
Act. To date, 65 applications from free clinics have been 
approved and almost 1,700 volunteer practitioners have been 
deemed.

National Hansen's disease program

    The Committee provides $16,109,000 for the National 
Hansen's disease program, which is $137,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and the same as the budget request. 
This program offers Hansen's disease treatment to 11 long-term 
residents who continue to receive care from the National 
Hansen's Disease Center and to others who receive care from 
grant-supported outpatient regional clinics. Other former long-
term residents have been offered and elected to receive a 
living allowance from the program and now live independently. 
These programs provide treatment to about 3,000 of the 6,000 
Hansen's disease sufferers in the continental United States.

National Hansen's disease program--buildings and facilities

    The Committee provides $100,000 for National Hansen's 
disease buildings and facilities, which is $120,000 below the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. These funds are used to finance the repair and upkeep 
of buildings at the Gillis W. Long Hansen's Disease Center at 
Carville, Louisiana.

Payment to Hawaii for treatment of Hansen's disease

    The Committee provides $1,996,000 for the treatment of 
persons with Hansen's disease in the State of Hawaii, which is 
the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $20,000 more 
than the budget request. The program, which provides a partial 
matching payment to the State of Hawaii, dates to the period of 
Father Damien's facility for sufferers of Hansen's disease. 
That facility now has less than 40 residents who live there by 
choice, and the grounds have been converted to a historical 
site. Most patients diagnosed with Hansen's disease in Hawaii 
are now treated in the same manner as new patients on the 
mainland; their care is handled on an out-patient basis, with 
the program paying for 256 active ambulatory Hansen's disease 
cases.

National Health Service Corps: Field placements

    The Committee provides $40,443,000 for field placements, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$9,714,000 above the budget request. These funds are used to 
support the activities of National Health Service Corps (NHSC) 
obligors and volunteers in the field, including travel and 
transportation costs of assignees, training and education, 
recruitment of students, residents and clinicians, and 
retention activities. Salary costs of most new assignees are 
paid by the employing entity. The Committee feels it is 
important to maintain NHSC field placement strength to support 
the recruitment and mentoring of clinicians and to encourage 
their retention. Thus, the Committee rejects the 
Administration's proposal to cut the program. The NHSC supports 
4,600 clinicians across the country who provide medical and 
dental services to four million people in low-income and 
underserved communities.
    The Committee is pleased by the increasing proportion of 
NHSC assignees being placed at community, migrant, homeless, 
and public housing health centers. The Committee encourages 
HRSA to further expand this effort to ensure that health 
centers have access to a sufficient level of health 
professionals through the NHSC, especially given recent efforts 
to expand the health centers program.

National Health Service Corps: Recruitment

    The Committee provides $91,057,000 for recruitment 
activities, which is $5,827,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the budget request. The program awards 
scholarships to health professions students and assists 
graduates in repaying their student loans. In return for every 
year of support, these individuals are obligated to provide a 
year of service in health professional shortage areas of 
greatest need. The minimum obligation is two years. This 
funding will support the recruitment of more than 1,700 
practitioners through the loan repayment and scholarship 
programs.

Health professions

    The Committee provides $393,920,000 for all health 
professions training programs, which is $59,495,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $278,880,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee rejects the rescission proposals 
included in the budget request that would cancel unobligated 
balances available at institutions of higher education with a 
student loan revolving fund.

Training for diversity

    As the first step in a continuing restoration and expansion 
of the diversity programs, the Committee provides $104,817,000, 
which is $41,031,000 or 64.3 percent above the fiscal year 2007 
level and $95,084,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
is acutely aware of the needs identified in the landmark 
Institute of Medicine report, ``Unequal Treatment,'' which 
issued recommendations to begin closing the profound gaps that 
exist in health care delivery and treatment. The report 
recommended increases in these diversity programs because they 
are the pipeline for training minority students in the health 
professions to serve in medically underserved communities.

Centers of excellence

    The Committee provides $28,431,000 for centers of 
excellence, which is $16,551,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request does not include funding for 
this program. The program is designed to strengthen the 
national capacity to educate underrepresented minority (URM) 
students in the health professions by offering special support 
to those institutions which train a significant number of URM 
individuals. Funds are used for the recruitment and retention 
of students and faculty, information resources and curricula, 
faculty and student research, and the development of plans to 
achieve institutional improvements. This increase will permit 
HRSA to fund the four centers of excellence at historically 
black colleges and universities as well as approximately six 
Hispanic, Native American, and other centers of excellence. The 
Committee is pleased that HRSA has re-focused the centers of 
excellence program on providing support to historically 
minority health professions institutions. The Committee 
recognizes the important role of this program in supporting 
faculty and other academic programs at minority institutions.

Health careers opportunity program

    The Committee provides $28,440,000 for the health careers 
opportunity program, which is $24,480,000 above the fiscal year 
2007 funding level. The budget request does not include funding 
for this program. The program provides grants to eligible 
schools and health educational entities with the goal of 
increasing the number of disadvantaged students entering health 
and allied health professions programs. The additional funds 
provided will increase the size of the program six-fold, 
permitting the award of as many as 24 additional grants to 
operate programs that prepare disadvantaged students at the 
earliest levels of the educational pipeline for careers in 
health and allied health professions. The Committee urges HRSA 
to give priority consideration to awarding grants to those 
institutions with an historic mission of training minorities in 
the health professions.

Faculty loan repayment

    The Committee provides $1,289,000 for the faculty loan 
repayment program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request does not include funding for 
this program. The program provides loan repayment for 
disadvantaged health professions students who serve as faculty 
for a minimum of two years. Their institutions are also 
required to make matching payments. The funding provided will 
support approximately thirty faculty with loan repayments of up 
to $20,000 per year.

Scholarships for disadvantaged students

    The Committee provides $46,657,000 for scholarships for 
disadvantaged students, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $36,924,000 above the budget request. 
The program provides grants to eligible health professions and 
nursing schools to provide scholarships to eligible individuals 
from disadvantaged backgrounds, including students who are 
members of racial and ethnic minority groups. By statute, not 
less than 16 percent of the funds must go to schools of 
nursing. This funding level will permit over 15,000 students to 
receive scholarships.

Training in primary care and dentistry

    The Committee provides $48,851,000 for training in primary 
care and dentistry, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request does not include funding for 
this program. The training program is comprised of four 
elements: (1) family medicine; (2) general internal medicine 
and general pediatrics; (3) physician assistants; and (4) 
general and pediatric dentistry. The Committee intends that the 
general and pediatric dentistry programs receive the same 
amount as was provided under the 2007 joint continuing funding 
resolution.

Area health education centers

    The Committee provides $31,200,000 for area health 
education centers (AHEC) program, which is $2,519,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level. The budget request does not 
include funding for this program. The program provides 
cooperative agreements to medical and nursing schools to 
encourage the establishment and maintenance of community-based 
training programs in off-campus rural and underserved areas. 
Emphasis is also placed on enhancing the diversity of the 
health personnel workforce and improving the practice 
environment and the quality of care available in underserved 
areas. This funding increase will permit the AHECs, which 
operate in 46 States, to expand their networks of community-
based training programs.

Allied health and other disciplines

    The Committee provides $3,960,000 for allied health and 
other disciplines, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request does not include funding for 
this program. The program assists eligible entities in meeting 
the costs associated with graduate psychology and chiropractic 
programs.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the graduate 
psychology education program, which provides interdisciplinary 
training for health service psychologists to provide mental and 
behavioral health care services to underserved populations, 
such as older adults, children, chronically ill persons, and 
victims of abuse or trauma, including returning military 
personnel. The need for behavioral and mental health services 
in an integrated health care system is significant and well 
documented. While being trained in both rural and urban 
communities, trainees also provide direct services to those who 
would otherwise not receive them. Since its establishment six 
years ago, trainees have worked with over thirty health 
professions and medical specialties. In addition, the program 
has increased the rate of students entering into and staying to 
practice in underserved areas following completion. Therefore, 
the Committee encourages HRSA to strengthen funding for the 
existing twenty grantees.

Geriatric programs

    The Committee provides $31,548,000 for geriatric programs, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level. 
Funding for these programs is not included in the fiscal year 
2008 budget request. The geriatric programs are comprised of 
three activities: (1) geriatric education centers; (2) the 
geriatric training program for physicians, dentists, and 
behavioral and mental health professionals; and (3) geriatric 
academic career awards. This funding supports about fifty 
geriatric education centers and training of 50,000 health care 
providers.

Public health, preventive medicine, and dental public health programs

    The Committee provides $7,920,000 for public health, 
preventive medicine, and dental public health programs, which 
is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level. Funding for 
these programs is not included in the budget request. The 
program awards grants to support the education and training of 
the public health workforce to deal with new and unanticipated 
problems and to place these specialists in underserved areas. 
This funding will support approximately 8,000 students with 
traineeships and medical residents.

Nurse training programs

    The bill provides $165,624,000, which is an increase of 
$15,945,000 or 10.7 percent over fiscal year 2007 and 
$60,317,000 over the budget request for nursing education 
programs. The Committee strongly disagrees with the President's 
request to cut these programs despite America's nursing 
shortage, which is projected to deepen--to over 1 million 
nurses--in the next decade without significant investment to 
train new nurses. This growing nursing shortage is having a 
detrimental impact on the entire health care system. Numerous 
studies have shown that nursing shortages contribute to medical 
errors, poor patient outcomes, and increased mortality rates. 
The aging of the baby boom generation increases the urgency of 
addressing the nursing shortage, since the boomers will require 
more nursing services as they age at the same time as many 
nurses--who are themselves members of the baby boom--retire. 
The increase provided in the bill provides a first step towards 
alleviating the long-term nursing shortage.

Advanced education nursing

    The Committee provides $57,061,000 for advanced education 
nursing, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level. The President's budget does not include funds for this 
program. The program provides grant support to eligible 
entities to meet the costs of: (1) projects that support the 
enhancement of advanced nursing education and practice; and (2) 
traineeships for individuals in advanced nursing education 
programs. The program prepares registered nurses as nurse 
faculty, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse 
midwives, nurse anesthetists, nurse administrators, public 
health nurses, and other nurse specialists for advanced 
practice roles. In fiscal year 2008, almost 3,000 students and 
9,000 trainees will be supported.

Nurse education, practice and retention

    The Committee provides $37,291,000 for nurse education, 
practice, and retention, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and the budget request. The nurse education, 
practice and retention program is a broad authority with 
targeted purposes under three priority areas--education, 
practice and retention--in response to the growing nursing 
shortage. Fiscal year 2008 funding will support approximately 
20 baccalaureate projects targeting expanded enrollment, 40 
career ladder mobility projects, and almost 30 enhanced patient 
care delivery system projects.

Nursing workforce diversity

    The Committee provides $16,107,000 for nursing workforce 
diversity, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and the budget request. The program provides grants and 
contracts to schools of nursing and other eligible entities to 
meet the costs of special projects to increase nursing 
education opportunities for individuals who are from 
disadvantaged backgrounds, including racial and ethnic 
minorities, by providing student scholarships or stipends, pre-
entry preparation, and retention activities. The program also 
contributes to the basic preparation of disadvantaged and 
minority nurses for leadership positions within the nursing and 
health care community. In fiscal year 2008, almost 21,000 
minority students, 3,000 nursing program students, and 3,000 
college pre-entry nursing students are expected to participate 
in the program. Almost 500 will receive scholarships.

Loan repayment and scholarship program

    The Committee provides $44,000,000 for the nurse loan 
repayment and scholarship program, which is $12,945,000 above 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $256,000 above the 
budget request. This program offers student loan repayment to 
nurses or scholarships to nursing students in exchange for an 
agreement to serve not less than two years at a health care 
facility with a critical shortage of nurses. This funding will 
provide more than 1,000 loan repayment agreements and almost 
300 scholarships.

Comprehensive geriatric nurse education

    The Committee provides $3,392,000 for comprehensive 
geriatric nurse education, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and the budget request. The comprehensive 
geriatric education program supports grants for (1) providing 
training to individuals who will provide geriatric care for the 
elderly; (2) develop and disseminate curricula relating to the 
treatment of the health care problems of elderly individuals; 
(3) train faculty members in geriatrics; or (4) provide 
continuing education to individuals who provide geriatric care. 
Nineteen training projects are expected to be funded in fiscal 
year 2008.

Nursing faculty loan program

    The Committee provides $7,773,000 for the nursing faculty 
loan program, which is $3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the budget request. The nursing faculty loan 
program supports the development of a student loan fund in 
schools of nursing to increase the number of qualified nursing 
faculty. Students may receive loans up to $30,000 per year for 
a maximum of 5 years. The program has a cancellation provision 
for up to 85 percent of the loan for recipients working full-
time as nursing faculty for a period of 4 years. Fiscal year 
2008 funding is expected to support grants to 67 institutions 
which operate loan funds.
    The Committee recognizes that the growing nurse faculty 
shortage is directly linked to the nationwide shortage of 
registered nurses. According to the American Association of 
Colleges of Nursing's 2006-2007 survey, almost three quarters 
of the nursing schools offering baccalaureate and graduate 
nursing programs pointed to faculty shortages as a major reason 
for turning away nearly 43,000 qualified applicants. In 
addition, the average ages of doctoral-prepared nurse faculty 
holding the ranks of professor, associate professor, and 
assistant professors are 59, 56, and 52 years, respectively. A 
wave of nurse faculty retirements is projected for the next ten 
years that will only worsen the crisis. The Committee urges the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services to continue efforts to 
address the nurse faculty shortage as well as the impending 
retirements of nurse faculty.

Children's hospitals graduate medical education payment program

    The Committee provides $307,009,000 for the children's 
hospitals graduate medical education payment program, which is 
$10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$196,991,000 above the budget request. The program provides 
support for graduate medical education training in children's 
teaching hospitals that have a separate Medicare provider 
number (``free-standing'' children's hospitals). The funding in 
this program is intended to make the level of Federal graduate 
medical education support more consistent with other teaching 
hospitals, including children's hospitals which share provider 
numbers with other teaching hospitals. Payments are determined 
by formula, based on a national per-resident amount. Payments 
support training of resident physicians as defined by Medicare 
in both ambulatory and inpatient settings. The Committee 
believes this program is important to restoring the 
reimbursement inequity faced by pediatric hospitals, which 
provide high quality care to children with difficult and 
expensive conditions. This program supports 61 free-standing 
children's hospitals and the training of more than 5,100 
medical residents on and off-site.

National practitioner data bank

    The Committee does not provide funding for the national 
practitioner data bank for fiscal year 2008, which is the same 
as both the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and the budget 
request. The Committee recommendation and the budget request 
assume that the data bank will be self-supporting, with 
collections of $18,900,000 in user fees. Traditional bill 
language is included to ensure that user fees are collected to 
cover the full costs of the data bank operations. The national 
data bank receives, stores, and disseminates information on 
paid medical malpractice judgments and settlements, sanctions 
taken by Boards of Medical Examiners, losses of membership in 
professional societies, and certain professional review actions 
taken by health care entities. Insurance companies, State 
licensure boards and authorities, and other health care 
entities and professional societies are required to report 
information to the data bank within 30 days of each action. The 
coverage of the data bank includes dentists and physicians, 
and, with respect to malpractice settlements and judgments, 
other categories of licensed health professionals. Hospitals 
are required to search the data bank when a health care 
provider applies for employment and once every two years 
thereafter. State licensing boards, other health care entities, 
licensing authorities, and professional societies also have 
access to the data bank. In fiscal year 2006, the board 
processed more than 3,600,000 queries.

Health care integrity and protection data bank

    The Committee does not provide funding for the health care 
integrity and protection data bank (HIPDB) for fiscal year 
2008. The Committee recommendation and the budget request 
assume that the data bank will be self-supporting, with 
collections of $4,000,000 in user fees. Traditional bill 
language is included to ensure that user fees are collected to 
cover the full costs of the data bank operations. HIPDB 
receives, stores, and disseminates information on final adverse 
actions taken against health care providers, suppliers, and 
practitioners, health care related civil judgments and criminal 
convictions. This information is collected from and made 
available to Government agencies and health plans. In fiscal 
year 2006, the bank processed more than 900,000 requests for 
information.
    The Committee supports the consolidation of these two 
similar data banks into one program, the National Practitioner 
Data Bank, as proposed by the Administration, to maximize 
efficiencies.

Maternal and child health block grant

    The Committee provides $750,000,000 for the maternal and 
child health (MCH) block grant, which is $57,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. States 
use the block grant to improve access to care for mothers, 
children, and their families; reduce infant mortality; provide 
pre- and post-natal care; support screening and health 
assessments for children; and provide systems of care for 
children with special health care needs. By statute, 85 percent 
of the first $600 million is allocated to States and 15 percent 
is allocated to Special Projects of Regional and National 
Significance (SPRANS). Amounts in excess of $600 million are 
allocated to Community Integrated Service Systems as well as 
State grants and SPRANS.
    The Committee includes bill language identifying 
$170,991,000 for SPRANS activities and intends that the 
following amounts be provided within SPRANS for the listed 
activities:
          $15,000,000 for an initiative increasing public 
        awareness and resources for women preparing for birth;
          $12,000,000 for a dental health initiative;
          $5,800,000 for epilepsy services demonstrations;
          $4,000,000 for sickle cell community demonstrations;
          $3,800,000 for heritable disorders screening; and
          $30,000,000 for autism early detection and 
        intervention.
    Public awareness for first time parents.--$15,000,000 is 
provided for new competitive grants to States to increase 
public awareness of resources available to women preparing for 
childbirth and new parents through advertising campaigns and 
toll-free hotlines. The Committee recommends this funding as 
part of its initiative to help reduce the number of abortions 
in America by alleviating the economic pressures and other real 
life conditions that can sometimes cause women to decide not to 
carry their pregnancies to term.
    Dental health.--As described in the ``Improving Access to 
Dental Care'' initiative in the front of the report, 
$12,000,000 is provided for up to 25 competitive State grants 
to help expand access to oral health services. $2,000,000 of 
this total is transferred from HRSA program management, the 
former placement of the oral health workforce activities 
program. States may use these grants for the purposes outlined 
in the Dental Health Improvement Act, such as encouraging more 
dentists to practice in shortage areas through such mechanisms 
as loan forgiveness and repayment for dentists; providing 
grants to establish or expand oral health services in 
community-based facilities; and expanding dental residency 
programs. States may also use these funds to integrate oral 
health services into the medical home concept for children with 
special health care needs, and for grants to ensure low-income 
pregnant women and women of child-bearing age have access to 
appropriate oral health services. States should develop 
proposals that address the shortage of dentists and dentists' 
reluctance for financial reasons to work in certain geographic 
areas and to serve low-income and Medicaid patients.
    In addition, as indicated in the HRSA Program Management 
section, the Committee directs HRSA to strengthen its support 
of the oral health infrastructure within the agency and to 
appoint a chief dental officer.
    The Committee is aware that dental disease 
disproportionately affects our nation's most vulnerable 
populations. New ways of bringing oral health care to 
underserved populations are needed to address geographic and 
other challenges that exist. The Committee encourages HRSA to 
explore innovative programs for delivering preventive and 
restorative oral health services, including State and community 
proposals and programs that seek to improve access to care in 
accordance with state licensing laws.
    Epilepsy.--The Committee provides $5,800,000 for epilepsy 
service demonstrations, which doubles the funding for this 
program compared to fiscal year 2007. The epilepsy service 
programs improve access to comprehensive, coordinated health 
care and related services for children and youth with epilepsy 
in medically underserved areas. Funds are used to support the 
development and testing of a national public health awareness 
campaign to increase seizure recognition and improve access to 
care among minorities and underserved populations. Funds are 
also used to support a national technical assistance support 
center to reach additional States in need of technical support 
and model program development.
    Sickle cell disease.--The Committee provides $4,000,000 to 
support the continuation of the seventeen community-based 
sickle cell disease outreach and supportive service centers. 
These centers coordinate followup on needs identified in sickle 
cell screening, provide referrals to networks of services, and 
support community education. The Committee also provides 
$2,184,000 for sickle cell anemia demonstrations, as discussed 
below, which are comprehensive university-based screening and 
treatment centers.
    Heritable disorders.--The Committee provides $3,800,000 for 
heritable disorders screening, which doubles the funding for 
this program compared to fiscal year 2007. This screening 
program is designed to strengthen States' newborn screening 
programs and improve States' ability to develop, evaluate, and 
acquire innovative testing technologies, and establish and 
improve programs to provide screening, counseling, testing and 
special service for newborns and children at risk for heritable 
disorders.
    The Committee urges HRSA to prioritize Fragile X as a key 
prototype in the development of cost-effective public health 
screening and genetic counseling programs. The Committee 
requests a report by July 1, 2008 on progress made in the 
development of a screening tool for Fragile X and in working 
with the National Institute of Child Health and Human 
Development to create the tests necessary for the inclusion of 
Fragile X in newborn screening programs.
    The Committee commends HRSA for convening the Secretary's 
Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders and Genetic Diseases 
in Newborns and Children to develop national recommendations 
for standardizing newborn screening programs in the U.S. and 
for funding the Regional Genetic Service and Newborn Screening 
Collaborative to address the maldistribution of genetic 
services and resources to bring services closer to local 
communities. However, the Committee is aware that wide 
disparities continue to exist among States in the number of 
conditions for which newborns are screened and in the service 
infrastructure for infants who test positive. The Committee 
encourages HRSA and the Secretary's Advisory Committee to 
consider developing written guidance for parents on the 
availability of additional screens that may not be required 
under State law.
    Autism.--The Committee provides $30,000,000 for activities 
authorized in the Combating Autism Act, including the promotion 
of screening tools and the expansion of Leadership Education in 
Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) training 
sites to diagnose autism spectrum disorders and related 
disabilities. The Committee believes it is critical to 
strengthen HRSA's activities targeting autism spectrum 
disorders to respond to this emerging national epidemic.
    Vision screening.--The Committee understands that States 
currently conduct childhood screening programs through their 
MCH block grant. The Committee recognizes that vision disorders 
are the leading cause of impaired health in childhood, and that 
one in four school-age children has a vision problem 
significant enough to affect their learning. The Committee 
urges the States to strengthen their vision screening programs 
and to broaden the programs' geographic reach. In this effort, 
States are encouraged to take maximum advantage of the ongoing 
vision screening program conducted by the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention, which is increased by 40.6 percent to 
$3,466,000 in the bill.
    Thalassemia.--The Committee reiterates its long-standing 
support for the continuation of funding for comprehensive 
thalassemia treatment centers under the SPRANS program. The 
Committee strongly encourages HRSA to continue this program and 
to coordinate closely its activities with the thalassemia 
clinical research network and the related voluntary 
organizations.
    Hemophilia.--The Committee urges HRSA to maintain its 
funding support of the network of hemophilia treatment centers, 
which provide comprehensive disease management services to men 
and women with bleeding and clotting disorders.
    Fetal Infant Mortality Review.--HRSA has operated the 
National Fetal Infant Mortality Review (NFIMR) program since 
1990. NFIMR provides training and assistance to enhance 
cooperative partnerships among local community health 
professionals, public health officers, community advocates and 
consumers to reduce infant mortality. The goal is to improve 
local services and resources for women, infants and families, 
to remove barriers to care, and to ensure culturally 
appropriate, family friendly services. Such efforts are crucial 
to understanding and addressing infant health disparities in 
communities at highest risk and are a component of many 
existing Healthy Start Initiatives.

Sickle cell anemia demonstration program

    The Committee provides $2,184,000 for the sickle cell 
anemia demonstration program, which is the same as the budget 
request and $4,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level. 
This program was created to develop systemic mechanisms for the 
prevention and treatment of sickle cell disease. It supports 
four university-based networks linked to local community health 
centers that provide treatment, education, continuity of care, 
and provider training for sickle cell anemia patients.

Traumatic brain injury

    The Committee provides $8,910,000 for the traumatic brain 
injury (TBI) program. This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request does not include funding for 
this program. The TBI program funds the development and 
implementation of statewide systems to ensure access to care 
including pre-hospital care, emergency department care, 
hospital care, rehabilitation, transitional services, 
rehabilitation, education and employment, and long-term 
community support. Grants also go to State protection and 
advocacy systems. In fiscal year 2006, 45 States received TBI 
awards, and 57 State protection and advocacy systems were 
funded.

Healthy Start

    The Committee provides $120,000,000 for Healthy Start, 
which is $18,482,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
and $19,497,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
recommends the $18,482,000 increase as part of its initiative 
to help reduce the number of abortions in America by 
alleviating the economic pressures and other real life 
conditions that can sometimes cause women to decide not to 
carry their pregnancies to term. Healthy Start provides 
discretionary grants to communities with high rates of infant 
mortality to provide ongoing sources of primary and preventive 
health care to mothers and their infants. Currently, 99 
communities have Healthy Start grants. The increase provided in 
the bill will support approximately twenty new grants to 
communities.

Universal newborn hearing screening

    The Committee recommendation includes $11,000,000 for the 
universal newborn hearing screening program, an increase of 
$1,196,000 over the fiscal year 2007 enacted level and 
$11,000,000 over the request. This program provides competitive 
grants to States for universal newborn hearing screening by 
means of physiologic testing prior to hospital discharge, 
audiologic evaluation by three months of age, and entry into a 
program of early intervention by six months of age.
    Currently, 52 States and territories have received 
competitive grants for the purpose of implementing statewide 
early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs. Since 
these grants have only been operational for a few years, the 
Committee believes that a small amount of continued Federal 
funding is critical at this time to ensure that State EHDI 
programs become fully operational and that screening programs 
are properly linked with diagnosis, early intervention, and the 
child's routine medical care. The Committee is concerned that 
even though approximately 90 percent of babies are now screened 
for hearing loss before one month of age, about one-third of 
those who are referred for screening do not receive diagnostic 
evaluations by three months of age. Moreover, only about half 
of the infants and toddlers diagnosed with permanent hearing 
loss are enrolled in appropriate early intervention programs by 
six months of age.
    To avoid duplication, the Committee encourages HRSA to 
coordinate projects funded with this appropriation with 
projects related to early hearing detection and intervention by 
the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental 
Disabilities, the National Institute on Deafness and Other 
Communication Disorders, the National Institute on Disability 
and Rehabilitation Research, and the Office of Special 
Education and Rehabilitative Services.

Emergency medical services for children

    The Committee provides $19,800,000 for the emergency 
medical services for children (EMSC) program, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2007 funding level. The budget request does 
not include funding for this program. Grants are provided to 
States and territories to incorporate pediatric components into 
existing emergency medical services systems and to schools of 
medicine to develop and evaluate improved procedures and 
protocols for treating children. In fiscal year 2006, 56 grants 
were awarded to States and territories.

Ryan White HIV/AIDS programs

    The Committee provides a program level of $2,237,086,000 
for Ryan White HIV/AIDS programs, which is $99,291,000 above 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $79,174,000 above the 
budget request. The bill also makes available $25,000,000 in 
program evaluation funding under section 241 of the Public 
Health Service for special projects of national significance. 
The Committee provides the maximum authorized level for the 
Ryan White Act. The bill includes language proposed by the 
Administration to make funds appropriated for Parts A and B 
available for three years to be consistent with the recent 
reauthorization. These programs provide medical and related 
support services to more than 500,000 people.
    The Committee is pleased that HRSA intends to fund the 
minority HIV/AIDS initiative at the full authorized level 
established in the recent Ryan White CARE Act authorization of 
$135,100,000. These programs are targeted to address the 
growing HIV/AIDS epidemic and its disproportionate impact upon 
communities of color, including African Americans, Latinos, 
Native Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and 
Pacific Islanders.
    The recent Ryan White CARE Act reauthorization provides up 
to 25 percent of available funds under Parts A, B, and C for 
``support services,'' necessary for individuals with HIV/AIDS 
to achieve their medical outcomes. The Committee is aware that 
food and nutrition services--which have been provided under the 
Act since 1990--are essential to the comprehensive treatment of 
HIV/AIDS. Among other contributions, such services facilitate 
the absorption of medicine, mitigate pharmaceutical side 
effects, maintain immune system function, and stem muscle and 
weight loss. Accordingly, the Committee expects HRSA to make no 
change in the status of such services as eligible support 
services under Ryan White and work to promote access to food 
and nutrition services for Ryan White-eligible individuals.
    The Committee is aware that over 30 percent of HIV-infected 
persons in the United States are also chronically infected with 
the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Chronic hepatitis C infection may 
lead to cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer, and is the 
leading cause of liver transplantation in the U.S. In addition, 
chronic hepatitis C disease progresses more rapidly in HIV-
infected persons, and end stage liver disease resulting from 
chronic hepatitis C infection is now a leading cause of death 
for people with HIV/AIDS. The Committee encourages HRSA to 
provide guidance to grantees to encourage them to proactively 
address HCV care and treatment among their HIV/HCV co-infected 
patient populations and provide more education and training to 
medical providers treating HIV/HCV co-infected persons. The 
Committee also encourages State AIDS drug assistance programs 
(ADAP) to provide coverage of therapies approved by the Food 
and Drug Administration for the treatment of HCV in HIV/HCV co-
infected patients.

Emergency assistance

    The Committee provides $636,300,000 for the Part A, 
emergency assistance program, which is $32,307,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. These 
funds provide grants to metropolitan areas with very high 
numbers of HIV/AIDS cases for outpatient and ambulatory health 
and social support services. Half of the amount appropriated is 
allocated by formula and half is allocated to eligible areas 
demonstrating additional need through a competitive grant 
process. The program will provide awards to 56 eligible 
metropolitan areas and transitional areas in fiscal year 2008.
    The Committee has provided funds within the part A program 
to prevent substantial funding losses in both eligible 
metropolitan areas and transitional grant areas. Changes in the 
recent reauthorization significantly altered the method for 
allocating part A funds, and additional funds are required to 
create a stop loss against unanticipated cuts that threaten to 
disrupt access to needed medical care and support services for 
people living with HIV and AIDS. The Committee includes bill 
language to cap maximum fiscal year 2007 losses at 8.4 percent 
for eligible metropolitan areas and 13.4 percent for 
transitional grant areas.
    When allocating fiscal year 2008 supplemental funds under 
part A of the Ryan White CARE Act, the Committee urges HRSA to 
provide additional increases to jurisdictions that have 
experienced cuts in their total awards relative to the amount 
awarded in fiscal year 2006.

Comprehensive care programs

    The Committee provides $1,239,500,000 for Part B, 
comprehensive care programs, which is $44,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $23,982,000 above the budget 
request. The funds provide formula grants to States for the 
operation of HIV service delivery consortia in the localities 
most heavily affected, the provision of home and community-
based care, continuation of health insurance coverage for 
infected persons, and purchase of therapeutic drugs. The 
Committee includes bill language identifying $830,593,000 of 
this total specifically to support State AIDS Drug Assistance 
Programs (ADAP), which is $41,047,000 above the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $16,047,000 above the budget request. 
The Part B program provides 59 grants to States and 
territories, 57 of which receive ADAP funding. In fiscal year 
2005, 132,000 clients were served by ADAP. The Part B program 
also awards States supplemental grants for emerging 
communities, 19 of which are eligible for grants this year.
    The Committee is concerned about the increasing incidence 
of HIV drug resistance among Americans living with HIV/AIDS. 
New, active HIV therapies are being developed that treat 
patients with HIV resistance. Current, national HIV treatment 
guidelines require that each patient's treatment regimen be 
individualized and include two or more active agents. CMS, in 
developing regulations for Medicare Part D plans, recognized 
the importance of making new HIV antiretrovirals available to 
providers and patients as soon as possible by requiring Part D 
plan pharmacy and therapeutics review committees to conduct 
expedited reviews of new HIV treatments within 90 days of FDA 
approval. Therefore, the Committee urges HRSA to ensure that 
State AIDS Drug Assistance Programs provide immediate access to 
all new antiretroviral therapies for their eligible clients.

Early intervention program

    The Committee provides $216,700,000 for Part C, the early 
intervention services program, which is $22,979,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $16,879,000 above the budget 
request. Funds are used for discretionary grants to community 
health centers, family planning agencies, comprehensive 
hemophilia diagnostic and treatment centers, Federally-
qualified health centers, county and municipal health 
departments and other non-profit community-based programs that 
provide comprehensive primary care services to populations with 
or at risk for HIV disease. The grantees provide testing, risk 
reduction counseling, transmission prevention, oral health, 
nutritional and mental health services, and clinical care. 
Optional services include case management, outreach, and 
eligibility assistance. Currently, 363 grantees provide 
comprehensive, primary care services to approximately 212,000 
people in 49 States and territories.
    The Committee urges HRSA to direct funding increases above 
the fiscal year 2007 level to existing Part C service areas 
rather than to expand the overall number of Part C programs. 
The number of Part C sites has continued to expand even in the 
absence of funding increases; existing programs are 
experiencing significant strains. There is already strong 
geographic diversity in the Part C program.

Children, youth, women, and families

    The Committee provides $71,800,000 for Part D, children, 
youth, women, and families programs, which is $6,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. HIV-
infected children, youth, women, and affected family members 
have multiple, complex medical, economic, and social service 
needs which often require more intensive care coordination, 
intensive case management, child and respite care, and direct 
service delivery to engage and maintain adolescents and mothers 
in care. Funds support innovative and unique strategies and 
models to organize, arrange for, and deliver comprehensive 
services through integration into ongoing systems of care. 
Currently, 89 grants support health care and support services 
for over 53,000 women, infants, children and youth living in 31 
States, D.C. and Puerto Rico.
    The Committee intends that at least 90 percent of part D 
funding be provided to existing service areas. Technical 
assistance may be provided to Part D grantees using up to 2 
percent of the funds appropriated under this section. The 
Committee is aware of the efforts of Part D grantees to care 
for youth infected with HIV and urges HRSA to disseminate the 
effective practices and models of care developed by Part D 
grantees across all Ryan White CARE Act providers.

AIDS dental services

    The Committee provides $13,086,000 for AIDS dental 
services, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and the budget request. The program includes two 
components: the dental reimbursement program, which reimburses 
dental education programs for non-reimbursed costs incurred in 
providing care to AIDS patients, and the community-based dental 
partnership, which increases access to oral health services and 
provider training in community settings. In fiscal year 2005, 
66 dental schools and post-doctoral dental education programs 
received partial reimbursement for the costs of serving 31,000 
patients. In addition, 12 community-based dental partnership 
grants provided training to students and residents enrolled in 
dental education programs that provide care for people with HIV 
under direction of dentists in the community.

Education and training centers

    The Committee provides $34,700,000 for AIDS education and 
training centers (AETCs), which is $1,000 less than the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $6,000,000 above the budget 
request. The program supports a network of 11 regional centers 
with more than 130 associated sites that conduct targeted, 
multi-disciplinary HIV education and training for health care 
providers.

Organ transplantation

    The Committee provides $23,049,000 for organ donation and 
transplantation activities, the same as the fiscal year 2007 
level and the budget request. These funds support a scientific 
registry of organ transplant recipients and the National Organ 
Procurement and Transplantation Network to match donors and 
potential recipients of organs, through a contract with the 
United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). In fiscal year 2005, 
more than 23,200 deceased donor organs were transplanted.
    The Committee applauds the efforts of the Division of 
Transplantation to implement the new provision of Public Law 
208-116, the Organ Donation and Recovery Improvement Act, which 
provides for reimbursement of travel and subsistence expenses 
of living organ donors. The Committee notes that the first 
awards under this new program are expected this spring and are 
anticipated to have a direct impact on increasing the rate of 
successful transplantations. The Committee further notes the 
successful implementation of the Organ Donation Breakthrough 
Collaborative, which has helped to increase the rate of organ 
donation.
    The Committee commends HRSA for its leadership in promoting 
increased organ and tissue donations across the nation and 
encourages the Division of Transplantation to expand its 
partnership with the pulmonary hypertension (PH) community in 
this important area. In addition, the Committee commends UNOS 
for working with the pulmonary hypertension community to 
address concerns regarding the allocation of lungs for 
transplantation in PH patients. The Committee encourages UNOS 
to continue its dialogue to monitor any concerns regarding the 
methodology used to determine transplant eligibility for PH 
patients.

National cord blood inventory program

    The Committee provides $3,963,000 for the national cord 
blood inventory program, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 appropriation and $1,997,000 above the Administration 
request. The Committee strongly supports this program and has 
appropriated $27,720,000 for this purpose since 2004. The 
purpose of this program is to provide funds to cord blood banks 
to build an inventory of the highest quality cord blood units 
for transplantation. As of this date, approximately 300 cord 
blood units have been collected.

Cell transplantation program

    The Committee provides $25,168,000 for the cell 
transplantation program, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $2,467,000 above the budget request. The 
C.W. Bill Young Cell Transplantation Program is the successor 
to the National Bone Marrow Donor Registry. Its purpose is to 
increase the number of transplants for recipients suitably 
matched to biologically unrelated donors of bone marrow and 
cord blood.

Office of pharmacy affairs

    The Committee provides $2,940,000 for the office of 
pharmacy affairs, which is the same as the budget request. No 
funding was provided in fiscal year 2007 funding level. The 
340B program requires drug manufacturers to provide discounts 
or rebates to certain entities that serve low-income patients. 
HRSA administers the program, calculates the 340B prices, and 
works with manufacturers to verify the pricing. Financial 
support for the office will help resolve identified 
deficiencies in the 340B drug pricing program and is intended 
to make major improvements in program operations.
    In January, 2007, HRSA issued proposed guidelines that 
would make significant changes to the traditional definition of 
the term ``patient'' under the drug discount program authorized 
by Section 340B of the Public Health Service Act. The Committee 
has heard concerns about numerous aspects of the proposed 
guidelines, including the limitations to prescriptions 
resulting from outpatient services and requirements regarding 
patient health record information. The Committee urges HRSA to 
consider the concerns raised by the external community as it 
reviews the guidelines before publication in final form.

Poison control centers

    The Committee provides $30,100,000 for poison control 
centers, which is $7,100,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $20,100,000 above the budget request. These funds 
support a grant program for 61 poison control centers, which 
fielded five million calls in 2006. In addition, funds are used 
to maintain a national toll-free number and to implement a 
media campaign to advertise that number, as well as to support 
the development of uniform patient management guidelines and 
the improvement of data collection.

Rural outreach grants

    The Committee provides $52,962,000 for rural outreach 
grants, which is $14,077,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level. The Administration does not request funding for this 
program. The program administers more than 200 grants to 
deliver and improve rural health care services to more than 
775,000 rural residents annually.

Rural health research

    The Committee provides $9,500,000 for rural health 
research, which is $763,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and the budget request. This activity supports eight 
rural health research centers and the Secretary's rural health 
advisory committee.

Rural hospital flexibility grants

    The Committee provides $63,538,000 for rural hospital 
flexibility grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request does not include funding for 
this program. The program is comprised of two components: (1) 
flexibility grants to States to assist small, at-risk rural 
hospitals that wish to convert to critical access hospitals and 
receive cost-based payments from Medicare and (2) small rural 
hospital improvement grants that provide modest amounts to 
hospitals to assist them in automation and compliance with 
confidentiality requirements. In fiscal year 2007, 92 grants 
are expected to be awarded to States for these activities.

Rural and community access to emergency devices

    The Committee provides $2,000,000 for the rural access to 
emergency devices and the public access defibrillation 
demonstration program, which is $513,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level. The Administration does not request 
funding for this program. The amount above the fiscal year 2007 
level may be used for rural EMS training and equipment 
assistance. The program assists both urban and rural 
communities in increasing survivability from sudden cardiac 
arrest by providing funding for the purchase, placement, and 
training in the use of automated external defibrillators 
(AEDs).
    An estimated 94 percent of all cardiac arrests that take 
place outside a hospital are deadly. Immediate cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation (CPR) and early defibrillation using an AED can 
more than double a victim's chance of survival. Communities 
with comprehensive AED programs, including training of 
anticipated rescuers, have achieved cardiac arrest survival 
rates of 40 percent or higher.

State offices of rural health

    The Committee provides $9,000,000 for State offices of 
rural health, which is $859,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the budget request. The State office of rural 
health program creates a focal point for rural health within 
each of the fifty States. In each State, the office collects 
and disseminates information on rural health, coordinates rural 
health resources and activities, provides technical assistance 
to rural providers and communities, and helps communities 
recruit and retain health professionals.

Black lung clinics

    The Committee provides $5,891,000 for black lung clinics, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$5,000 above the budget request. The program supports 15 
grantees that treat about 11,000 patients who are active and 
retired coal miners and others with occupation-related 
respiratory and pulmonary impairments. Of the 15 grantees, six 
receive health center funding as well as black lung grants.

Radiation exposure screening and education program

    The Committee provides $1,917,000 for the radiation 
exposure screening and education program, which is $2,000 below 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $13,000 above the budget 
request. This program provides seven grants to States, local 
governments, and healthcare organizations for the education, 
prevention, and early detection of radiogenic cancers and 
diseases resulting from exposure to uranium during mining and 
milling at nuclear test sites. 1,400 patients are served by the 
program.

Denali commission

    The Committee concurs with the budget request and does not 
include funding for the Denali Commission. The fiscal year 2007 
funding level is $39,283,000.

Family planning

    The Committee provides $310,910,000 for the family planning 
program, which is $27,764,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $27,807,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee recommends the $27,764,000 increase as part of its 
initiative to help reduce the number of abortions in America by 
alleviating the economic pressures and other real life 
conditions that can sometimes cause women to decide not to 
carry their pregnancies to term. The program currently serves 
over five million low-income women and men at 4,400 clinics 
nationwide. This funding increase will allow the program to 
serve 98,000 new clients. Family planning funds in the bill are 
expected to prevent more than one million unintended 
pregnancies.
    The program provides grants to public and private non-
profit agencies to support a range of family planning and 
reproductive services, as well as related preventive health 
services such as patient education and counseling, breast and 
cervical cancer examinations, STD and HIV prevention education, 
counseling and testing and referral, and pregnancy diagnosis 
and counseling. The program is the only source of health care 
for many of its clients.

Healthcare-related facilities and other programs

    The Committee includes funding for construction and 
renovation (including equipment) of health care and other 
facilities and other health-related activities. The Committee 
includes the following projects in the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
A.O. Fox Memorial Hospital, Oneonta, NY for                     $250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Access Community Health Network, Chicago, IL for                 225,000
 facilities and equipment for Chicago sites..........
Adirondack Medical Center, Saranac Lake, NY for                  250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Adrian College, Adrian, MI for nurse training                    250,000
 programs, including facilities and equipment........
Adventist Glen Oaks Hospital, Glendale Heights, IL               200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Adventist Health, Roseville, CA for expansions to the            250,000
 clinical information system, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Alamo Community College System, San Antonio, TX for              300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Alaska Addictions Rehabilitation Services, Inc.,                 150,000
 Wasilla, AK for facilities and equipment............
Alderson-Broaddus College, Philippi, WV for                      100,000
 facilities and equipment for the nursing program....
Alice Hyde Medical Center, Malone, NY for facilities             100,000
 and equipment.......................................
Alleghany Memorial Hospital, Sparta, NC for an                   150,000
 electronic health records initiative, including
 equipment...........................................
Alle-Kiski Medical Center, Natrona Heights, PA for               350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Alliance for NanoHealth, Houston, TX for facilities              450,000
 and equipment.......................................
AltaMed Health Services Corp., Los Angeles, CA for               275,000
 facilities and equipment............................
American Oncologic Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center,            500,000
 Philadelphia, PA for facilities and equipment.......
American Samoa, Pago Pago, AQ for facilities and                 400,000
 equipment for the LBJ Medical Center................
Armite County Medical Services, Liberty, MS for                  135,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Arnold Palmer Hospital, Orlando, FL for facilities               200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Ashland County Oral Health Services, Ashland, OH for             100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Asian Americans for Community Involvement, San Jose,             378,000
 CA for facilities and equipment for a community
 health clinic.......................................
Association for Utah Community Health, Salt Lake                 300,000
 City, UT for health information technology for
 community health centers represented by the
 Association throughout the State....................
Atlantic Health Systems, Florham Park, NJ for an                 500,000
 electronic disease tracking system..................
Avis Goodwin Community Health Center, Dover, NH for              375,000
 facilities and equipment in Somerworth, NH..........
Avilsta Adventist Hospital, Louisville, CO for health            200,000
 information systems.................................
Bad River Tribe of Lake Superior Chippewa, Odanah, WI            500,000
 for facilities and equipment for a health clinic....
Ball Memorial Hospital, Muncie, IN, for facilities               100,000
 and equipment.......................................
Baltimore City Health Department, Baltimore, MD for              200,000
 facilities and equipment for mobile units...........
Baltimore Medical System, Baltimore, MD for                      200,000
 facilities and equipment for a community health care
 facility............................................
Baptist Health Medical Center--Heber Springs, Heber               75,000
 Springs, AR for facilities and equipment............
Banert Hospital, Paterson, NJ for facilities and                 200,000
 equipment...........................................
Banes-Kasson County Hospital, Susquehanna, PA for                150,000
 obstetrical care....................................
Bare Family Health Center, Barre, MA for facilities              150,000
 and equipment.......................................
Bay Area Medical Clinic, Marinette, WI for facilities            200,000
 and equipment.......................................
BayCare Health System, Clearwater, FL for upgrades to            200,000
 medical information systems.........................
Baylor Research Institute, Dallas, TX for facilities             100,000
 and equipment.......................................
Bayonne Medical Center, Bayonne, NJ for health                   300,000
 information technology..............................
Baystate Health Systems, Springfield, MA for                     200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI for a Core Molecular            500,000
 Laboratory, including facilities and equipment......
Belmont University, Nashville, TN for facilities and             100,000
 equipment for the Health Science Center.............
Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN for a nurse                200,000
 training program....................................
Benedictine Hospital, Kingston, NY for health                    175,000
 information systems.................................
Benefis Healthcare, Great Falls, MT for facilities               300,000
 and equipment.......................................
Berea Health Ministry Rural Health Clinic, Inc.,                  50,000
 Berea, KY for facilities and equipment for a rural
 diabetes clinic.....................................
Bloomington Hospital Foundation, Bloomington, IN for             200,000
 for health information systems......................
Bloomsburg Hospital, Bloomburg, PA for facilities and            200,000
 equipment...........................................
Blount Memorial Hospital, Maryville, TN for purchase             100,000
 of equipment........................................
Boone Hospital Center, Columbia, MO for facilities               200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Boriken Neighborhood Health Center, New York, NY for             150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Boscobel Area Health Care, Boscobel, WI for                      300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA for facilities and             500,000
 equipment...........................................
Boston University Medical School, Boston, MA for                 250,000
 facilities and equipment for biomedical research....
Bridge Community Health Clinic, Wausau, WI for                   500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, CT for facilities               100,000
 and equipment.......................................
Brockton Neighborhood Health Center, Brockton, MA for            200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Brookside Community Health Center, San Pablo, CA for             350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Brunswick County, Bolivia, NC for facilities and                 150,000
 equipment for a senior center.......................
Bryan W. Whitfield Hospital, Demopolis, AL for                   100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Bureau County Health Clinic, Princeton, IL to expand             150,000
 rural health services, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Cactus Health Services, Inc., Sanderson, TX for                  175,000
 primary health care services in rural communities in
 Terrell and Pecos Counties..........................
California Hospital Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA              400,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
California State University, Bakersfield, CA for                 200,000
 nurse training programs, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Camillus House, Inc., Miami, FL for facilities and                60,000
 equipment...........................................
Canonsburg General Hospital, Canonsburg, PA for                  150,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Cape Cod Free Clinic and Community Health Center,                150,000
 Mashpee, MA for facilities and equipment............
Capital Park Family Health Center, Columbus, OH for              200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Cardinal Stritch University, Milwaukee, WI for a                 100,000
 nursing training program............................
Carolinas HealthCare System, Charlotte, NC for                   100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Carroll County Regional Medical Center, Carrollton,              200,000
 KY for facilities and equipment.....................
Carroll County Youth Service Bureau, Westminster, MD             350,000
 for facilities and equipment for the Outpatient
 Mental Health Clinic................................
Center for Health Equity, Louisville, KY for a mobile            225,000
 health unit.........................................
Central Wyoming College, Riverton, WY for facilities             200,000
 and equipment at the Virtual Medical Skills.........
Center for Training Nurses in Rural Health Care......
CentroMed, San Antonio, TX for facilities and                    300,000
 equipment...........................................
Champlain Valley Physician's Hospital, Plattsburgh,              250,000
 NY for facilities and equipment.....................
Charles A. Dean Memorial Hospital, Greenville, ME for            200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Chatham County Safety Net Collaborative, Savannah, GA            200,000
 for purchase of equipment...........................
Cherry Street Health Services, Grand Rapids, MI for              200,000
 an electronic health records initiative, including
 equipment...........................................
Children's Friend and Family Services, Salem, MA for             200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Children's Home of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA for                200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Children's Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota,                     15,000
 Minneapolis, MN for facilities and equipment........
Children's Hospital and Health System, Milwaukee, WI             350,000
 for purchase of equipment...........................
Children's Hospital at Albany Medical Center, Albany,            200,000
 NY for facilities and equipment.....................
Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron, Akron,              300,000
 OH for facilities and equipment.....................
Children's Hospital of Orange County, Mission Viejo,             150,000
 CA for purchase of equipment........................
Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters, Norfolk,            550,000
 VA for pediatric facilities and equipment...........
Children's Hospital, Denver, CO for facilities and               200,000
 equipment...........................................
Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota,                   100,000
 Minneapolis, MN for facilities and equipment for the
 Mobile Pediatric Health Simulation Center...........
Children's Medical Center, Dayton, OH for CARE House,            100,000
 including facilities and equipment..................
Children's Memorial Hospital Chicago, IL for                     525,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC               500,000
 for facilities and equipment for emergency
 preparedness........................................
Children's Specialized Hospital, Mountainside, NJ for            300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Chippewa Valley Hospital, Durand, WI for facilities              125,000
 and equipment.......................................
Chiricahua Community Health Centers, Inc., Elfrida,              400,000
 AZ for facilities and equipment for the Bisbee/Naco
 Chiricahua community health center in Bisbee, AZ and
 the Douglas/El Frida Medical and Dental Border
 Healthcare Clinic in Douglas, AZ....................
Christian Health Care Center of New Jersey, Wyckoff,             200,000
 NJ for facilities and equipment.....................
Christian Sarkine Autism Treatment Center,                       200,000
 Indianapolis, IN for facilities and equipment.......
Christus Santa Rosa's Children's Hospital, San                   200,000
 Antonio, TX for facilities and equipment............
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center,                   300,000
 Cincinnati, OH for purchase of equipment............
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners,                     150,000
 Inverness, FL for facilities and equipment..........
City of Austin, TX for facilities and equipment for              250,000
 the Travis County Hospital District.................
City of Chesapeake, VA for infant mortality and                  100,000
 chronic disease prevention program, including
 equipment...........................................
City of Hueytown, AL for the Senior Citizens' Center,            200,000
 including facilities and equipment..................
City of Oakland, CA for facilities and equipment for             500,000
 a new youth center to house health services programs
City of Stockton, CA for facilities and equipment for            300,000
 a health care facility..............................
City of Stonewall, OK for facilities and equipment...            260,000
Clarion Health Center, Clarion, PA for purchase of               100,000
 equipment...........................................
Cleveland Clinic Huron Hospital, East Cleveland, OH              250,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Cobb County Government, Marietta, GA for a senior                325,000
 health center, including facilities and equipment...
Coffeyville Regional Medical Center, Coffeyville, KS             250,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Coles County Council on Aging, Mattoon, IL for                   200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
College Misericordia, Dallas, PA for facilities and              275,000
 equipment for the NEPA Assistive Technology Research
 Institute...........................................
Collier County, Naples, FL to develop a health care              342,000
 access network for the under- and uninsured,
 including information technology upgrades...........
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO for                  300,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Columbia Memorial Hospital, Hudson, NY for health                150,000
 information systems.................................
Columbus Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH for a                 100,000
 telehealth project..................................
Columbus Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH for                   300,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Communi Care, Inc., Columbia, SC for health                      285,000
 information systems, facilities, and equipment......
Community College of Aurora, Aurora, CO for                      350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Community Dental Services, Albuquerque, NM for                   300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Community Health Care, Tacoma, WA for facilities and             400,000
 equipment...........................................
Community Health Center of Franklin County, Turners              150,000
 Falls, MA for health information systems............
Community Health Works, Forsyth, GA for rural health              50,000
 care outreach.......................................
Community Hospital of Bremen, Bremen, IN for                     125,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Community Hospital TeleHealth Consortium, Lake                   200,000
 Charles, LA for a telehealth initiative.............
Community Medical Centers, Stockton, CA for                      200,000
 facilities and equipment for Gleason House..........
Comprehensive Community Action Program (CCAP),                   100,000
 Cranston, RI for facilities and equipment for dental
 care................................................
Connecticut Hospice, Inc., Branford, CT for health               300,000
 information systems.................................
Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, TX for               600,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Cooperative Education Service Agency 11 Rural Health             225,000
 Dental Clinic, Turtle Lake, WI for dental services..
County of Modoc Medical Center, Alturas, CA for                  150,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
County of Peoria, Peoria, IL or facilities and                   200,000
 equipment...........................................
County of San Diego, CA for Public Health Services               286,000
 for the purchase of equipment.......................
Crousee Hospital, Syracuse, NY for purchase of                   300,000
 equipment and improvement of electronic medical
 information.........................................
Crowder College-Nevada Campus, Nevada, MO for                    200,000
 facilities and equipment for the Moss Higher
 Education Center....................................
Crozer-Chester Medical Center, Upland, PA for                    300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Cumberland Medical Center, Crossville, TN for                    150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH for              275,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Delaware Technical and Community College, Dover, DE              150,000
 for purchase of equipment...........................
Denver Health and Hospital Authority, Denver, CO for             300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Des Moines University and Broadlawns Medical Center,             200,000
 Des Moines, IA for a mobile clinic..................
Detroit Primary Care Access, Detroit, MI for health              300,000
 care information technology.........................
Dixie County, Cross City, FL for facilities and                   75,000
 equipment for the primary care facility.............
Dodge County Hospital, Eastman, GA for facilities and            100,000
 equipment...........................................
Drew County Memorial Hospital, Monticello, AR for                200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
DuBois Regional Medical Center, DuBois, PA for                   200,000
 purchase of equipment and electronic medical records
 upgrades............................................
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC for the                 350,000
 Metabolic Institute, including facilities and
 equipment...........................................
East Tennessee Children's Hospital, Knoxville, TN for            180,000
 facilities and equipment............................
East Tennessee State University College of Pharmacy,             250,000
 Johnson City, TN for facilities and equipment.......
Easter Seals of Mahoning, Trumbull, and Columbiana               200,000
 Counties, Youngstown, OH for facilities and
 equipment...........................................
Eddy County, NM, for a regional substance abuse                  150,000
 rehabilitation center, including facilities and
 equipment...........................................
Edgemoor Hospital, Santee, A for purchase of                     150,000
 equipment...........................................
Eisenhower Medical Center, Rancho Mirage, CA for                 150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
El Proyecto del Barrio, Arleta, ICA for facilities               250,000
 and equipment at the Azusa Health Center, Azusa, CA.
El Proyecto del Barrio, Winnetka, CA for health                  150,000
 information systems.................................
Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, NC              200,000
 for facilities and equipment for a science education
 building............................................
Emerson Hospital, Concord, MA for facilities and                 200,000
 equipment...........................................
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, Englewood, NJ             150,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Excela Health, Mt. Pleasant, MA for facilities and               350,000
 equipment...........................................
Fairfield Medical Center, Lancaster, OH for                      200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Fairview Southdale Hospital, Edina, MN for purchase              150,000
 of equipment........................................
Family and Children's Aid, Danbury, CT for facilities            250,000
 and equipment for the Harmony Center................
Family Behavioral Resource, Greensburg, PA for                   100,000
 community health outreach activities................
Family Center of the Northern, Neck, Inc., White                 200,000
 Stone, VA for obstetric care services, including
 facilities and equipment............................
Family Health Center of Southern Oklahoma,                       100,000
 Tishomingo, OK for facilities and equipment.........
Family HealthCare Network, Visalia, CA for electronic            200,000
 medical records upgrades............................
Family Medicine Spokane, Spokane, WA for rural                   150,000
 training assistance.................................
Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences, Orlando,            150,000
 FL for facilities and equipment.....................
Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL for             2,000,000
 facilities and equipment for the Autism Research and
 Treatment Center....................................
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, FL for purchase              300,000
 of equipment to support nursing programs............
Floyd Valley Hospital, Le Mars, IA for facilities and            100,000
 equipment...........................................
Freeman Health System, Joplin, MO for purchase of                255,000
 equipment...........................................
Fulton County Medical Center, McConnelsburg, PA for              250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Gardner Family Health Network, Inc., San Jose, CA for            300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Gaston College, Health Education Institute, Dallas,              150,000
 NC for nurse training programs, including facilities
 and equipment.......................................
Gateway to Care, Houston, TX for health information              200,000
 technology..........................................
Gertrude A. Barber Center, Erie, PA for the Autism               150,000
 Early Identification Diagnostic and Treatment
 Center, including purchase of equipment.............
Glen Rose Medical Center, Glen Rose, TX for                      330,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Glendale Adventist Medical Center, Glendale, CA for              350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Glens Falls Hospital, Glens Falls, NY for facilities             375,000
 and equipment.......................................
Grady Health Systems, Atlanta, GA for electronic                 150,000
 medical records upgrades............................
Grandview Hospital, Dayton, OH for facilities and                150,000
 equipment...........................................
Greater Hudson Valley Family Health Center,Inc.,                  75,000
 Newburgh, NY for facilities and equipment...........
Greater New Bedford Community Health Center, New                 300,000
 Bedford, MA for health information systems..........
Griffin Hospital, Derby, CT for facilities and                   400,000
 equipment...........................................
Gritman Medical Center, Moscow, ID for facilities and            100,000
 equipment...........................................
Gundersen Lutheran Health System, West Union, IA for             250,000
 a mobile health unit................................
Gunderson Lutheran, Decorah, IA for a Remote Fetal               250,000
 Monitoring Program, including purchase, of equipment
Halifax Regional Health System, South Boston, VA for             300,000
 an electronic health records initiative, including
 equipment...........................................
Hamilton Community Health Network, Flint, MI for                 200,000
 health care information technology..................
Hampton University, Hampton, VA for health                       250,000
 professions training................................
Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX for                 300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX for                 200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX for                 150,000
 facilities and equipment for an outpatient physical
 and occupational therapy center.....................
Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX for                 200,000
 facilities and equipment for the diabetes program...
Harris Methodist Erath County Hospital, Stephenville,            140,000
 TX for facilities and equipment.....................
Hatzoloh EMS, Inc., Monsey, INY for purchase of                  125,000
 ambulances..........................................
Hawkeye Community College, Waterloo, IA for                      350,000
 facilities and equipment for a health center........
Healing Tree Addiction Treatment Solutions, Inc.,                150,000
 Sterling, CO for facilities and equipment...........
HEALS Dental Clinic, Huntsville, AL for facilities                75,000
 and equipment.......................................
HealthCare Connection, Cincinnati, OH for an                     150,000
 electronic health records initiative, including
 equipment...........................................
HealthEast Care System, St. Paul, MN for health                  500,000
 information systems.................................
Heartland Community HealthlClinic, Peoria, IL for                300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Hektoen Institute for Medical Research Beloved                   250,000
 Community Wellness Program, Chicago, IL for
 facilities and equipment............................
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI for            100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, Valencia, CA               200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Highland Community Hospital, Picayune, MS for health             200,000
 information systems.................................
Highlands County, Sebring, FL for facilities and                 400,000
 equipment for the veterans service office...........
Holy Name Hospital, Teaneck, NJ for facilities and               150,000
 equipment...........................................
Home Nursing Agency, Altoona, PA, for telehealth                 100,000
 services, including purchase of equipment...........
I Hormel Foundation, Austin, MN for facilities and               400,000
 equipment for the cancer research center............
Hospice of Northwest Ohio Toledo Center, Toledo, OH              100,000
 for health information systems......................
Hospice of the Western Reserve, Cleveland, OH for a              150,000
 pediatric care program..............................
Houston County Hospital District, Crockett, TX for               200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Howard Community College,Columbia, MD for facilities             150,000
 and equipment for radiologic technology.............
Hudson Alpha Institute for Biotechnology, Huntsville,            275,000
 AL for facilities and equipment.....................
Hudson Headwaters Health Network, Inc., Glens Falls,             100,000
 NY for health information systems...................
Humility of Mary Health Partners, Youngstown, OH for             200,000
 health information technology.......................
Humphreys County Memorial Hospital, Belzoni, MS for              175,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Hunterdon Medical Center, Flemington, NJ for                     500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Hunter's Hope Foundation, Orchard Park, NY, including            200,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Huntsville Hospital, Huntsville, AL for facilities               175,000
 and equipment.......................................
Hurley Medical Center, Flint, MI for health                      200,000
 information systems.................................
Idaho Caring Foundation, Inc., Boise, ID for oral                300,000
 health services for low-income children.............
Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID for the                    200,000
 Advanced Clinical Simulation Laboratory, including
 facilities and equipment............................
Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Chicago, IL for                 250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Illinois Primary Health Care Association,                        225,000
 Springfield, IL for health information systems for
 clinic sites across the State.......................
India Community Center, Militias, CA for facilities              300,000
 and equipment for the medical clinic................
Indiana University Bloomington, IN for facilities and             75,000
 equipment for the School of Nursing.................
Indiana University School of Medicine, Gary, IN for              400,000
 facilities and equipment for the Northwest Indiana
 Health Research Institute...........................
Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis,             150,000
 IN for facilities and equipment.....................
Indiana University Southeast New Albany, IN for                   75,000
 facilities and equipment for the School of Nursing..
Inland Behavioral Health Services, Inc., San                     500,000
 Bernardino, CA for facilities and equipment.........
Institute for Family Health, New Paltz, NY for health            100,000
 information systems across all eight academic health
 centers.............................................
Institute for Research and Rehabilitation, Houston,              200,000
 TX for purchase of equipment........................
INTEGRIS Health, Oklahoma City, OK for a telemedicine            200,000
 demonstration.......................................
Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, UT for an              170,000
 electronic health records initiative, including
 equipment...........................................
Jameson Hospital, New Castle, PA for facilities and              250,000
 equipment...........................................
Jasper Memorial Hospital, Monticello, GA for                      40,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Jefferson Regional Medical Center Nursing School,                200,000
 Pine Bluff, AR for facilities and equipment.........
Jenkins County GA Hospital, Millen, GA for facilities            250,000
 and equipment.......................................
John Wesley Community Health Institute, Bell Gardens,            150,000
 CA for facilities and equipment for the Bell Gardens
 Health Center.......................................
Johnson Memorial Hospital, Stafford Springs, CT for              250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Johnston Memorial Hospital, Smithfield, NC for                   200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Kalamazoo, MI for            350,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD for                     450,000
 facilities and equipment for the International
 Center for Spinal Cord Injury facility..............
Kent State University Stark Campus, North Canton, OH             500,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Kent State University, Ashtabula, OH for facilities              200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Kilmichael Hospital, Kilmichael, MS for facilities               175,000
 and equipment.......................................
Kirkwood Community College, Cedar Rapids, IA for                 200,000
 facilities, equipment and curriculum for an advanced
 medical simulation instruction center...............
Knox Community Hospital, Mount Vernon, OH for                    275,000
 facilities and equipment............................
La Clinica de la Raza, Oakland, CA for facilities and            250,000
 equipment for the San Antonio Neighborhood Health
 Center..............................................
La Rabida Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL for                   225,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, PA              200,000
 for the Drug Information Center.....................
Lakeland Community College, Kirtland, OH for a health            100,000
 information training program, including facilities
 and equipment.......................................
Lamar University, Beaumont, TX for the Community and             150,000
 University Partnership Service, including facilities
 and equipment.......................................
Lanai Women's Center, Lani City, HI for facilities               100,000
 and equipment.......................................
Laurens County Health Care System, Clinton, SC for an            100,000
 electronic health records initiative, including
 equipment...........................................
Lawrence Hospital Center, Bronxville, NY for                     225,000
 facilities and equipment............................
League Against Cancer, Miami, FL for purchase of                 200,000
 equipment...........................................
Liberty County, FL, Bristol, FL for facilities and               300,000
 equipment for a medical facility....................
Liberty Regional Medical Center, Hinesville, GA for              100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Limestone Community Care, Inc. Medical Clinic,                    75,000
 Elkmont, AL for facilities and equipment............
Lincoln Community Health Center, Durham, NC for                  200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center, Bronx, NY              200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Lodi Memorial Hospital, Lodi, CA for a telehealth                175,000
 project.............................................
Loretto, Syracuse, NY for facilities and equipment               250,000
 for elderly health care and skilled nursing programs
Los Angeles Orthopaedic Hospital, Los Angeles, CA for            275,000
 facilities and equipment in the Lowman Center.......
Louisville Metro Department of Public Works,                     250,000
 Louisville, KY for facilities and equipment for a
 mobile health unit..................................
Lourdes Medical Center of Burlington County,                     150,000
 Willingboro, NJ for purchase of equipment...........
Loyola University Health System, Maywood, IL for                 250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Palo Alto, CA for            200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Madison Center, South Bend, IN for facilities and                150,000
 equipment for a clinic for attention deficit
 hyperactivity disorder..............................
Madison County Memorial Hospital, Rexburg, ID for                200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Madison County, Virginia City, MT for facilities and             200,000
 equipment...........................................
Madison St. Joseph Health Center, Madisonville, TX               120,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Maine Center for Marine Biotechnology, Gulf of Maine             100,000
 Research Institute, Portland, ME for facilities and
 equipment...........................................
Maine Primary Care Association, Augusta, ME for                   50,000
 health information systems in community health
 centers across the State............................
Manchester Memorial Hospital, Manchester, CT for                 300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Marana Health Center, Marana, AZ for facilities and              125,000
 equipment...........................................
Marias Medical Center, Shelby, MT for purchase of                200,000
 equipment...........................................
Marquette General Hospital, Marquette, MI for                    300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Marshalltown Medical and Surgical Center,                        300,000
 Marshalltown, IA for high resolution medical
 imaging, including purchase of equipment............
Mary Scott Nursing Center, Dayton, OH for facilities             200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Maryland State Dental Association, Columbia, MD for              150,000
 facilities and equipment for mobile dental care
 units...............................................
Maryville University, St. Louis, MO for facilities               200,000
 and equipment at the Center for Science and Health
 Professions.........................................
Mason County Board of Health, Maysville, KY for                  300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health                     200,000
 Sciences, Worcester, MA for health information
 technology systems..................................
Maury Regional Hospital, Columbia, TN for facilities             250,000
 and equipment.......................................
Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN for facilities            300,000
 and equipment.......................................
Memorial Hermann Baptist Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont,            200,000
 TX for facilities and equipment.....................
Memorial Hermann Healthcare System, Houston, TX for              200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital, Houston, TX for             100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Mendocino Coast District Hospital, Fort Bragg, CA for            300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, Keshena, WI for             375,000
 facilities and equipment for the Family Wellness
 Center..............................................
Mercy College of Northwest Ohio, Toledo, OH for                  200,000
 facilities and equipment for the continuing
 professional education division.....................
Mercy Health Foundation, Durango, CO for facilities              200,000
 and equipment for a community health clinic.........
Mercy Hospital Grayling, Grayling, MI for facilities             125,000
 and equipment.......................................
Mercy Hospital, Buffalo, NY for facilities and                   100,000
 equipment...........................................
Mercy Medical Center, Redding, CA for facilities and             200,000
 equipment...........................................
Mercy Medical Center-House of Mercy, Des Moines, IA              275,000
 for facilities and equipment related to substance
 abuse...............................................
Mercy Memorial Hospital, Monroe, MI for facilities               200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Mercy Ministries Health Center, Laredo, TX for a                 100,000
 mobile health unit..................................
Mercy Suburban Hospital, Norristown, PA for                      300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Methodist Hospital of Southern California, Arcadia,              550,000
 CA for facilities and equipment.....................
Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX for purchase of                  200,000
 equipment...........................................
Metropolitan Hospital, New York, NY for facilities               100,000
 and equipment.......................................
MetroWest Medical Center Framingham Union Hospital,               75,000
 Framingham, MA for facilities and equipment for
 interpreting services...............................
Miami Beach Community Health Center, Miami Beach, FL             150,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN              200,000
 for facilities and equipment for the school of
 nursing.............................................
Middlesex Community College, Lowell, MA for                      200,000
 facilities and equipment for the health education
 programs............................................
Middletown Regional Hospital, Middletown, OH for                 100,000
 facilities and equipment for the Greentree Science
 Academy in Franklin, OH.............................
Mid-Ohio FoodBank, Columbus, OH for facilities and               200,000
 equipment...........................................
Miles Community College, Miles City, MT for the                  200,000
 Pathways to Careers in Healthcare initiative........
Mission Hospitals, Asheville, NC for facilities and              200,000
 equipment...........................................
Missouri Delta Medical Center, Sikeston, MO for                  200,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Monroe Clinic, Monroe, WI for health care information            250,000
 technology..........................................
Monroe County Hospital, Forsyth, GA for facilities                45,000
 and equipment.......................................
Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY for health                   75,000
 information systems.................................
Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians, Pike                 100,000
 Road, AL for facilities and equipment to serve the
 disabled............................................
Morehead State University, Morehead, KY to improve               300,000
 rural health........................................
Morris Heights Health Center, Inc., Bronx, NY for                100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Morton Hospital and Medical Center, Taunton, MA for              300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Mount Nittany Medical Center, State College, PA for              200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Mount Vernon Hospital, Mount Vernon, NY for                      200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Mount Wachusett Community College, Gardner, MA for               325,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Muhlenberg Community Hospital, Greenville, KY for                150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Naugatuck Valley Community College, Waterbury, CT for            100,000
 facilities and equipment for the nursing program....
Nebraska Hospital Association Research and Education             250,000
 Foundation, Lincoln, NE for a telehealth
 demonstration, including purchase of equipment......
New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old                    300,000
 Westbury, NY for disease management and patient
 advocacy programs, including purchase of equipment..
New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY for                 500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, NJ for                200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Newark-Wayne Community Hospital, Newark, NY for                  500,000
 facilities improvements and digital health care
 equipment...........................................
Newport Hospital, Newport, RI for facilities and                 300,000
 equipment...........................................
Newton Memorial Hospital, Newton, NJ for purchase of             150,000
 equipment...........................................
Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center, Niagara Falls,            400,000
 NY for facilities and equipment.....................
Norman Regional Health System, Norman, OK for                    200,000
 telehealth and electronic medical records
 initiatives.........................................
NorthEast Ohio Neighborhood Health Services, Inc.,               250,000
 Cleveland, OH for facilities and equipment..........
Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, Green Bay, WI             175,000
 for a mobile health clinic..........................
Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck, NY for health             200,000
 information technology systems......................
Northern Westchester Hospital, Mount Kisco, NY for               100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Northland Medical Center, Princeton, MN for purchase             250,000
 of equipment........................................
Northwest Community Health Care, Pascoag, RI for                 300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Northwest Hospital Intermediate Care Unit,                       100,000
 Randallstown, MD for facilities and equipment.......
Northwest Kidney Centers, Seattle, WA for facilities             100,000
 and equipment.......................................
Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, ID for                     100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL for                  375,000
 facilities and equipment for Prentice Women's
 Hospital............................................
Oakland University School of Nursing, Rochester, MI              250,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Oaklawn Adult Group Home, Goshen, IN for facilities              150,000
 and equipment.......................................
Oakwood Healthcare System Foundation, Dearborn, MI               200,000
 for facilities and equipment for the Western Wayne
 Family Health Center................................
Ocean Beach Hospital, Ilwaco, WA for a telepharmacy              350,000
 program.............................................
Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center,               150,000
 Columbus, OH for James Cancer Survivorship Center
 for construction of facilities......................
Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH               200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Oklahoma University College of Medicine--Tulsa,                  150,000
 Tulsa, OK for facilities and equipment..............
Olympic Community Action Program, Port Angeles, WA                50,000
 for facilities and equipment for the OlyCAP Oral
 Health Center.......................................
Oregon Coast Community College, Newport, OR for                   75,000
 facilities and equipment for health professions
 education...........................................
Osceola County Health Department, Poinciana, FL for              150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Osceola Medical Center, Osceola, WI for facilities               150,000
 and equipment.......................................
Our Lady of Lourdes Memorial Hospital, Binghamton, NY            325,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Palisades Medical Center, North Bergen, NJ for                   250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Palmetto Health Foundation, Columbia, SC for                   1,000,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Parkland Health Center, Farmington, MO for facilities            200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Passavant Area Hospital, Jacksonville, IL for                    200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Pattie A. Clay Regional Medical Center, Richmond, KY             225,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Pee Dee Healthy Start, Florence, SC for programs to               88,000
 improve maternal and child health...................
Peninsula Hospital Center, New York, NY for health               200,000
 information systems.................................
People, Inc., Williamsville, NY for electronic health            200,000
 records upgrades....................................
Peralta Community College, 0akland, CA for facilities            200,000
 and equipment for the nursing program at Highland
 Hospital............................................
Person Memorial Hospital, Roxboro, NC for facilities             200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ for health              250,000
 information systems.................................
Placer County, Auburn, CA for construction of the                250,000
 Children's Health Center/Emergency Shelter..........
Pointe Coupee Better Access Community Health, New                100,000
 Roads, LA for facilities and equipment..............
Ponce Center of Autism, Municipality of Ponce, PR for            225,000
 facilities and equipment at the Autism Center.......
Powell County Medical Center, Deer Lodge, MT for                 100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Powell Valley Health Care, Powell, WY for electronic             300,000
 information technology..............................
Prairie Star Health Center, Hutchinson, KS for                   200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Preston Memorial Hospital, Kingwood, WV for                      275,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Project Access Spokane, Spokane, WA for healthcare               200,000
 delivery to low income residents....................
ProMedica Continuing Care Service Corporation,                   150,000
 Adrian, MI for a telemedicine initiative............
Provena Saint Joseph Hospital, Elgin, IL for                     300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Providence Health System, Anchorage, AK to improve               200,000
 services in underserved regions.....................
Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel, NY for facilities and            200,000
 equipment...........................................
Quebrada Health Center, Municipality of Camuy, PR for            125,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Quincy Valley Medical Center, Quincy, WA for                     150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Rancho Santiago Community College District, Santa                150,000
 Ana, CA for facilities and equipment for a medical
 education complex...................................
Reading Hospital School of Nursing, West Reading, PA             100,000
 for nurse training programs including facilities and
 equipment...........................................
Reformed Presbyterian Woman's Association,                       200,000
 Pittsburgh, PA for facilities and equipment for a
 skilled nursing facility............................
Regional Children's Hospital, Johnson City, TN for               100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Rhode Island Quality Institute, Providence, RI for               250,000
 health information technology in conjunction with
 Rhode Island mental health organizations............
Rio Arriba County, Espanola, NM for facilities and               750,000
 equipment for the Health Commons....................
Riverside County Regional Medical Center, Moreno                 225,000
 Valley, CA for facilities and equipment.............
Riverside County Regional Medical Center, Moreno                 140,000
 Valley, CA for facilities and equipment.............
Riverside Health System, Newport News, VA for the                150,000
 Patient Navigator Program...........................
Roosevelt Hospital, New York, NY for facilities and              200,000
 equipment...........................................
Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Rosebud, SD for facilities and              100,000
 equipment...........................................
Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY for                   300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Rural Health Technology Consortium for facilities and            200,000
 equipment...........................................
Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL for                  225,000
 facilities and equipment for the Center for Advanced
 Medical Response....................................
Saginaw Valley State University, University Center,              350,000
 MI for purchase of equipment........................
Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI for an                150,000
 electronic health records initiative, including
 equipment...........................................
Sam Rogers Health Clinic, Kansas City, MO for                    200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
San Antonio Hospital Foundation, Upland, CA for                  450,000
 facilities and equipment............................
San Francisco Medical Center Outpatient Improvement              450,000
 Programs, Inc., San Francisco, CA for facilities and
 equipment...........................................
San Mateo County, Redwood City, CA for facilities and            400,000
 equipment for the San Mateo Medical Center Emergency
 Department..........................................
San Ysidro Health Center, San Ysidro, CA for                     100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Sandoval County, Bernalillo, NM for a telemedicine               200,000
 initiative, including purchase of equipment.........
Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital, Orange, CA for                     150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Schneck Medical Center, Semour, IN for facilities and            375,000
 equipment...........................................
Scotland Memorial Hospital, Laurinberg, NC for                   200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Seattle, WA for                     100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Sharp Rehabilitation Services, San Diego, CA for                 150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Shasta Community Health Center, Redding, CA for                  150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Shawano County Rural Health Initiative, Shawano, WI               75,000
 for rural health care...............................
Sidney Health Center, Sidney, MT for purchase of                 200,000
 equipment...........................................
Sierra Nevada Memorial Foundation, Grass Valley, CA              250,000
 for an electronic health records initiative.........
Sistersville General Hospital, Sisterville, WV for               225,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Skagit Valley Hospital Cancer Care Center, Mount                 275,000
 Vernon, WA for facilities and equipment.............
Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hospital, Wellsboro, PA            200,000
 for purchase of equipment...........................
Somerset Medical Center, Somerville, NJ for                      350,000
 electronic health records upgrades..................
South Broward Hospital District, Hollywood, FL for               250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
South Carolina HIV/AIDS Council, Columbia, SC for                185,000
 health outreach.....................................
South Nassau Communities Hospital, Oceanside, NY for             200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
South Shore Hospital, South Weymouth, MA for                     300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Southampton Hospital, Southampton, NY for facilities             300,000
 and equipment.......................................
Southeast Alabama Medical Center, Dothan, AL for                 350,000
 facilities and equipment for the Southeast Regional
 Cancer Screening Program............................
Southeast Community College, Cumberland, KY for                  100,000
 facilities and equipment for an allied health
 training center.....................................
Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau,                   0
 MO for facilities and equipment.....................
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX for                    150,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Southern Vermont Recreation Center Foundation,                   100,000
 Springfield, VT for facilities and equipment for a
 medical rehabilitation unit.........................
Southwest Tennessee Community College, Memphis, TN               200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
St. James Hospital and Health Centers, Chicago                   225,000
 Heights, IL for facilities and equipment for the
 Olympia Fields campus...............................
St. Agnes Hospital, Fresno, CA for purchase of                   160,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Ambrose University, Davenport, IA for facilities             150,000
 and equipment.......................................
St. Anthony Community Hospital, Warwick, NY for                  100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Anthony Hospital, Chicago, IL for facilities and             200,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Anthony Memorial Health Centers, Hammond, IN for             275,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Bernard Health Center, Inc., Chalmette, LA for               200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Bernardine Medical Center, San Bernardino, CA for            200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Camillus Health and Rehabilitation Center,                   300,000
 Syracuse, NY for the brain injury program, including
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Catharine College, St. Catharine, KY for the                 175,000
 allied health science program, including facilities
 and equipment.......................................
St. Charles Parish, LaPlace, LA for purchase of                  150,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Clair Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA for facilities and            200,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Claire Regional Medical Center, Morehead, KY for             200,000
 facilities construction.............................
St. Elizabeth Medical Center, Utica, NY for                      400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Francis Hospital, Escanaba, MI for facilities and            125,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Francis Medical Center, Trenton, NJ for                      250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. James Parish Hospital, Lutcher, LA for facilities            200,000
 and equipment.......................................
St. John's North Shore Hospital, Harrison Township,              200,000
 MI for facilities and equipment.....................
St. Joseph of the Pines, Southern Pines, NC for an               100,000
 electronic health records system....................
St. Joseph Regional Medical Center, South Bend, IN               275,000
 for health care information technology..............
St. Joseph's Hospital Mercy Care Services, Atlanta,              300,000
 GA for health information technology................
St. Joseph's Hospital, Buckhannon, WV for facilities             100,000
 and equipment.......................................
St. Joseph's Hospital, Savannah GA for facilities and            275,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center, Paterson, NJ               200,000
 for health information technology...................
St. Joseph's/Candler Health System, Savannah, GA for             200,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
St. Luke's Quakertown Hospital, Quakertown, PA for               400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Luke's Regional Medical Center, Ltd., Boise, ID              200,000
 for purchase of equipment...........................
St. Mary Medical Center Foundation, Langhorne, PA for            100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Mary Medical Center, Apple Valley, CA for the                500,000
 electronic intensive care unit......................
St. Mary's Hospital Foundation, Grand Junction, CO               200,000
 for facilities and equipment for the Saccomanno
 Education Center....................................
St. Mary's Hospital, Madison, WI for facilities and              150,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Mary's Medical Center, Huntington, WV for                    400,000
 facilities and equipment for the Center for
 Education...........................................
St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, NV for                 250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center,                 300,000
 Missoula, MT for an electronic medical records
 system..............................................
St. Peter's Hospital Foundation, Albany, NY for                  200,000
 facilities and equipment for the St. Peter's Breast
 Center..............................................
St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, FL for                   250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Vincent Hospital, Billings, MT for facilities and            300,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Vincent's Charity Hospital, Cleveland, OH for                450,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Vincent's Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT for                 200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Xavier University, Chicago, IL for facilities and            200,000
 equipment...........................................
Stamford Hospital, Stamford, CT for facilities and               200,000
 equipment...........................................
Stark Prescription Assistance Network, Canton, OH for            150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
State Fair Community College, Sedalia, MO for                    300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Stewart-Marchman Center, Inc., Daytona Beach, FL for             150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Stony Point Ambulance Corps, Stony Point, NY for                 375,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Summers County Commission, Hinton, WV for facilities             230,000
 and equipment for the Appalachian Regional
 Healthcare Hospital.................................
Swedish Covenant Hospital, Chicago, IL for facilities            250,000
 and equipment.......................................
Sylvan Grove Hospital, Jackson, MS for facilities and             50,000
 equipment...........................................
Tangipahoa Parish, Loranger, LA for facilities and               100,000
 equipment...........................................
Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX for the              200,000
 Rural Nursing Education Program, including purchase
 of equipment........................................
Tarrant County Infant Mortality Task Force, Ft.                  100,000
 Worth, TX for education and outreach programs.......
Taylor Regional Hospital, Hawkinsville, GA for                    55,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Temple Health and Bioscience Economic Development                250,000
 District, Temple, TX for facilities and equipment...
Teton Valley Hospital and Surgicenter, Driggs, ID for            200,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Texas A&M University--Kingsville, Kingsville, TX for             150,000
 facilities and equipment for a research facility....
Texas Institute for Genomic Medicine, College                    125,000
 Station, TX for facilities and equipment............
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso            550,000
 and Lubbock, TX for facilities and equipment for the
 West Texas Center for Influenza Research, Education
 and Treatment.......................................
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center,                    100,000
 Lubbock, TX for health professionals training,
 including facilities and equipment..................
Thomas Jefferson University Breast Cancer Center,                400,000
 Philadelphia, PA for facilities and equipment.......
Thomason General Hospital, EI Paso, TX for facilities            350,000
 and equipment.......................................
Thundermist Health Center, Woonsocket, RI for health             500,000
 information technology..............................
Tohono O'odham Nation, sells, AZ for facilities and              100,000
 equipment for its diabetes and dialysis program.....
Toledo Children's Hospital, Toledo, OH for facilities             75,000
 and equipment for a palliative care program.........
Tomorrow's Child/Michigan SIDS, Lansing, MI for                  200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Town of Argo, AL for facilities and equipment for the            100,000
 Senior Citizens' Center for Health and Wellness.....
Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix,              500,000
 AZ for facilities and equipment.....................
Transylvania Community Hospital, Inc., Brevard, NC               275,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Tulare District Hospital, Tulare, CA for an                      150,000
 electronic medical record system....................
Tuomey Healthcare System, Sumter, SC for health                  200,000
 information systems.................................
Twin City Hospital, Dennison, OH for facilities and              300,000
 equipment...........................................
Union Hospital, Terre Haute, IIN for health                      200,000
 information technology..............................
Uniontown Hospital, Uniontown, PA for facilities and             300,000
 equipment for the chest pain center.................
Unity Health Care, Washington, DC for health                     200,000
 information systems.................................
University Community Hospital/Pepin Heart Hospital,              200,000
 Tampa, FL for purchase of equipment.................
University Health System, San Antonio, TX for                    175,000
 facilities and equipment............................
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL for a                      100,000
 telehealth initiative...............................
University of Arizona Medical Center, Tucson, AZ for             400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little              200,000
 Rock, AR for facilities and equipment...............
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little              180,000
 Rock, AR for facilities and equipment at the
 Antenatal and Neonatal Guidelines, Education, and
 Learning System (ANGELS)............................
University of Arkansas Medical School Cancer Research            325,000
 Center, Little Rock, AR for facilities and equipment
University of California, Davis Health System,                   420,000
 Sacramento, CA for facilities and equipment for the
 Center for Education................................
University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL for                 225,000
 facilities and equipment............................
University of Illinois College of Medicine, Peoria,              200,000
 IL for facilities and equipment.....................
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA for facilities and             100,000
 equipment for a public health research and education
 building............................................
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA for facilities and             100,000
 equipment for an advanced biomedical research
 institute...........................................
University of Kansas Research Center, Lawrence, KS               425,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center,             350,000
 Worcester, MA for health information technology.....
University of Memphis, Memphis, TN for facilities and            200,000
 equipment for the community health building.........
University of Miami, Miami, FL for equipment at the              150,000
 Center for Research in Medical Education............
I University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI            350,000
 for facilities and equipment for the C.S. Mott
 Children's and Women's Hospitals....................
University of North Alabama, Florence, AL for                    225,000
 facilities and equipment for a science building.....
University of North Texas, Denton, TX for the center             350,000
 for Computational Epidemiology, including facilities
 and equipment.......................................
University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO to                  350,000
 develop the National Center for Nursing Education,
 including facilities and equipment..................
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL for the                   400,000
 Florida Cancer Clinical Trials Project..............
University of Tennessee of Chattanooga, Chattanooga,             400,000
 TN for a low birth weight study.....................
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center,                 300,000
 Dallas, TX for facilities and equipment for the
 sickle cell program.................................
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center,                 200,000
 Dallas, TX for purchase of equipment................
University of Virginia Health System,                            150,000
 Charlottesville, VA for a telehealth project for
 southwest VA........................................
University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI for                 165,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Utah Navajo Health System, Inc., Montezuma Creek, UT             100,000
 for telehealth systems..............................
Valley Cooperative Health Care, Hudson, WI for health             75,000
 information systems.................................
Vanguard University Nursing Center, Costa Mesa, CA               200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Village Network Boys' Village Campus, Wooster, OH for            250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Virtua Memorial Hospital Burlington County, Mount                200,000
 Holly, NJ for purchase of equipment.................
Visiting Nurse Association Healthcare Partners of                400,000
 Ohio, Cleveland, OH for telehealth..................
Wadsworth Rittman Hospital Foundation, Wadsworth, OH             400,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Wake County, Raleigh, NC for facilities and equipment            300,000
 for Holly Hill Hospital.............................
Washington County, GA Regional Medical Center,                   250,000
 Sandersville, GA for facilities and equipment.......
Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC for                   200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Washington Parish, Bogalusa, LA for health care                  100,000
 centers, including facilities and equipment.........
Wayne Memorial Hospital, Jesup, GA for facilities and            300,000
 equipment...........................................
West Jefferson Medical Center, Marrero, LA for                   200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
West Shore Medical Center, Manistee, MI for                      150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
West Side Community Health Services, St. Paul, MN for            150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
West Virginia University Hospital, Morgantown, WV for            175,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Western North Carolina Health System, Asheville, NC              300,000
 for health information technology...................
Whidden Memorial Hospital, Everett, MA for facilities            275,000
 and equipment.......................................
White County Memorial Hospital, Monticello, IN for               210,000
 facilities and equipment............................
White Memorial Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA for               400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
White Plains Hospital Center, White Plains, NY for               225,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Whiteside County Department of Health, Rock Falls, IL            200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Whittemore Peterson Institute for Neuro-Immune                   200,000
 Disease, Sparks, NV for facilities and equipment....
Wind River Community Health Center, Riverton, WY for             250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Wing Memorial Hospital, Palmer, MA for facilities and            200,000
 equipment...........................................
Winneshiek Medical Center, Decorah, IA for purchase              230,000
 of medical equipment................................
Wolfson Children's Hospital, Jacksonville, FL for                300,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center, Brooklyn,             230,000
 NY for equipment for a hospital-based radiologic
 technology school...................................
Woodruff County Nursing Home, McCrory, AR for                    200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Wyoming County Community Hospital, Warsaw, NY for                100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
YMCA of Central Stark County, Canton, OH for                     500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
York Memorial Hospital, York, PA for facilities and               92,000
 equipment...........................................
Youth Crisis Center, Jacksonville, FL for facilities             200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Zucker Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, NY for                      250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bioterrorism hospital grants to states

    The Committee provides funding for this activity in the 
Office of the Secretary, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness 
and Response, as requested in the President's request and 
provided in the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2007.

Telehealth

    The Committee provides $7,000,000 for telehealth, which is 
$181,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the 
budget request. The telehealth program works with and supports 
communities in their efforts to develop cost-effective uses of 
telehealth technologies. These technologies bring health 
services to isolated populations and health-related education 
to the practitioners who serve them. The program supports 16 
grants for networks along with five regional resource centers.

Program management

    The Committee provides $142,191,000 for the cost of Federal 
staff and related activities to coordinate, direct, and manage 
the programs of the Health Resources and Services 
Administration, which is $4,103,000 below the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $2,000,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee reduces funding for this account by $2,000,000 
because it intends to support the dental shortages 
demonstration currently funded in program management in the MCH 
SPRANS dental health initiative.
    The Committee is concerned that there is a widespread lack 
of awareness among health care providers that cardiovascular 
disease is the leading killer of women in the United States. 
The Committee encourages HRSA to conduct an education and 
awareness campaign for physicians and other health care 
professionals relating to the prevention, diagnosis, and 
treatment of heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular 
diseases in women.
    The unfortunate death earlier this year of a 12-year old 
Maryland boy from a brain infection stemming from an abscessed 
tooth has focused the Committee's attention on the issue of 
access to oral health care for underserved populations. As the 
agency that supports programs that provide services to 
disadvantaged, medically underserved and special populations, 
the Committee believes that HRSA should be actively involved in 
addressing this problem. The Committee was disturbed to learn 
that the lack of administrative support for oral health 
infrastructure within HRSA and collaborative oral health 
initiatives among HRSA bureaus and with other Federal agencies 
has made it nearly impossible for HRSA staff to respond to 
States' needs. The Committee believes that HRSA must appoint a 
chief dental officer who can coordinate the agency's oral 
health activities, focus on rebuilding the HRSA dental corps 
and provide direction for HRSA field officers. The Committee 
directs HRSA to report to the Committee no later than October 
30, 2007 on its activities to name a chief dental officer.

           HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Health Education Assistance Loans (HEAL) program 
insures loans provided by non-Federal lenders to students in 
health professions schools. Under the accounting rules 
established in the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, one account 
is maintained to pay the obligations arising from loans 
guaranteed prior to fiscal year 1992. A second account pays 
obligations and collects income from premiums on loans 
guaranteed in fiscal year 1992 and beyond. Each annual cohort 
of loans is independently tracked in this account. The 
authority for this program expired in fiscal year 1999. Fiscal 
year 1998 was the last year in which loans were obligated to 
previous borrowers under the HEAL authority.
    The Committee provides $1,000,000 to liquidate obligations 
from loans guaranteed prior to 1992, which is $3,000,000 below 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the same as budget 
request.
    The Committee provides $2,906,000 for HEAL program 
management, which is $8,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and the same as the budget request.

                 VACCINE INJURY COMPENSATION TRUST FUND

    The Committee makes available the release of $57,547,000 
from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund in fiscal year 
2008, which is $1,676,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program provides a 
system of compensation for individuals with vaccine-associated 
injuries or deaths. Funds for claims from vaccines administered 
on or after October 1, 1988 are generated by a per-dose excise 
tax on the sale of selected prescribed vaccines. Revenues 
raised by this tax are maintained in a Vaccine Injury 
Compensation Trust Fund.
    Trust funds made available in the bill will support the 
liability costs of vaccines administered after September 30, 
1988. They will also support the $3,528,000 in costs incurred 
by the agency in the operation of the program, which is 
$454,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the 
same as the budget request.

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


                DISEASE CONTROL, RESEARCH, AND TRAINING

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$6,457,832,000 for the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC), which is $255,160,000 above the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $475,181,000 above the budget request. 
Of the funds provided, $316,079,000 shall be derived from 
evaluation set-aside funds available under section 241 of the 
Public Health Service Act, which is $50,979,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 set-aside and $50,079,000 above the requested 
set-aside. The Committee includes an undistributed reduction of 
$2,000,000 within this account.
    With the exception of the public health and health services 
block grant, which has a statutorily-determined formula 
distribution, all funds provided in this appropriation are 
awarded via competitive grant/cooperative agreement or 
contract, administratively-determined formula, or are awarded 
on a sole-source basis where only one eligible partner is 
determined. Funding is typically awarded to States, localities, 
public health departments, higher education institutions, 
private industry, or nonprofit voluntary groups or associations 
and is reviewed by outside peer reviewers.
    The CDC assists State and local health authorities and 
other non-governmental health-related organizations to 
understand, control, and reduce disease and other health 
problems. The activities of CDC focus on several major 
priorities, including providing core public health functions, 
responding to urgent public health threats, monitoring the 
nation's health using scientific methods, building the nation's 
public health infrastructure, promoting health throughout each 
life-stage, and providing leadership in the implementation of 
nationwide prevention strategies to encourage responsible 
behavior and adoption of lifestyles that are conducive to good 
health.

Infectious diseases

    The Committee provides a program level of $1,913,302,000 
for infectious diseases, which is $109,071,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $118,934,000 above the budget 
request. Of the funds provided, $12,794,000 shall be derived 
from evaluation set-aside funds available under section 241 of 
the Public Health Service Act, as proposed in the budget 
request.
            Immunization and respiratory diseases
    The Committee provides a program level of $636,159,000 for 
immunization and respiratory diseases, which is $68,155,000 
over the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $91,182,000 above 
the budget request. Of the amount provided, $12,794,000 is to 
be derived from section 241 evaluation set-aside funds, as 
provided in fiscal year 2007 and as proposed in the request. In 
addition, the current vaccines for children program is expected 
to provide $2,761,957,000 in vaccine purchases and distribution 
support in fiscal year 2008, for a total of $3,398,116,000 for 
immunization and respiratory diseases activities in fiscal year 
2008.
    In fiscal year 2007, CDC reorganized within the 
coordinating center for infectious diseases to combine 
activities related to respiratory diseases with immunization 
activities. In addition, a new influenza division was created 
within this new national center for immunization and 
respiratory diseases.
    Immunization project grants are awarded to States and local 
agencies for planning, developing, and conducting childhood and 
adult immunization programs including enhancement of the 
vaccine delivery infrastructure. CDC directly maintains a 
stockpile of vaccines, supports consolidated purchase of 
vaccines for State and local health agencies, and conducts 
surveillance, investigations, and research into the safety and 
efficacy of new and presently used vaccines. The Committee 
notes that there are other Federal programs that provide 
immunizations to children, including the State children's 
health insurance program (SCHIP), the maternal and child health 
block grant, and community health centers.
    The Committee recommends $516,273,000 for the immunization 
program authorized by section 317 of the Public Health Service 
Act, which is $58,750,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $91,150,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
is aware that prior to 2000 and the introduction of new 
vaccines, such as the recent human papillomavirus vaccine, the 
317 immunization program was adequately providing vaccines to 
children and adolescents traditionally dependent on the public 
sector for support, but who were not eligible for the vaccines 
for children program.
    Currently, the 317 immunization program is falling far 
short of the need. The current estimate of the cost to fully 
immunize a female through age 18 is over $1,240 and for a male 
it is over $936--this compares with a total cost of $186 for 
females and males in 1999. As a result of these increased 
vaccine costs, the number of children receiving vaccines under 
the 317 program has fallen from 747,000 in 1999 to an estimated 
279,000 in 2006. The Committee recommendation is the first step 
toward the goal of fully immunizing all eligible individuals. 
The additional funding included above the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation will allow approximately 42,000 additional 
children and adolescents to receive the full vaccine schedule 
compared to the estimated number of those who will be served in 
2007.
    The Committee is concerned that immunization levels for 
vaccines routinely recommended for many adolescents and adults 
lag far behind coverage levels for vaccines for children. The 
Committee understands that CDC led a process during the early 
1990s that resulted in the development of immunization action 
plans (IAPs) in all 50 States and in many major urban areas to 
achieve 90 percent immunization coverage for vaccines 
recommended for young children. These IAPs were the result of 
community planning efforts led by State and local health 
departments and included detailed actions thought to be needed 
to achieve coverage goals, activities that could be undertaken 
with available resources and estimates of the resources 
required for such efforts. The Committee believes that while 
maintaining the commitment to and the coverage levels for 
children, a similar process may be useful for reaching 
adolescent and adult immunization goals, and encourages CDC to 
provide funding to States or local organizations that receive 
section 317 immunization grant funds to develop community 
adolescent and adult immunization planning demonstrations to 
achieve 90 percent immunization coverage for vaccines routinely 
recommended for adolescents and adults. These models should 
include existing and new efforts planned within existing 
resources; new activities needed and estimates for those needs.
    The Committee is pleased with the report on the section 317 
immunization program that CDC provided and requests that the 
report be updated and promptly submitted by February 1, 2008, 
to reflect fiscal year 2009 cost estimates. The updated report 
also should include an estimate of optimum State and local 
operations funding as well as CDC operations funding needed 
relative to current levels to conduct and support childhood, 
adolescent, and adult programs. This estimate should include 
the cost of vaccine administration; surveillance and assessment 
of changes in immunization rates; vaccine storage, handling and 
quality assurance; implementation of centralized vaccine 
distribution and other vaccine business improvement practices; 
needs to support provider and public outreach and education on 
new vaccines; identification of barriers to immunization and 
strategies to address such barriers; maintenance, utilization, 
and enhancement of immunization information systems, including 
integration with public health preparedness and other public 
health information technology systems; innovative strategies to 
increase coverage rates in hard-to-reach populations and 
geographic pockets of need; vaccine safety; and other non-
vaccine resource needs of a comprehensive immunization program. 
Each of these activities is critical to ensuring the delivery 
of life-saving vaccines to our nation and has been under-funded 
in recent years.
    The Committee recommends $82,575,000 for immunization and 
respiratory diseases program operations, which is $19,759,000 
above the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $32,000 above the 
budget request. This funding supports vaccine tracking, vaccine 
safety, and prevention activities. Included within the total is 
$19,800,000 to provide funds to States to increase demand for 
influenza vaccine with the intention that by doing so, U.S. 
vaccine production capacity also will be stimulated.
    The Committee recommends $37,311,000 for activities related 
to preparing for and responding to a pandemic influenza, which 
is $10,354,000 below the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. Included within this total is 
$19,800,000 to develop a repository of pandemic virus reference 
strains for manufacturing and $14,850,000 to increase the stock 
of diagnostic reagents for influenza.
    Vaccine safety datalink.--In fiscal year 2006, the 
Committee requested that the National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) convene a panel of 
expert, independent researchers for the purpose of exploring 
the possibility of using the CDC's vaccine safety datalink 
(VSD) to conduct a study that could ``identify or rule out any 
association between thimerosal exposure in pediatric vaccines 
and increased rates of autism.'' The expert panel convened in 
May 2006 and issued a report, which recommended that gaps and 
uncertainties in the VSD be addressed prior to the 
consideration of further studies of autism and thimerosal using 
the VSD. Given that the VSD ten-year contract totals more than 
$120,000,000, the Committee urges CDC to report to the House 
Committee on Appropriations no later than March 1, 2008 on its 
response to the NIEHS recommendations. This report should 
include information about current and ongoing CDC studies that 
address the potential association between thimerosal exposure 
in pediatric vaccines and neurodevelopmental disorders 
including autism.
            HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis, STD and TB prevention
    The Committee provides $1,042,303,000 for HIV/AIDS, viral 
hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases (STD), and 
tuberculosis (TB) prevention, which is $32,112,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $14,495,000 below the 
request.
    Within the total, $715,463,000 is for domestic HIV/AIDS 
prevention and research, which is $17,413,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $29,644,000 below the budget 
request. This funding level supports HIV research, 
surveillance, epidemiologic and laboratory studies, and 
prevention activities. CDC provides funds to State and local 
health departments to develop and implement integrated 
community prevention plans. The Committee supports the domestic 
HIV/AIDS initiative and provides $63,000,000 for the testing 
component of the initiative within CDC, which is $18,000,000 
more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $30,000,000 
less than the budget request. The Committee does not provide a 
set-aside within this funding for the early diagnosis grant 
program and notes that currently no States have adopted the HIV 
testing policies designated for eligibility to receive funding 
under this new authorization.
    Within the total, $18,615,000 is for the viral hepatitis 
program, which is $1,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $1,025,000 more than the budget request. The 
division of viral hepatitis provides the scientific and 
programmatic foundation for the prevention, control, and 
elimination of hepatitis virus infections in the U.S.
    Within the total, $157,537,000 is for the sexually 
transmitted diseases (STD) prevention program, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $227,000 more 
than the budget request. The division of STD prevention 
provides national leadership through research, policy 
development, and support of effective services to prevent 
sexually transmitted diseases and their complications such as 
infertility, adverse outcomes of pregnancy, and reproductive 
tract cancer. CDC assists health departments, health-care 
providers, and non-governmental organizations and collaborates 
with other governmental entities through the development, 
syntheses, translation, and dissemination of timely, science-
based information; the development of national goals and 
science-based policy; and the development and support of 
science-based programs that meet the needs of communities.
    Within the total, $150,688,000 is for the tuberculosis 
program, which is $13,699,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $13,897,000 more than the budget request. The 
TB program provides grants to States and large cities for a 
broad range of tuberculosis control activities. In addition, 
the CDC supports State and local laboratories and conducts 
research, epidemiological investigations, and education and 
training seminars.
    HIV/AIDS in minority communities.--Funds are provided 
within the total for domestic HIV/AIDS prevention and research 
programs to support activities that are targeted to address the 
growing HIV/AIDS epidemic and its disparate impact on 
communities of color, including African Americans, Latinos, 
Native Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and 
Pacific Islanders.
    Hepatitis B.--The Committee applauds CDC's efforts to 
develop and implement a new strategy to screen individuals at 
risk for chronic hepatitis B. As only approximately one-third 
of individuals with hepatitis B are aware of their condition, 
the Committee urges CDC to continue to collaborate with the 
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney 
Diseases in the development of a public health strategy to 
expand the screening of individuals at risk for chronic 
hepatitis B. In addition, the Committee notes that accurate 
national statistics are lacking as to the number of Americans 
infected with hepatitis B, as existing population-based surveys 
have not included Asian/Pacific islander groups in whom 
hepatitis B is by far the most common. The Committee is aware 
that there are now six pharmaceutical products available for 
the treatment of hepatitis B and that three of them have become 
available in the last two years. The significant improvement in 
treatment options increases the timeliness of an aggressive 
screening program for hepatitis B.
    Hepatitis C.--The Committee is concerned that more than 75 
percent of the 4 million people with hepatitis C are unaware of 
their condition because the condition is often asymptomatic 
until advanced liver damage develops. Therefore, the Committee 
urges CDC to implement an aggressive screening program. In 
addition to targeting at-risk populations, the Committee urges 
the consideration of age-based screening policies to more 
effectively reach infected populations. The Committee also 
urges CDC to support a campaign of public announcements that 
will highlight the need for appropriate screening and medical 
follow-up for target populations.
    The Committee also recognizes the alarming rate of 
individuals co-infected with hepatitis C and HIV, and that end-
stage liver disease secondary to hepatitis C is now the leading 
cause of death for individuals with HIV disease. The Committee 
urges that funding be focused on expanding the capability of 
State health departments, particularly to enhance resources 
available to the hepatitis C State coordinators and for 
increased screening initiatives. The Committee also encourages 
the division of viral hepatitis to collaborate with the Health 
Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to implement 
improved HCV screening programs for HIV-infected individuals 
served by HRSA programs.
    Global tuberculosis.--TB is an enormous public health 
crisis in the developing world, killing millions of people in 
the prime of their lives every year. Despite the development of 
effective treatments against TB fifty years ago, there have 
never been more people infected with the disease in the history 
of the world. Approximately 2 billion people (approximately 30 
percent of the world's population) have been infected with 
mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of TB. TB is a 
leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals and in women 
of childbearing age. Each year, TB takes the lives 2 million 
people and there are 8 million new cases; another million die 
of the combination of HIV and TB. To help stem this growing 
pandemic, the Committee provides funding to enhance and expand 
the existing CDC cooperative agreement on TB vaccine research.
    Intensified support and activities to accelerate control 
(ISAAC).--The Committee applauds CDC for implementing the ISAAC 
initiative for targeting TB in African Americans and along the 
U.S.-Mexico border, universal genotyping of all culture 
positive TB cases, and expanding clinical trials and 
development of new tools for the diagnosis and treatment of TB. 
The Committee notes with concern, however, reports of 
extensively drug resistant tuberculosis strains in Africa that 
demonstrate extremely high mortality rates. The Committee urges 
CDC to continue to provide leadership and technical expertise 
to other nations experiencing outbreaks of extensively drug 
resistant tuberculosis and to coordinate activities with other 
Federal and international health agencies.
    Multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and extensively 
drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB).--The Committee is 
extremely concerned about MDR TB and XDR-TB. The Committee 
urges CDC to expand resources for global TB control to enhance, 
maximize, and target resources for surveillance, including 
laboratory testing, and control of TB in the U.S. and around 
the world, while ensuring preparedness and response capacity 
for both MDR TB and XDR-TB.
    Tuberculosis elimination and laboratory cooperative 
agreements.--The Committee is concerned that CDC is not meeting 
its commitment to fully implement the new funding formula under 
the TB elimination and laboratory cooperative agreements. The 
Committee supports the CDC distribution formula that would 
award funds in proportion to the number and complexity of TB 
cases in a jurisdiction and urges CDC to accelerate and 
complete the implementation of this new formula as soon as 
possible to ensure Federal TB funds are awarded to reflect the 
actual number and complexity of TB cases in each jurisdiction.
            Zoonotic, vector-borne, and enteric diseases
    The Committee provides $70,342,000 for zoonotic, vector-
borne, and enteric diseases, which is $272,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $7,390,000 more than the 
budget request. Within this total, no less than the level 
allocated in fiscal year 2007 for the West Nile virus program 
is recommended for fiscal year 2008.
    The new national center for zoonotic, vector-borne, and 
enteric diseases was created in 2007 through a reorganization 
of the infectious disease program. This center provides 
national and international scientific and programmatic 
leadership addressing zoonotic, vector-borne, foodborne, 
waterborne, mycotic, and related infections to identify, 
investigate, diagnose, treat, and prevent these diseases. The 
programs focus on the continuing challenge of emerging and re-
emerging zoonoses and the ecologies from which these diseases 
have emerged, while recognizing the importance of working 
collaboratively, not just across CDC and the traditional public 
health community, but also with agricultural, wildlife, 
companion animal, and environmental agencies and organizations.
            Preparedness, detection, and control of infectious diseases
    The Committee provides $164,498,000 for preparedness, 
detection, and control of infectious diseases, which is 
$8,532,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$34,857,000 more than the budget request. Within the total, 
$19,228,000 is to address the growing problem of antimicrobrial 
resistance, which is $1,748,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $1,776,000 more than the budget request.
    The new national center for preparedness, detection, and 
control of infectious diseases will provide greater focus on 
preparedness and response capacity for new and complex 
infectious disease outbreaks, and will manage and coordinate 
emerging infectious diseases, integrate laboratory groups, and 
facilitate increased quality and capacity in clinical 
laboratories. The center will serve as a focal point for 
engaging outside agencies and partners in quality laboratory 
systems and improved healthcare settings.
    Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus 
aureus (CA-MRSA).--The Committee is concerned about the 
explosion in virulence and prevalence of MRSA strains in the 
U.S. Compounding this problem is a fundamental shift from 
primarily hospital-based transmission to community-based 
transmission of MRSA. The spread of CA-MRSA through perfectly 
healthy community members with no hospital contact concerns the 
Committee. Within the funds provided, the Committee encourages 
CDC to conduct a strong, extramural research program in MRSA 
epidemiology and pathophysiology. The Committee encourages CDC 
to maximize this MRSA research through continued support for 
entities with established MRSA research programs.

Health promotion

    The Committee provides $1,002,212,000 for health promotion, 
which is $42,550,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
and $43,480,000 above the budget request.
            Chronic disease prevention, health promotion, and genomics
    The Committee provides $869,479,000 for chronic disease 
prevention, health promotion, and genomics, which is 
$34,481,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$35,284,000 more than the budget request. Chronic diseases have 
had a profound human and economic toll on our nation. More than 
1.7 million Americans die of a chronic disease each year, 
accounting for approximately 70 percent of all deaths in the 
U.S. The programs funded through this budget activity provide 
support for State and community programs, surveillance, 
prevention research, evaluation, and health promotion.
    Within the total provided, the Committee includes the 
following amounts for chronic disease prevention, health 
promotion, and genomics activities:
           $48,744,000 for heart disease and stroke programs, 
        which is $4,431,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
        level and $4,475,000 above the budget request;
           $69,157,000 for diabetes programs, which is 
        $6,287,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
        $6,351,000 above the budget request;
           $326,100,000 for cancer prevention and control 
        programs, which is $19,379,000 more than the fiscal 
        year 2007 funding level and $19,691,000 more than the 
        budget request (included within this total is 
        $19,605,000 for the WISEWOMAN program, $9,000,000 to 
        carry out activities authorized by Johanna's Law, and 
        $6,505,000 for activities related to ovarian cancer);
           $22,797,000 for arthritis and other chronic diseases 
        programs, which is $764,000 more than the fiscal year 
        2007 funding level and $787,000 more than the budget 
        request (included within this total is $8,402,000 for 
        the epilepsy program);
           $104,347,000 for tobacco programs, which is the same 
        as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $106,000 
        above the budget request;
           $42,250,000 for nutrition, physical activity and 
        obesity programs, which is $899,000 more than the 
        fiscal year 2007 funding level and $941,000 more than 
        the budget request (included within this total is 
        $2,300,000 for the fruit and vegetable program formerly 
        known as the 5-a-day program);
           $27,544,000 for health promotion, which is $224,000 
        more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
        $254,000 more than the budget request (within the 
        total, $3,466,000 is provided for the visual screening 
        education program and $1,000,000 is provided within 
        community health promotion for activities related to 
        sleep disorders);
           $56,449,000 for school health programs, which is 
        $500,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
        and $556,000 more than the budget request (within the 
        amount provided, $500,000 shall be used to develop and 
        policy to manage the risk of food allergies and 
        anaphylaxis in schools and to provide parents with 
        enhanced information on these conditions via the 
        Internet);
           $48,530,000 for the safe motherhood/infant health 
        programs, which is $4,412,000 more than the fiscal year 
        2007 funding level and $4,456,000 more than the budget 
        request;
           $10,000,000 for new demonstration grant program to 
        prevent teen pregnancy, which was not requested by the 
        Administration;
           $13,140,000 for oral health programs, which is 
        $1,500,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
        and $1,511,000 more than the budget request;
           $29,556,000 for prevention centers, which is $30,000 
        less than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the 
        same as the budget request;
           $26,386,000 for steps to a healthier U.S., which is 
        $17,299,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
        level and the same as the budget request;
           $37,553,000 for REACH, which is $3,414,000 more than 
        the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $3,449,000 more 
        than the budget request; and,
           $6,926,000 for genomics, which is the same as the 
        fiscal year 2007 funding level and $7,000 more than the 
        budget request.
    Alzheimer's disease and healthy aging.--There is growing 
scientific evidence that many of the same strategies that 
preserve overall health may also help prevent or delay the 
onset of cognitive impairment and dementia. For example, 
statins used for heart disease may hold promise in the fight 
against Alzheimer's disease and epidemiological studies show 
that individuals taking anti-inflammatory drugs to treat 
conditions such as arthritis have a lower occurrence of 
Alzheimer's; others appear to link known risk factors for 
diabetes and heart disease with those for Alzheimer's disease. 
In light of this evidence, three years ago Congress launched a 
CDC brain health initiative to promote greater public awareness 
and communication, better surveillance on the burden of the 
disease in communities, public health interventions and greater 
prevention research.
    Blindness prevention.--Despite the fact that half of all 
blindness can be prevented through education, early detection 
and treatment, it is estimated that the number of blind and 
visually impaired people will double by 2030 if nothing is done 
to curb vision problems. The Committee strongly supports CDC's 
vision health initiative.
    Cancer survivorship.--The Committee supports the CDC's 
efforts to address the needs of the approximately 10 million 
cancer survivors living with, through, and beyond cancer. The 
Committee is especially supportive of efforts to provide 
comprehensive services to cancer patients and survivors through 
multiple partnerships, which in turn provide individuals with 
one-stop resources.
    Chronic kidney disease.--The Committee previously has 
expressed concern regarding the need to expand public health 
strategies to combat chronic kidney disease (CKD) given that 
many individuals are diagnosed too late to initiate treatment 
regimens that could reduce morbidity and mortality. There are 
20 million Americans who have CKD, and another 20 million who 
are at risk of developing the disease. Individuals with 
diabetes or hypertension have especially high vulnerability. 
Kidney disease is the ninth leading cause of death in the U.S., 
and death by cardiovascular disease is 10 to 30 times higher in 
kidney dialysis patients than in the general population. The 
Committee encourages CDC to continue development of a public 
health strategy for chronic kidney disease.
    Colorectal cancer.--Colorectal cancer is the third most 
commonly diagnosed cancer among both men and women in the U.S. 
and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. When 
colorectal cancer is detected and treated early, survival is 
greatly enhanced. The Committee is pleased with the leadership 
of CDC's national colorectal cancer roundtable in promoting the 
availability and advisability of screening to both health care 
providers and the general public. The Committee encourages CDC 
to continue to expand its partnerships with State health 
departments, professional and patient organizations, and 
private industry to combat this devastating disease.
    Community-based approaches to address obesity.--The 
Committee recognizes the importance of community-based 
approaches to address our national obesity epidemic which 
results from poor nutrition and lack of physical activity. 
These innovative and cost-effective programs establish 
sustainable policy and environmental change in the area of 
healthy eating and active living to address the chronic disease 
and obesity crisis.
    Diabetes.--Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in 
the U.S., and costs the nation an estimated $132,000,000,000 in 
direct and indirect costs. Approximately 14.6 million Americans 
are diagnosed with diabetes, and an estimated 6.2 million 
people are undiagnosed and remain untreated. The incidence of 
the disease in America has increased approximately 14 percent 
in the last two years alone, and over 1.5 million new cases of 
diabetes are diagnosed each year. CDC estimates that one in 
three children born today will develop diabetes in their 
lifetime.
    The collateral health effects of diabetes can be 
devastating, often causing heart disease, stroke, blindness, 
kidney failure, pregnancy complications, amputations of the 
leg, foot, and toe, as well as contributing to deaths related 
to influenza and pneumonia. Known preventive measures can 
reduce the devastating consequences of diabetes, but these 
preventions are not currently practiced universally. The 
Committee believes that public awareness campaigns must be 
promoted to reach the general population so that individuals 
with diabetes are encouraged to take appropriate measures to 
check their blood glucose levels and to take action to prevent 
or slow the progression of their disease. A goal of the CDC is 
to increase the percentage of individuals with diabetes who 
receive annual eye and foot exams, and at least two A1C 
measures per year.
    It is estimated that maintaining a certain blood glucose 
level (A1C target of less than seven) would reduce the health 
complications of diabetes and achieve direct and indirect 
medical cost savings. The Committee encourages CDC to establish 
additional national public-private partnerships to leverage 
Federal resources with private-sector contributions to expand 
the national diabetes education program. These new efforts 
could augment public awareness campaigns encouraging 
individuals with diabetes to be tested and know their A1C 
levels so that they and their healthcare professionals can take 
appropriate action to control their condition.
    Epilepsy.--The Committee supports the CDC epilepsy program, 
which has made considerable progress over the past decade in 
establishing and advancing a public health agenda to meet the 
needs of Americans with epilepsy. The Committee applauds CDC's 
activities to train first-responders, educators, school nurses, 
employers, family caregivers, and other health care 
professionals in the recognition, diagnosis and treatment of 
seizures.
    Food allergies.--The Committee is concerned with the sharp 
increase in the incidence of food allergies among children, and 
requests CDC produce a report to the Committee by April 15, 
2008 detailing the national incidence of children with reported 
food allergies, possible causes of the reported increased 
incidence, and steps the CDC recommends to address this growing 
national threat to children's health.
    Genetics of diabetic kidney disease.--The Committee 
acknowledges CDC for its collaboration with the National 
Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to 
implement the Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) Study, a 
large scale effort to identify the genetic determinants of 
diabetic kidney disease. The Committee urges CDC to take steps 
to ensure that GoKinD biosamples are made available to the 
research community in a sustainable and long-term manner, such 
as through a central biorepository, so that this valuable 
genetic collection can be efficiently mined for knowledge that 
could lead to the development of new therapies to treat 
diabetic kidney disease.
    Gynecologic cancer education and awareness program.--The 
Committee is encouraged by the progress that has been made by 
CDC, in coordination with the Office of Women's Health, to 
initiate a national education campaign on gynecologic cancers. 
In the absence of an available screening test, the Committee 
understands that the best way for gynecologic cancers to be 
detected early is for women and health professionals to 
recognize its signs and symptoms. The Committee is pleased that 
these efforts were authorized in statute with the passage of 
Johanna's Law: The Gynecologic Cancer Education and Awareness 
Act. The Committee provides funding for activities authorized 
by Johanna's Law to support the continuation and expansion of 
this program. Within the total, a portion is to be allocated 
toward the completion of a report to Congress providing a 
description of past and present activities of the Department of 
Health and Human Services to increase awareness and knowledge 
of the public with respect to different types of cancer, 
including gynecologic cancers as well as past efforts to 
increase awareness and knowledge of health care providers with 
respect to different types of cancer, including gynecologic 
cancers.
    Heart disease and stroke.--The Committee remains strongly 
supportive of CDC's new division for heart disease and stroke 
prevention. Heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular 
diseases continue to be the leading cause of death in every 
State; however, effective prevention efforts are not practiced 
universally. Additionally, the current surveillance systems in 
the U.S. cannot directly track progress towards achieving the 
goal of Healthy People 2010, which is to reduce the epidemic 
burden of heart disease and stroke. The Committee continues to 
support the goal of providing funding for basic implementation 
of CDC's heart disease and stroke prevention program in each 
State. The Committee is aware that many States still need this 
program and understands that CDC's national competition allowed 
non-funded States to apply for this program for the first time 
since 2002, but required all 33 funded States to re-compete for 
support.
    Inflammatory bowel disease.--It is estimated that up to 1.4 
million people in the U.S. suffer from Crohn's disease or 
ulcerative colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel 
disease (IBD). The Committee has included funding to continue 
this important initiative.
    Interstitial cystitis.--The Committee is pleased by the 
progress made by CDC on educating the public and professional 
communities about interstitial cystitis (IC). In addition to 
generating public attention to IC, the Committee encourages CDC 
to develop and implement a comprehensive structured outreach 
plan for the provider community.
    National school lunch and breakfast program.--The Committee 
is aware that the disparity of national standards is having a 
negative effect on national school lunch and breakfast 
programs. Therefore, the Committee encourages CDC to work with 
the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture to 
establish uniform national nutrition standards for all schools 
participating in the national school lunch and breakfast 
programs and to define what it means to implement the dietary 
guidelines for Americans.
    Oral health.--The Committee recognizes that to reduce 
disparities in oral diseases will require additional and more 
effective efforts at the State and local levels. The Committee 
has provided funding to strengthen State capacities to assess 
the prevalence of oral diseases and the associated health 
burden, to target resources and interventions, such as 
additional water fluoridation and school-linked sealant 
programs, and resources to the underserved, to assess trends in 
oral diseases, and to evaluate changes in policies and 
programs. The Committee encourages CDC to advance efforts to 
reduce the disparities and burden from oral diseases, including 
those that are closely linked to chronic diseases such as 
diabetes and heart disease.
    Primary immunodeficiency diseases.--Within funds available, 
the Committee encourages CDC to support the national physician 
education and public awareness campaign for primary 
immunodeficiency syndrome. The campaign has featured public 
service announcements, physician symposia, publications, and 
the development of website and educational materials, as well 
as mailings to physicians, school nurses, daycare centers, and 
others. Together with the private investments in this activity, 
the campaign has directly resulted in a three-fold increase in 
diagnosis, testing, and treatment since the campaign began.
    Psoriasis.--As many as 7.5 million Americans are affected 
by psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis--chronic, inflammatory, 
painful and disfiguring diseases for which there are limited 
treatment options and no cure. The Committee understands that 
there are very few efforts to collect epidemiologic and other 
related data on individuals with psoriasis and psoriatic 
arthritis, and as such, researchers and clinicians are limited 
in their longitudinal understanding of these diseases and their 
effects on individual patients. The Committee encourages CDC to 
support longitudinal studies to learn about key attributes such 
as response to treatment, substantiating the waxing and waning 
of psoriasis, understanding associated manifestations like nail 
disease and arthritis, the relationship of psoriasis to other 
public health concerns such as the high rate of smoking and 
obesity among those with the disease as well as the association 
of psoriasis with other serious medical conditions such as 
diabetes and heart attack. The Committee believes a national 
registry that collects longitudinal psoriasis and psoriatic 
arthritis patient data will help improve the care and outcomes 
for people with these diseases by increasing the understanding 
of: psoriasis incidence/prevalence, the distribution of disease 
severity, risk factors, and the incidence/prevalence of co-
morbidities.
    Pulmonary hypertension.--The Committee continues to 
encourage CDC to foster greater awareness of pulmonary 
hypertension, a rare blood vessel disorder of the lung in which 
the pressure in the pulmonary artery rises above normal levels 
and may become life threatening. When pulmonary hypertension 
occurs in the absence of a known cause, it is referred to as 
primary pulmonary hypertension. Secondary pulmonary 
hypertension (SPH) means the cause is known. Emphysema and 
bronchitis are common causes of SPH. Other less frequent causes 
are the inflammatory or collagen vascular diseases such as 
scleroderma, CREST syndrome, or systemic lupus erythematosus. 
Congenital heart diseases that cause shunting of extra blood 
through the lungs like ventricular and atrial septal defects, 
chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, HIV infection, liver disease 
and diet drugs like fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine also are 
causes of pulmonary hypertension.
    Sleep disorders.--The Committee is aware that sleep 
disorders are critically under-addressed contributors to many 
chronic diseases and has provided $1,000,000 for CDC's 
participation in the national sleep awareness roundtable, a 
partnership with other Federal agencies and the health 
community, and to integrate messages about sleep into the 
national public health network. The Committee also urges CDC to 
incorporate sleep and sleep related disturbances into 
established CDC surveillance systems.
    Teen pregnancy prevention demonstration grants.--A new 
$10,000,000 initiative is recommended for grants to State and 
local public health departments, school districts, and 
nonprofit organizations to support factually and medically 
accurate, age-appropriate approaches to preventing teen 
pregnancies, including information about both abstinence and 
contraception, and dissemination of science-based tools and 
strategies to prevent HIV, STD, and teen pregnancy. The 
Secretary of Health and Human Services shall require each 
applicant for financial assistance under this program to 
certify that all materials proposed in the application and 
funded during the project period of the grant are medically 
accurate. The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall 
require a panel of medical experts to review all grant 
applications and assess whether the materials proposed are 
medically accurate. These demonstration projects shall be 
evaluated based on their success in reducing the rate of teen 
pregnancies in their respective communities. The Committee's 
recommendation for this activity is part of its initiative to 
reduce the number of abortions in America by alleviating the 
economic pressures and other real life conditions that can 
sometimes cause women to decide not to carry their pregnancies 
to term.
    Underage drinking.--The Committee recognizes the importance 
of monitoring risk factors that science has demonstrated 
contribute to youth drinking, and urges CDC to develop and 
continue its work to monitor and report on the level of risk 
faced by youth from exposure to alcohol advertising.
            Birth defects, developmental disabilities, disability and 
                    health
    The Committee provides $132,733,000 for birth defects, 
developmental disabilities, disability and health, which is 
$8,069,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$8,196,000 more than the budget request. This program collects, 
analyzes, and makes available data on the incidence and causes 
of birth defects and developmental disabilities.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for birth defects, developmental disabilities, 
disability, and health activities:
          $38,750,000 for birth defects and developmental 
        disabilities, which is $227,000 above the fiscal year 
        2007 funding level and $266,000 above the budget 
        request (included within this total is $2,496,000 for 
        the folic acid program);
          $72,987,000 for human development and disability, 
        which is $6,976,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
        level and $7,043,000 above the budget request (included 
        within this total is $16,500,000 for autism activities 
        and $10,500,000 for early hearing detection and 
        intervention activities); and,
          $20,996,000 for blood disorders, which is $866,000 
        more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
        $887,000 more than the budget request (included within 
        this total is $18,187,000 for the hemophilia program).
    Amputee population.--There are currently more than 1.9 
million Americans living with limb loss due to diabetes, 
trauma, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. The Committee 
recognizes that one of the greatest challenges facing 
individuals with limb loss is access to necessary health and 
rehabilitative services. The Committee applauds CDC for its 
efforts to address these challenges through the work of the 
disability and health team and strongly supports CDC's resource 
and information center, which assists individuals living with 
disabilities, and their families, in need of information on 
medical, physical, and emotional needs, and resources and 
support to reintegrate socially and economically into society.
    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD).--Current 
estimates indicate that AD/HD affects almost 4.5 million 
school-age children and can last into adulthood. Only half of 
all children with AD/HD receive necessary treatment, with lower 
diagnostic and treatment rates among girls, minorities and 
children in foster care. The Surgeon General has reported a 
severe lack of professionals trained to diagnose and treat the 
condition effectively. The Committee continues to support the 
AD/HD activities of the National Center on Birth Defects and 
Developmental Disabilities as it responds to the overwhelming 
demand for information and support services, reaches special 
populations in need, and educates health and education 
professionals on AD/HD.
    Cerebral palsy.--The Committee is pleased with CDC's 
progress in autism and developmental disabilities surveillance 
and is encouraged to learn of the launch of the largest ever 
epidemiologic study of potential causes of autism spectrum 
disorders. The Committee encourages CDC to build upon these 
successes and to also focus on the development of surveillance 
and research activities focused on cerebral palsy, another 
priority public health concern.
    Cooley's anemia.--The Committee remains pleased with the 
progress that CDC has made with regard to the establishment of 
a blood safety surveillance program for Cooley's anemia 
patients, who are the largest consumers of red blood cells. CDC 
maintains an archive of tested and analyzed blood samples, as 
well as monitoring for other complicating factors.
    Down syndrome.--The Committee commends CDC for initiating a 
study to document the onset and course of secondary and related 
developmental and mental disorders in individuals with Down 
syndrome. The Committee encourages further research relating to 
these areas of dual diagnosis.
    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DBMD).--The 
Committee is aware of recent efforts by CDC to develop a 
Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patient registry that 
will provide a virtual web interface that identifies and 
characterizes the patient population, provides, as examples, 
common data elements and clinical endpoints for clinical 
trials, and accelerates translational research through broader 
clinical trial networks. This patient registry will serve as a 
model for rare disease. The Committee encourages the agency to 
work directly with the patient and scientific communities to 
accelerate this project with a goal for its launch of March 1, 
2008, and to the extent possible and practicable, to align 
these efforts with any cross-agency initiative to coordinate 
focus and investments in rare disease patient registries. The 
Committee also urges CDC to work with the Agency for Healthcare 
Research and Quality to finalize the DBMD care considerations 
and integrate the care considerations as part of the DBMD 
international patient registry.
    Early hearing detection and intervention.--Within the total 
provided, $10,500,000 is designated for the early hearing 
detection and intervention (EHDI) program for newborns, 
infants, and young children with hearing loss. This funding 
will allow States to continue to invest in developing 
appropriate surveillance and tracking systems to provide timely 
and appropriate diagnostic and intervention services to infants 
and toddlers. Funding also may be used to support applied 
research projects related to increasing the accuracy of newborn 
hearing screening, improving the effectiveness of tracking and 
surveillance programs, determining the etiology and 
epidemiology of childhood hearing loss, and analyzing the costs 
and benefits of such programs. The Committee encourages CDC to 
assist States in clarifying how EHDI surveillance, tracking, 
and data management programs are affected by the Health 
Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and the Family 
Education Rights and Privacy Act. The Committee urges CDC to 
coordinate its efforts with the Health Resources and Services 
Administration, the National Institute on Deafness and Other 
Communication Disorders, the National Institute on Disability 
and Rehabilitation Research, and the Office of Special 
Education and Rehabilitative Services.
    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS).--The Committee is concerned 
about the prevalence of FAS in the U.S. and notes that drinking 
during pregnancy continues to be the nation's leading known 
preventable cause of mental retardation and birth defects. The 
Committee encourages CDC to continue and enhance efforts to 
prevent, reduce, and diagnose FAS disorders. The Committee 
requests that CDC submit a progress report within six months on 
the contributions made to preventing and reducing FAS 
disorders, and for CDC's future plans, including programmatic 
and funding priorities.
    Folic acid education campaign.--The Committee is aware of a 
recent analysis conducted by CDC that showed folate 
concentrations among non-pregnant women of child bearing age 
have decreased by 16 percent from 1999-2000 through 2003-2004. 
These findings are troubling and the Committee is concerned 
that women are not receiving an adequate level of folic acid to 
prevent neural tube defects. Within the funds provided, the 
Committee has included sufficient resources for CDC to expand 
the folic acid education campaign and inform more women and 
healthcare providers about the benefits of folic acid, 
particularly the Hispanic population.
    Fragile X.--The Committee supports the CDC's continuation 
of public health activities in the areas of fragile X, fragile 
X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, and fragile X-associated 
premature ovarian failure. The Committee encourages CDC to 
focus its efforts primarily on increasing epidemiological 
research, surveillance, and screening efforts, with particular 
attention towards collecting epidemiological data on the 
incidence and prevalence of fragile X and related conditions, 
including autism. The Committee urges CDC to support the 
development of a national registry to track patients living 
with fragile X. The Committee also encourages CDC to distribute 
existing educational materials to the health care professional 
community and the public and not to create new, duplicative 
educational materials. The Committee requests that CDC report 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, no later 
than April 15, 2008 with a progress update on CDC's efforts and 
spending priorities as they relate to fragile X.
    Hemophilia.--The Committee recognizes the many 
accomplishments of the blood disorders division and the network 
of hemophilia treatment centers. The Committee expects CDC to 
continue its efforts to support and expand access to 
comprehensive chronic disease management for people with 
bleeding and clotting disorders and to improve outreach to the 
growing numbers of women with bleeding disorders.
    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT).--The Committee 
encourages CDC to establish a hereditary hemorrhagic 
telangiectasia resource center to increase identification of 
people affected with HHT, and increase knowledge, education and 
outreach of this largely preventable life-threatening 
condition. The Committee encourages CDC to provide information 
on effective evidence-based interventions and treatments to 
prevent premature death in the HHT population, improve outcomes 
and the quality of life for people living with HHT by creating 
a database to collect and analyze data, support epidemiology 
studies, provide surveillance, and train health care 
professionals.
    Marfan syndrome.--The Committee continues to be interested 
in Marfan syndrome, a heritable condition that affects the 
connective tissue. In the Marfan syndrome, the connective 
tissue is defective and does not act as it should--it 
degenerates. Because connective tissue is found throughout the 
body, the Marfan snydrome can affect many body systems, 
including the skeleton, eyes, heart and blood vessels, nervous 
system, skin, and lungs. The problems that occur in the heart 
and blood vessels are the most life-threatening aspects of the 
Marfan syndrome. Many individuals with Marfan syndrome are 
undiagnosed or misdiagnosed until they experience a cardiac 
complication, frequently due to valvular prolapse or aortic 
aneurysms. The Committee encourages CDC to increase awareness 
of the condition and requests a report on these outreach 
activities as part of CDC's fiscal year 2009 budget 
justification.
    National Birth Defects Prevention Study.--The Committee 
supports CDC's efforts in the area of birth defects 
surveillance, research, and prevention and encourages CDC to 
continue the promising research being conducted by the regional 
centers for birth defects research and prevention and to 
increase assistance to States to implement community-based 
birth defects tracking systems, programs to prevent birth 
defects, and activities to improve access to health services 
for children with birth defects. The Committee encourages the 
CDC to expand the birth defects studied in the National Birth 
Defects Prevention Study to include single gene disorders, like 
fragile X.
    Paralysis.--To meet the growing demand for information, 
resources, and public health services by individuals with 
paralysis, the Committee supports efforts to expand a paralysis 
resource center.
    Preterm birth.--Preterm birth is a serious and growing 
public health problem that occurs in 12.5 percent of all births 
in the U.S. The Committee strongly encourages CDC to conduct 
additional epidemiological studies on preterm birth, including 
the relationship between pre-maturity, birth defects, and 
developmental disabilities. The Committee also encourages the 
establishment of systems for the collection of maternal-infant 
clinical and biomedical information to link with the pregnancy 
risk assessment monitoring system (PRAMS) and other 
epidemiological studies of pre-maturity in order to track 
pregnancy outcomes and prevent preterm birth.
    Spina bifida.--The Committee recognizes that spina bifida 
is the leading permanently disabling birth defect in the U.S. 
While spina bifida and related neural tube defects are highly 
preventable through adequate daily folic acid consumption, and 
its secondary effects can be mitigated through appropriate and 
proactive medical care and management, such efforts have not 
been adequately supported to result in significant reductions 
in these costly conditions. The Committee encourages CDC to use 
resources for quality of life activities related to improving 
medical and psychosocial treatment. The Committee continues to 
strongly support CDC's collaboration with the Agency for 
Healthcare Research and Quality to develop a patient registry.
    Tourette syndrome.--The Committee commends CDC for its 
continued work on developing a public health education and 
research program for Tourette syndrome. This program educates 
parents, physicians, educators, and other health care workers 
about the disorder and expands on the scientific knowledge base 
on prevalence, risk factors, and co-morbidities of Tourette 
syndrome.
    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).--TSC is a genetic 
disorder that causes uncontrollable tumor growth. Because this 
disorder can affect multiple organs of the body, it is 
difficult to diagnose, track and properly treat. The Committee 
encourages CDC to develop an initiative to collect and analyze 
data from the nationwide network of TSC clinics; support 
surveillance and epidemiological studies; and to educate health 
care professionals and teachers who come into contact with TSC 
patients.

Health information and service

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$254,028,000 for health information and service, which is 
$31,375,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 program level and 
$10,532,000 more than the budget request. Of the funds 
provided, $183,924,000 shall be derived from evaluation set-
aside funds available under section 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act. The evaluation set-aside is $49,689,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $48,789,000 more than 
the budget request.
            Health statistics
    The Committee provides $120,000,000 for health statistics, 
which is $10,979,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $10,079,000 more than the budget request. The health 
statistics program is responsible for collecting, interpreting, 
and disseminating data on the health status of the U.S. 
population and the use of health services. Surveys include the 
National Health Interview Survey, the National Health and 
Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), the National Health Care 
Survey, the National Vital Statistics System, and the National 
Survey of Family Growth.
    The Committee commends the national center for health 
statistics (NCHS) for fulfilling its mission as the nation's 
premiere health statistics agency and for ensuring the 
credibility and integrity of the data it produces. In 
particular, the Committee congratulates NCHS for its timely 
release of critical data and encourages it to continue making 
information, including data from NHANES and the National Health 
Interview Study, accessible to the public as soon as possible.
    Additionally, the Committee is interested in the National 
Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and includes an additional 
$200,000 over fiscal year 2007 for NCHS to make necessary 
improvements to the survey to increase sample size in order to 
produce annual statistics and to strengthen the statistics for 
teenagers and minority and low-income groups. The Committee's 
recommendation for the NSFG is part of its initiative to help 
reduce the number of abortions in America by alleviating the 
economic pressures and other real life conditions that can 
sometimes cause women to decide not to carry their pregnancies 
to term.
    Food allergies.--Life-threatening food allergies severely 
impair the quality of life for allergic children and their 
parents. For reasons that scientists can not yet explain, food 
allergies appear to be afflicting more and more children each 
year. The Committee is disappointed that CDC does not currently 
track the incidence of food allergies as it does for other 
conditions. The Committee strongly urges CDC to include the 
incidence of food allergies in the National Health Interview 
Survey, or a comparable annual tracking mechanism.
    Genomics.--The National Health and Nutrition Examination 
Survey (NHANES) is a continuous survey representative of the 
U.S. population that assesses health and nutrition status. With 
the success and continual improvement of genomic technologies, 
the Committee believes that the next improvement in this survey 
will be to genotype participants of past and future NHANES 
surveys using large-scale genotyping platforms (with 
appropriate consideration for consent, privacy, and 
confidentiality), as part of CDC's beyond gene discovery 
initiative, and assess the impact of genetic variation on 
public health, along with nutrition and environmental factors.
    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).--The Committee is 
concerned that NTM incidence continues to rise. Mycobacteria 
are environmental organisms found in both water and soil that 
cause substantial respiratory damage. The Committee continues 
to encourage the national center for health statistics to 
include questions regarding NTM testing in ongoing surveys to 
gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of this 
emergent disease.
    Nutrition monitoring.--The Committee affirms America's 
commitment to nutrition for all and encourages NCHS and the 
Agricultural Research Service at the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture to develop a national nutrition monitoring system. 
Such system should support both management decision-making and 
research needed to address and improve the crisis of obesity, 
nutrition-related diseases, physical inactivity, food 
insecurity, and the poor nutritional quality of the American 
diet, as well as provide the data needed to protect the public 
against environmental pathogens and contaminants.
    Vital statistics.--The Committee values NCHS and its 
critical role in monitoring our nation's health. The Committee 
is troubled that NCHS lacks the support it needs to collect a 
full year's worth of data on births, deaths, and other vital 
information. CDC should ensure that NCHS has sufficient funds 
to contract with the vital records jurisdictions for the 
purchase of 12 months of vital statistics data under the agreed 
upon terms of the vital statistics cooperative program. In 
addition, CDC should develop a plan on how to directly support 
jurisdictions as they implement electronic systems that will 
improve the timeliness, quality, and security of birth and 
death data.
            Public health informatics
    The Committee provides $94,855,000 for public health 
informatics, which is $24,214,000 more than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $453,000 more than the budget request. 
Information systems and information technology extend the 
traditional reach of public health professionals. Activities 
funded through public health informatics include on-going 
collaborative efforts to build a national network of public 
health information systems to enhance detection and monitoring, 
surveillance, data analysis and interpretation, preparedness, 
communications, and response.
    Pandemic influenza.--The Committee provides $24,545,000 for 
pandemic influenza activities as requested by the 
Administration. Within this total, $14,645,000 is to develop a 
vaccine registry to monitor vaccine use and distribution that 
will supplement already existing State registries to include 
adults and $9,900,000 is for real-time assessment and 
evaluation of influenza interventions.
    Physician reqistry.--The Committee directs the national 
center for public health informatics to continue to fund at a 
level of $325,000 from existing appropriations the 
establishment of a nationwide database of contact information 
for practicing physicians that can be used by Federal agencies 
and State and local health departments in the event of a 
terrorist attack, natural disaster, pandemic, or other severe 
public health emergency. The Committee expects this effort to 
be coordinated with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for 
Preparedness and Response to avoid any programmatic 
duplication.
            Health marketing
    The Committee provides a program level of $39,173,000 for 
health marketing, which is $3,818,000 less than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and the same as the budget request. Health 
marketing uses commercial, non-profit, and public service 
marketing, and communication science practices to better 
understand people's health-related needs and preferences, to 
motivate changes in individuals and organizations to protect 
and improve health, and to develop and enhance partnerships 
with public and private organizations.

Environmental health and injury prevention

    The Committee provides $305,151,000 for environmental 
health and injury prevention, which is $17,047,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $17,477,000 more than 
the budget request.
            Environmental health
    The Committee provides $165,005,000 for environmental 
health, which is $15,518,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $15,741,000 more than the budget request. The 
environmental health program focuses on preventing disability, 
disease, and death caused by environmental factors through 
laboratory and field research.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for environmental health activities:
          $40,473,000 for the environmental health laboratory, 
        which is $13,491,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
        level and $13,531,000 above the budget request;
          $56,731,000 for general environmental health 
        activities, which is $2,027,000 above the fiscal year 
        2007 funding level and $2,108,000 above the budget 
        request (included within this total is $26,533,000 for 
        the environmental health outcome tracking network; 
        funding is not provided for arctic health or volcanic 
        emissions activities);
          $31,898,000 for asthma programs, which is the same as 
        the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $48,000 more 
        than the budget request; and,
          $35,903,000 for childhood lead poisoning prevention 
        programs, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
        funding level and $54,000 more than the budget request.
    Asthma.--The Committee is pleased with the work that CDC 
has done to address the increasing prevalence of asthma. 
However, the increase in asthma among children remains 
alarming. The Committee encourages CDC to continue to expand 
its outreach aimed at increasing public awareness of asthma 
control and prevention strategies, particularly among at-risk 
populations in underserved communities. To further facilitate 
this effort, CDC is urged to support community-based 
interventions that apply effective approaches demonstrated in 
research projects within the scientific and public health 
community.
    Biomonitoring.--The Committee applauds CDC's biomonitoring 
efforts and encourages CDC to continue this program and to 
continue to improve its efforts to communicate these results in 
context. In particular, the CDC's National Report on Human 
Exposure to Environmental Chemicals is a significant new 
information database that provides invaluable information for 
setting research priorities and for tracking trends in human 
exposures over time. Accordingly, the Committee continues to 
support the CDC environmental health laboratory's efforts to 
provide exposure information by conducting biomonitoring for 
environmental chemicals. The Committee urges CDC to devote a 
greater proportion of program resources to implement the 
recommendations of the National Academies' National Research 
Council, particularly with regard to the development of 
necessary methods to interpret human biomonitoring 
concentrations in the context of potential health risk and the 
enhancement of efforts to communicate results in context. CDC 
is encouraged to collaborate with toxicologists, health 
scientists, laboratory analytical chemists, and Environmental 
Protection Agency scientists in this effort.
    Childhood lead poisoning prevention.--The Committee 
commends CDC for its commitment to support the enhanced 
development of a portable, hand-held lead screening device that 
holds great promise for increasing childhood screening rates in 
underserved communities. Further development of this device 
will help ensure its application in community health settings.
    Climate change.--Additional scientific research is needed 
to further understand the potential health effects of global 
climate change and to identify tools to educate health 
professionals about adaptation strategies. The Committee 
encourages CDC to begin to develop public health research, 
technical assistance, and surveillance programs to understand 
the impacts of climate change on health.
    Landmine survivors.--The Committee commends CDC for its 
effective response to the public health threat posed by 
landmines and improvised explosive devices. Within the funds 
provided, the Committee urges CDC to support programmatic and 
geographic expansion to include those injured by civil strife 
and terrorism, including, but not limited to, landmines.
    Mercury and arsenic exposure.--The Committee recognizes the 
extraordinary services of the environmental health laboratory 
to develop new and improved biomonitoring methods to accurately 
and rapidly assess human exposure to mercury and arsenic, 
including exposure to the form of mercury in thimerosal, and to 
improve health risk assessment by expanding studies of the 
relationship between biomonitoring exposure levels and disease.
    National Report on Dietary and Nutritional Indicators in 
the U.S. Population.--The Committee supports the efforts of the 
environmental health laboratory and its commitment to improving 
the measurement of dietary and nutritional indicators in the 
American people. The Committee is aware that many Americans are 
confused about which foods to eat to improve and maintain their 
health. The Committee is also aware that there is a wide gap 
between recommended dietary intake and what people eat. 
Consequently, without knowledge of what levels of most dietary 
or nutritional indicators actually are in people's bodies, it 
is difficult for public health officials and others to improve 
the diet and nutritional status of Americans. The Committee 
recognizes that future reports will provide this essential 
information, which is not available in any other document in 
either the private or public sector. A publicly funded program 
that monitors human levels of vitamins, trans fats and omega-3 
fatty acids, and other indicators of nutritional and dietary 
status is needed to provide the hard scientific data needed to 
make critical decisions about nutritional health for the 
nation.
    Newborn screening quality assurance program.--Within the 
funds provided for the environmental health laboratory, the 
Committee provides $7,000,000 for the newborn screening quality 
assurance program. Funds also are included for the 
biomonitoring program to enhance State public health laboratory 
biomonitoring capabilities, including upgrading facilities and 
equipment and bolstering workforce capacity, and to provide 
adequate technical assistance and training to States in 
biomonitoring. Increased funds for newborn screening are 
provided for additional technical assistance to State newborn 
screening labs, new screening tools, and methods to increase 
accuracy and expand the number of disorders screened, and 
population-based pilot testing to ensure the effectiveness of 
new screening tools.
    Trans fat.--The Committee is supportive of the division of 
laboratory sciences and its commitment to improving the 
measurement of risk factors associated with heart disease, 
stroke, and other cardiovascular disease. Dietary fat profiles 
have a significant impact on health. The Committee is aware 
that experimental evidence shows an increasing risk of heart 
disease associated with trans fat intake, and that many State 
and local governments are proposing bans in restaurants and 
schools. A publicly funded surveillance system to monitor trans 
fat levels and other fatty acids, such as omega-3 fatty acids, 
in humans is needed to assess the impact of public health 
interventions to reduce the intake of trans fat. In addition, 
the lipid standardization program currently offers 
standardization services for lipids to Federally-funded and 
other public health research labs and also is well-equipped to 
standardize trans fat measurement.
            Injury prevention and control
    The Committee provides $140,146,000 for the injury 
prevention and control program, which is $1,529,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $1,736,000 more than the 
budget request. Within the total, $5,816,000 is provided for 
the traumatic brain injury program, which is $529,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $537,000 more than the 
budget request.
    Injuries are the leading cause of death among children and 
adults under 44 years of age in the U.S. In 2004, more than 
167,000 people died from injuries and violence and over 29 
million people sustained injuries serious enough to require 
treatment in an emergency department. The injury prevention and 
control program supports intramural research, injury control 
research centers, extramural research grants, and technical 
assistance to State and local health departments to prevent 
premature death and disability and to reduce human suffering 
and medical costs caused by injury and violence.
    Child maltreatment.--The Committee applauds CDC's 
activities in the area of child maltreatment. A growing body of 
research indicates that childhood abuse and neglect may 
contribute significantly to the development of both acute and 
chronic health conditions throughout the lifespan, including 
obesity and heart disease. The Committee encourages CDC to 
develop a network of consortia that will address research and 
training, as well as the dissemination of best practices and 
prevention efforts, on the health harms of child abuse and 
neglect.
    Children and adolescents.--Within the total, the Committee 
includes sufficient funds for CDC to support an additional 
injury control research center that will conduct research on 
injury and injury prevention related to children and 
adolescents. The Committee believes that children and 
adolescent populations have special and underserved needs in 
injury control. Injury is the leading cause of death and 
disability among children and teenagers in the U.S. Currently, 
there is no center that focuses exclusively on childhood and 
adolescent injuries even though children and adolescents are 
affected by injury more than any other segment of the 
population.
    Gun control advocacy.--The Committee maintains bill 
language prohibiting funds in this bill from being used to 
lobby for or against the passage of specific Federal, State or 
local legislation intended to advocate or promote gun control. 
The Committee understands that CDC's responsibility in this 
area is primarily data collection and the dissemination of that 
information and expects that research in this area to be 
objective and grants to be awarded through an impartial, 
scientific peer review process.
    National violent death reporting system.--The Committee is 
supportive of the national violent death reporting system 
(NVDRS) and has included funds to continue implementation of 
the NVDRS in fiscal year 2008. The Committee urges CDC to 
continue to work with private health and education agencies as 
well as State agencies in the development and implementation of 
this injury reporting system.

Occupational safety and health

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$310,937,000 for occupational safety and health, which is 
$56,838,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$57,939,000 above the budget request. Of the amount provided, 
$88,361,000 is to be derived from section 241 evaluation set-
aside funds, rather than $87,071,000 as provided in fiscal year 
2007 and proposed in the budget request.
    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 
(NIOSH) conducts applied research, develops criteria for 
occupational safety and health standards, and provides 
technical services to government, labor and industry, including 
training for the prevention of work-related diseases and 
injuries. This appropriation supports surveillance, health 
hazard evaluations, intramural and extramural research, 
instrument and methods development, dissemination, and training 
grants.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
program levels for occupational safety and health research 
activities:
          $21,806,000 for education and research centers, which 
        is $1,982,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
        and $2,112,000 above the budget request;
          $12,732,000 for personal protective technology 
        development activities, which is the same as the fiscal 
        year 2007 funding level and $84,000 above the budget 
        request;
          $112,834,000 for the national occupational research 
        agenda, which is $13,648,000 more than the fiscal year 
        2007 funding level and $13,728,000 more than the budget 
        request;
          $50,000,000 for the World Trade Center treatment and 
        monitoring program for 9/11 responders and recovery 
        personnel, which is double the amount requested by the 
        Administration in the Public Health and Social Services 
        Emergency Fund;
          $25,200,000 for mining research, which is $13,000,000 
        less than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
        $12,748,000 less than the budget request; and,
          $88,365,000 for other occupational safety and health 
        research, which is $4,208,000 more than the fiscal year 
        2007 funding level and $4,763,000 more than the budget 
        request.
    Cancer incidence and mortality study.--The Committee 
continues to be pleased with the progress of research and the 
translation of that research into practice under the national 
occupational research agenda. Within the funding provided, the 
Committee encourages NIOSH to continue its study of former 
manufacturing workers through the initiation of a cancer 
incidence and mortality study within this population.
    Mining research.--The Committee notes that an additional 
$13,000,000 for research to develop mine safety technology and 
to make improvements to leased facilities has been provided to 
NIOSH within the fiscal year 2007 supplemental appropriations 
bill (P.L. 110-28). The period of availability for the 
supplemental funding extends through fiscal year 2008.
    World Trade Center.--The Committee includes report language 
under the Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund 
section requesting that the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services, together with the Director of NIOSH, submit a 
comprehensive long-term plan, including cost estimates, 
regarding a program of medical monitoring and treatment of all 
individuals exposed to toxins at the World Trade Center site 
following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.
    The Committee notes that an additional $50,000,000 for the 
treatment and monitoring program has been provided to NIOSH 
within the fiscal year 2007 supplemental appropriations bill 
(P.L. 110-28). The supplemental funding is available until 
expended.

Global health

    The Committee provides $381,337,000 for global health, 
which is $47,299,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
and $1,618,000 above the budget request.
    Through its global health activities, CDC coordinates, 
cooperates, participates with, and provides consultation to 
other nations, U.S. agencies, and international organizations 
to prevent and contain diseases and environmental health 
problems and to develop and apply health promotion activities. 
In cooperation with Ministries of Health and other appropriate 
organizations, CDC tracks and assesses evolving global health 
issues and identifies and develops activities to apply CDC's 
technical expertise to be of maximum public health benefit.
    Within the total, the following amounts are included for 
global health activities:
          $122,769,000 for the global AIDS program, which is 
        the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
        $1,546,000 more than the budget request;
          $144,438,000 for the global immunization program, 
        which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
        and $55,000 more than the budget request;
          $32,479,000 for global disease detection, which is 
        the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
        $13,000 more than the budget request;
          $8,985,000 for the global malaria program, which is 
        the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
        $4,000 more than the budget request, and;
          $72,666,000 for other global health activities, which 
        is $47,299,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
        level and the same as the budget request.
    Pandemic influenza.--The Committee provides $69,300,000 for 
pandemic influenza activities as requested by the 
Administration. Within this total, $17,820,000 is for rapid 
outbreak response for high-priority countries, $3,960,000 is 
for human-animal interface studies, and $47,520,000 is for 
international surveillance, diagnosis, and epidemic 
investigations.
    Malaria.--The Committee recognizes that malaria is a global 
emergency affecting mostly poor women and children. While 
malaria is treatable and preventable, tragically it remains one 
of the leading causes of death and disease worldwide. The 
Committee appreciates the integral and unique role that the CDC 
malaria program plays in national and global efforts to prevent 
and control malaria. The Committee urges CDC to expand malaria-
related research, program implementation, and evaluation. 
Insecticide resistance and drug resistance have the real 
potential to compromise global malaria efforts and point to the 
need for the development and testing of new technologies and 
materials for insecticide-treated nets and new anti-malarial 
therapies. The Committee is concerned that failure to support 
these efforts could seriously impair future control efforts. 
Additionally, the Committee encourages CDC to provide technical 
assistance and support program research in non-African malaria-
affected countries, which, in turn, can then be used to 
strengthen control efforts in African countries.

Terrorism preparedness and response

    The Committee provides $1,598,751,000 for terrorism 
preparedness and response, which is $57,451,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $94,376,000 above the budget 
request. CDC distributes grants to State, local, and 
territorial public health agencies; centers for public health 
preparedness; and other to support infrastructure upgrades to 
respond to all potential hazards, including acts of terrorism 
or infectious disease outbreaks. Funds are used for needs 
assessments, terrorism response planning, training, 
strengthening epidemiology and surveillance, and upgrading 
laboratory capacity and communications systems. Activities 
support the establishment of procedures and response systems, 
and build the infrastructure necessary to respond to a variety 
of disaster scenarios.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for terrorism preparedness and response activities:
          $789,948,000 is for upgrading State and local 
        capacity, which is $5,606,000 more than the fiscal year 
        2007 funding level and $91,681,000 more than the budget 
        request (included within the total is $734,536,000 for 
        the bioterrorism cooperative agreement program);
          $136,815,000 is for upgrading CDC capacity, which is 
        the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
        $223,000 more than the budget request;
          $9,500,000 is for the anthrax research study, which 
        is $4,383,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
        level--the Administration's budget request did not 
        include funding for this activity;
          $81,153,000 is for the biosurveillance activities, 
        which is $2,593,000, more than fiscal year 2007 funding 
        level and $7,028,000 less than the budget request 
        (included within this total is $50,000,000 for BioSense 
        and $21,028,000 for quarantine stations); and,
          $581,335,000 is for the strategic national stockpile, 
        which is $56,635,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
        level and the same as the budget request.
    BioSense.--The Committee has not provided the full budget 
request for the BioSense program due to concerns that this and 
other similar syndromic and event detection systems across the 
Federal government may not be the most efficient and effective 
way to detect the presence of pathogens. State and local health 
departments have principal responsibility for protecting the 
public's health and therefore take the lead in conducting 
disease surveillance and supporting response efforts. According 
to a June 2005 Government Accountability Office (GAO) report, 
many State, local, and private networks are not being utilized 
to collect data and State and local health departments do not 
find the data collected to be useful. The Committee has 
invested $189,100,000 in the BioSense program since fiscal year 
2003, but does not have a comprehensive plan for its 
development and full scale implementation.
    The Committee requests, that not later than April 1, 2008, 
GAO submit a report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations that evaluates BioSense. This report should 
include an analysis of the ability of hospitals and Federal, 
State, and local public health officials to respond to 
emergencies based on the information received from BioSense 
versus local surveillance data; comparisons of the costs and 
benefits of operating BioSense with State, local, and private 
surveillance systems; annual and long-term cost and timeline 
estimates for the development and implementation of BioSense; 
and recommended benchmarks and performance indicators that 
should be developed as part of a comprehensive plan.
    Leased aircraft.--The Committee is concerned about recent 
reports that the three leased aircraft that are available to 
CDC for public health emergency situations are rarely used. The 
fiscal year 2006 cost for maintaining access to these jets was 
approximately $8,500,000. The Committee requests that CDC 
prepare a report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations by no later than 30 days after enactment of this 
Act and then provide semiannual updates thereafter on the cost 
of the aircraft, purpose of each trip, and passengers on the 
aircraft for each trip. The report also should provide a 
justification for maintaining leases for three aircraft.

Public health research

    The Committee provides $31,000,000 for public health 
research, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and the budget request. The Committee provides these 
funds through the section 241 evaluation set-aside funds as 
provided in fiscal year 2007 and as proposed in the budget 
request.
    Through the public health research funding, CDC supports 
high-quality public health research that studies the best 
methods for making the transition from research to practice. 
Funds support research that is proposed by experienced 
investigators working with communities, health practitioners, 
and policymakers to address local priority health concerns.

Public health improvement and leadership

    The Committee provides $199,237,000 for public health 
improvement and leadership, which is $9,429,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $8,825,000 above the budget 
request. Within this total, the Committee provides $6,000,000 
for the CDC Director's discretionary fund.
    This activity supports several cross-cutting areas within 
CDC. Included is the CDC's leadership and management function, 
which funds the CDC office of the director, coordinating 
centers, and each constituent center and office. The public 
health improvement and leadership funding also supports the 
CDC's public health workforce and career development efforts, 
and the director's discretionary fund.
    Public health professionals.--The Committee is concerned 
about documented shortages in State health departments of 
applied epidemiologists and laboratory scientists--core public 
health professionals. The Committee urges CDC to provide a 
stable, dedicated source of funding for existing fellowship 
training programs designed to alleviate these shortages.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Adler Aphasia Center, Maywood, NJ for a program to              $100,000
 improve communication and other life skills for
 people with aphasia.................................
Advocate Good Shepard Hospital, Barrington, IL for                30,000
 the expansion of an ongoing pilot project to address
 the growing problem of childhood obesity among
 elementary schools in Lake County, IL...............
Alameda County Public Health Department, Office of               250,000
 AIDS Administration, Oakland, CA for an HIV/AIDS
 prevention and testing initiative...................
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX for                      200,000
 epidemiological research and educational outreach
 related to childhood cancer in cooperation with the
 Vannie E. Cook Jr. Cancer Foundation in McAllen, TX.
Bayside Community Center, San Diego, CA for its STEPS            150,000
 health education and outreach program for senior
 citizens............................................
Berean Community & Family Life Center, Brooklyn, NY              200,000
 for obesity prevention programs and community health
 and wellness education..............................
Bienestar Human Services, Inc., Los Angeles, CA to               125,000
 expand a mobile HIV rapid testing program in East
 Los Angeles.........................................
Boys and Girls Club of Delaware County, Jay, OK for              300,000
 equipment and operating expenses for programs to
 improve diet, physical activity, and emotional
 health..............................................
California State University-Fullerton, Fullerton, CA             250,000
 for programs aimed at preventing obesity and
 promoting health in children........................
Charles R. Drew Wellness Center, Columbia, SC for an             235,000
 obesity focused wellness program....................
Charter County of Wayne, Michigan, Detroit, MI for               200,000
 Infant Mortality Prevention services................
Chez Panisse Foundation, Berkeley, CA for the school             250,000
 lunch initiative to integrate lessons about
 wellness, sustainability and nutrition into the
 academic curriculum.................................
Children's Hunger Alliance, Columbus, OH for programs            200,000
 to prevent childhood obesity........................
Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH             200,000
 for the Center for Injury Research and Policy.......
County of Marin, San Rafael, CA for research and                 250,000
 analysis related to breast cancer incidence and
 mortality in the county.............................
CREATE Foundation, Tupelo, MS for childhood obesity              300,000
 prevention programs.................................
Dupage County, Wheaton, IL for a county-wide physical            150,000
 fitness assessment pilot project....................
East Carolina University, Brody School of Medicine,              200,000
 Greenville, NC for a project to study the problem of
 racial disparities in cardiovascular diseases.......
El Puente, Brooklyn, NY for an obesity, diabetes,                220,000
 STD, and HIV/AIDS prevention program for adolescents
 and their families as well as control and management
 of asthma and other environmentally connected
 diseases............................................
Friends of the Congressional Glaucoma Caucus                      75,000
 Foundation, Lake Success, NY to provide glaucoma
 screenings and follow-up in the Phoenix, AZ area....
Friends of the Congressional Glaucoma Caucus                     350,000
 Foundation, Lake Success, NY to provide glaucoma
 screenings and follow-up in the Virgin Islands......
Georgia Chapter of the American Lung Association,                350,000
 Smyrna, GA to study the relationship between
 residential floor coverings and distributive
 patterns of airborne particulates...................
Haitian American Association Against Cancer, Inc.,               240,000
 Miami, FL for cancer education, outreach, screening
 and related programs................................
Healthy Eating Lifestyle Principles, Monterey, CA for            175,000
 a program to improve nutrition by promoting the
 accessibility and consumption of fresh fruits and
 vegetables in schools...............................
Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters-               150,000
 Florida, Coral Gables, FL to create a preventative
 health care model...................................
Ingalls Development Foundation, Harvey, IL for a                 225,000
 comprehensive cancer prevention and early detection
 program, focusing on minority populations...........
International Rett Syndrome Association, Clinton, MD             150,000
 for education and awareness programs regarding Rett
 syndrome............................................
Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club, Bronx, NY for a                    300,000
 nutrition and anti-obesity demonstration program for
 6- to 12-year-old children..........................
Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY for asthma                  200,000
 education, counseling, and prevention programs......
Louisville Department of Public Health and Wellness,             100,000
 Louisville, KY for improving and providing
 preventative healthcare to men to address disease
 and obesity prevention, oral health, and stress
 management..........................................
Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN              300,000
 for research and education regarding ways of
 increasing physical activity and fitness among
 children and adolescents............................
Myositis Association, Washington, DC to develop a                 75,000
 national patient registry for individuals afflicted
 with myositis.......................................
Natividad Medical Center, Salinas, CA for a diabetes             125,000
 care management program.............................
Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV for a                     200,000
 comprehensive program to reduce cancer incidence and
 mortality rates and address cancer health
 disparities.........................................
North Shore Health Project, Gloucester, MA for                   100,000
 outreach and education on hepatitis C...............
Plymouth State University, Plymouth, NH for the                  150,000
 Partners Enabling Active Rural Living Institute to
 develop an evidence-based model for promoting and
 enabling appropriate daily physical activity in
 rural communities...................................
Providence Cancer Center, Portland, OR for the rural              75,000
 and underserved cancer outreach project.............
Pulmonary Hypertension Association, Silver Spring, MD            200,000
 for public education and outreach...................
San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San                    200,000
 Antonio, TX for further studies and public health
 outreach regarding environmental health concerns at
 and near the former Kelly Air Force Base............
SHAREing and CAREing, Astoria, NY to provide                     100,000
 culturally sensitive breast health education,
 referrals for screenings/diagnostic and support
 services for medically underserved and uninsured
 minority women......................................
Silent Spring Institute, Newton, MA for studies of               100,000
 the impact of environmental pollutants on breast
 cancer and women's health...........................
Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats,               100,000
 Atlanta, GA for programs related to bioterrorism and
 emerging biological threats.........................
St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, Wabasha, MN to                   100,000
 support a disease prevention pilot program to reduce
 the incidence of heart disease......................
St. Francis Medical Center Foundation, Lynwood, CA               100,000
 for health education and outreach...................
St. John's Regional Medical Center, Oxnard, CA for               200,000
 diabetes prevention and management programs.........
St. John's Well Child and Family Center, Los Angeles,            100,000
 CA for a patient education program to address
 obesity, diabetes, and hypertension.................
University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ            170,000
 for diabetes educational outreach programs..........
University of Findlay Center for Public Health                   300,000
 Preparedness, Findlay, OH for training programs on
 school safety and workplace violence avoidance......
University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort            300,000
 Worth, TX for the Center for Minority Health,
 Education, Research and Outreach....................
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL to create,                375,000
 implement, and evaluate programs to assist school-
 aged children in becoming physically active and
 healthy.............................................
University of Texas Pan American, Edinburg, TX for               200,000
 the South Texas Border Health Disparities Center's
 program on preventing obesity in minority
 populations.........................................
University of Texas, Brownsville, TX for studies                 250,000
 regarding the health of the Hispanic population in
 the Rio Grande Valley...............................
Virgin Islands Perinatal Inc., Christiansted, VI for             150,000
 implementation of chronic disease management and
 prevention modalities to minimize adverse outcomes
 related to diabetes and hypertension................
Voorhees College, Denmark, SC for a demonstration                135,000
 program on reversing diabetes in minority
 communities.........................................
Wayne County Department of Public Health, Detroit, MI            275,000
 for a lead poisoning assessment, prevention, and
 intervention program................................
WestCare Foundation, Las Vegas, NV, for the Batterers            500,000
 Intervention Program in Needles, CA and surrounding
 communities.........................................
Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT to develop a              300,000
 comprehensive ovarian cancer prevention and early
 detection program...................................
YBH Project, Inc., Albany, GA for nutrition, fitness,            100,000
 and education programs for middle school students
 and their families..................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Preventive health and health services block grant

    The Committee provides $109,000,000 for the preventive 
health and health services block grant, which is $10,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2007 funding level. The budget request 
does not include funding for this program. This block grant 
provides flexible funds to States by formula for a wide range 
of public and preventive health activities. The flexibility 
afforded to the States, allows them to target funds to address 
chronic diseases, such as diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, 
and stroke, to direct funds to meet challenges of outbreaks of 
infectious diseases, such as West Nile virus and influenza, 
and/or to implement prevention and control programs related to 
injury and abuse.

Buildings and facilities

    The Committee provides $10,500,000 for buildings and 
facilities, which is $123,900,000 below the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $9,500,000 below the budget request. These 
funds support efficient maintenance and operations of existing 
facilities to protect the interest and investment of the 
government so that deterioration of CDC facilities does not 
occur again.

Business services and support

    The Committee provides $344,377,000 for business services 
and support, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $24,500,000 above the budget request. Some of the 
activities that are supported through this funding are 
administrative services and programs, the human resources 
center, capital planning and investment control, financial 
management, security and emergency preparedness, and 
information technology services.
    It is the Committee's intention that funds provided in 
business services and support are sufficient to carry out CDC's 
business functions. The Committee will not support programmatic 
``tapping'' to achieve additional funding in this area and 
appreciates that CDC has made efforts to curtail this practice. 
If additional funding is required for activities within this or 
any other budget line, the Committee expects CDC to work with 
the Department of Health and Human Services to prepare 
reprogramming requests to be submitted to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations.

                     National Institutes of Health

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$29,649,887,000 for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), 
which is $750,000,000 above the fiscal year 2007 appropriation 
and $1,028,646,000 above the request.
    As described in the ``Advancing Biomedical Research'' 
initiative in the front of the report, the Committee has made 
difficult choices in order to provide a $750,000,000 increase 
for biomedical research supported by NIH. The Committee hopes 
to stop the funding rollercoaster NIH has experienced during 
the past decade and provide a substantial and sustainable 
growth path for the future.
    The funding level recommended by the Committee would 
provide 10,666 new and competing grants, an increase of 545 
over fiscal year 2007. The number of total grants would rise to 
39,003. The recommendation would also reverse the two-year 
freeze in the inflationary adjustment of grants, with an 
average two percent increase for new grants. The recommendation 
is attentive to the pipeline issue, providing funding for three 
programs to support young investigators as well as a two 
percent average increase in research training stipends. The 
Committee fully funds the Administration's request of 
$300,000,000 for transfer to the global fund for AIDS, malaria 
and tuberculosis and continues the National Children's Study 
with an appropriation of $110,900,000. The Common Fund is 
supported as a set-aside within the Office of the Director at 
the statutory minimum of $495,153,000 rather than through an 
assessment of institute and center budgets. The Committee also 
preserves the taxpayer's investment in the research labs on the 
NIH campus by increasing the buildings and facilities account 
by $40,000,000.
    The following chart displays the funding provided to each 
of the 27 appropriations that comprise the total NIH 
appropriation. The full name of each institute and center is 
included in the table along with its acronym. These acronyms 
will be used throughout the report rather than repeating the 
full name of the institute or center. Funding levels are also 
shown in the detailed table at the back of the report.

                                          NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                2008 Committee compared to--
                   Institutes/Centers                     Fiscal year 2008 -------------------------------------
                                                             Committee       Fiscal year 2007     2008 Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Cancer Institute (NCI)........................          4,870,382            +72,743            +88,268
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)......          2,965,775            +42,846            +40,362
National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research               395,753             +6,050             +6,031
 (NIDCR)...............................................
Nat. Inst. of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases             1,731,893            +26,025            +23,848
 (NIDDKD)..............................................
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke          1,559,106            +23,561            +22,087
 (NINDS)...............................................
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases            4,632,019           +264,311            +39,537
 (NIAID)...............................................
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS).          1,966,019            +30,211            +24,557
Nat. Inst. of Child Health and Human Development                 1,273,863            +19,156             +8,917
 (NICHD)...............................................
National Eye Institute (NEI)...........................            677,039             +9,923             +9,219
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences                652,303            +10,301            +14,897
 (NIEHS)...............................................
National Institute on Aging (NIA)......................          1,062,833            +15,573            +15,685
Nat. Inst. Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & Skin Diseases             516,044             +7,804             +7,962
 (NIAMS)...............................................
Nat. Inst. on Deafness & Other Communication Disorders             400,305             +6,637             +6,623
 (NIDCD)...............................................
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)..........            139,527             +2,123             +1,727
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism                 442,870             +6,611             +6,365
 (NIAAA)...............................................
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)................          1,015,559            +14,938            +15,194
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).............          1,425,531            +21,037            +20,110
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).......            493,996             +7,505             +9,560
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and                       303,318             +6,431             +2,855
 Bioengineering (NIBIB)................................
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)..........          1,171,095            +37,855            +58,597
National Center for Complementary and Alternative                  123,380             +1,804             +1,681
 Medicine (NCCAM)......................................
National Center on Minority Health and Health                      202,691             +3,247             +8,196
 Disparities (NCMHHD)..................................
John E. Fogarty International Center (FIC).............             67,599             +1,153             +1,005
National Library of Medicine (NLM).....................            325,484             +4,634            +12,922
Office of the Director (OD)............................          1,114,422            +67,521           +597,360
Buildings and Facilities...............................            121,081            +40,000            -14,919
                                                        ========================================================
    Total..............................................         29,649,887           +750,000         +1,028,646
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       National Cancer Institute

    Mission.--NCI conducts and supports basic and applied 
cancer research in early detection, diagnosis, prevention, 
treatment, and rehabilitation. NCI provides training support 
for research scientists, clinicians and educators, and 
maintains a national network of cancer centers, clinical 
cooperative groups, and community clinical oncology programs, 
along with cancer prevention and control initiatives and 
outreach programs to rapidly translate basic research findings 
into clinical practice.
    Unprecedented gains.--The Committee is pleased to note the 
important gains returned by the nation's investment in cancer 
research. These investments are proving to be important steps 
toward advances in diagnosis, treatment and prevention for many 
cancers. For example, the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid 
(caBIG) will allow investigators to manage and share clinical 
data in real time in a move toward ``digital biology''. The 
Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility initiative will scan 
the entire human genome and identify genetic changes associated 
with either increased or decreased risk for breast and prostate 
cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas, done in conjunction with 
NHGRI, will test the complex science and technology framework 
needed to systematically identify and characterize genomic 
changes associated with cancer. The repository named REMBRANDT 
developed by NCI and NINDS is a publicly available 
bionformatics knowledge base of primary brain tumor data. The 
new Clinical Proteomics Program is developing the standards 
needed to characterize patterns of protein markers in human 
serum for very early detection of cancer. The Nanotechnology 
Alliance for Cancer began harnessing nanotechnologies for 
cancer diagnostics, targeted imaging, and drug delivery.
    Cancer metastasis to bone.--A frequent complication of 
cancer is its spread to bone (bone metastasis) that occurs in 
up to 80 percent of patients with myeloma and 70 percent of 
patients with either breast or prostate cancer--causing severe 
bone pain and pathologic fractures. Only 20 percent of breast 
cancer patients and five percent of lung cancer patients 
survive more than five years after discovery of bone 
metastasis. The Committee understands that immune response 
plays a role in cancer metastasis and encourages NCI to focus 
research in the emerging area of osteoimmunology. The Committee 
encourages NCI, as well as NIAMS, NIA, and NIDDK, to support 
research to determine mechanisms to identify, block and treat 
cancer metastasis to bone. Furthermore, the Committee 
encourages NCI to expand research on osteosarcoma to improve 
survival and quality of life and to prevent metastatic 
osteosarcoma in children and teenagers who develop this cancer. 
In addition, NCI is encouraged to strengthen research on tumor 
dormancy as it relates to bone metastasis.
    Gynecologic cancers.--Today, in the United States, one 
woman will be diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer every seven 
minutes. That is almost 200 per day and 80,000 in a given year. 
Furthermore, almost 30,000 women die from a gynecologic cancer 
each year. Existing NCI funding for specialized programs of 
research excellence (SPOREs), program projects, the early 
detection network, and investigator initiated grants has 
accelerated basic, molecular-based research discoveries for 
gynecologic cancers. The Committee encourages NCI to give 
priority to gynecologic cancers under its nanotechnology plan, 
its oncology biomarker qualifications initiative, and its 
cancer genomics atlas project, jointly conducted with NHGRI. 
This will allow laboratory discoveries to be translated into 
clinical applications at the bedside causing a decrease in the 
mortality rates for women with gynecologic cancer.
    Gynecologic oncology clinical trials.--The Committee 
recognizes NCI's longstanding commitment to improving the 
health of women through gynecologic oncology clinical trials. 
These trials have led to the identification of new therapeutic 
agents and techniques for treating gynecologic cancers. This 
effort has directly produced improved outcomes for ovarian 
cancer patients as a result of changes in the way ovarian 
cancer is treated and the development of a vaccine for 
preventing the virus that causes cervical cancer. The Committee 
encourages NCI to continue its support of gynecologic oncology 
clinical trials through public-private partnerships with the 
pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries and the NCI-
sponsored cancer centers and cooperative groups.
    HPV Vaccine and cervical cancer.--The Committee encourages 
NCI to study if there are clinical and cost benefits of 
prospectively tracking pap test results and outcomes in women 
who have been vaccinated for human papillomavirus (HPV). The 
Committee encourages NCI to support research that will identify 
the most cost-effective management strategy for cervical cancer 
screening in the era of HPV vaccines and to identify the 
circumstances where pap test/HPV screening fails in vaccinated 
women.
    Liver cancer.--The Committee notes that the incidence of 
primary liver cancer continues to increase. Liver cancer is one 
of the few cancers experiencing continuing increases in 
mortality, and treatment options remain very limited. The 
Committee encourages NCI to work closely with NIDDK to develop 
a basic, clinical and translational research program designed 
to reverse these trends and enhance survivability.
    Pancreatic cancer.--The Committee recognizes that 
pancreatic cancer is the country's fourth leading cause of 
cancer death among men and women. While NCI support for 
pancreatic cancer research has increased during the past 
several years, unfunded opportunities remain. The Committee 
strongly encourages the Institute to continue to support the 
existing pancreatic cancer SPORES and to consider using 
separate pay lines for each cancer within the SPORE program.
    Lymphoma.--The incidence rates for non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 
the general population have doubled since the 1970s. The 
reasons for its increased incidence are not clear. The 
Committee recommends an enhanced commitment to research 
focusing on the possible environmental links to lymphoma. The 
Committee suggests that NCI direct funds to: (1) studies on the 
identification of environmental-genetic interactions which may 
influence the development of lymphoma; (2) studies of adequate 
scope to assure the identification of environmental risk 
factors for specific subtypes of lymphoma; (3) small studies 
designed to improve detection and quantification of 
historically difficult-to-measure environmental factors; (4) 
studies that are directed toward enhancing the understanding of 
the role of the immune system in the initiation and progression 
of lymphoma; and, (5) studies that examine the simultaneous 
presence of a wide profile of infectious agents among 
individuals with lymphoma. Lymphoma is often diagnosed in young 
adulthood and middle age, and survivors may experience 
immediate, but also late and long-term effects of the disease 
and treatment. Although there are effective treatments for 
Hodgkin lymphoma, survivors of this form of lymphoma may have a 
wide range of side effects from the disease and will require 
long-term monitoring and follow-up care to address the long-
term effects. The Committee encourages NCI to dedicate some of 
its survivorship research to problems confronted by lymphoma 
survivors.
    Lymphatic research and lymphatic diseases.--The Committee 
recommends that NCI support research on lymphedema, a chronic, 
progressive and historically neglected complication that must 
be endured by many cancer survivors. The Committee also 
encourages the Institute to support the study of 
lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic imaging, which are critical to 
a greater understanding of cancer metastasis and lymphedema.
    Ovarian cancer.--Today, in the United States, there is no 
widely available screening test for ovarian cancer. More than 
22,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year 
and 16,000 women are expected to die from it. Ovarian cancer 
has a high mortality rate, 55 percent over five years, mainly 
because there is no proven effective method for early 
detection. Research is being conducted on glycomic profiling 
which may identify unique patterns of glycosylation that may be 
more sensitive and specific than CA-125, an existing blood 
marker, in identification of early stage ovarian cancer. 
Circulating plasma proteins, another blood marker, could also 
possibly serve as biomarkers to differentiate women with 
ovarian cancer from healthy women. The Committee encourages NCI 
to make randomized, prospective studies that would lead to the 
validation and acceptance of these and other biomarkers for the 
early detection of ovarian cancer a priority.
    Clinical trial participation.--Despite efforts to improve 
participation in cancer clinical trials, only three percent of 
adult cancer patients participate in trials, and the 
participation by senior citizens is even more limited. The 
Committee strongly encourages NCI to support research to 
investigate decision-making by patients, particularly with 
respect to barriers to, and decisions on, participation in 
clinical trials. This research effort should be undertaken to 
inform strategies to enhance accrual in cancer clinical trials. 
Current low levels of accrual are often rate-limiting in the 
development of novel treatment approaches, and solving this 
problem would ultimately improve outcomes for cancer patients.
    Cancer centers.--The Committee commends NCI on the success 
of its cancer centers program. Given that minority populations 
suffer disproportionately from virtually every form of cancer, 
the Committee encourages NCI to consider supporting the 
establishment of a comprehensive center at a minority 
institution focused on research, treatment, and prevention of 
cancer in African American and other minority communities. The 
Committee is pleased with NCI's attention to this important 
matter.
    Tissue repositories.--Cancer biorepositories, because they 
centralize and standardize molecular annotation of tissues, 
have the potential to accelerate the understanding of cancer 
and the discovery and development of new biomarkers, new 
diagnostics and new therapeutic approaches. The Committee 
encourages NCI to continue to support efforts to centralize the 
collection and distribution of tissue and pursue programs to 
make them available to researchers.
    Neuroblastoma.--The Committee notes with concern the 
incidence of neuroblastoma, an aggressive pediatric cancer with 
poor survival rates among Stage III and Stage IV patients. The 
Committee encourages NCI to accelerate support for 
neuroblastoma research with a focus on clinical trials for 
high-risk patients. The Committee requests a comprehensive 
report on NCI's research in this area, including planned 
clinical and translational research initiatives, as part of 
NCI's fiscal year 2009 budget justification.
    Radioisotope research.--The Committee encourages NCI to 
continue and enhance its support for radioisotope-targeted 
therapy and research. This research ultimately benefits cancer 
patients worldwide by developing new, productive avenues for 
the use of nuclear stockpile materials previously earmarked for 
weapons development.

               National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    Mission.--NHLBI provides leadership for a national research 
program in diseases of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, and 
blood, in transfusion medicine, and in sleep disorders through 
support of basic, clinical, and population-based and health 
education research.
    Cardiovascular diseases.--The Committee commends the 
Institute for its leadership in undertaking an inclusive 
strategic planning process, which included a national 
conference on heart disease. The Committee looks forward to 
receiving the heart disease action plan from the meeting as 
well as updates on progress made to implement its goals. The 
Committee continues to regard research on heart disease, stroke 
and other cardiovascular diseases as a top health priority. The 
Committee strongly believes that as the baby boomers age, more 
research on cardiovascular diseases is critically needed to 
better prevent, diagnose, treat, and cure cardiovascular 
diseases.
    Congenital heart disease.--The Committee recognizes that 
congenital heart disease is a chronic disease affecting 
approximately 1.8 million Americans. It commends NHLBI for 
convening a working group to address this issue, and supports 
its recommendation that action be taken to prevent needless 
disability and premature mortality in this rapidly-growing 
population. The Committee urges NHLBI to work with patient 
associations and other appropriate public health organizations 
to develop education and research initiatives targeted to the 
life-long needs of congenital heart disease survivors.
    Cardiovascular disease and women.--The Committee remains 
concerned that as the population ages women will continue to be 
affected by cardiovascular disease at high rates. The Committee 
encourages the Institute to place a high priority on heart 
disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases in women by 
intensifying its investment in basic, clinical, translational, 
and trans-institute cardiovascular disease research. Despite 
new therapies, the Committee continues to believe that research 
is needed to better understand the causes of these diseases in 
women, develop more effective treatments and cures, and prevent 
cardiovascular diseases, which remain a major cause of 
permanent disability and the number one killer of women.
    Gender differences in health and disease are well 
established. For example, while cardiovascular disease is the 
number one killer of both women and men, women die of 
cardiovascular disease an average of ten to twenty years later 
than men. Numerous primary and secondary randomized controlled 
prevention trials have been conducted in men showing the 
benefit of lowering total and LDL cholesterol. Women have been 
included in many of these studies but not in sufficient numbers 
to permit a meaningful analysis of the benefits for women 
alone. As a result, women are currently treated according to 
the data from studies where there is a preponderance of men--
namely, the treatment is designed to lower total and LDL 
cholesterol. This is done on the assumption that this treatment 
regime is the best approach to primary prevention in women. 
However, there are some significant indications that high HDL-
cholesterol and low triglycerides are more important for 
women's cardiovascular health. The Women's Health Initiative 
did not substantiate the expectations from observational 
studies that postmenopausal hormone therapy reduces the risk of 
coronary heart disease in spite of lowering total cholesterol 
and LDL-cholesterol. New research is needed to answer the 
question of the optimal lipid profile in primary prevention of 
cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in women and to define 
gender differences. The Committee encourages NHLBI to undertake 
this type of research.
    Heart disease and diabetes.--Heart disease is the leading 
cause of death in diabetic patients, and individuals with type 
1 diabetes have a 10-fold increased risk of heart disease 
compared to others of the same age. Research has shown that 
heart disease begins as early as childhood or adolescence in 
type 1 diabetes patients. NHLBI is encouraged to promote 
research to identify early biomarkers of cardiovascular disease 
in young diabetic patients to learn who might benefit from 
therapeutic agents that are currently used in adults. Delaying 
heart disease by even a few years could make a significant 
difference in the lives and health of young diabetic patients.
    Pulmonary hypertension (PH).--The Committee commends NHLBI 
for its leadership in advancing research on PH, a rare, 
progressive, and fatal disease that predominantly affects 
women. The Committee continues to view research on pulmonary 
hypertension as a high priority. It encourages the Institute to 
consider expanding its specialized centers of clinically 
oriented research program in this area and to establish a PH 
research network to facilitate collaboration and data sharing 
among leading PH investigators.
    Thalassemia.--The Committee remains strongly supportive of 
the focused research effort that is being undertaken by the 
thalassemia clinical research network, which is comprised of 
the leading research institutions in the field of thalassemia, 
or Cooley's anemia. In addition, the Committee commends NHLBI 
for its commitment to pursue gene therapy and urges the 
Institute to move aggressively in pursuing a research agenda 
that will lead to a cure.
    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).--The Committee remains very 
interested in efforts to find a cure for LAM, a progressive and 
often fatal lung disease of women with no effective treatment. 
The Committee supports both intramural and extramural means of 
expanding research on LAM and urges NHLBI to use all available 
mechanisms as appropriate, including support of state-of-the-
science symposia, request for applications, and facilitating 
access to human tissues, to stimulate a broad range of clinical 
and basic LAM research. The Committee understands that recent 
scientific findings have presented new treatment approaches for 
clinical testing, and that experimental trials with the drug 
sirolimus have begun. The Committee commends NHLBI for 
supporting the multicenter international 
lymphangioleiomyomatosis efficacy of sirolimus trial (MILES) 
trial, and further encourages the support of other phase I and 
phase II clinical treatment trials to capitalize on the LAM 
patient population that NHLBI has assembled who do not qualify 
for the MILES trial. The Committee is also aware of the 
potential benefit of establishing LAM centers, and suggests 
NHLBI consider supporting these activities.
    Sleep disorders.--The Committee encourages the National 
Center on Sleep Disorders Research to partner with CDC to 
implement a sleep education and public awareness initiative 
using the roundtable model that has been successful for NIH 
institutes and public health service agencies.
    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.--The Committee is aware 
that Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (or Alpha-1) is the major 
known genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary 
disease (COPD), the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. 
and the only one of the four leading causes of death with a 
rising mortality over the past decade. As many as three percent 
of individuals with COPD have undetected Alpha-1. In addition, 
individuals with Alpha-1 can exhibit symptoms of advanced 
emphysema, even in the absence of tobacco use. Alpha-1 is an 
indication for lung transplantation. Alpha-1 is also a factor 
in the development of liver disease in children and adults. The 
Committee commends NHLBI for its plans to focus additional 
research efforts in the area of COPD. As there is a growing 
appreciation of the role of genetic influences on the 
development of COPD and as Alpha-1 is the major identified 
genetic risk factor in this condition, the additional focus on 
research leading to a better understanding of Alpha-1, 
including improved management and therapeutic approaches, is 
important. The Committee further recommends cooperation between 
NHLBI, NIDDK, NHGRI, and other institutes to enhance the NIH 
research portfolio, and to provide appropriate information to 
health professionals. The Committee suggests achieving these 
goals through use of the NHLBI rare lung diseases consortium 
and the COPD clinical research network.
    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).--Mycobacteria are 
environmental organisms found in both water and soil that can 
cause significant respiratory damage. The Committee is aware of 
the increasing incidence of NTM pulmonary infections in women, 
particularly involving rapidly growing mycobacteria. The 
Committee commends NHLBI for its planning meetings regarding 
NTM; and recommends further collaboration with NIAID, the 
advocacy community, and other Federal agencies to provide a 
better understanding of NTM, enhance diagnostic and treatment 
options, and promote education of health care providers.
    Bleeding and clotting disorders.--The Committee commends 
NHLBI for its commitment to research in bleeding and clotting 
disorders. The Committee encourages the Institute to continue 
these efforts focusing on improved and novel therapies for 
these disorders and maintaining its collaborative relationship 
with the scientific and medical research community and 
voluntary organizations.
    Marfan syndrome.--The Committee commends NHLBI for its 
strong leadership on Marfan syndrome research, particularly its 
sponsorship of a landmark pediatric heart network clinical 
trial focused on the drug losartan. The Committee encourages 
NHLBI to continue to partner with the Marfan syndrome community 
on this research, and explore ways to support promising 
ancillary studies to the clinical trial. The Committee also 
applauds the Institute for establishing a working group on 
Marfan syndrome and looks forward to reviewing the group's 
recommendations for future research.
    Bone marrow failure diseases.--The Committee applauds NHLBI 
for funding research that has led to a greater understanding of 
bone marrow failure diseases. The Committee encourages NHLBI to 
collaborate with NCI to fund new research efforts that seek new 
treatments and cures for aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic 
syndromes (MDS), and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH).
    Lymphatic research and lymphatic diseases.--The Committee 
recognizes the leadership role NHLBI has played in advancing 
lymphatic research within its Institute and strongly encourages 
continuation of these efforts in concert with NSE /ORWH AND 
OTHER RELEVANT/CI, NIAID, NIDDK, NIAMS, and other relevant ICs. 
The Committee urges NHLBI's lung division to engage in 
lymphatic research initiatives, with particular attention to 
congenital lymphatic malformation-induced pulmonary 
dysfunction.

         National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

    Mission.--The mission of NIDCR is to improve the Nation's 
oral, dental and craniofacial health through research, research 
training, and the dissemination of health information. NIDCR 
accomplishes its mission by performing and supporting basic and 
clinical research; conducting and funding research training and 
career development programs to ensure an adequate number of 
talented, well-prepared, and diverse investigators; 
coordinating and assisting relevant research and research-
related activities among all sectors of the research community; 
and promoting the timely transfer of knowledge gained from 
research and its implications for health to the public, health 
professionals, researchers, and policy-makers.
    Dental disease.--Dental disease is the most common chronic 
childhood illness and one of the most prevalent unmet needs in 
poor children. Research indicates that dental disease has a 
serious impact on learning and overall health of children, and 
recent data indicates an increase in early childhood cases. The 
Committee commends NIDCR for its current efforts in this area 
and encourages NIDCR to support additional research to 
determine the most effective methods for preventing, 
controlling, and treating early childhood carries.

    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    Mission.--NIDDK supports research in three major disease 
categories: diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolic diseases; 
digestive diseases and nutrition; and kidney, urologic, and 
hematologic diseases. NIDDK supports a coordinated program of 
fundamental and clinical research and demonstration projects 
relating to the causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of 
diseases within these categories. The Institute also supports 
efforts to transfer the knowledge gained from its research 
program to health professionals, patients, and the general 
public.
    Cooley's anemia.--The Committee continues to support the 
high quality research being conducted by NIDDK on such issues 
as iron chelation and non-invasive iron measurement. The 
development of a less burdensome means of iron chelation is 
urgently needed. In addition, the Committee encourages NIDDK to 
continue to work closely with NIBIB to develop and perfect non-
invasive means of measuring iron that accumulates in the heart 
and liver.
    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD).--The Committee is pleased 
that NIH-supported PKD research has rapidly led to the 
development of multiple human clinical trials and 
interdisciplinary studies focused on slowing PKD disease 
progression or even reversing the progression of PKD. Given the 
momentum in PKD research, the Committee encourages NIDDK to 
promote additional PKD clinical trials and multidisciplinary 
research, and expand knowledge-based studies of pathophysiology 
and molecular biology. The Committee encourages NIDDK to 
conduct a comprehensive review of its structure to ensure that 
funding is directed to areas of research (such as PKD) that 
show the best return on investment in terms of ameliorating 
and/or curing diseases.
    Management of pediatric kidney disease.--The complexity and 
variety of causes unique to childhood kidney diseases require 
multiple detailed treatment regimens for chronic kidney 
disease, dialysis and kidney transplantation. When these life-
saving medication and treatment plans are not followed, 
patients experience life-threatening complications and costly 
hospitalizations. The Committee urges NIDDK to conduct trans-
institute trials to study methods to improve adherence with 
treatment regimens for children and adolescents throughout the 
spectrum of chronic kidney disease, particularly in the areas 
of dialysis and post-kidney transplantation. Additionally, the 
Committee urges NIDDK to support collaborating networks of 
health care providers to collect data and plan trials to 
improve therapy for the spectrum childhood kidney diseases and 
the transition of children with kidney disease into adulthood.
    Glomerular disease.--The Committee continues to be pleased 
with the work of NIDDK in the area of glomerular disease 
research, particularly as it relates to focal segmental 
glomerulosclerosis. The Committee commends NIDDK for conducting 
a glomerular disease workshop and encourages the Institute to 
support research related to the findings of the workshop. The 
Committee is also aware of the potential for progress in the 
understanding of glomerular diseases through the establishment 
of a patient registry.
    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS).--The Committee is gratified by 
NIDDK's continuing commitment to support research on MPS 
disorders and appreciates NIDDK's involvement and collaboration 
with NINDS and the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) on a recent 
scientific conference to identify and address impediments to 
effective therapies and to develop a strategy to determine the 
minimum standard protocol for clinical application of effective 
therapies for MPS. The Committee recognizes the efforts of 
NIDDK to address glycosaminoglycans accumulation issues and its 
effects on bones and joints; additionally the Committee is 
pleased with the continuing focus on addressing the challenges 
of the blood-brain barrier. The Committee recognizes the 
implementation of NIDDK's molecular therapy core centers 
(MTTCs) to support research on gene and other molecular therapy 
research for a variety of genetic diseases; two of the four 
centers study MPS. The objective of bringing together 
investigators from relevant disciplines to enhance and extend 
the effectiveness of their research and cultivate collaboration 
between scientists is a positive development. MTCCs that 
include new technologies, such as homologous recombination and 
RNA-interference, gene therapy and novel approaches to human 
therapies, are supported by the Committee.
    Bowel incontinence.--This condition affects people of all 
ages and is associated with a wide variety of causes. The 
Committee is pleased that NIDDK is collaborating with NICHD on 
an incontinence state-of-the-science conference and encourages 
the Institute to prioritize implementation of this conference.
    Irritable bowel syndrome.--The Committee is pleased that 
NIDDK is formulating an action plan for digestive diseases 
through the National Commission on Digestive Diseases and that 
irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) will be included.
    Inflammatory bowel disease.--The Committee has been 
encouraged in recent years by discoveries related to Crohn's 
disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as 
inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These extremely complex 
disorders represent a major cause of morbidity from intestinal 
illness. The Committee commends NIDDK for its strong leadership 
in this area and continues to encourage the Institute to 
strengthen research focused on: (1) the cellular, molecular and 
genetic structure of IBD, (2) identification of the genes that 
determine susceptibility or resistance to IBD in various 
patient subgroups, and (3) translation of basic research 
findings into patient clinical trials as outlined in the 
research agenda developed by the scientific community entitled, 
``Challenges in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.''
    Drug-induced liver injury.--The Committee is aware of the 
good work of the five centers which comprise the drug-induced 
liver injury network (DILIN). This network represents an 
important database to record, examine, and research the liver 
toxicity of various pharmaceutical and over the counter 
products. In view of the increasing incidence of liver injury 
from prescription and nonprescription drugs, the Committee 
encourages NIDDK to strengthen the DILIN network and requests a 
review of progress made in the use of the NILIN network data in 
developing findings or recommendations to reverse the incidence 
of liver injury.
    Hepatitis B.--The Committee is pleased with the NIH 
commitment to conduct a consensus conference in 2008 on best 
treatment practices for individuals with hepatitis B, 
especially with the growing number of treatment options. As 
most people who are infected with hepatitis B are unaware of 
their infection, the Committee encourages NIDDK to continue to 
collaborate with CDC in the development of a public health 
strategy to expand the screening of individuals at risk for 
chronic hepatitis B.
    Hepatitis C.--The Committee notes that several new 
antiviral agents are in development against hepatitis C. 
However the problem of antiviral drug resistance has emerged as 
a stumbling block. The Committee encourages implementation of 
clinical studies aimed at overcoming antiviral drug resistance, 
possibly by utilizing novel agents in combination.
    Obesity-related liver disease.--The Committee notes that 
there is an emerging obesity-related chronic liver disease, 
which may affect as many as one in four adults and a 
significant number of obese children. The Committee encourages 
NIDDK to continue to support fatty liver disease clinical 
trials that includes both adult and pediatric populations.
    Beta cell research.--The Committee commends NIDDK for its 
support of the beta cell biology consortium (BCBC) which has 
developed excellent resources, research reagents, and databases 
that add value to the entire beta cell biology research 
community. NIDDK is encouraged to support research focused on 
translating the fundamental discoveries made by the BCBC into 
clinical applications that may directly benefit type 1 diabetes 
patients.
    Digestive diseases.--Diseases of the digestive system may 
affect up to one-half of all Americans at some time in their 
lives. Serious disorders such as colorectal cancer, 
inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, 
hemochromatosis, celiac disease, and hepatitis take a 
tremendous toll in terms of human suffering, mortality, and 
economic burden. The Committee commends NIDDK on the success of 
its digestive disease centers program in addressing a wide 
range of disorders that result in tremendous human suffering 
and economic cost. The Committee encourages NIDDK to strengthen 
this important program with an increased emphasis on irritable 
bowel syndrome.
    Acute liver failure.--The Committee is concerned that over 
one-third of acute liver failure cases, resulting from over the 
counter drug interactions and other causes, are fatal due 
largely to the continuing shortage of livers available for 
transplantation. The Committee is aware that there is no 
effective and approved medical procedure such as dialysis, 
cellular transplants, or other techniques to maintain liver 
function after acute failure for a period of time until a liver 
becomes available for transplantation or the liver repairs 
itself naturally. The Committee encourages research in this 
area, consistent with the liver disease research action plan, 
to reduce the mortality rate for those who suffer from acute 
liver failure.
    Glucose monitoring.--Recent advances in continuous glucose 
monitoring technology have the potential to revolutionize the 
way diabetes is managed on a daily basis, but more research is 
needed to validate this technology in a variety of patient 
populations under ``real world'' conditions. Moreover, 
biomedical research progress is enabling increasing numbers of 
type 1 diabetes patients to live with this disease for more 
than fifty years. The NIDDK is urged to support clinical 
research on the potential benefits of continuous glucose 
monitoring in type 1 diabetes patients over the age of 65 to 
assess the potential of this technology to produce better 
health outcomes in these individuals and to obtain evidence to 
support healthcare coverage for continuous monitoring devices 
in elderly diabetic patients.
    Prostatitis.--The Committee supports the efforts of the 
NIDDK chronic prostatitis collaborative research network 
(CPCRN) to find the cause and a cure for prostatitis. The past 
ten years of research by the CPCRN have produced important 
progress. The Committee encourages NIDDK to maintain the 
momentum of this research to prevent the loss of previous work, 
which would have to be duplicated at a later date if this 
silent epidemic is to be controlled.
    Hemophilia and hepatitis C.--The Committee understands that 
hepatitis C continues to have a devastating impact on the 
hemophilia population, with as many as 75 percent of all 
persons with hemophilia having contracted HCV and many of these 
individuals co-infected with HIV. The Committee encourages 
NIDDK to pursue research initiatives on co-infection and the 
progression of liver disease in this population.
    Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome IC/PBS.--The 
Committee is concerned about the lack of clarity surrounding 
the definition of IC and suggests that NIDDK host a meeting of 
international IC experts that specifically addresses these 
issues to update its research criteria and clarify its 
investigative questions on IC.
    The Committee encourages NIDDK to support research in areas 
that examine predisposition/risk factors, underlying cellular 
and molecular pathology of IC/PBS and the association/cross-
sensitization of IC/PBS with other disorders/diseases. The 
Committee also suggests that NIDDK fund translational research 
in IC/PBS that would include pilot therapy testing and early 
intervention of lifestyle/behavioral changes to prevent/lessen 
symptoms. The Committee encourages NIDDK to take an active role 
in ongoing studies of the epidemiology of IC in order to 
address design issues and to ensure the consultation of outside 
experts.
    Cellular therapies.--The Committee is encouraged by recent 
clinical trial results, in which 14 patients recently diagnosed 
with type 1 diabetes remained insulin-free for up to 34 months, 
post treatment with an immunosuppressive regimen followed by 
the infusion of autologous hematopoietic stem cells. Given 
these positive results, the Committee recommends NIH continue 
to support clinical trials in the U.S. using cellular therapies 
to treat type 1 diabetes, including therapies such as the 
lymphoablative hematopoietic stem cell treatment used in this 
trial as well as alternative therapies using cell sources such 
as dendritic cells, T-regulatory cells, or umbilical cord blood 
cells.

        National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

    Mission.--NINDS supports and conducts basic and clinical 
neurological research and research training to increase 
understanding of the brain and improve the prevention and 
treatment of neurological and neuromuscular disorders. The 
NINDS mission encompasses over 600 disorders, including stroke, 
head and spinal cord injury, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and 
neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.
    Stroke.--The Committee commends the Institute for its 
leadership in initiating a strategic planning process for 
stroke research. Stroke is this nation's third leading cause of 
death and the Committee regards stroke research as a top health 
priority. The Committee encourages the Institute to enhance its 
investment in basic, clinical, translational, and trans-
institute stroke research using all available mechanisms. As 
the baby boomers age, additional stroke research is critically 
needed to identify innovative methods to better diagnose, 
treat, rehabilitate, and prevent stroke.
    The Committee is encouraged that the Institute convened 
experts in the field of stroke to conduct a midpoint review of 
the ten-year plan outlined in the stroke progress review group 
(SPRG) report. The Committee supports the full and timely 
implementation of the SPRG report and expects an update on 
implementation of the report in hearings on the fiscal year 
2009 budget request.
    Duchenne translational conference.--The Committee is aware 
that NIH will be convening a conference focused on 
translational research opportunities for Duchenne and Becker 
Muscular Dystrophy (DBMD) this June. The Committee applauds NIH 
for taking this concrete step forward and requests that a 
comprehensive report summarizing the conference's findings, 
identifying the most promising opportunities for a DBMD 
translational research initiative and establishing clear next 
steps to establish this initiative, be published within five 
months of the conclusion of the conference. The Committee 
requests the Muscular Dystrophy Coordinating Committee (MDCC) 
develop a clear action plan that includes, among all the 
identified goals, tracking of NIH funded grants against the 
identified scientific opportunities for DBMD translational 
research, and mapping areas of investment and areas of unmet 
opportunity, by February 1, 2008.
    Dystonia.--The Committee continues to support research 
regarding the neurological movement disorder dystonia. The 
Committee is pleased with progress made in broadening the 
dystonia research portfolio resulting from the joint dystonia 
research program announcement and understands that eleven new 
grants have been funded as a result of this initiative. The 
Committee commends NINDS on its sponsorship of the June 2006 
scientific workshop on dystonia and looks forward to 
initiatives based on this activity.
    The Committee is very pleased with progress demonstrated by 
the NIH intramural research program in the treatment and 
understanding of dystonia. NIH intramural researchers have 
successfully utilized injections of botox to treat many 
patients who otherwise would be severely debilitated by 
dystonia. The Committee urges continued work in this important 
area of study and treatment.
    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT).--CMT is one of the most common 
inherited neurological disorders. It is characterized by a 
slowly progressive degeneration of the peripheral muscles in 
the foot, lower leg, hand, and forearm. In severe forms it 
debilitates children so that they require wheelchairs and may 
even result in premature death. The Committee recognizes the 
NINDS workshop on peripheral neuropathies held in the fall of 
2006 that focused on developing research opportunities to 
address CMT. The workshop concluded that there were a number of 
specific research directions that were particularly relevant 
including (1) the development of high throughput screening to 
identify candidate treatments that may be currently available 
for patients, (2) research into novel mechanisms to repair 
genetic abnormalities in patients with CMT, (3) research into 
interactions between neurons and glial cells that are disrupted 
and cause disability in many CMT patients, and (4) research 
into the biological role of inflammatory cells that may 
exacerbate disability in CMT patients. The Committee encourages 
NINDS to capitalize on these recommendations through mechanisms 
such as a relevant program announcement or request for 
applications.
    Down syndrome.--The Committee notes the recent publication 
of a number of breakthrough studies concerning the structure 
and function of synapses in cognitive circuits in mouse models 
of Down syndrome. These findings suggest that important 
advances are possible that could enhance cognitive function in 
both children and adults with this disorder. The Committee 
notes that these advances were suggested by the Down syndrome 
workshop sponsored by NINDS, the goal of which was to address 
research priorities for optimizing the structure and function 
in neuronal circuits important for cognition. The Committee 
commends NINDS for its leadership in organizing the workshop 
and encourages it to build upon the important findings from the 
meeting. In particular, the Committee encourages NINDS to 
identify opportunities for investigating the genetic and 
cellular basis for abnormalities in the structure and function 
of cognitive circuits in both the developing and mature nervous 
systems of people with Down syndrome. NINDS is also encouraged 
to work with NIA to develop strategies to investigate the 
biology of age-related disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease 
and Parkinson's disease, in people with Down syndrome.
    Hydrocephalus.--Hydrocephalus is a serious neurological 
condition, characterized by the abnormal buildup of 
cerebrospinal fluids in the ventricles of the brain. It is a 
condition, not a disease, which affects an estimated one 
million Americans. It can be congenital, or acquired for no 
known cause or secondary to many conditions, illnesses, or 
injuries. Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is an acquired 
condition that generally affects people over the age of 50 and 
often goes undetected or misdiagnosed for many years as 
dementia, Alzheimer's disease, or Parkinson's disease. Some 
estimates suggest that over 375,000 older Americans have NPH. 
There is no known cure for hydrocephalus. The standard 
treatment was developed in 1952, and carries multiple risks 
including shunt failure, infection and over-drainage. The 
Committee commends NINDS for taking lead sponsorship of the 
2005 workshop to set national research priorities for 
hydrocephalus. The Committee encourages the institute to 
significantly strengthen funding for hydrocephalus research 
along with actively soliciting grant applications based on the 
findings from the workshop. The Committee also encourages NINDS 
to seek opportunities to collaborate with other institutes and 
offices at NIH, including NIA, NICHD, NEI, NIBIB and ORD, to 
support research collaboratively in epidemiology, 
pathophysiology, disease burden and improved treatment for 
hydrocephalus.
    Mucolipidosis Type IV (ML4).--Now that NIMH has created and 
can make available to researchers a strain of mice that 
replicates the genetic mutation which causes ML4 in humans, the 
Committee encourages NINDS to sponsor targeted research to 
develop therapies which might alleviate some of the effects of 
ML4 and similar genetic disorders, or even lead to their cure.
    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).--The Committee commends 
NINDS for the advancement of the SMA therapeutics development 
program and encourages NINDS to continue to commit the full 
range of resources to identifying and completing preclinical 
research and development (R&D) of SMA drug candidates. The 
Committee urges NINDS to plan clinical trials and 
infrastructure including site support, patient registries, 
biomarker development and natural history studies.
    Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS).--OMS is a rare, auto-
immune, disorder that targets the brain. In childhood, it is 
associated with neuroblastoma of the chest, abdomen, or pelvis. 
Besides the hallmark features of involuntary eye movements, 
muscle jerks, and gait disorder, the children have rages, 
inability to sleep, and may become mute and unable to sit or 
stand. Permanent problems in motor control, language 
development, behavior and cognition, even mental retardation, 
are common. The available treatment options for OMS are 
extremely limited. The Committee encourages the Institute to 
accelerate research efforts to identify OMS susceptibility 
genes and biomarkers, and to develop innovative 
immunotherapeutic strategies.
    Torval cysts.--The Committee encourages NINDS to collect 
and analyze data on torval cysts, their causes, their 
diagnosis, and their treatment.
    Vulvodynia.--NIH-supported research indicates that millions 
of women suffer from chronic pelvic and genitourinary pain 
conditions such as vulvodynia. The Committee encourages NINDS, 
in coordination with the NICHD, Office of Research on Women's 
Health (ORWH), the NIH pain consortium and other institutes, to 
strengthen its support of research in this area, with a focus 
on etiology and multi-center therapeutic trials. The Committee 
also encourages NINDS to work with ORWH and other relevant 
institutes and government agencies, as well as patients and 
professional organizations, to implement an education outreach 
campaign on vulvodynia.
    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS).--The Committee applauds NINDS 
for its collaboration efforts with NIDDK, ORD and MPS patient 
advocates by taking the leading role in a landmark MPS 
scientific conference, whose objective was to identify and 
address impediments to effective therapies.
    Traumatic brain injury (TBI).--The Committee is pleased 
with the work being done at NINDS on TBI translational basic 
science research and rehabilitation and encourages the 
Institute to continue such work, specifically bench science 
research into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of TBI and 
into neuroprotection/regeneration and repair of the injured 
brain.
    Dandy-Walker and hydrocephalus research.--The Committee 
encourages NINDS to establish a coordinating committee for 
Dandy-Walker and hydrocephalus research. This coordinating 
committee is encouraged to report its findings to the public on 
the progress in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, disease 
burden, treatment improvements, diagnoses and awareness for 
Dandy-Walker and hydrocephalus.
    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT).--HHT is a 
multi-system vascular genetic disorder that affects 75,000 
Americans, producing arterioveneous malformations in the brain 
and lung. The Committee recognizes that while HHT is largely 
preventable with proper intervention, twenty percent of 
children and adults with HHT die or become disabled due to lack 
of recognition by the medical community. The Committee 
encourages NINDS to support research that would improve the 
quality of life for people living with HHT.
    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).--TSC is a genetic 
disorder that triggers uncontrollable tumor growth in multiple 
organs of the body, including the brain, heart, kidneys, lungs, 
liver, eyes, or skin. The Committee applauds the leadership 
undertaken at NINDS to coordinate research through the trans-
NIH tuberous sclerosis coordinating committee. The Committee 
recommends that the scope of the coordinating committee be 
broadened to include planning of international conferences and 
annual targeted workshops on specific areas of TSC research as 
identified by the coordinating committee and the TSC research 
community. The Committee also suggests that NINDS human 
genetics resource center develop a TSC DNA Repository that 
would serve as a research resource for the TSC research 
community. Finally, the Committee encourages NINDS to stimulate 
and support research on the role of early onset seizures in TSC 
and subsequent cognitive development.
    Epilepsy.--Epilepsy remains a major, unsolved public health 
problem affecting the lives of millions of Americans and their 
families. The Committee seeks intensified efforts by the 
Institute to produce breakthroughs in the prevention, 
treatment, and eventual cure of epilepsy. The Committee 
applauds NINDS for hosting the second ``Curing Epilepsy 2007'' 
Conference in March 2007 and encourages NINDS to issue a report 
and develop plans and goals based on the latest research 
developments--as highlighted at the conference. Additionally, 
the Committee recognizes that trials and longitudinal studies 
are needed to test findings and further develop exciting 
research directions in epilepsy.

         National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

    Mission.--NIAID supports and conducts basic and clinical 
research and research training programs in infectious diseases 
caused by, or associated with, disorders of the immune system. 
NIAID supported research includes research on AIDS, asthma and 
allergies, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, 
tropical diseases, and emerging microbes. The goals of NIAID 
research are to understand disease pathogenesis better, to 
improve disease diagnosis, to develop new and improved drugs to 
treat diseases, and to develop new and improved vaccines to 
prevent disease, many of which significantly affect public 
health.
    The Committee includes bill language requested by the 
Administration allowing NIH to transfer the funds appropriated 
for the construction of extramural biodefense research 
facilities to accounts that would remain available until 
expended. This would permit the grantees additional time to 
complete the construction of these complex projects and comply 
with the requirements of the National Environmental Protection 
Act.
    Antiviral drug resistance.--The committee recognizes that 
several new drugs to treat hepatitis B have become available 
recently and several more are being developed, both against 
hepatitis B and hepatitis C. One of the major challenges in 
implementing these therapies is the development of antiviral 
drug resistance. The Committee encourages the development of 
standardized terminology to describe this resistance and 
studies of the mechanism of resistance and methods to overcome 
resistance.
    Asthma.--The Committee is pleased with NIAID's leadership 
regarding asthma research and management. The Committee 
encourages NIAID to continue to improve its focus and effort on 
asthma management, especially as it relates to children. The 
Committee also encourages NIAID to collaborate more actively 
with voluntary health organizations to support asthma 
prevention, treatment, and research activities.
    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB).--The Committee 
understands that NIAID is working on a response plan to drug 
resistant tuberculosis, including extremely drug resistant TB 
(XDR-TB), and applauds these efforts. The Committee encourages 
the appropriate allocation of resources to effectively address 
this global health emergency.
    Liver transplantation.--The Committee applauds the 
significant progress in developing successful techniques for 
liver transplantation, but notes that the next medical frontier 
is to focus on improving the long-term quality of life of 
individuals who receive liver transplants. The Committee 
encourages additional research focused on these long-term 
quality of life issues, as well as research to improve patient 
and graft survival, pre-transplant graft evaluation and 
preservation, with a particular focus on research to reduce and 
eventually eliminate a transplant recipient's dependence on 
immunosuppressive drugs.
    Malaria vaccine.--The Committee commends NIAID for its 
malaria research and, specifically, its effort to create a 
malaria vaccine. The Committee encourages NIAID to target 
resources to support malaria vaccine development, drug 
development, diagnostics, vector control, infrastructure and 
research capability, and to strengthen components of the 
implementation plan for global research on malaria. The 
Committee encourages NIAID to strengthen its efforts related to 
developing improved diagnostic tools which will help in the 
early identification of malaria and support the provision of 
rapid treatment. The Committee is concerned that drug-resistant 
malaria increasingly is being reported around the world, making 
the development of new drugs to treat malaria essential. Of 
further concern is that reports of insecticide-resistant 
mosquitoes are on the rise. To that end, the Committee 
encourages NIAID to undertake additional research on the basic 
biology and ecology of mosquitoes, as well as work in genomics 
to develop new insecticides or render mosquitoes incapable of 
transmitting malaria.
    Antibiotic resistance.--The Committee is concerned about 
the alarming rates of antibiotic resistance and the related 
increase in morbidity, mortality and health care costs. Little 
research has been devoted to defining optimal dosing regimens, 
particularly in defining the minimal duration of therapy 
necessary to cure many types of infections. The Committee 
recognizes that studies of this type require a long-term 
commitment and are not likely to be funded by pharmaceutical 
manufacturers since the products are already approved by the 
FDA. The consensus of many experts is that infections may be 
treated for longer periods of time than are necessary, 
needlessly increasing the antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, 
the Committee encourages NIAID to support randomized controlled 
trials to define the necessary length of therapy.
    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PI).--NIAID is the lead 
agency for research into bone marrow transplantation (BMT), 
which can cure some primary immunodeficiencies. The Institute 
has made significant progress in reducing graft versus host 
disease (GVHD) and improving therapies when GVHD develops. With 
newborn screening of certain PI diseases being piloted, the 
Committee urges the Institute to redouble its efforts to ensure 
that identified patients have the best possible chance for 
survival.
    Clinical islet transplantation.--The Committee acknowledges 
the productive collaboration of the NIDDK and NIAID in 
overseeing the Clinical Islet Transplantation Consortium (CIT). 
The development of seven clinical trial protocols of islet 
transplantation marks a significant step toward validating this 
procedure as a viable treatment for type 1 diabetes patients 
suffering from extremely ``brittle'' or difficult-to-control 
blood sugar levels. NIDDK and NIAID are urged to take steps to 
ensure the efficient launch of these trials and to expedite 
patient recruitment and enrollment.
    Anaphylaxis.--The issue of food allergies is an area of 
particular concern to this Committee. As many as 30,000 
individuals, many of whom are children, require emergency room 
admission for food allergies every year, and several hundred 
die. The Committee supports intensive NIAID research in 
anaphylaxis and food allergy research to develop a cure for 
anaphylaxis, or severe allergic reactions to food or 
medications.

             National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Mission.--NIGMS supports research and research training in 
the basic biomedical sciences. Institute grantees, working in 
such fields as cell biology, biophysics, genetics, 
developmental biology, pharmacology, physiology, biological 
chemistry, bioinformatics, and computational biology study 
normal biological processes to better understand what goes 
wrong when disease occurs. In this way, NIGMS supports the new 
knowledge, theories, and technologies that can then be applied 
to the disease-targeted studies supported by other NIH 
components. NIGMS-supported basic research advances also find 
applications in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical 
industries. The Institute's training programs help provide the 
scientists needed by industry and academia. NIGMS also has 
programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce.
    Training programs.--The Committee continues to be pleased 
with the quality of NIGMS's training programs, particularly 
those that have a special focus on increasing the number of 
minority scientists such as the Minority Access to Research 
Careers (MARC) and Minority Biomedical Research Support (MBRS) 
programs. The Committee encourages NIGMS to continue to support 
these important initiatives, and is particularly pleased that 
NIGMS has supported biomedical career opportunity programs for 
high school and undergraduate college students in conjunction 
with historically black health professions schools. The 
Committee urges continued, long-term support of this program.

        National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

    Mission.--The NICHD conducts and supports laboratory and 
clinical research on the reproductive, developmental, and 
behavioral processes that determine and maintain the health and 
well-being of children, adults, families and populations. In 
addition, research in medical rehabilitation is supported.
    Demographic research.--The Committee applauds NICHD for 
supporting demographic research. As a result of this support, 
important strides have been made in our understanding of family 
dynamics--especially how these factors influence marriage and 
the health and development of children. In addition, 
interdisciplinary demographic research has uncovered clues 
regarding the causes of health disparities across racial, 
ethnic, educational, and income groups. The Committee 
encourages NICHD to maintain its levels of investment in 
demographic training and infrastructure support and to support 
opportunities for interdisciplinary research into the complex 
environmental and biological mechanisms that produce health 
disparities.
    Pulmonary rehabilitation.--Pulmonary rehabilitation has 
been increasingly recognized as an important treatment option 
for the many patients with disabling chronic lung diseases, 
like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The 
Committee encourages the National Center for Medical 
Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) to expand research 
opportunities in this area.
    Newborn screening.--Screening is used for early 
identification of infants affected by certain genetic, 
metabolic, hormonal or functional conditions for which there is 
effective treatment or intervention. Screening detects 
disorders in newborns which, if left untreated, can cause 
death, disability, mental retardation and other serious 
illnesses. The Committee encourages NICHD to continue to 
prioritize fragile X as a key prototype in the development of 
cost-effective newborn screening programs.
    Premature ovarian failure (POF).--POF is a condition in 
which the ovaries stop functioning normally in a woman younger 
than age 40. Studies show that women who have POF of unknown 
cause have a one in fifty chance of being a premutation carrier 
of the FMR1 gene, the same gene that causes fragile X syndrome. 
Women with POF and a family history of female relatives with 
POF have a one in fifteen chance in carrying this premutation. 
The Committee acknowledges the importance of furthering 
research into the FMR1 premutation to inform the research 
community about the genetic causes of infertility and disorders 
of altered ovarian function. The Committee supports further 
research efforts focused on collecting DNA and other genetic 
information from women who possess a mutation of the FMR1 gene 
as well as women who have POF. To accomplish this goal, the 
Committee encourages NICHD to include the collection of genetic 
and DNA data on women who are relatives of people living with 
fragile X in the development of a national fragile X patient 
registry. Additionally, NICHD is encouraged to take steps to 
develop a comprehensive research strategy on POF as it relates 
to the FMR1 gene.
    Traumatic brain injury (TBI).--Congress is pleased with the 
work being done on TBI translational science research and 
rehabilitation at the NCMRR and encourages NCMRR to continue 
such work; especially the cooperative multi-center traumatic 
brain injury clinical trials network.
    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).--SMA is the leading single 
gene cause of death in infants and toddlers and the most 
prevalent genetic motor disease. The severity of the disease, 
its relatively high incidence, and the possibility of imminent 
treatments led the NINDS to initiate the innovative SMA 
Project. The Committee is concerned that the NICHD has not 
dedicated resources specifically to initiate work and sustain 
ongoing resources for SMA. The Committee is aware, for 
instance, that despite multiple submissions last year, little 
funding was dedicated by NICHD to SMA-related research. The 
Committee encourages NICHD to support specific basic, 
translational, and clinical research initiatives on SMA. The 
Committee also encourages NICHD to coordinate funding with 
NINDS to ensure increased participation of investigators in SMA 
and developmental neurobiology relevant to SMA and to establish 
a cross-institute working group comprised of NICHD, NINDS, and 
NIGMS.
    Liver wellness in children.--The National Children's Study 
(NCS) provides a unique opportunity to study the prevalence of 
obesity-related chronic liver disease, also known as fatty 
liver, from birth to early adulthood. The Committee understands 
that fatty liver is the most common liver abnormality in 
children age 2 to 19 years old, and disproportionately affects 
Hispanic-Americans. The Committee encourages NICHD to analyze 
the prevalence of fatty liver under the NCS to better 
understand obesity-related chronic illnesses in children and to 
work with other agencies in the screening and prevention of 
these diseases.
    Primary immunodeficiency (PI) diseases.--The Committee 
continues to be impressed with the dedication of financial and 
personnel resources by NICHD to physician education and public 
awareness programs to reach early diagnosis of this class of 
140 diseases. In addition, the Institute's focus on newborn 
screening research is critical as States begin to implement 
pilot newborn screening programs for severe combined 
immunodeficiency disease (SCID), one of the most severe forms 
of PI. NICHD is urged to coordinate its efforts with CDC and 
the States in this critical implementation period.
    Pre-term births.--A recent national study showed that the 
rate of pre-term births among first pregnancies has increased 
50 percent over the past decade. The data also revealed that 
women in their first pregnancy are at highest risk for 
developing preeclampsia, which puts them at risk for 
devastating maternal complications and fetal death. In 
addition, the study also showed a racial disparity with black 
women at a two-fold higher risk than white women. The Committee 
understands that the prediction and prevention of these first 
pregnancy complications is problematic and that there is a 
shortage of research on the etiology and prevention 
interventions for this cohort of women. The Committee requests 
that NICHD conduct research on women in their first pregnancy 
in order to fill the gap in knowledge for the prevention of 
these complications.
    Assisted reproductive technology (ART).--ART over the past 
two decades has allowed thousands of infertile couples to have 
children, accounting for 1.1 percent of total U.S. births and 
17.1 percent of U.S. multiple births. There is recent evidence 
of higher rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes even in single 
birth pregnancies associated with ART including increased low 
birth weight, fetal growth restrictions, genetic disorders and 
congenital disorders. The Committee encourages NICHD to support 
an initiative for a multi-site cohort study on ART that would 
emphasize pregnancy outcomes, and short and long term effects 
on children to determine if the adverse outcomes are 
specifically related to ART procedures.
    Stillbirth.--The Committee applauds NICHD's efforts in 
addressing stillbirth, a major public health issue with 
morbidity equal to that of all infant deaths. The Committee 
understands that the NICHD cooperative network has an ongoing 
study using a standard protocol at five clinical sites and 
encourages NICHD to continue supporting this effort.
    Vulvodynia.--As a result of efforts funded by the NICHD, 
the number of highly qualified scientists interested in 
researching vulvodynia has greatly increased. The Committee 
commends NICHD for reissuing its program announcement in this 
area and suggests that a request for applications be 
considered. The Committee encourages NICHD to strengthen its 
support of vulvodynia studies in 2006, with a particular 
emphasis on etiology and multi-center therapeutic trials. The 
Committee commends NICHD for working with ORWH to implement an 
educational outreach campaign on vulvodynia and calls upon the 
Institute to continue these efforts.
    Pre-term birth.--The Committee recognizes that prematurity 
is the leading cause of newborn death and an estimated twenty 
percent of infants who survive suffer long term consequences, 
including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and developmental 
delays that affect the child's ability to do well in school. 
The Committee encourages NICHD to strengthen research on the 
underlying causes of pre-term delivery and the development of 
treatments for the prevention of premature birth. Furthermore, 
the Committee is aware that a 2006 Institute of Medicine report 
found that a multidisciplinary research approach is needed to 
better understand premature birth, and therefore encourages NIH 
to use this strategy to fund research on pre-term birth.
    Mental retardation.--The Committee recognizes the 
outstanding contributions of the Mental Retardation/
Developmental Disabilities Research Centers (MRDDRC) toward 
understanding why child development goes awry, discovering ways 
to prevent developmental disabilities, and discovering 
treatments and interventions to improve the lives of people 
with developmental disabilities and their families. The 
Committee is particularly pleased with the MRDDRC contributions 
in the areas of autism, fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome and 
other genetic and environmentally induced disorders. These 
centers have greatly improved our understanding of the causes 
of developmental disabilities. However, the Committee is 
concerned that the centers have not been given sufficient 
resources to sustain the progress made in this critical area, 
even though they received outstanding scientific evaluations. 
The Committee urges NICHD to provide additional resources to 
the MRDDRCs so that they can conduct translational research to 
develop effective prevention and intervention strategies for 
children and adults with developmental disabilities.

                         National Eye Institute

    Mission.--NEI conducts and supports basic and clinical 
research, research training, and other programs with respect to 
blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual 
function, preservation of sight, and the special health 
problems and needs of individuals who are visually-impaired or 
blind. In addition, NEI is responsible for the dissemination of 
information, specifically public and professional education 
programs aimed at the prevention of blindness.
    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD).--The Committee 
commends NEI for its trans-Institute research into the cause, 
prevention, and treatment of AMD, the nation's leading cause of 
blindness, including identification of gene variants associated 
with an increased risk for AMD, which presents an opportunity 
to predict and preempt the disease. The Committee encourages 
further research into diagnostics for early detection and 
appropriate therapies. The Committee also applauds NEI for 
initiating the second phase of its age-related eye disease 
study, in which additional dietary supplements are being 
studied to determine if they can demonstrate or enhance their 
protective effects against progression to the advanced form of 
AMD, as shown with dietary zinc and antioxidant vitamins in the 
study's first phase. This research is a potentially cost-
effective means by which to decrease the progression of this 
disease.
    Diabetic eye disease.--The Committee applauds NEI for the 
collaborative efforts of the diabetic retinopathy clinical 
research network to test innovative treatments for diabetic eye 
disease. The Institute is encouraged to consider expanding and 
extending the network by increasing the number of clinical 
trials with new drugs and therapeutics that can treat and 
prevent diabetic retinopathy.
    National ophthalmic disease genotyping network.--The 
Committee congratulates NEI on its progress in identifying many 
of the genes involved in some of the most devastating eye 
diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), 
retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and glaucoma, and the progress that 
has been made in understanding the underlying disease 
mechanisms and in developing appropriate treatments. NEI's new 
national ophthalmic disease genotyping network (eyeGENE) will 
help accelerate application of these new approaches to 
medicine. By encouraging the participation of patients and 
their families who need highly-specialized genetic testing 
services and coordinating the efforts of many vision research 
laboratories, vital information is being collected 
confidentially and maintained securely. This information will 
help preempt eye disease by enabling qualified investigators to 
develop targeted treatments and to identify those individuals 
who are appropriate candidates for these treatments.

          National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

    Mission.--The mission of NIEHS is to prevent disease and 
improve human health by using environmental sciences to 
understand human biology and disease. This mission is achieved 
through conducting and supporting disease-oriented biomedical 
research (basic, integrative, clinical, and epidemiologic), 
enhancing research capacity in environmental health sciences, 
prevention and intervention strategies, and communication with 
researchers, public health and health care providers, and the 
public.
    Validation of alternative methods.--The Committee commends 
the interagency coordinating committee on the validation of 
alternative methods (ICCVAM) for beginning to develop a five-
year plan to research, develop, translate and validate new and 
revised non-animal and other alternative assays for integration 
of reliable methods into Federal agency testing programs. The 
plan will prioritize areas which have the potential to most 
significantly and rapidly reduce, refine or replace laboratory 
animal methods. The Committee requests that the plan be 
submitted to the Committee by January 1, 2008.
    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (Alpha 1).--The Committee is 
aware that Alpha-1 is the major genetic risk factor for chronic 
obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the fourth leading cause 
of death in the U.S. and the only leading cause of death with a 
rising mortality. As many as three percent of individuals with 
COPD have undetected Alpha-1. Given the link between 
environmental factors and the onset of Alpha-1-related COPD, 
the Committee encourages NIEHS to develop research initiatives 
to explore gene-environment interaction research and to support 
public-private partnerships.
    Bone marrow failure diseases.--Aplastic anemia, 
myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and paroxysmal nocturnal 
hemoglobinuria (PNH) are life threatening, non-contagious 
diseases. While there are no known causes of bone marrow 
failure diseases, they have been linked to environmental 
factors. The Committee encourages NIEHS to work with NHLBI and 
NCI to fund research that explores these links to determine 
what, if any, environmental factors may cause bone marrow 
failure diseases.
    Mercury.--In order to properly research gaps in the area of 
mercury exposure and brain chemistry, the Committee encourages 
NIEHS encouraged to pursue studies of how inorganic mercury and 
organic mercury compounds (including ethyl, methyl, and other 
forms of mercury from all sources) are processed in the bodies 
of children and adults. NIEHS is also encouraged to support 
studies of the toxic effects of inorganic mercury and organic 
mercury compounds on the nervous systems of young children, 
adults, and the elderly and methods of properly removing 
mercury and mercury-containing compounds from the brains of 
affected humans. The Committee requests NIEHS to evaluate the 
feasibility of conducting several studies outlined in the 2006 
NIEHS report to the Committee entitled: ``Thimerosal Exposure 
and Childhood Vaccines'' and report back to the Committee on 
its plan by the end of February 2008.
    NIH is encouraged to continue its work on the long-term 
effects of the exposure of pregnant women to methyl mercury, 
including higher than average levels of exposure, and to report 
to the Committee by April 1, 2008 the results of these studies.
    Toxic exposure and brain development.--Notwithstanding the 
Institute of Medicine May 2004 report on autism, the Committee 
believes it is important to develop a more complete 
understanding of the impact that toxic exposures may have on 
brain development. There is a convergence of findings from 
tissue culture studies, animal models, and clinical studies of 
immune dysfunction in children with autism and other 
neurodevelopmental disorders that suggests a biological link 
between genetic sensitivity and damage to developing brains 
from certain toxins. It is important that NIH continue this 
research to better understand the impact that exposures to 
mercury (including thimerosal) and other toxins may have on 
brain development. A more complete understanding of the impact 
of these exposures through research, including animal models, 
will help to develop more effective interventions.
    Parkinson's disease.--The Committee commends NIEHS for 
funding the collaborative centers for neurodegenerative disease 
environmental research (CCNDER) to foster multidisciplinary 
research approaches to elucidate gene-environment interactions 
in neurodegenerative diseases. The Committee encourages NIEHS 
to ensure that the CCNDER program continues to pursue promising 
Parkinson's research resulting from the work of the 
collaborative centers for Parkinson's disease environmental 
research (CCPDER) program. The Committee requests NIEHS to 
report to Congress on the outcomes and results of Parkinson's 
disease research conducted under CCPDER and plans for ensuring 
that promising Parkinson's research continues under the new 
CCNDER program.
    Food allergies.--The Committee recognizes the potential 
relationship between environmental conditions and food 
allergies, and encourages NIEHS to fund research in cooperation 
with NIAID to understand the causes and potential therapies for 
the growing danger of anaphylaxis resulting from food 
allergies.

                      National Institute on Aging

    Mission.--NIA supports and conducts biomedical, social and 
behavioral research, training, and health information 
dissemination with respect to the aging process and the 
diseases and other special problems and needs of older 
Americans.
    Demographic and economic research.--The Committee 
encourages NIA to sustain its commitment to the demography of 
aging centers program. These centers coordinate key data 
collection and dissemination activities that benefit the entire 
field of population aging research and inform public policy 
issues, such as reform of federal entitlement and health care 
programs. The Committee also congratulates NIA for elevating 
the dialogue surrounding global aging issues by hosting with 
the Department of State the Summit on Global Aging.
    Down syndrome.--The Committee commends NIA for its support 
of studies to examine the cellular, molecular and genetic bases 
for age-related neuropathological and cognitive abnormalities 
in people with Down syndrome. It encourages NIA to further 
examine these abnormalities and to devise new methods for 
diagnosing and treating them. Given that all people with Down 
syndrome develop the neuropathological changes of Alzheimer's 
disease, and that many or most go on to suffer dementia, NIA is 
encouraged to consider how studies of the Down syndrome 
population might enhance the ability to understand, diagnose 
and treat Alzheimer's disease. The Committee encourages NIA to 
collaborate with other institutes to address the issues that 
face elderly adults with Down Syndrome.
    Gerontology centers.--The Committee expresses its full 
support for the Edward R. Roybal Research Centers on Applied 
Gerontology. The centers are designed to move promising social 
and behavioral basic research findings out of the laboratory 
and into programs, practices, and policies that will improve 
the lives of older people and the capacity of society to adapt 
to societal aging. The Committee suggests that NIA consider 
expanding the numbers of centers, developing new topics for 
research especially in the area of diversity and ethnic and 
minority communities, and providing opportunities for 
collaborative, interdisciplinary research between the Roybal 
centers and other program initiatives such as the resource 
centers for minority aging research (RCMAR) and the demographic 
centers.
    Bone strength.--The Committee has learned that although 
bone mineral density has been a useful predictor of 
susceptibility to fracture, other properties of the skeleton 
contribute to bone strength, such as geometry and composition. 
At this time, little is understood as to how these properties 
influence bone strength. The Committee encourages NIA to work 
with NIAMS, NIBIB, NICHD, NIDDK, NCRR and NHLBI to support 
research, including research on bone structure and periosteal 
biology, which will achieve identification of the parameters 
that influence bone strength and lead to better prediction for 
prevention and treatment of bone diseases.

 National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

    Mission.--NIAMS conducts and supports basic and clinical 
research and research training, and the dissemination of health 
information on the more than 100 forms of arthritis; 
osteoporosis and other bone diseases; muscle biology and muscle 
diseases; orthopedic disorders, such as back pain and sports 
injuries; and numerous skin diseases.
    Burden of skin diseases.--The Committee continues to urge 
NIAMS to strengthen the research portfolio on skin disease and 
develop partnerships with the skin disease research community 
to address recognized challenges and future research questions. 
The Committee is especially concerned about epidermolysis 
bullosa (EB), a rare, genetic skin disease characterized by 
severe blistering and sores on the skin and, in some cases, on 
mucous membranes, the external surface of the eye, as well as 
the respiratory, gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts. The 
Committee also notes the importance of autoimmune diseases, 
such as scleroderma, in the overall burden of skin diseases.
    Psoriasis.--The Committee encourages NIAMS to expand and 
coordinate genetic, clinical, and basic psoriasis and psoriatic 
arthritis research, with emphasis on the cellular and molecular 
mechanisms of disease; understanding the genetics that lead to 
psoriasis susceptibility; the role of inflammation in psoriasis 
co-morbidities such as obesity, depression and heart disease; 
and studies to ascertain if aggressive early treatment of 
psoriasis can prevent or mitigate psoriatic arthritis, which 
often appears as much as a decade after psoriasis.
    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS).--In previous years, the 
Committee has encouraged NIAMS to support and work 
collaboratively with NIDDK in an effort to achieve a greater 
understanding of bone and joint lesions in MPS disorders. 
Research focused on the underlying pathophysiology of bone and 
joint lesions, the gene mutations and substrates that are 
stored and potential therapeutic approaches continue to be of 
interest to the Committee. In its congressional justification, 
the Institute noted that it would welcome applications for 
musculoskeletal-related research related to MPS. It also noted 
its meetings with NIDDK, NINDS and MPS patient advocates to 
examine opportunities for collaboration. The Committee is 
interested in further information on the outcome of these 
efforts and the steps that are being taken to encourage 
progress in this area of study.
    Lupus.--The Committee is aware that despite numerous 
important research advances, few new therapies are available to 
patients with lupus. Treatment with steroids, anti-inflammatory 
agents and immunosuppressive medications may be palliative, but 
these medications have numerous side effects and may become 
less effective over time. Advances in the identification of 
lupus susceptibility genes and biomarkers make it important to 
translate these research advances into clinically relevant 
treatments. The Committee encourages the Institute to develop 
focused programs designed to move research advances from the 
laboratory to the patient's bedside so that the complications 
of lupus and the underlying disease can be treated more 
effectively.
    Musculoskeletal trauma and skeletal pain.--The Committee 
recognizes that of the 29.7 million Americans who are treated 
for injuries at U.S. hospital emergency departments, more than 
40 percent have injuries to the musculoskeletal system. In the 
U.S., back pain is a major reason listed for lost time from 
work. The Committee encourages NIAMS, NIA, NIDCR, and NCCAM to 
study ways to better understand the epidemiology of back pain, 
improve existing diagnostic techniques, as well as develop new 
ones. The Committee also encourages NIAMS, NIBIB, NICHD, NIDCR, 
NIDDK and NIA to expand research to improve diagnostic and 
therapeutic approaches to lower the impact of musculoskeletal 
traumas, as well as research on accelerated fracture healing--
including the use of biochemical or physical bone stimulation, 
the role of hematopoietic niches to preserve bone stem cells, 
the use of mesenchymal bone stem cells, and biomaterials and 
biologicals in bone repair and regeneration--and research into 
repair of nonunion fractures in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

    Mission.--NIDCD funds and conducts research in human 
communication. Included in its program areas are research and 
research training in the normal and disordered mechanisms of 
hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. The 
Institute addresses special biomedical and behavioral problems 
associated with people who have communication impairments or 
disorders. In addition, NIDCD is actively involved in health 
promotion and disease prevention, dissemination of research 
results, and supports efforts to create devices that substitute 
for lost and impaired sensory and communication functions.
    Tinnitus.--The Committee recognizes that tinnitus, 
characterized by loud ringing in the ears, can be a severely 
debilitating medical condition. While tinnitus 
disproportionately impacts military personnel exposed to 
explosive devices or loud noise, it also affects people of all 
ages, including children and the elderly. In 2005, the NIDCD 
held a workshop to explore areas of needed research for the 
treatment and cure of tinnitus. The Committee encourages NIDCD 
to follow up on the workshop's recommendations, including 
increasing collaboration between NIH, the Department of 
Defense, and the Department of Veterans Affairs to support a 
multi-disciplinary research approach that promotes accurate 
diagnosis and treatment to cure tinnitus.

                 National Institute of Nursing Research

    Mission.--NINR supports and conducts scientific research 
and research training to reduce the burden of illness and 
disability; improve health-related quality of life; and 
establish better approaches to promote health and prevent 
disease.
    End-of-life science.--Improving the care of terminally ill 
patients at the end of life continues to be an urgent public 
health need, along with the need to improve the end-of-life 
experience for the patient's loved ones. Additional research is 
needed into improving palliative care, reducing caregiver 
burden, and improving the interactions between patients, loved 
ones, and clinicians. The Committee recognizes NINR's continued 
leadership in end-of-life sciences and encourages the 
Institute's continued focus in this area.
    Nursing shortage.--The shortage of nurses in the U.S. is a 
great concern for the field of healthcare. The nursing shortage 
threatens our nation's healthcare delivery systems, and 
shortages of nursing faculty impair the ability of schools of 
nursing to train new nurses. The Committee is concerned about 
the potential impact of the nursing shortage on nursing 
research and encourages NINR to explore innovative strategies 
for recruiting and developing additional nurse scientists. The 
Committee encourages NINR to support training programs that 
will develop the next generation of nurse scientists, 
especially those with multidisciplinary research skills and 
those from underserved populations.
    Health disparities.--The Committee continues to encourage 
NINR to support research into the causes of health disparities 
and into the development of innovative methods for overcoming 
such disparities. In addition, NINR is encouraged to develop 
new nurse scientists from underserved populations as a way to 
encourage new health disparities research.

           National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    Mission.--NIAAA supports research to generate new knowledge 
to answer crucial questions about why people drink; why some 
individuals are vulnerable to alcohol dependence or alcohol-
related diseases and others are not; the relationship of 
genetic and environmental factors involved in alcoholism; the 
mechanisms whereby alcohol produces its disabling effects, 
including organ damage; how to prevent alcohol abuse and 
associated damage, especially in the underage population; and 
how alcoholism treatment can be improved. NIAAA addresses these 
questions through a program of biomedical, behavioral, and 
epidemiologic research on alcoholism, alcohol abuse, and 
related problems.
    Underage drinking.--The Committee commends NIAAA for its 
inter-disciplinary approach to understanding and addressing 
underage drinking within the context of overall physical 
development. The Committee is aware that this framework formed 
the scientific foundation of the ``Surgeon General's Call to 
Action to Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking.'' The Committee 
further commends NIAAA for spearheading research to address key 
aspects of underage drinking. This includes research projects 
to engage health care systems in identifying and addressing 
underage drinking, particularly in rural areas. NIAAA is also 
supporting projects to address fundamental questions about the 
impact of child and adolescent alcohol consumption on the 
developing brain including: (1) what are the effects (both long 
and shorter-term) of alcohol exposure on the developing brain; 
(2) what is the effect of timing, dose and duration of alcohol 
exposure on brain development; and (3) to what extent do these 
effects resolve or persist.

                    National Institute on Drug Abuse

    Mission.--NIDA-supported science addresses questions about 
drug abuse and addiction, which range from its causes and 
consequences to its prevention and treatment. NIDA research 
explores how drugs of abuse affect the brain and behavior and 
develops effective prevention and treatment strategies; the 
Institute works to ensure the transfer of scientific data to 
policymakers, practitioners, and the public.
    Drug abuse and crime.--The Committee is very concerned 
about the well-known connections between drug use and crime. 
Research continues to demonstrate that providing treatment to 
individuals involved in the criminal justice system 
significantly decreases future drug use and criminal behavior, 
while improving social functioning. The Committee strongly 
supports NIDA's efforts in this area, particularly the criminal 
justice drug abuse treatment studies (CJ-DATS).
    HIV/AIDS and drug abuse.--The Committee understands that 
drug abuse and addiction continue to fuel the spread of HIV/
AIDS in the United States and abroad, and that drug abuse 
prevention and treatment interventions can be very effective in 
reducing HIV risk. Research should continue to examine every 
aspect of HIV/AIDS, drug abuse, and addiction, including risk 
behaviors associated with both injection and non-injection drug 
abuse, how drugs of abuse alter brain function and impair 
decision making, and HIV prevention and treatment strategies 
for diverse groups. The Committee applauds the Institute for 
holding a spring 2007 conference titled ``Drug Abuse and Risky 
Behaviors: The Evolving Dynamics of HIV/AIDS,'' and urges the 
Institute to continue supporting research that focuses on 
developing and testing drug abuse-related interventions 
designed to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS.
    Research translation.--The Committee commends NIDA for its 
outreach and work with State substance abuse authorities to 
reduce the current fifteen to twenty-year lag between the 
discovery of an effective treatment intervention and its 
availability at the community level. In particular, the 
Committee applauds NIDA for continuing its work with the 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to 
strengthen State agencies' capacity to support and engage in 
research that will foster statewide adoption of meritorious 
science-based policies and practices. The Committee encourages 
NIDA to continue collaborative work with States to ensure that 
research findings are relevant and adaptable by State substance 
abuse systems.
    Drug abuse and brain development.--The Committee notes 
neuroimaging research by NIDA and others showing that the human 
brain does not fully develop until about age 25. The Committee 
encourages NIDA to continue its emphasis on adolescent brain 
development to better understand how developmental processes 
and outcomes are affected by drug exposure, the environment, 
and genetics.
    Centers of excellence for physician information.--The 
Committee is pleased that NIDA has created centers of 
excellence for physician information, and understands that 
these centers will serve as national models to support the 
advancement of addiction awareness, prevention, and treatment 
in primary care practices. The NIDA centers of excellence will 
target physicians-in-training, including medical students and 
resident physicians in primary care specialties. The Committee 
urges the Institute to continue its focus on activities to 
provide physicians and other medical professionals with the 
tools and skills needed to incorporate NIDA-funded research 
findings into their clinical practices.
    Minority populations.--The Committee notes that the 
consequences of drug abuse disproportionately impact 
minorities, especially African American populations. The 
Committee is pleased to learn that NIDA continues to encourage 
researchers to conduct more studies in this population and to 
target their studies in geographic areas where HIV/AIDS is high 
and/or growing among African Americans, including in criminal 
justice settings.
    AAPI behavioral research.--The Committee recognizes that 
there is a need for additional research to develop a body of 
knowledge addressing the bio-psycho-social aspects of substance 
abuse as well as co-occurring disorders among Asian American 
and Pacific Islander (AAPI) populations. The Committee urges 
NIDA, NIAAA, and NIMH to address the behavioral health research 
needs for AAPI populations, including studies focused on AAPI 
incidence and prevalence data for substance abuse and co-
occurring disorders; research addressing the biological 
differences that may exist within AAPI populations; nature of 
substance abuse among AAPI populations; effective prevention 
and treatment strategies; and culturally appropriate ways to 
evaluate AAPI substance services; and the etiology, causes and 
impact on AAPI populations as a result of substance use and 
abuse.

                  National Institute of Mental Health

    Mission.--NIMH is responsible for research activities that 
seek to improve diagnosis, treatments, and overall quality of 
care for persons with mental illnesses. Disorders of high 
priority to NIMH include schizophrenia, depression and manic 
depressive illness, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety 
disorders and other mental and behavioral disorders that occur 
across the lifespan; these include childhood mental disorders 
such as autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; 
eating disorders; and other illnesses. NIMH supports and 
conducts fundamental research in neuroscience, genetics, and 
behavioral science. In addition to laboratory and controlled 
clinical studies, the NIMH supports research on the mental 
health needs of special populations and health services 
research.
    Adolescent depression and suicide.--Suicide is the third 
leading cause of death among teenagers; for the first time in 
sixteen years, teen suicide rates have increased in the U.S. 
Depressive disorders, one of the major risk factors for 
suicide, continue to be very common in adolescence. The 
Committee therefore strongly encourages NIMH to strengthen its 
investment in finding ways to better identify the risk factors 
for suicide in adolescents, improving the criteria for 
identifying those at risk, and examining the outcomes of 
actions taken to assist those found to be at risk.
    Geriatric mental health.--By the year 2010, there will be 
approximately 40 million people in the United States over the 
age of 65, and 20 percent of them will experience mental health 
problems. A national crisis in geriatric mental health care is 
emerging, and action must be taken to avert serious problems in 
the future. For the past five years, this Committee has urged 
NIMH to strengthen research devoted to older adults; however, 
the geriatric mental health research portfolio supported by 
NIMH continues to be dramatically disproportionate to the 
increasing number of older Americans. The Committee requests 
that NIMH provide data on funding targeted toward geriatric 
mental health research in 2002-2006 and the amount of funding 
provided to new investigators in late-life mental health 
research. In addition, the Committee urges NIMH to place a 
stronger emphasis on research on adults over age 65 to reflect 
the growth in numbers of this population.
    Suicide prevention research.--Suicide is a major, 
preventable public health problem. In 2004, it was the eleventh 
leading cause of death in the U.S., accounting for 32,000 
deaths. An estimated eight to 25 attempted suicides occur per 
every suicide death. The Committee is pleased to note that NIMH 
is supporting three developing centers for interventions to 
prevent suicide and encourages NIMH to strengthen its 
investment in suicide prevention research.
    Down syndrome.--The Committee encourages NIMH to develop 
new strategies for cataloging, diagnosing and treating 
behavioral disorders that are common in people with Down 
syndrome, including autism, pervasive developmental disorder, 
obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and psychosis. The 
Committee encourages NIMH to coordinate its research on Down 
syndrome with NICHD, NINDS, NIA and other institutes.

                National Human Genome Research Institute

    Mission.--NHGRI coordinates extramural and intramural 
research, as well as research training, in the areas of 
genomics and genetics. The Division of Extramural Research 
supports research on sequence and function of both human and 
non-human genomes, human genetic variation, technology 
development for genome research, database management and 
analysis, and research on the ethical, legal, and social 
implications of human genome research. The Division of 
Intramural Research focuses on applying the tools and 
technologies of the successful Human Genome Project to 
understanding the genetic and environmental basis of disease, 
and developing DNA-based diagnostics and gene-based therapies.
    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).--The Committee is supportive 
of the development of a carrier screening program for SMA and 
the trans-institute collaborative effort initiated by NHGRI to 
develop a strategic plan addressing research-related needs to 
improve carrier screening technology. The Committee encourages 
NHGRI to work collaboratively and cooperatively with the 
advocacy community in this effort.

      National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

    Mission.--The NIBIB mission is to improve human health by 
leading the development and accelerating the application of 
biomedical technologies. The Institute is committed to 
integrating the engineering and physical sciences with the life 
sciences to advance basic research and medical care.

                 National Center for Research Resources

    Mission.--NCRR provides laboratory scientists and clinical 
researchers with environments and tools that they can use to 
prevent, detect, and treat a wide range of diseases. This 
support enables discoveries that begin at the molecular and 
cellular level, move to animal-based studies, and then are 
translated to patient-oriented clinical research, resulting in 
cures and treatments for both common and rare diseases. NCRR 
connects researchers with each other and with patients and 
communities across the nation to bring the power of shared 
resources and research to improve human health.
    Image guided therapy.--The Committee applauds NCRR for its 
development and support of a national image guided therapy 
center (IGT) for research, training, and services related to 
novel imaging tools for disease diagnosis and therapy. NCRR is 
encouraged to work with NIDDK and NIBIB to ensure that this 
unique resource center engages with the diabetes research 
community to accelerate the development of new methods for the 
non-invasive imaging of pancreatic islets for applications in 
type 1 diabetes research and treatment.
    Rare diseases.--The Committee commends NCRR for the 
development of the rare disease consortium, including rare lung 
diseases such as LAM, and urges the continuation of the 
program.
    Research Centers in Minority Institutions Program (RCMI).--
The Committee continues to recognize the critical role of 
minority institutions in addressing the ongoing racial and 
ethnic health disparities in the United States. The Committee 
encourages NIH to expand its direct participation with minority 
institutions and increase the resources available to these 
institutions. The Committee also recognizes the importance of 
the RCMI program in building research capacity at minority 
institutions. The RCMI program assists minority institutions in 
competing for NIH grants and other funding by helping to 
recruit promising researchers, equip and modify existing 
laboratories, and fund core research facilities and other 
research support at minority institutions. The Committee 
further expresses support for the proposed RCMI translational 
research network (RTRN) and its focus on strengthening ties 
between minority institutions, and encourages NIH to designate 
specific resources for the RTRN apart from the existing RCMI 
program.

       National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Mission.--NCCAM was established to stimulate, develop, and 
support rigorous and relevant research of high quality and 
open, objective inquiry into the safety and effectiveness of 
complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practices and to 
train individuals to apply the tools of exacting science to CAM 
systems and modalities in order to provide health care 
professionals and the American public with reliable information 
about these practices.
    Improving liver disease outcomes.--The Committee is pleased 
with the progress made in studying the benefit of active 
ingredients in milk thistle and SAM-e, a naturally occurring 
compound, in ameliorating and improving the outcome of 
individuals with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

       National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities

    Mission.--NCMHD conducts and supports research, training, 
information dissemination, and other programs aimed at reducing 
the disproportionately high incidence and prevalence of 
disease, burden of illness and mortality experienced by certain 
American populations, including racial and ethnic minorities 
and other groups, such as the urban and rural poor, with 
disparate health status.
    Glomerular disease.--The Committee understands that a type 
of glomerular disease, focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, 
which is a group of diseases affecting the filtering mechanisms 
of the kidneys, is more common in African Americans than the 
general population. The Committee encourages NCMHD to include 
glomerular disease in its research portfolio.
    Research endowment.--The Committee commends NCMHD for its 
leadership in addressing the longstanding problem of health 
status disparities in minority and medically underserved 
populations. For fiscal year 2008, the Committee continues to 
encourage NCMHD to implement its successful research endowment 
program as an ongoing initiative in a manner consistent with 
the authorizing legislation. The Committee also commends NCMHD 
for its successful Project EXPORT initiative and urges 
continued support for this important program.
    Health disparities among Hispanic-Americans.--The Committee 
is aware of promising research on health disparities among 
Hispanic-Americans. The Committee encourages NCMHD to continue 
to conduct such research, in close coordination with Hispanic 
researchers, with the goal of identifying the most promising 
avenues for disease-specific research to address health 
disparities among Hispanic-Americans.

                  John E. Fogarty International Center

    Mission.--FIC was established to improve the health of the 
people of the United States and other nations through 
international cooperation in the biomedical sciences. In 
support of this mission, the FIC pursues the following four 
goals: mobilize international research efforts against global 
health threats; advance science through international 
cooperation; develop human resources to meet global research 
challenges; and provide leadership in international science 
policy and research strategies.
    Malaria and tuberculosis (TB).--The Committee appreciates 
the important and unique role that FIC plays in addressing 
global health challenges. The Committee commends the Center for 
the success of its programs to strengthen science and public 
health research institutions in low-income countries, 
specifically in malaria, TB, and neglected tropical diseases. 
The Committee urges FIC to continue supporting research 
training focused in these areas to enable developing country 
scientists to develop effective, evidence-based strategies to 
prevent, treat, and diagnose these debilitating diseases. While 
major investments in biomedical research by NIAID and others 
are resulting in new tools and medical advances, the Committee 
realizes that improvements in health outcomes will be delayed 
without local scientific expertise to translate research 
findings into practice. The Committee encourages FIC to promote 
applied health research in developing countries to speed the 
implementation of new health interventions for malaria, TB, and 
neglected tropical diseases.
    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).--The 
Committee notes that COPD is the fourth leading cause of death 
worldwide, and encourages FIC to enhance its COPD research and 
training activities.
    Tuberculosis training.--The Committee is pleased with the 
FIC's efforts to supplement grants in the AIDS international 
training and research program (AITRP) and the international 
training and research program in emerging infectious diseases 
(ERID), which train tuberculosis experts in the developing 
world.

                      National Library of Medicine

    Mission.--NLM collects, organizes, and disseminates 
information important to biomedicine; serves as a national 
information resource for medical education, research, and 
health service activities; enhances access to biomedical 
literature through electronic services; serves the public by 
providing electronic access to reliable health information for 
consumers; supports and directs the national network of 
libraries of medicine; provides grants for research in 
biomedical communications, medical library development, and 
training health information specialists; conducts and supports 
research in biomedical informatics and computational biology; 
and creates information resources for genomics, molecular 
biology, toxicology, medical images, environmental health, 
emergency preparedness and response, and health services 
research.
    Health information technology.--The Committee encourages 
NLM to conduct outreach activities to all public and private 
sector organizations which have demonstrated capabilities in 
health information technology. The Committee is particularly 
interested in disease management technology as it relates to 
saving health care dollars, and improving care for chronically 
ill individuals and the workforce.
    Outreach.--The Committee encourages NLM to continue its 
outreach activities aimed at educating health care 
professionals and the general public about the Library's 
products and services, in coordination with medical librarians 
and other health information specialists.
    PubMed Central.--The Committee commends NLM for its 
leadership in developing PubMed Central, an electronic online 
repository for life science articles. Because of the high level 
of expertise health information specialists have in the 
organization, collection, and dissemination of medical 
information, the Committee believes that health sciences 
librarians have a role to play in the further development of 
PubMed Central. The Committee encourages NLM to work with the 
medical library community regarding issues related to 
copyright, fair use, and classification of information on 
PubMed Central.
    Registry of liver toxicities.--The Committee applauds NLM's 
plan to create an accessible, on-line registry of the liver 
toxicity of medications and sees this as an important step to 
help physicians and patients avoid the devastating consequences 
of liver failure. The registry will include information 
regarding the liver toxicity of over four hundred drugs to 
assist physicians to better understand the potential of drugs 
to interfere with the normal functions of the liver. The 
Committee encourages the inclusion in the registry of 
information from databases that catalog information on the 
interrelationship between environmental toxins and genes.
    NIEHS journal management.--The Committee understands that 
NLM has been assigned the management of the recompetition of 
the publication of the NIEHS journal, Environmental Health 
Perspectives. The Committee is aware of earlier problems 
resulting from efforts to privatize this publication and to 
dramatically reduce its budget. The Committee expects NLM to 
take the necessary steps to ensure that the quality and 
comprehensiveness of the journal is maintained.

                         Office of the Director

    Mission.--OD provides leadership to the NIH research 
enterprise and coordinates and directs initiatives that cross-
cut NIH. OD is responsible for the development and management 
of intramural and extramural research and research training 
policy, the review of program quality and effectiveness, the 
coordination of selected NIH-wide program activities, and the 
administration of centralized support activities essential to 
the operations of NIH.
    The Committee includes bill language identifying 
$495,153,000 for the total support of the Common Fund. The 
Committee believes this funding approach is preferable to 
assessing the institutes and centers and using the director's 
discretionary fund.
    The Committee includes bill language within the Office of 
the Director account allocating $110,900,000 to continue the 
National Children's Study. The Committee would not normally 
identify funding in bill language for a specific research 
effort, but feels an exception is necessary in this case 
because the Administration has resisted supporting the study.
    The Committee repeats bill language from the fiscal year 
2007 bill identifying $14,000,000 for flexible research 
authority modeled on the Department of Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency (DARPA).
    The Committee includes bill language providing not more 
than $500,000 to be used for the Foundation on NIH.
    Seven general provisions are included in the bill 
pertaining to NIH:
           The Committee rejects the Administration 
        proposal to limit salaries of researchers through an 
        NIH grant to not more than the rate of Executive Level 
        II and continues the language (sec. 203) setting the 
        limit at Executive Level I.
           The Committee continues traditional language 
        (sec. 208) to provide the Director of NIH, jointly with 
        the Director of the Office of AIDS Research, the 
        authority to transfer up to three percent of human 
        immunodeficiency virus research funding. The Committee 
        also continues a provision (sec. 209) to make NIH funds 
        available for human immunodeficiency virus research 
        available to the Office of AIDS Research.
           The Committee continues a provision (sec. 
        214) granting authority to the OD to support research 
        under the flexible research authority.
           The Committee includes language (sec. 216) 
        similar to that carried in the House-reported version 
        of the fiscal year 2007 bill requiring NIH-funded 
        authors to deposit final, peer-reviewed manuscripts in 
        the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central 
        database within twelve months of the official date of 
        publication.
           The Committee includes language (sec. 217) 
        requested by the Administration permitting institutes 
        and centers to use their appropriation for renovation 
        and improvement of facilities, up to $2,500,000 per 
        project and up to a total of $35,000,000 across NIH.
    The Committee shares NIH's concern about the pipeline for 
new investigators and the prospect of researchers becoming so 
discouraged by repeated rejection of their applications that 
they leave the field. The Committee provides funding for the 
following programs to begin to address this problem:
           $91,500,000 within the Office of the 
        Director for the Director's one-year Bridge awards for 
        investigators who either are being considered for their 
        first award renewal or have just missed the funding 
        payline with no other sources of support;
           $31,000,000 funded through all the 
        institutes and centers for the Pathways to Independence 
        program to provide new investigators with mentored 
        grants that convert into independent research project 
        grants; and
           $40,000,000 through the Common Fund for the 
        New Innovator awards that provide first-time 
        independent award funding for a five-year period based 
        more on ideas than experimental data.
    The Committee believes the Director's Pioneer Awards are an 
effective tool to encourage high risk, transformative research 
and has provided $27,000,000 within the Common Fund for this 
purpose.
    As requested by the Administration, included within funding 
for the Office of the Director is $95,310,000 for radiological, 
nuclear and chemical countermeasures and up to $10,000,000 for 
the Director's discretionary fund.
    The Committee understands that the National Institutes of 
Health Reform Act of 2006 signed into law on January 15, 2007 
contains significant organizational and reporting requirements. 
The Committee requests that the agency provide a report 
detailing the timeline for planned implementation of each of 
these requirements, particularly the establishment of the 
Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic 
Initiatives, the appointment of the Council of Councils and the 
Scientific Management Review Board, the electronic coding 
system for research grants, and the biennial report to 
Congress. The report to the Committee should also include the 
personnel appointed to lead these efforts; the authorities 
delegated to these new entities; and organizational tables 
displaying how the new entities link to the existing NIH 
structure. The Committee requests the first report by September 
1, 2007, followed by semi-annual reports thereafter through 
2009.
    The Committee expects NIH to notify the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations each time the Director uses the 
one percent transfer authority provided in the NIH 
reauthorization.
    The Committee is concerned about numerous incidents at the 
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences that call 
into question the administrative and scientific management of 
the Institute. The Committee understands that the HHS Inspector 
General and Congressional committees are investigating a range 
of troubling circumstances in areas as diverse as management of 
scientific journals, employee complaints about performance 
appraisal systems, alleged conflict of interest by outside 
contractors hired to operate peer review systems, and improper 
use of Federal funds in office renovation and support staff 
assignments. The Committee believes it is necessary for the 
Office of the Director to take a leadership role in conducting 
a comprehensive management review of the entire Institute. The 
Committee directs the NIH Director to task the Office of 
Management Assessment with conducting an on-site review of 
scientific and administrative operations at NIEHS. This review 
should encompass personnel practices, including communication 
with employee unions; contracting procedures; financial 
management and accounting practices; and enforcement of 
financial disclosure and conflict of interest by NIEHS 
employees and contractor staff. The Committee understands this 
review will require a substantial level of effort, but would 
like to receive a report on the review findings by January 1, 
2008.
    The Committee understands that although NIH has established 
a detailed policy for its Federal employees on conflict of 
interest and financial disclosure, there is no similar policy 
in place for the 6,830 staff NIH hires through contract. These 
staff support NIH in both administrative and research 
functions. Having learned of some of the flagrant conflict of 
interest situations identified among the NIH Federal staff, the 
Committee is concerned that there is great potential for 
similar problems among the NIH contract staff. The Committee 
directs the NIH Director, after consultation with the U.S. 
Office of Government Ethics, to develop a conflict of interest 
policy that is appropriate for contract staff. The Committee 
expects a report from the NIH Director by October 1, 2007 on 
the plans and timeline for implementation of a conflict of 
interest and financial disclosure policy for contract staff.
    The Committee is deeply troubled by the recent allegations 
of religious discrimination occurring in the NIH spiritual 
ministry department. The Committee was alarmed to learn that, 
since 2004, three chaplains who voiced concerns against these 
discriminatory practices were subsequently terminated from 
their duties. The Committee notes the January, 2006 findings of 
the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that one of these 
chaplains who complained about the intolerent environment in 
the department was the target of ``discriminatory and 
retaliatory animus''.
    The Committee directs that the HHS Inspector General to 
review the overall operation of the spiritual ministry 
department at NIH's clinical research center, with a specific 
emphasis on the adequacy of policies and procedures addressing 
any problems of religious intolerance. The review should also 
address the performance of the current staff of the spiritual 
ministry and make personnel recommendations to the director of 
the clinical center. The Committee requests a report on the 
Inspector General's findings and recommendations by January 1, 
2008. The Committee urges NIH to develop a plan to ensure that 
they are providing adequate chaplain services to people of all 
faiths.

Office of Research on Women's Health

    The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) works in 
collaboration with the institutes and centers of NIH to promote 
and foster efforts to address gaps in knowledge related to 
women's health through the enhancement and expansion of funded 
research and/or the initiation of new investigative studies. 
ORWH is responsible for ensuring the inclusion of women in 
clinical research funded by NIH, including the development of a 
computerized tracking system and the implementation of 
guidelines on such inclusion. ORWH is also involved in 
promoting programs to increase the number of women in 
biomedical science careers, and in the development of women's 
health and sex and gender factors in biology as a focus of 
medical/scientific research.
    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).--The Committee is pleased 
with the increased focus on IBS at ORWH and encourages the 
office to continue strengthening research on this prevalent 
functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is estimated that 
between 25 and 45 million Americans, disproportionately women, 
suffer from IBS.

Office of AIDS Research

    The Office of AIDS Research (OAR) is responsible for 
coordination of the scientific, budgetary, legislative, and 
policy elements of the NIH AIDS research program. OAR develops 
a comprehensive plan for NIH AIDS-related research activities 
which is updated annually. The plan is the basis for the 
president's budget distribution of AIDS-related funds to the 
institutes and centers within NIH. The Committee expects the 
Director of NIH to use this plan and the budget developed by 
OAR to guide his decisions on the allocation of AIDS funding 
among the institutes. The Director of NIH also should use the 
full authority of his office to ensure that the institutes and 
centers spend their AIDS research dollars in a manner 
consistent with the plan. In addition, OAR allocates an 
emergency AIDS discretionary fund to support research that was 
not anticipated when budget allocations were made.
    The bill includes continues language permitting the OAR to 
use up to $4,000,000 for construction or renovation of 
facilities, as authorized in title XXIII of the Public Health 
Service Act.
    Microbicides.--There is an urgent need to expand the 
development pipeline with more microbicide candidate products, 
particularly those that target HIV in new ways. In addition to 
candidates that may arise from basic research efforts, the best 
possibilities may be found within pharmaceutical companies 
where there are dozens of potential compounds already developed 
as therapeutics that could move into clinical development as 
microbicides if made available. In recent years, nonprofit 
groups have entered into innovative agreements with leading 
pharmaceutical companies to jointly test and develop leading 
AIDS drugs as microbicides. The Committee believes that more 
partnerships like these between the pharmaceutical industry and 
the nonprofit community will be critical and should receive the 
active support of NIH leadership.
    Microbicide research branch.--Women and girls are the new 
face of HIV/AIDS and are increasingly affected by the disease 
in every region of the world. The Committee has long advocated 
that NIH accelerate and better coordinate its microbicide 
research and notes with approval that NIH has stated its intent 
to establish a dedicated microbicide branch at NIH with clearly 
identified leadership, funding and staffing. The Committee 
strongly supports establishment of this branch and requests 
that NIH prepare within six months of passage of this bill a 
report detailing progress made in establishing a microbicide 
branch, including detailed information on staff and funding 
dedicated to this effort.

Office of Dietary Supplements

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) was established in 
recognition that dietary supplements can have an important 
impact on the prevention and management of disease and on the 
maintenance of health. ODS is charged with promoting, 
conducting, and coordinating scientific research within NIH 
relating to dietary supplements.

Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research

    The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research 
(OBSSR) provides leadership and direction for the development 
of a trans-NIH plan to increase the scope of and support for 
behavioral and social science research and in defining an 
overall strategy for the integration of these disciplines 
across NIH institutes and centers; develops initiatives to 
stimulate research in the behavioral and social sciences arena 
and to integrate a biobehavioral perspective across the 
research areas of NIH; and promotes studies to evaluate the 
contributions of behavioral, social and lifestyle determinants 
in the development, course, treatment, and prevention of 
illness and related public health problems.

Office of Rare Disease Research

    The Office of Rare Disease Research (ORD) was established 
in recognition of the need to provide a focal point of 
attention and coordination at NIH for research on rare 
diseases. ORD works with Federal and non-Federal national and 
international organizations concerned with rare disease 
research and orphan products development; develops a 
centralized database on rare diseases research; and stimulates 
rare diseases research by supporting scientific workshops and 
symposia to identify research opportunities.
    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS).--The Committee commends ORD 
for its collaborative efforts with NINDS and NIDDK in 
supporting a landmark scientific conference with the objective 
of identifying and addressing impediments to effective 
therapies. The Committee notes ORD's accessibility to MPS 
patient advocates and other rare disease organizations with 
similar goals and is gratified that ORD has used its resources 
to support enhanced activity in MPS research.

Multi-institute research issues

    National Children's Study.--The Committee strongly supports 
full and timely implementation of the National Children's Study 
that aims to quantify the impacts of a broad range of 
environmental influences, including physical, chemical, 
biological, and social influences, on child health and 
development. The Committee urges NIH to coordinate the 
involvement of the Department, the lead Federal partners, and 
other interested non-Federal partners conducting research on 
children's environmental health and development.
    Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA).--The 
Committee is pleased with the extensive planning and 
consultation that NIH has conducted in the development of the 
CTSA program, and it will be very interested in the progress 
report due July 1, 2007 that was requested in the fiscal year 
2007 House Appropriations Committee report. The Committee 
understands that a national CTSA evaluation is being developed, 
along with evaluations of each CTSA site. The Committee 
believes it is important that the national evaluation include 
the expertise of external reviewers not affiliated with the 
CTSA grants or NIH. These reviewers would provide credibility 
grounded in independent experience with the challenges of 
clinical and translational research. Such viewpoints would 
contribute to a candid assessment of the successes and 
shortcomings of the CTSA research model and its impact on the 
clinical research enterprise. The Committee recommends that NIH 
include such reviewers in the evaluation of CTSA's impact. The 
Committee suggests that participants in the Institute of 
Medicine's Clinical Research Roundtable who are not affiliated 
with the CTSA program would be useful additions to the 
program's evaluation.
    Research training stipends.--The Committee is concerned 
about NIH's response to the finding in the 2000 National 
Academy of Sciences needs assessment that NRSA stipends are 
unduly low in view of the high level of education and 
professional skills involved in biomedical research. Plans to 
increase awards to $25,000 for graduate and $45,000 for entry-
level postdoctoral stipends, and to maintain that value with 
annual cost-of-living adjustments, have not been realized. The 
Committee has provided funding to permit an average two percent 
increase in stipends and urges NIH to prioritize further 
increases for NRSA stipends in future years. NIH should also be 
prepared to discuss comparability of stipends to levels of 
income available to students and postdoctorates from other 
sources during hearings on the fiscal year 2009 budget. The 
Committee requests that NIH provide a report by March 1, 2008 
estimating the funding increase that would be needed to 
increase the minimum stipend award to $45,000 for entry-level 
postdoctoral students. The Committee is aware of the higher 
cost of living that individuals pursuing NIH funded post-
doctoral research in urban areas experience. The Committee 
urges NIH to consider making adjustments to fellowship awards 
to reflect geographic differences in living expenses and 
requests that NIH include in the report mentioned above 
information on the budgetary impact of such adjustments.
    Minority research training programs.--The Committee 
supports the recommendations put forward in the 2005 National 
Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on NIH minority research 
training programs. The Committee believes that the training of 
research scientists is a critical component of the NIH mission, 
and the Committee urges NIH to improve its data systems so that 
more complete information about NIH-supported graduate and 
post-doctoral research assistants and trainees is available. 
Without adequate data, the NIH programs cannot be properly 
evaluated or monitored. As proposed by the NAS, the Committee 
recommends the NIH develop an integrated NIH-wide trainee and 
research assistant data tracking system. The Committee further 
encourages NIH to engage trainees and research assistants in 
the data tracking process to document outcomes such as future 
funding awards, including those programs that are targeted to 
underrepresented minorities.
    Fragile X syndrome.-- This syndrome has many 
characteristics and features that make it important to the 
research portfolios of multiple NIH institutes and centers. The 
Committee places most of the report language pertaining to 
fragile X in the NIH Office of the Director to emphasize the 
cross-disciplinary nature of many of the disease's research 
questions. For example, the symptoms of fragile X syndrome 
include digestive difficulties. Some affected individuals also 
show hyperphagia and obesity. Understanding this disorder may 
permit the development of treatments to relieve these fragile X 
symptoms and may also help understanding disorders with similar 
symptoms. The Committee encourages NIDDK to coordinate its 
efforts with other Institutes working on related activities, 
including NIMH, NINDS, NICHD, NHGRI and FIC.
    More generally, the Committee encourages the institutes to 
support clinical drug trials of pharmaceuticals indicated for 
treatment for fragile X, as well as basic and translational 
fragile X research, including efforts to analyze the linkages 
among fragile X, autism, and autism spectrum disorders. The 
institutes are encouraged to convene a scientific session in 
2008 to develop a `Blueprint' of coordinated fragile X research 
strategies and public-private partnership opportunities for 
fragile X research. The Committee believes it is important in 
these efforts to collaborate with the Federally-funded fragile 
X centers of excellence and the fragile X clinics consortium. 
The Committee requests a report by September 2008 on progress 
in achieving these goals.
    In the research field of aging, the Committee encourages 
NIA to expand its existing dialogue with NINDS to fund research 
on fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). NIA is 
encouraged to strengthen its existing research portfolio into 
this newly identified neurological disorder, which involves 
progressively severe tremors and difficulty with walking and 
balance that specifically affect some older premutation 
carriers, generally grandfathers of children with fragile X 
syndrome. The Committee suggests that NIA include FXTAS among 
its priorities in the area of adult-onset disorders. Given the 
link, FXTAS may serve as a gateway to understanding other aging 
disorders including parkinsonism and dementia.
    In addition, the Committee encourages NIMH to include 
fragile X in its studies of related neuropsychiatric disorders 
and to work with other Institutes such as NICHD and NINDS to 
develop cooperative research support mechanisms in this area.
    Finally, there are important aspects of Fragile X to be 
studied in genomic research. FMRP, the protein whose absence 
results in fragile X syndrome, is a regulator of translation of 
many genes, including those involved in learning and memory. A 
genomic approach to understanding the diverse pathways 
regulated by FMRP would aid in the understanding of human 
cognition and identify potential targets for drug design to 
alleviate the symptoms of fragile X and related disorders. The 
Committee encourages NHGRI to strengthen its research 
activities on fragile X and to coordinate these efforts with 
other Institutes working on related activities, including NIMH, 
NINDS, NIDDK, NICHD and FIC.
    Autism.--The Committee recognizes the growing public health 
crisis represented by the dramatic rise in autism, which 
according to CDC now strikes one in 150 of our nation's 
children. Autism causes serious hardships to families of 
children with autism, as well as to the children themselves, 
and also creates an extreme financial burden to families and 
our nation. The care of a child diagnosed with autism is 
estimated to cost $3,200,000 in direct and indirect costs over 
his/her lifetime; all individuals diagnosed with autism are 
projected to cost the nation an estimated $35,000,000,000 
annually. In response to this crisis, the Combating Autism Act 
was signed into law last year, which expanded autism activities 
at CDC and HRSA, authorized increased funding for autism, 
created centers of excellence and called for the establishment 
of an inter-agency autism coordinating committee (IACC), 
charged with the preparation of a strategic research plan for 
autism. The Committee encourages HHS's prompt appointment of 
the IACC and looks forward to its completion of an autism 
strategic research plan. In addition, the Committee encourages 
NIH to use its research funds to implement the recommendations 
of that strategic plan.
    Alzheimer's disease.--Alzheimer's disease is reaching 
epidemic levels in the United States. Nearly half of people 
over age 85, and more than one in 8 over age 65 have the 
disease. Currently, more than 5 million Americans suffer from 
Alzheimer's, including up to half a million people under age 
65. Unless science finds ways to prevent, cure or more 
effectively treat Alzheimer's soon, by mid-century as many as 
16 millionpersons will be living with this disease, placing an 
even greater strain on families as well as Medicare, Medicaid 
and State healthcare programs. To prevent this will require a 
stepped-up investment in a comprehensive Alzheimer's research 
strategy that includes: basic investigator-initiated research 
to isolate the best targets for drug development; cost-
effective interdisciplinary research across multiple 
institutions that shares data and biological materials; multi-
site clinical trials to test potential therapies; and larger-
scale clinical studies, inclding neuron-imaging techniques, to 
find early biomarkers of disease so as to speed drug discovery 
and to identify those at risk so treatment can start soon 
enough to make a difference. To those ends the Committee 
encourages the National Institute on Aging, the National 
Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National 
Institute of Mental Health to continue to assign a high 
priority to their respective Alzheimer research portfolios, and 
to continue to work collaboratively whenever appropriate.
    Congenital and genetic disease of bone.--The Committee is 
aware that thousands of children and adolescents nationwide 
suffer from musculoskeletal disorders and malformations, many 
of which have devastating effects on mortality and disability. 
Diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta, fibrous dysplasia, 
osteoporosis, and Paget's disease are caused by poorly 
understood genetic mutations. In Paget's disease, underlying 
genetic defects can also be exacerbated by environmental 
factors. The Committee understands that the science of genetics 
has led to tremendous advances in our understanding of numerous 
systems that affect bone health, but little of this technology 
is being applied to bone research. The Committee encourages 
NIAMS and NICHD to support research focusing on mechanisms of 
preventing fractures and improving bone quality and correcting 
malformations, on innovations in surgical and non-surgical 
approaches to treatment, on physical factors that affect 
growth, and on genetic defects that cause bone disease. 
Furthermore, the Committee urges NIAMS, NICHD, NIDCR, and NIDDK 
to expand research on skeletal stem cell biology and the 
genetics and pathophysiology of rare disorders such as fibrous 
dysplasia, melhoreostosis, XLinked hypophosphatemic rickets, 
and fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.
    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DBMD).--The 
Committee is encouraged by the progress made in the area of 
DBMD, particularly through support of the six MD centers of 
excellence and advancement of a conference focusing on 
translational research opportunities. The Committee urges NIH 
to continue to provide sufficient funding to advance the work 
of the centers, encourage greater collaboration and resource 
sharing between centers, and to further additional DBMD 
research opportunities. Given increasing concerns about cardiac 
complication in both DBDM patients and carriers, the Committee 
suggests that the muscular dystrophy coordinating committee be 
broadened to include the Director of NHLBI.
    Musculoskeletal trauma and skeletal pain.--The Committee 
recognizes that of the 60 million Americans injured annually, 
more than one-half incur injuries to the musculoskeletal 
system. In the U.S., back pain is a major reason listed for 
lost time from work. The Committee encourages NIAMS, NIA, 
NIDCR, and NCCAM to study ways to better understand the 
epidemiology of back pain and improve existing diagnostic 
techniques, as well as develop new ones. The Committee also 
encourages NIAMS, NIBIB, NICHD, NIDCR, NIDDK and NIA to conduct 
research to improve diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to 
lower the impact of musculoskeletal traumas, as well as 
research on accelerated fracture healing and research into 
repair of nonunion fractures in osteogenesis imperfecta.
    Psoriasis.--In addition to the research priorities the 
Committee has identified for psoriasis in NIAMS, the disease 
has relevance to the research portfolios of several other 
institutes. The Committee encourages NHLBI to undertake 
research on the link between severe psoriasis and increased 
risk of heart attack, as this may help advance the 
understanding of both heart disease and psoriasis. Secondly, 
since the Committee understands that while psoriasis manifests 
itself on the skin, it may be an auto-immune disease. The 
Committee encourages NIAID to identify and study immune cells 
and inflammatory processes involved in psoriasis. Lastly, 
because it is a disease involving both genetic and 
environmental/lifestyle components, the Committee encourages 
NIEHS to identify environmental and lifestyle triggers 
associated with psoriasis onset, flares, and disease state 
which will help in the development of appropriate therapies and 
interventions. The Committee encourages NIEHS to expand its 
biomarker work to include efforts to identify psoriasis and 
psoriatic arthritis genetic susceptibility.
    Autism and vaccines.--The Committee continues to be aware 
of concerns about reports of a possible association between the 
measles component of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and a 
subset of autism termed autistic entercolitis. There have been 
presentations at medical meetings by researchers presenting 
data showing the presence of measles RNA in inflamed intestines 
of children with autism. The Committee continues its interest 
in this issue and encourages the interagency coordinating 
committee to continue to give serious attention to these 
reports. The Committee is aware that research is underway, 
supported by NIH, and encourages NIH to expedite this research.
    Down syndrome.--The Committee encourages the Director of 
NIH to note recent advances in the neurobiology of Down 
syndrome, especially regarding the structure and function of 
neural circuits that mediate cognition. These advances point to 
Down syndrome as a fertile area for research investments that 
could lead to effective treatments for cognitive difficulties 
in both adults and children with this disorder. Studies of 
cognition in Down syndrome could be a useful trans-NIH 
initiative that would accelerate progress toward understanding 
and treating cognitive problems in both children and adults. 
The Committee requests the Director of NIH to report to the 
Committee by April 2008, regarding his views as to whether this 
research would be an appropriate use of Common Fund resources.
    Amyloidosis.--The Committee encourages NIH to continue to 
intensify its research efforts into amyloidosis, a group of 
rare diseases characterized by abnormally folded protein 
deposits in tissues. These diseases are often fatal and there 
is no known cure. Treatment involving large-dose intravenous 
chemotherapy followed by stem cell replacement or rescue is 
effective for many patients, but this procedure is risky, 
unsuitable for some patients, and not a cure. The Committee 
understands that NIH has held a U.S. seminar on amyloidosis and 
participated in an international conference on the disease. The 
Committee urges NIH to pursue the recommendations from these 
meetings and identify steps that need to be taken to increase 
the understanding, prevention and treatment of this devastating 
group of diseases.
    Neurofibromatosis (NF).--NF is an important research area 
for multiple NIH institutes. The Committee highlights NF 
research in the following specific areas and encourages further 
work by the institutes involved:
    Recognizing NF's connection to many of the most common 
forms of human cancer, the Committee encourages NCI to enhance 
its NF research portfolio in such areas as further development 
of animal models, natural history studies, genetic and drug 
screening, therapeutic experimentation, and pre-clinical and 
clinical trials. The Committee further encourages NCI to apply 
existing cancer drugs to NF patients in clinical trials and to 
develop new drugs for NF, which might then apply to the general 
population because of NF's connection to most forms of human 
cancer. The Committee applauds work being done analyzing the 
DNA of NF tumor samples, which not only will help find a 
treatment for NF by determining its functioning, its connection 
to modifier genes and to an individual's personal genetic make-
up, but also connect it to other forms of cancers and other 
diseases.
    Significant advances continue to be made in research on 
NF's implications with heart disease and, in particular, its 
involvement with hypertension and congenital heart disease. The 
Committee encourages NHLBI to continue to enhance its NF 
research portfolio in light of the significant implications for 
the general population.
    Learning disabilities occur with high frequency in children 
with NF. Great advances have been made in the past few years in 
the successful treatment of learning disabilities in pre-
clinical NF animal models. The Committee encourages NICHD to 
support clinical trials for NF patients in this area.
    NF accounts for approximately five percent of genetic forms 
of deafness. Unlike other genetic forms of deafness, NF-
associated deafness is potentially preventable or curable if 
tumor growth is halted before damage has been done to the 
adjacent nerve. Research is now being conducted to cure 
deafness in mice with NF through gene therapy, with important 
implications for gene therapy in general and for patients 
suffering from meningiomas and other tumors in particular. The 
Committee encourages NIDCD to strengthen its NF research 
portfolio through all suitable mechanisms, including requests 
for applications and clinical trials.
    Vulvodynia.--In the last decade, NIH has supported three 
important research conferences on vulvodynia, as well as the 
first prevalence study and clinical trial of the disorder. 
These efforts demonstrated the need for additional research and 
served to heighten the research community's interest in 
studying vulvodynia. The Committee recommends that the Director 
build upon these initial successes by coordinating through ORWH 
collaborative extramural and intramural research into the 
causes of, and treatments for, vulvodynia. This effort should 
involve ORWH, NICHD, NINDS, and other relevant ICs, as well as 
the NIH pain consortium. The Committee also commends ORWH for 
working to plan an educational outreach campaign on vulvodynia. 
The Committee encourages the Director to work with the Center 
for Scientific Review and the institutes and centers to ensure 
that experts in vulvodynia, and related chronic pain and female 
reproductive system conditions, are adequately represented on 
peer review panels.
    Parkinson's disease.--The Committee remains very interested 
in NIH-funded research that aims to expedite discovery of 
better treatments and a cure for Parkinson's disease. The 
Committee continues to be aware that Parkinson's disease 
research would benefit from targeted and measured investment of 
resources by NIH which would result in significant dividends in 
terms of reduction in human suffering and economic costs to 
society. The Committee encourages NIH to use a Parkinson's 
disease planning process with an outcomes-oriented approach 
that makes disease eradication and treatment a top priority. 
The Committee requests NIH to report to the Committee by June 
2008 on a strategic plan for future investments in Parkinson's 
research that outlines progress already made and specific 
results of investments. The Committee urges NIH to intensify 
its support to pursue promising translational and clinical 
research that may result in scientific breakthroughs for people 
living with Parkinson's disease. The Committee continues to 
support the innovative multidisciplinary Parkinson's disease 
research and training provided by the Morris K. Udall 
Parkinson's Disease Research Centers of Excellence. The 
Committee applauds the creation of an additional coordinating 
center to further focus and manage the interdisciplinary 
efforts of the Udall centers. The Committee further encourages 
NIH to require that the Udall centers include a clinical 
component, in addition to their ongoing basic and translational 
research.
    Brain tumors.--Brain tumors are the most common solid tumor 
type for children, and the leading cause of pediatric cancer 
death. Because current treatments are invasive, toxic, and 
cause debilitating side effects and impairments, the Committee 
encourages the Directors of NIH, NCI, NINDS, NIBIB, and ORD to 
develop a comprehensive research plan to focus on children's 
brain tumors with the goal of identifying alternative, safer 
and more effective treatments, as well as a cure. The Committee 
further encourages the NIH to achieve this objective by 
targeting basic and clinical research, accelerating the 
enhancement of the institutes' cancer research portfolios, 
creating research priorities with a sequential agenda and 
timeline, and facilitating the coordination and collaboration 
of public and private organizations already funding related 
research initiatives. This comprehensive research plan should 
provide specific time frames for the implementation of goals. 
The Committee requests submission of the plan by the end of 
fiscal year 2008.
    Spina bifida.--The Committee encourages the institutes to 
study the causes and care of the neurogenic bladder in order to 
improve the quality of life of children and adults with spina 
bifida; to support research to address issues related to the 
prevention and treatment of spina bifida and associated 
secondary conditions such as hydrocephalus; and to invest in 
understanding the myriad co-morbid conditions experienced by 
children with spina bifida, including those associated with 
both paralysis and developmental delay.
    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).--The Committee encourages 
the Director of NIH to monitor the progress of the SMA Project 
at NINDS. The Committee notes that the SMA Project is an 
excellent example of high risk, high reward research that was a 
focus of the recent reauthorization of the NIH by Congress. The 
current SMA project is scheduled to reach its near-term 
milestones in 2007 and thus it is important that the OD 
participate in planning for the successive stages of the 
project, including clinical trials and the infrastructure that 
will be needed to support drug development. Specific attention 
by the OD is necessary to ensure that the results of this 
innovative project are maximized, as well as to ensure that it 
serves as a model for other diseases as an innovative program 
to accelerate actual treatments for disease.
    Dystonia.--The Committee is very pleased with progress 
demonstrated by the NIH intramural research program in the 
treatment and understanding of dystonia. NIH intramural 
researchers have successfully utilized injections of Botox to 
treat many patients who otherwise would be severely debilitated 
by dystonia. The Committee urges continued work in this 
important area of study and treatment.
    Mitochondrial disease.--The Committee encourages NIH to 
intensify its research efforts into primary mitochondrial 
disease. Mitochondria are specialized compartments within 
almost every cell and are responsible for producing energy. 
Mitochondrial diseases result when there is a genetic defect 
that reduces the ability of the mitochondria to produce energy. 
As the mitochondria fail to produce energy, the cell will not 
function properly. If the energy production falls to a critical 
level, cell death will follow. Approximately 1 in 2000 children 
born in the U.S. each year develop a mitochondrial disease. 
Most of these affected children will not survive beyond their 
teenage years. There is currently no cure or effective 
treatment for those suffering from primary mitochondrial 
disease. Mitochondrial dysfunction is also implicated in 
numerous disease states and degenerative disorders such as 
Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, heart disease, 
diabetes and cancer. Intensified research into primary 
mitochondrial disease will help further understanding into 
these other conditions.
    Gene therapy research.--The Committee is encouraged by 
promising research being undertaken in gene therapy, especially 
regarding thalassemia, or Cooley's anemia. NIH has indicated 
that human clinical trials could begin between 2008 and 2010. 
The Committee encourages that every step be taken to assure 
that this research moves forward without delay at the earliest 
possible date, consistent with safety.
    Drug safety for children.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of ensuring that drugs are safe and effective for 
use by children. The Committee strongly supports continued 
implementation of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act, 
which supports the pediatric testing of off-patent drugs. The 
Committee recognizes the important work of NICHD to implement 
this legislation. NICHD should continue to act as coordinator 
for all other Institutes within NIH for which pediatric 
pharmacological drug research may have therapeutic relevance, 
and, in consultation with the Food and Drug Administration, 
develop study requests. The Committee requests NICHD to provide 
an annual report on the implementation process instituted, 
including the process of prioritizing a list of needs in 
pediatric therapeutics; the number of pediatric studies 
supported to date through the research fund; the contributions 
of the individual Institutes of the NIH to the studies; the 
estimated cost of each ongoing or proposed study; the nature 
and type of studies proposed or undertaken including whether 
any studies are comparative; the estimated completion date of 
all proposed or ongoing studies; the patent status of the drugs 
studied; the number of drugs remaining on the priority list; 
and the key ethical, scientific, intellectual property, and 
operational issues that have arisen in the implementation of 
the program.
    Interdisciplinary genetic research.--Approximately one out 
of every 200 babies born has chromosomal abnormalities which by 
definition are multisystemic in that they are caused by changes 
in multiple genes and result in alterations to dozens of 
contiguous genes. The frequency and complexity of these 
conditions have a major impact on childhood morbidity and 
mortality. The Committee commends NIH for supporting 
independent investigators studying chromosome abnormalities and 
for partnering to sponsor meetings on many conditions. However, 
the Committee encourages NIH to sponsor mechanisms to support 
multidisciplinary, multi-institute research focused on devising 
treatments for the 20,000 babies born every year with a 
chromosome abnormality, especially those involving chromosome 
18.
    Peer review.--The Committee is concerned that individuals 
with surgical expertise are sometimes not assigned to surgical 
research grant application review. The Committee urges the 
Center for Scientific Review to ensure that there is an 
adequate number of specialty-specific peer reviewers, 
especially cardio-thoracic surgeons, in organ-specific or 
system-specific study sections reviewing surgical research 
applications.
    Study of gender differences.--The Committee notes that, in 
2001, the Institute of Medicine released a report that stressed 
the importance of biological gender as a basic variable that 
needs to be considered in all areas of biomedical research. 
Recent findings have demonstrated that significant differences 
between men and women exist in health and disease. One of the 
fields where such differences are most pronounced is 
neuroscience. The Committee strongly encourages each of the 15 
institutes involved in the NIH Neuroscience Blueprint to 
carefully analyze its NIH Neuroscience Blueprint research 
portfolio to ensure gender is included as a variable, when 
appropriate, and to require that all reported results include 
gender specific analysis. The Committee requests a written 
report from the Director that includes information on the 
progress of these efforts at each of the NIH Neuroscience 
Blueprint institutes prior to the fiscal year 2009 budget 
hearings.
    Basic behavioral research.--The Committee is aware that 
basic behavioral research focused on such areas as cognition, 
perception, emotion, social interaction, and learning have led 
to important advances and improved treatments for depression, 
bipolar and other affective disorders, diabetes, compliance on 
behavior change related to diabetes, heart disease, cancer, 
obesity, and more effective public health announcements and 
interventions. In view of the fact that eight out of the ten 
leading causes of death have a significant behavioral component 
and that basic research is the underpinning of advances in 
behavioral research, the Committee is concerned with the 
continued lack of focus of scientific leadership at NIH for 
this important field of science. However, the Committee views 
the new Office of Portfolio Analysis and Strategic Initiatives 
(OPASI) within the Office of the Director as a potentially 
important source of leadership in encouraging NIH investment in 
behavioral science research. The recent NIH reauthorization 
placed OBSSR within OPASI. As OPASI begins to perform its 
function of analyzing balance and content in all NIH areas of 
research, it would be appropriate for OPASI to set as an 
initial task a review of the NIH basic behavioral research 
portfolio. The Committee requests that the Director of NIH 
instruct OPASI, using OBSSR expertise, to prepare a strategic 
plan for basic behavioral research. This plan should include 
the amount spent in fiscal years 2006 and 2007, by institute 
and center, on basic behavioral research, and a plan for NIH's 
investment in basic behavioral research for fiscal year 2008 
and beyond. This strategic plan should also identify any gaps 
in the NIH basic behavioral research portfolio. The Committee 
expects to receive the strategic research plan no later than 
May 1, 2008.
    Disparities in clinical trials.--The Committee commends NIH 
for prioritizing increases in the number of participants from 
populations that suffer from health disparities in clinical 
trials as part of the NIH health disparity research plan. 
Unfortunately, data from NIH-funded trials continually show 
that participation numbers from certain groups, including 
racial and ethnic minorities and the elderly, remain low. The 
Committee encourages NIH to revisit the issue of health 
disparities in clinical trials with a goal of increasing 
participation from under-represented populations.
    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).--TSC is a genetic 
disorder that triggers uncontrollable tumor growth in multiple 
organs of the body, including the brain, heart, kidneys, lungs, 
liver, eyes and skin. Because of the effects of TSC on multiple 
organ systems, the Committee urges NIH to continue coordinating 
TSC research activities through the trans-NIH tuberous 
sclerosis coordinating committee. The Committee also encourages 
the various institutes that fund TSC research to place 
increased emphasis on this important research, and to increase 
coordination with the TSC community as future research plans 
are developed and executed.
    Minority training.--The Committee continues to recognize 
the critical role played by minority institutions at both the 
graduate and undergraduate level in addressing the health 
research and training needs of minority populations. These 
programs help facilitate the preparation of a new generation of 
scientists. The Committee encourages NIH to strengthen 
participation from minority institutions with a track record of 
producing minority scholars in science and technology.
    Bridging the sciences.--The Committee believes the 
``Bridging the Sciences'' demonstration program fulfills a need 
not met elsewhere in the Federal government by supporting 
research at the interface between the biological, behavioral, 
and social sciences with the physical, chemical, mathematical, 
and computational sciences. The Committee encourages the 
Director to give high priority to developing a demonstration 
program and to collaborate with the Department of Energy, the 
National Science Foundation, and other agencies. The Committee 
notes the importance of compliance with the statutory 
provisions dealing with appropriate, multidisciplinary peer 
review panels and the unique type of research envisioned.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

    Mission.--The Buildings and Facilities appropriation 
provides for the design, construction, improvement, and major 
repair of clinical, laboratory, and office buildings and 
supporting facilities essential to the mission of the National 
Institutes of Health. The funds in this appropriation support 
the 77 buildings on the main NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland; 
the Animal Center in Poolesville, Maryland; the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences facility in Research 
Triangle Park, North Carolina; and other smaller facilities 
throughout the United States.

       Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


               SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

    The Committee provides a program level of $3,393,841,000 
for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration (SAMHSA), which is $66,820,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $226,252,000 above the budget 
request. Within the total, $120,913,000 is provided through the 
evaluation set-aside, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
level and $250,000 less than the request. The Committee does 
not include requested bill language that would authorize SAMHSA 
to withhold 5 percent of State block grant allotments if a 
State does not report on national outcome measures and to 
redistribute those remaining to funds to States that do report.
    The majority of funding administered by SAMHSA, 70 percent, 
is distributed by statutory formula to States and territories. 
The rest of the programs administered by SAMHSA are competitive 
grants or contracts to State or private organizations or are 
competitive cooperative agreements to States, territories or 
tribal organizations that use an outside peer review process 
for evaluation.
    SAMHSA is responsible for supporting mental health and 
alcohol and drug abuse prevention and treatment services 
nationwide through discretionary capacity expansion and science 
to service activities, formula block grants to the States and 
associated technical assistance efforts. The agency consists of 
three principal centers: the center for mental health services, 
the center for substance abuse treatment, and the center for 
substance abuse prevention. The office of the administrator is 
responsible for overall agency management.
    The Committee provides $128,514,000 for activities 
throughout SAMHSA programs of regional and national 
significance that are targeted to address the growing HIV/AIDS 
epidemic and its disparate impact on communities of color, 
including African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian 
Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. This is 
$16,993,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$16,717,000 more than the budget request. These funds provide 
grants to organizations with a history of providing culturally 
competent, community-specific, and linguistically appropriate 
services in hard to reach and high-risk communities of color to 
expand service infrastructure and capacity.
    The Committee includes within the total provided for 
programs of regional and national significance across SAMHSA, 
$57,123,000 for homeless programs, which is $11,508,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $20,105,000 more 
than the budget request. The Committee is hopeful that programs 
that provide supportive services to individuals in permanent 
housing settings will help to end long-term homelessness in 
this country and directs SAMHSA to develop supportive services 
programs within the authority of the programs of regional and 
national significance.
    The Committee recognizes that substance abuse is at 
critically high levels among American Indians and Alaska 
Natives and is deeply concerned about the epidemic of mental 
health and substance abuse problems on reservations and among 
urban Indian populations. According to CDC, rates of substance 
abuse and dependency are the highest among the American Indian 
and Alaska Native population at 14.1 percent. The Committee is 
deeply troubled by recent reports, which state that 30 percent 
of American Indian youths have experimented with 
methamphetamines. The Committee encourages SAMHSA to strengthen 
outreach to tribal organizations, particularly with respect to 
the access to recovery and targeted capacity expansion-general 
programs, in order to increase tribal participation in these 
programs. Furthermore, the Committee requests SAMHSA to submit 
a report to the House Committee on Appropriations not later 
than six months after the enactment of this Act on its past 
outreach efforts to tribal organizations, the current 
participation rates of eligible tribal organizations, and 
barriers to access facing tribal organizations. Additionally, 
the Committee includes adequate funding to ensure that no less 
than $4,070,000 shall be made available to tribes and tribal 
organizations for treatment programs for mental illness and 
substance abuse.
    Health disparities need to be addressed as the demographics 
of our society are changing dramatically. The Committee notes 
that minorities represent 30 percent of the population and are 
projected to increase to 40 percent by 2025. Yet, only 23 
percent of recent doctorates in psychology, social work and 
nursing were awarded to minorities. For fiscal year 2008, the 
Committee has provided no less than the level allocated in 
fiscal year 2007 for the minority fellowship program in order 
to train culturally competent mental health, and substance 
abuse treatment and prevention professionals. The 
Administration did not request funding for this program.

Center for mental health services

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$910,625,000 for the center for mental health services (CMHS), 
which is $26,767,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
and $103,397,000 above the budget request. Within the total, 
$21,413,000 is provided through the evaluation set-aside as 
requested.
    Research shows that more than 90 percent of those who 
suffer from eating disorders are women between the ages of 12 
and 25. Data indicate that eating disorders are almost as 
prevalent as alcohol or drug problems among middle and high 
school female students, but that far less time is spent on 
preventing eating disorders than on substance abuse prevention 
programs. Therefore, the Committee urges SAMHSA to integrate 
eating disorder education and prevention programs into its core 
mental health programs, particularly those that serve middle 
and high school students.
            Programs of regional and national significance
    The Committee provides $277,030,000 for mental health 
programs of regional and national significance, which is 
$13,767,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$90,397,000 above the budget request. The program includes 
studies that identify the most effective service delivery 
practices, knowledge synthesis activities that translate 
program findings into useful products for the field, and 
knowledge application projects that support adoption of 
exemplary service approaches throughout the country.
    The Committee provides $96,156,000 to continue and expand 
violence prevention programs in schools, including elementary, 
secondary, and postsecondary educational institutions. This is 
$3,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$20,446,0000 more than the budget request. Funds are used by 
schools to establish an emergency/crisis management response 
plan; to provide mental health and substance abuse treatment 
services to those in need; to educate students on mental health 
promotion, suicide, and violence prevention; to prepare 
educational materials on mental health for students and 
families of students to increase awareness of mental health and 
substance abuse issues in young adults; to train students and 
school personnel to respond effectively to students with mental 
and behavioral health problems that could lead to school 
failure, substance abuse, and/or violent behaviors; and, as 
needed, to develop a network/infrastructure to link the school 
with health care providers who can treat mental and behavioral 
problems. Of this amount, the Committee intends that not less 
than $80,868,000 be used to collaborate with the Department of 
Education for the safe schools/healthy students initiative and 
not less than $3,000,000 shall be used for a jointly funded 
initiative administered by the Department of Education and 
SAMHSA to support competitive grants to institutions of higher 
education to develop and implement emergency management plans 
for preventing campus violence (including assessing and 
addressing the mental health needs of students) and for 
responding to threats and incidents of violence or natural 
disaster in a manner that ensures the safety of the campus 
community.
    Within funds provided, the Committee recommends $32,360,000 
for the national child traumatic stress initiative, which is 
$2,942,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$4,292,000 more than the budget request. This program has 
established 54 treatment development and community service 
centers to treat children who have experienced trauma and also 
supports the national center for traumatic stress. It is 
estimated that more than 34,000 traumatized children and their 
families will directly benefit from services delivered as a 
result of this initiative.
    The mental health needs of our nation's seniors are largely 
ignored within our mental health system. While many older 
Americans experience depression, dementia, anxiety and 
substance abuse disorders, far too often these conditions are 
not recognized or treated. Outreach to elderly persons 
conducted in places frequented by seniors, such as senior 
centers, meal sites, primary care settings and other locations, 
is needed. The elderly treatment and outreach program is the 
only Federally-funded services program dedicated specifically 
to the mental health care of older adults. It is for this 
reason that within the funds provided, the Committee recommends 
that no less than the level allocated in fiscal year 2007 be 
allocated for the older adults program. The Administration did 
not request funding for this program. Additionally, SAMHSA is 
urged to study, or to commission a study, examining the mental 
health workforce needed to address the healthcare needs of 
older adults.
    The Committee recognizes that veterans returning from Iraq 
and Afghanistan have enhanced needs for mental health care and 
other supportive services that they may want to access through 
the community. To improve veterans' access to mental health and 
related services, the Committee encourages SAMHSA to fund a 
pilot internet-based veterans' portal within the network of 
care. The portal should include a comprehensive service 
directory; a veteran-specific library; links to advocacy and 
support groups; and state-of-the-art, interactive technology 
for personal recordkeeping, and information-sharing. Such a 
resource will enable veterans and their families to identify 
and access available services, educate themselves about mental 
illnesses, facilitate communications with providers and others, 
and overcome the stigma that often prevents veterans from 
seeking care.
    According to CDC, teen suicide rates in the U.S. increased 
by 18 percent between 2003 and 2004. The Committee is deeply 
concerned by this disturbing development and urges SAMHSA to 
strengthen its efforts to assist local educational systems and 
non-profit entities to implement mental health screening and 
suicide prevention programs and to identify evidence-based 
practices for facilitating treatment for youth at risk. As 
evidence-based programs are developed and identified, the 
Committee urges SAMHSA to support activities in fiscal year 
2008 to determine how these practices can be best implemented 
at the community level.
    The Committee requests that SAMHSA provide not less than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level for statewide family network 
grants, consumer and consumer supported technical assistance 
centers, the national training and technical assistance center, 
the statewide consumer network program, and the anti-stigma 
campaign.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:
            Mental health block grant
    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$441,256,000 for the mental health block grant, which is 
$13,000,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the 
budget request. The block grant provides funds to States to 
support mental health prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation 
services. Funds are allocated according to statutory formula 
among the States that have submitted approved annual plans. The 
Committee notes that the mental health block grant funding 
represents less than 2 percent of total State mental health 
funding and less than 3 percent of State community-based mental 
health services. Within the total, $21,413,000 is provided 
through the evaluation set-aside as requested.
    The community mental health services block grant program 
distributes funds to 59 eligible States and territories through 
a formula based upon specified economic and demographic 
factors. Applications must include an annual plan for providing 
comprehensive community mental health services to adults with a 
serious mental illness and children with a serious emotional 
disturbance.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Access Community Health Center, Bloomingdale, IL for            $250,000
 mental health services..............................
Advocate Health Care, Oak Brook, IL for specialized              275,000
 and comprehensive psychotherapy and support to
 abused and neglected children and their families....
Alfred University, Alfred, NY for a graduate school              100,000
 psychologist training program.......................
American Red Cross, Lower Bucks County Chapter,                  100,000
 Levittown, PA to provide mental health counseling
 and case management services, along with related
 services............................................
City and County of San Francisco Department of Public          1,000,000
 Health, San Francisco, CA for mental health and
 substance abuse services for homeless persons in
 supportive housing..................................
City of Los Angeles, CA for supportive housing                   250,000
 services............................................
Community Rehabilitation Center, Inc., Jacksonville,             200,000
 FL for substance abuse and mental health programs...
Family Services of Greater Waterbury, Waterbury, CT              125,000
 for the outpatient counseling/psychiatric program...
Family Support Systems Unlimited, Inc., Bronx, NY for            150,000
 mental health services..............................
Fulton County Department of Mental Health, Atlanta,              100,000
 GA for a jail diversion program.....................
Heartland Health Outreach, Inc., Chicago, IL for                 150,000
 mental health services to refugee children..........
Helen Wheeler Center for Community Mental Health,                200,000
 Kankakee, IL for mental health services.............
Holy Spirit Hospital, Camp Hill, PA for the Teenline             100,000
 suicide prevention program..........................
Indiana Wesleyan University, Marion, IN for the                  150,000
 Institute of Training in Addiction Studies..........
Jewish Association for Residential Care, Farmington              200,000
 Hills, MI for the Lifelines project.................
Kids Hope United, Waukegan, IL for the multi-systemic            270,000
 therapy program for youth...........................
New Image Homeless Shelter, Los Angeles, CA for                   50,000
 mental health case management.......................
Pacific Clinics, Arcadia, CA for mental health and               250,000
 suicide prevention programs for Latina youth........
Prime Time House, Inc., Torrington, CT for mental                125,000
 health services.....................................
Ruth Rales Jewish Family Service, Boca Raton, FL to              100,000
 provide preventive youth mental health services and
 clinical outreach to at risk students...............
Ventura County Probation Office, Ventura, CA for                 200,000
 treatment and related services for juvenile
 offenders with mental health and chemical dependency
 problems............................................
Ventura County Sheriff's Department, Thousand Oaks,              200,000
 CA for training programs related to the mentally ill
Youthville, Wichita, KS for an adoption and trauma               300,000
 resource center.....................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

            Children's mental health
    The Committee provides $104,078,000 for the grant program 
for comprehensive community mental health services for children 
with serious emotional disorders, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. Funding 
for this program supports grants and technical assistance for 
community-based services for children and adolescents up to age 
22 with serious emotional, behavioral, or mental disorders. The 
program assists States and local jurisdictions in developing 
integrated systems of community care. Each individual served 
receives an individual service plan developed with the 
participation of the family and the child. Grantees are 
required to provide increasing levels of matching funds over 
the six-year grant period.
            Grants to States for the homeless (PATH)
    The Committee provides $54,261,000 for the grants to States 
for the homeless (PATH) program, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. PATH 
grants to States provide assistance to individuals suffering 
from severe mental illness and/or substance abuse disorders and 
who are homeless or at imminent risk of becoming homeless. 
Grants may be used for outreach, screening and diagnostic 
treatment services, rehabilitation services, community mental 
health services, alcohol or drug treatment services, training, 
case management services, supportive and supervisory services 
in residential settings, and a limited set of housing services.
            Protection and advocacy
    The Committee provides $34,000,000 for the protection and 
advocacy program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the budget request. This funding is 
distributed to States according to a formula based on 
population and income to assist State-designated independent 
advocates to provide legal assistance to mentally ill 
individuals during their residence in State-operated facilities 
and for 90 days following their discharge.

Center for substance abuse treatment

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$2,195,993,000 for the center for substance abuse treatment 
(CSAT), which is $38,453,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $85,312,000 above the budget request. Within the 
total, $83,500,000 is provided through the evaluation set-aside 
as requested.
    The Committee recognizes that the Asian American and 
Pacific Islander (AAPI) populations are one of the fastest 
growing groups in the U.S., and the need for substance abuse 
services continues to outpace the availability and access to 
culturally competent services. The Committee encourages SAMHSA 
to work with appropriate organizations that provide substance 
abuse services to create a comprehensive system of outreach, 
training, information and resources, and prevention and 
treatment services that will be culturally competent and 
accessible to all AAPI populations across the U.S.
            Programs of regional and national significance
    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$402,402,000 for substance abuse treatment programs of regional 
and national significance, which is $3,453,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $50,312,000 above the budget 
request. Within the total, $4,300,000 is provided through the 
evaluation set-aside as requested. The program supports 
activities to improve the accountability, capacity and 
effectiveness of substance abuse treatment services and 
services delivery. These activities include capacity expansion 
initiatives to help communities respond to serious, emerging 
and unmet treatment needs and science into services initiatives 
through monitoring and accreditation of treatment programs, 
training, dissemination and knowledge application activities. 
The program promotes the adoption of science- and evidence-
based treatment practices by developing and field-testing new 
treatment models in order to facilitate the provision of 
quality treatment services and service delivery. These 
activities are undertaken in actual service settings rather 
than laboratories and results are disseminated to State 
agencies and community treatment providers. The goal is to 
promote continuous, positive treatment service delivery change 
for those people who use and abuse alcohol and drugs.
    Within the funding provided, the Committee recommends 
$98,000,000 for the access to recovery treatment voucher 
program. This is $703,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The fiscal 
year 2008 funding will provide the second year of funding for 
State and tribal grantees that will be competing for funding in 
fiscal year 2007. Within this amount, $25,000,000 is dedicated 
to finance treatment services for methamphetamine abuse.
    Within the funding provided, the Committee recommends 
$37,823,000 for criminal justice activities, which is 
$13,709,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
the same as the budget request. The Committee provides an 
increase for treatment drug court grants, but also maintains 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level for other criminal justice 
programs. The Committee urges SAMHSA to ensure, through the 
grant application process, that successful applicants for the 
treatment drug court program demonstrate evidence of direct and 
extensive consultation and collaboration with the corresponding 
State substance abuse agency in the planning, implementation 
and evaluation of the grant.
    The Committee recommends no less than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level for the addiction technology transfer centers 
(ATTCs). The ATTC network operates 14 regional centers and one 
national office to translate the latest science of addiction, 
including evidence-based addiction treatment. The ATTCs also 
are an important component of the blending initiative that 
seeks to improve the manner in which research findings are 
moved into every day practice.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
City of Las Vegas, NV for the EVOLVE program.........           $200,000
City of Oxford, Oxford, MS for a substance abuse                 250,000
 treatment program...................................
Fulton County, Atlanta, GA for Project Excell, an                100,000
 intensive outpatient treatment program serving
 homeless males with co-occurring substance abuse and
 mental health disorders.............................
Gavin Foundation, South Boston, MA for substance                 250,000
 abuse treatment services at its Cushing House
 facility for adolescents............................
Glide Foundation, San Francisco, CA for substance                250,000
 abuse services......................................
Metro Homeless Youth Services of Los Angeles, Los                100,000
 Angeles, CA to expand services for homeless youth
 with substance abuse problems.......................
Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center,                        100,000
 Minneapolis, MN for a dual diagnosis outpatient
 treatment program...................................
Nassau University Medical Center, East Meadow, NY for            200,000
 substance abuse treatment services..................
Sandhills Teen Challenge, Carthage, NC for substance             100,000
 abuse treatment services............................
Sheriffs Youth Program of Minnesota, Inver Grove                 125,000
 Heights, MN for chemical dependency treatment
 services............................................
Talbert House, Cincinnati, OH for a substance abuse              300,000
 treatment program...................................
Trumbull County Lifelines, Warren, OH for behavioral             200,000
 health services.....................................
Union Station Foundation, Pasadena, CA for services              150,000
 to homeless families................................
United Way of Treasure Valley, Boise, ID for a                   400,000
 substance abuse treatment program...................
Wayne County Academy, Alpha, KY for a substance abuse            200,000
 counseling program..................................
WestCare Kentuckv, Ashcamp, KY for a substance abuse             200,000
 treatment proqram...................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

            Substance abuse prevention and treatment block grant
    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$1,793,591,000 for the substance abuse prevention and treatment 
(SAPT) block grant, which is $35,000,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and the budget request. Within the 
total, $79,200,000 is provided through the evaluation set-aside 
as requested. The SAPT block grant provides funds to States to 
support alcohol and drug abuse prevention, treatment, and 
rehabilitation services. Funds are allocated among the States 
according to a statutory formula. State applications including 
comprehensive State plans must be approved annually by SAMHSA 
as a condition of receiving funds.
    The Committee is aware that the SAPT block grant is an 
effective and efficient program. Data collected from States 
demonstrate that SAPT block grant funded programs help people 
remain abstinent from alcohol and other drug use; find or 
regain employment; find stable housing; stay away from criminal 
activity; reunite with their families; and live productively in 
communities across the country. The Committee is aware, for 
example, that certain SAPT block grant funded programs report 
that approximately 70 to 80 percent of persons completing 
treatment are abstinent at discharge. The Committee is also 
aware that States employ a broad range of accountability 
strategies to ensure that SAPT block grant funded services 
achieve results. Overall, the SAPT block grant funds over 
10,500 community-based organizations to help serve the nation's 
most vulnerable citizens--including those with HIV/AIDS. The 
Committee applauds States for supporting family treatment 
services through the SAPT block grant given the impact of 
addiction on children, women, and families.
    The Committee recognizes the important role played by the 
20 percent prevention services set-aside within the SAPT block 
grant. This effective substance abuse prevention program helped 
contribute to a 23 percent decrease in youth drug use over the 
last five years. The Committee urges SAMHSA to promote maximum 
flexibility in the use of prevention set-aside funds in order 
to allow each State to employ prevention strategies that match 
State and local circumstances.

Center for substance abuse prevention

            Programs of regional and national significance
    The Committee provides $194,502,000 for the substance abuse 
prevention programs of regional and national significance, 
which is $1,600,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $38,041,000 more than the budget request. The program 
identifies and disseminates evidence-based substance abuse 
prevention approaches.
    Within the total, the Committee recommends $7,000,000 to 
carry out programs authorized by the Sober Truth on Preventing 
(STOP) Underage Drinking Act: $5,000,000 for community-based 
coalition enhancement grants; $1,000,000 for the 
Intergovernmental Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of 
Underage Drinking (ICCPUD); and, $1,000,000 to continue and 
enhance the national adult-oriented media public service 
campaign to prevent underage drinking. The Committee intends 
that the funding provided to ICCPUD will be used to provide a 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on 
State underage drinking prevention and enforcement activities 
consistent with the STOP Underage Drinking Act, including a 
comprehensive summary of the actions taken to accomplish the 
recommendations in the Surgeon General's call to action.
    The Committee commends the Surgeon General's ``Call to 
Action'' on underage drinking, and shares the Surgeon General's 
concern about new research indicating that the developing 
adolescent brain may be particularly susceptible to long term 
harms from alcohol use, including neurocognitive impairment. 
The Committee urges ICCPUD to develop and pursue efforts to 
carry out the Surgeon General's Call to Action, including 
supporting and assisting State and local efforts. The Committee 
encourages the Surgeon General and the administrator of SAMHSA 
to continue speaking out on the issue.
    The strategic prevention framework state incentive grant 
(SPF SIG) program is designed to promote, bolster, and sustain 
prevention infrastructure in every State in the country. The 
Committee recognizes that the lynchpin of the SPF SIG program 
is State flexibility. Therefore, the Committee urges SAMHSA to 
promote flexibility in the use of SPF SIG funds in order to 
allow each State to tailor prevention strategies that are most 
appropriate for the populations in their own jurisdiction.
    The Committee recommends funding at no less than the level 
provided in fiscal year 2007 for the centers for the 
application of prevention technologies (CAPTs). The 
Administration did not request funding for this program. The 
purpose of the CAPTs is to translate the latest substance abuse 
prevention science and improve the practices of prevention 
professionals and community coalition members. The CAPTs are 
SAMHSA's only regional network system that provides substance 
abuse prevention workforce training through regional 
conferences, workshops, customized technical assistance, 
curriculum development, online courses, and trainer events.
    The Committee supports the continuation and enhancement of 
SAMHSA's fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) center for 
excellence, and requests that SAMHSA submit a progress report 
within six months of enactment of this bill on the center's 
accomplishments and lessons learned in preventing and reducing 
FASD. The report should outline future plans for the center, 
including programmatic and funding priorities.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, New                 $500,000
 Haven, CT to support innovative multi-disciplinary
 intervention programs serving children and families
 exposed to violence and trauma......................
Fighting Back Partnership, Vallejo, CA for an                    250,000
 intervention program targeting elementary and high
 school students who are at risk for substance abuse
 and misuse..........................................
Institute for the Advanced Study of Black Families,              150,000
 Oakland, CA for integrated HIV/AIDS and substance
 abuse prevention with African American women and
 teenagers...........................................
Operation SafeHouse, Riverside, CA for a substance               100,000
 abuse prevention program............................
Partnership for a Drug-Free America, New York, NY for            250,000
 educational awareness programs on prescription and
 over-the-counter drug abuse.........................
Shiloh Economic Development Center, Bryan, TX for a              150,000
 substance abuse prevention program..................
South Boston Community Health Center, South Boston,              100,000
 MA for substance abuse prevention services..........
YMCA of the East Bay, Richmond, CA for substance                 100,000
 abuse orevention activities.........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Program management

    The Committee provides a program level total of $92,721,000 
for program management, of which $16,000,000 is provided 
through the evaluation set-aside. The fiscal year 2008 program 
level is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$498,000 less than the budget request. The appropriation 
provides funding to coordinate, direct, and manage the agency's 
programs. Funds are used for salaries, benefits, space, 
supplies, equipment, travel and overhead.

               Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    The Committee provides a total of $329,564,000 for the 
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), which is 
$10,578,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
the same as the budget request.
    The mission of AHRQ is to improve the quality, safety, 
efficiency, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of health 
care for all Americans. The agency fulfills its mission by 
conducting and supporting health services research that focuses 
on answering questions on such topics as clinical practice, 
outcomes of care and effectiveness, evidenced-based medicine, 
health care quality, patient safety and medical errors, health 
care costs and financing, and health information technology. 
AHRQ research findings are used by providers, health care 
administrators, and others to improve health care quality, 
accessibility, and outcomes of care.
    The Committee provides $271,564,000 for research on health 
costs, quality, and outcomes, which is $10,578,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This program identifies the most effective and 
efficient approaches to organize, deliver, finance, and 
reimburse health care services; determines how the structure of 
the delivery system, financial incentives, market forces, and 
better information affects the use, quality, and cost of health 
services; and facilitates the translation of research findings 
for providers, patients, plans, purchasers, and policymakers. 
It also funds research that determines what works best in 
increasing the cost effectiveness and appropriateness of 
clinical practice; supports the development of tools to measure 
and evaluate health outcomes, quality of care, and consumer 
satisfaction with health care system performance; and 
facilitates the translation of information into practical uses 
through the development and dissemination of research 
databases.
    Within the total available, the Committee does not provide 
funding requested by the Administration for the new ``network 
of networks'' under the personalized health care initiative. 
The Committee is concerned that HHS has yet to develop a 
detailed, integrated, and coherent implementation plan for 
achieving health information technology strategic goals, as 
recommended by the General Accounting Office. The Committee 
includes report language within the Office of the National 
Coordinator for Health Information Technology that requests a 
report that identifies specific program objectives; details the 
timelines and performance benchmarks to achieve these 
objectives; and links specific initiatives and resources to 
these program objectives. The report also should include 
information on health information technology activities funded 
through AHRQ.
    Within the total for research on health costs, quality, and 
outcomes, $30,000,000 is provided for the comparative 
effectiveness health care research program, which is 
$15,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
the budget request. This program provides current, unbiased 
evidence about the comparative effectiveness of different 
health care interventions. The objective of the program is to 
help consumers, health care providers, and others make informed 
choices among treatment alternatives, including drugs.
    Safe patient handling and movement.--The Committee is 
concerned about the consequences of manual patient lifting, 
transferring and movement in hospitals, nursing homes and other 
patient care settings that can be a detriment to quality 
patient care, including increased risk of injury to patients 
from being lifted and moved without assistive equipment and 
patient injuries including skin tears, skin ulceration, falls 
and shoulder dislocations. The Committee is further concerned 
by findings that a nurse on a typical shift lifts 1.8 tons and 
that work-related injuries to nurses frequently result in loss 
of work time and can be debilitating, career-ending events, and 
that injury and fear of injury are listed as top reasons why 
nurses leave the profession thereby exacerbating the already 
critical nursing shortage. The Committee urges AHRQ to 
undertake or commission a study to determine the impact of 
utilizing assistive devices and patient-lifting equipment on 
patient injuries and outcomes, the health and safety of nurses, 
and the financial implications of using available technology.
    Spina bifida.--The Committee supports the expansion and 
development of the national spina bifida patient registry and 
encourages AHRQ to lead the effort to validate quality patient 
treatment data measures for the registry being developed with 
CDC. The Committee requests that AHRQ report to Congress on the 
status of this effort as part of the fiscal year 2009 budget 
justification.
    The Committee provides $55,300,000 for the Medical 
Expenditures Panel Surveys (MEPS), which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. The MEPS 
provide data for timely national estimates of health care use 
and expenditures, private and public health insurance coverage, 
and the availability, costs, and scope of private health 
insurance benefits. This activity also provides data for 
analysis of changes in behavior as a result of market forces or 
policy changes on health care use, expenditures, and insurance 
coverage; develops cost/savings estimates of proposed changes 
in policy; and identifies the impact of changes in policy for 
subgroups of the population.
    For program support, the Committee provides $2,700,000 
which is the same as fiscal year 2007 funding level and the 
budget request. This activity supports the overall direction 
and management of the agency.

               Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services


                     GRANTS TO STATES FOR MEDICAID

    The Committee provides $141,630,056,000 for the Federal 
share of current law state Medicaid costs, which is 
$36,159,099,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$2,000,000 above the budget request. This amount does not 
include $65,257,617,000 which was advance funded in the fiscal 
year 2007 appropriation for the first quarter of fiscal year 
2008. In addition, the Committee provides an advance 
appropriation of $67,292,669,000 for program costs in the first 
quarter of fiscal year 2009. The Committee has also included 
indefinite budget authority for unanticipated costs in fiscal 
year 2008.
    Medicaid is projected to provide health care to 50.0 
million people in fiscal year 2008, an increase of 1.9 percent. 
This represents 16.9 percent of the U.S. population. Medicaid 
will provide coverage to more than one out of every five 
children in the nation. Non-disabled adults under age 65 and 
children will represent 72 percent of the Medicaid population, 
but account for 32 percent of Medicaid benefit outlays. In 
contrast, the elderly and disabled populations are estimated to 
make up 28 percent of the Medicaid population, yet account for 
approximately 68 percent of Medicaid benefit outlays. Medicaid 
is the largest payer for long-term care for all Americans.

                  PAYMENTS TO HEALTH CARE TRUST FUNDS

    The Committee provides $188,828,000,000 for the payments to 
the health care trust funds account, which supports Part B and 
prescription drug benefits for 44.6 million Medicare 
beneficiaries. This amount is $12,529,520,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $200,000,000 above the budget 
request. This entitlement account includes the general fund 
subsidy to the Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust 
Fund for Medicare Part B benefits and for Medicare drug 
benefits and administration as well as other reimbursements to 
the Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund for benefits and 
related administrative costs, which have not been financed by 
payroll taxes or premium contributions. The Committee continues 
to include bill language requested by the Administration 
providing indefinite authority for paying the general revenue 
portion of the Part B premium match and provides resources for 
the Part D drug benefit program in the event that the annual 
appropriation is insufficient.

                           PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

    The Committee makes available $3,230,163,000 in trust funds 
for Federal administration of the Medicare and Medicaid 
programs, which is $89,056,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $43,863,000 below the budget request.
    Research, demonstration, and evaluation.--The Committee 
provides $23,070,000 for research, demonstration and 
evaluation, which is $34,350,000 below the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $10,630,000 below the budget request. These 
funds support a variety of studies and demonstrations in such 
areas as monitoring and evaluating health system performance; 
improving health care financing and delivery mechanisms; 
modernization of the Medicare program; the needs of vulnerable 
populations in the areas of health care access, delivery 
systems, and financing; and information to improve consumer 
choice and health status. The Committee includes the full 
request of $14,400,000 for the Medicare Current Beneficiary 
Survey. Funding requested by the Administration for Real Choice 
Systems Change grants not included in the bill.
    The Committee encourages CMS to conduct a demonstration 
project to identify effective therapy management program models 
for low-income Medicare Part D enrollees living with HIV/AIDS. 
The demonstration project would emphasize evidence-based 
prospective medication management, technological innovation, 
and outcome reporting. Recent medical studies show that 
patients receiving medication therapy management services for 
HIV dramatically improve their clinical status and demonstrate 
significant cost reductions in their overall health care.
    The Committee commends CMS on its work to implement the 
low-vision rehabilitation services demonstration. The Committee 
encourages CMS to update the design and consider expanding the 
number of sites in the five-year demonstration.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Access Health, Inc., Muskegon, MI, for a small                  $200,000
 business health coverage program....................
Bedford Ride, Bedford, VA for a program to assist                 70,000
 seniors.............................................
Bi-State Primary Care Association, Concord, NH to                300,000
 treat uninsured patients............................
City and County of San Francisco Department of Public          1,000,000
 Health, San Francisco, CA for enhancements to the
 HIV/AIDS service delivery system in San Francisco...
City of Detroit, MI for the Detroit Primary Care                 300,000
 Access Project......................................
City of Waterbury, CT for a health access program....            200,000
Gadsden County, FL, Quincy, FL for a prescription                100,000
 assistance medical services program.................
Jefferson Area Board for Aging, Charlottesville, VA              100,000
 to address nursing assistant shortages in long-term
 care settings.......................................
Orange County's Primary Care Access Network, Orlando,            200,000
 FL for a health care access network.................
Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, GA for a project                     150,000
 regarding the transition of older patients from
 hospital to home....................................
Thurston-Mason County Medical Society, Olympia, WA               200,000
 for Project Access for the uninsured................
Valley Hospice, Inc., Steubenville, OH to develop                250,000
 best practices for hospices across the State........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Medicare operations.--The Committee provides $2,221,215,000 
to support Medicare claims processing contracts, which is 
$61,973,000 above the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$82,400,000 below the budget request. This activity supports 
the two largest Federal health care programs, Medicare and 
Medicaid, along with the State Children's Health Insurance 
Program (SCHIP) and the Medicare prescription drug program. CMS 
is the largest purchaser of health care in the U.S., serving 
about 92 million Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries, including 
those covered under SCHIP.
    The Committee includes bill language that extends the 
availability of $163,800,000 until September 30, 2009 for 
Medicare contracting reform activities. Bill language requested 
by the Administration directing CMS to ensure that no fewer 
than fifteen Medicare administrative contractors begin 
operations by December 15, 2008 is not included in the bill. 
The amount provided for contracting reform activities is 
sufficient to support the fiscal year 2008 activities of the 
first phase of contracts to be awarded in fiscal year 2007. The 
Committee also includes bill language requested by the 
Administration providing $49,869,000 for the Healthcare 
Integrated General Ledger Accounting System, to remain 
available until September 30, 2009. The Committee does not 
include language from the fiscal year 2007 bill identifying a 
particular funding level for the CMS revitalization plan with 
extended funding availability because the revitalization plan 
is concluding and funding for the remainder of the project is 
provided within the account without extended availability.
    Within this total, the Committee provides $45,000,000 for 
the State Health Insurance Program (SHIP), which is $10,800,000 
above the fiscal year 2007 level and $10,600,000 above the 
Administration request. The Committee believes SHIP is an 
important vehicle to help the nearly 45 million Medicare 
beneficiaries grapple with changes in coverage and prescription 
drug plans. SHIP provides one-on-one counseling to those who 
have trouble accessing the internet or the toll-free hotlines.
    The Committee is concerned that many seniors do not have a 
good understanding of the benefits covered, and not covered, 
under the Medicare program. In particular, studies have 
indicated that a majority of adults who are 45 or older 
overestimate Medicare coverage for long-term care. The 
Committee commends CMS for stating its intention to inform all 
target households through its initial mailings that ``Medicare 
generally does not pay'' for long term care. The Committee also 
encourages the Department to use other efficient communication 
methods, in addition to the Internet and direct mail, to 
clarify widely held misperceptions about Medicare and long term 
care. This policy would allow individuals to better prepare for 
their potential long-term care needs without impoverishing 
themselves to qualify for Medicaid where they have limited 
choices beyond institutional care.
    The Committee commends CMS for its initial community-based 
activities for a Medicare education and outreach campaign 
directed towards dual eligible persons. The Committee is aware, 
however, that there is considerable evidence that low-income 
dual eligible persons with mental disabilities continue to need 
direct help with Part D enrollment. The Committee urges CMS to 
increase the share of funds for one-on-one pharmaceutical 
benefits counseling that are provided for counseling of dual 
eligible persons through community-based organizations and 
safety net community mental health centers.
    Biomedical research progress is enabling increasing numbers 
of type I diabetes patients to live with this disease for more 
than fifty years. Recent advances in continuous glucose 
monitoring technology have the potential to revolutionize the 
way diabetes is managed on a daily basis, and the Committee is 
aware that more research is underway to validate this 
technology in a variety of patient populations under ``real 
world'' conditions. While research is underway, the Committee 
urges CMS not to make premature coverage decisions for this 
durable medical equipment or take actions that would delay the 
adoption of these technologies. The Committee commends CMS's 
current efforts to stimulate the exploration of emerging 
technologies in the device area and believes the potential of 
continuous monitoring devices is worthy of further exploration.
    State survey and certification.--The Committee provides 
$293,524,000 for state inspections of facilities serving 
Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries, which is $35,396,000 above 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. The Committee does not include bill language requested 
by the Administration which authorizes the Secretary of Health 
and Human Services to charge fees associated with conducting 
revisit surveys at health care facilities.
    This program supports the certification and periodic 
inspection of more than 52,000 facilities receiving Medicare 
funding, such as nursing homes, hospitals, hospices, and 
rehabilitation centers. In 2008, more than 70,000 surveys are 
expected to be conducted. The number of facilities requiring 
certification has increased dramatically in recent years--16 
percent since 2002.
    State high risk insurance pools.--The Committee provides 
$50,000,000 to support the State high risk insurance pools 
program. This program was not funded in fiscal year 2007. The 
Administration did not request funding for fiscal year 2008.
    33 States currently operate high-risk pools that are the 
health insurers of last resort for almost 200,000 individuals 
who have lost or are ineligible for group insurance coverage, 
and who are medically high-risk and unable to purchase 
individual health insurance in the commercial market. High-risk 
pools represent a successful public/private partnership. All 
risk pool participants pay a monthly premium, capped at 125 to 
200 percent of the average market premium. Insurers and health 
care providers support the program through assessments, and 
some States contribute to their pools.
    Federal administration.--The Committee provides 
$642,354,000 to support Federal administrative activities 
related to the Medicare and Medicaid programs, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $833,000 below 
the budget request. As requested by the Administration, the 
Committee repeats language from last year's bill authorizing 
CMS to use funds for the Healthy Start, Grow Smart program for 
parents of children enrolled in the Medicaid program.
    The Committee believes that the growing gap between the 
size of the nation's aging baby boom population and the number 
of pulmonary/critical care physicians poses challenges to the 
future delivery of high quality, efficient care under Medicare 
and Medicaid. The Committee urges CMS to review HRSA's May 2006 
Report to Congress, ``The Critical Care Workforce: A Study of 
Supply and Demand for Critical Care Physicians'', and to 
consult with relevant critical care societies to develop 
recommendations and pulmonary/critical care-based models to be 
tested to alleviate the impact of the critical care workforce 
shortage on Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries.
    The Committee notes ongoing concern regarding Medicare 
beneficiary access to the lifesaving biologic therapy 
intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). The Committee encourages 
CMS to continue to work with members of the IVIG community to 
address these challenges, and commends CMS for establishing 
separate Medicare codes for each brand of IVIG introduced in 
the market after October 1, 2003.

                  HEALTH CARE FRAUD AND ABUSE CONTROL

    The Committee provides $383,000,000 to be transferred from 
the Medicare trust funds for health care fraud and abuse 
control activities conducted by CMS, the HHS Inspector General, 
and the Department of Justice, which is $200,000,000 above the 
Administration request. This activity has not been funded in 
prior years. This funding is in addition to $1,131,031,000 that 
is provided as mandatory funding through authorizing bills. 
These funds provide resources for expanded efforts for Medicaid 
program integrity activities, for safeguarding the Medicare 
prescription drug benefit and the Medicare Advantage program, 
and for program integrity efforts carried out by the Department 
of Justice.

                Administration for Children and Families


  PAYMENTS TO STATES FOR CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT AND FAMILY SUPPORT 
                                PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $2,949,713,000 for the child 
support enforcement and family support programs, and 
$1,000,000,000 in advance funding for the first quarter of 
fiscal year 2009 to ensure timely payments for the child 
support enforcement program. This amount is the same as the 
budget request. The Committee recommends estimated funding of 
$38,000,000 for payments to territories, the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and the budget request. The Committee 
notes that the authorized funding level for the repatriation 
program is set at $1,000,000 under section 1113(d) of the 
Social Security Act even though approximately $1,300,000 is 
needed to support the current repatriation program. The 
Committee urges the authorizing committee of jurisdiction to 
adjust the ceiling to accommodate the current nonemergency 
needs of the program as well as to permit rapid response to 
emergency repatriation of U.S. citizens due to war, threat of 
war, invasion, natural disaster, or similar crises.

                   LOW INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $2,662,000,000 for the low income 
home energy assistance program (LIHEAP). This amount is 
$500,830,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$880,000,000 more than the budget request. The Committee 
recommends $1,980,000,000 for the State formula grants, which 
is $480,000,000 more than the budget request and the same as 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level. The Committee recommends 
$682,000,000 for the contingent emergency reserve. This is 
$500,830,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$400,000,000 more than the budget request.
    LIHEAP provides assistance to low-income households to help 
pay the costs of home energy. This program serves the most 
vulnerable in the country--94 percent of households receiving 
LIHEAP grants have at least one family member who is elderly, 
disabled, a child under 18, or have a single adult living with 
one or more children. More than three quarters of such 
households reported an annual income at or below $20,000. 
Currently only 16 percent of eligible households based on 
Federal guidelines receive LIHEAP assistance. The amount 
recommended by the Committee could provide energy assistance to 
1,252,075 more families than in fiscal year 2007.

                     REFUGEE AND ENTRANT ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $650,630,000 for refugee 
assistance programs. This is $62,783,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $5,000,000 less than the budget 
request.
    In addition, the Committee recommends that the Office of 
Refugee Resettlement (ORR) again be granted authority to carry 
over unexpended funds from fiscal year 2008 to reimburse the 
costs of services provided through September 30, 2010, for all 
programs within the jurisdiction of ORR.

Transitional and medical services

    The Committee recommends $294,021,000 for transitional and 
medical services. This is $28,475,000 more than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
transitional and medical services program provides funding for 
the State-administered cash and medical assistance program that 
assists refugees who are not categorically eligible for TANF or 
Medicaid, the unaccompanied minors program that reimburses 
States for the cost of foster care, and the voluntary agency 
grant program in which participating national refugee 
resettlement agencies provide resettlement assistance with a 
combination of Federal and matched funds.

Victims of trafficking

    The Committee recommends up to $9,814,000 for the victims 
of trafficking program. This is $9,000 less than the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $5,002,000 less than the budget 
request. The Committee strongly supports the continued 
administration of a national network for identification, 
tracking, and certification of trafficking victims. The 
Committee's recommendation does not include funds for an 
unauthorizied grant program for domestic victims of 
trafficking. Many of the domestic victims are eligible for 
Federal benefits in addition to all trafficking benefits, 
except those reserved for refugees.
    The Committee supports efforts to ensure that child 
trafficking victims do not remain trapped in life-threatening 
situations out of fear of being interrogated by law enforcement 
authorities. The Committee requests the Department to expedite 
letters of eligibility so that minor victims may be connected 
to benefits without delay. Furthermore, the Committee is 
concerned about the low number of child trafficking victims 
being identified and recommends that the Department expand its 
practices on the identification of human trafficking victims.

Social services

    The Committee recommends $154,005,000 for social services. 
This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$4,395,000 more than the budget request. Funds are distributed 
by formula as well as through the discretionary grant-making 
process for special projects.
    Within the funds provided, the Committee has included 
$19,000,000 for support to communities with large 
concentrations of Cuban and Haitian entrants of varying ages 
whose cultural differences make assimilation especially 
difficult, justifying a more intense level and longer duration 
of Federal assistance.
    The Committee continues to request that the Administration 
for Children and Families adequately fund refugee school impact 
grants.

Preventive health

    The Committee recommends $4,748,000 for preventive health 
services. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $48,000 more than the budget request. These 
funds are awarded to States to ensure adequate health 
assessment activities for refugees.

Targeted assistance

    The Committee recommends $48,590,000 for the targeted 
assistance program. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $486,000 more than the budget request. 
These grants provide assistance to areas with high 
concentrations of refugees.

Unaccompanied minors

    The Committee recommends $129,635,000 for the unaccompanied 
minors program. This is $34,317,000 more than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $5,027,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recognizes the complexity of detention for 
unaccompanied children (UAC) awaiting removal proceedings and 
urges the Administration for Children and Families to ensure 
that the safety and humane treatment of these children are key 
priorities of the agencies that detain them. The Committee has 
included additional funds for the care and placement of an 
increasing number of UAC through foster care, shelter care, 
staff secure or secure detention centers, and for additional 
field staff in areas of high apprehensions. The Committee 
supports the Department's efforts to prioritize care for UACs 
in child-centered, age-appropriate, small group and foster-care 
settings. The Committee requests the Department to brief the 
Committee on the allegations of abuse by shelter staff and what 
steps the Department is taking to prevent such abuse in the 
future. The Committee does not recommend that funds be included 
for expanded background checks before placement of UAC. Most of 
the funds requested for this activity would pay for additional 
shelter costs as new background checks would lengthen the 
average shelter stay of a UAC by one to three weeks. The 
Committee believes this additional cost is excessive because 
ORR currently performs, and the Committee expects it to 
continue to perform, a rigorous background check on each adult 
to whom a child is released and conducts a home assessment as 
circumstances warrant.
    The Committee supports the Department's efforts to provide 
medical service that meet quality standards for the children 
under its care. The Committee directs the Department to provide 
the Committee a report on expenses incurred in fiscal years 
2007 and 2008 and what it expects to incur in fiscal year 2009 
delivering routine, emergent, and emergency mental and physical 
medical services to UAC.
    The Committee recognizes the legal representation crisis 
and need for guardians for UAC and is pleased with the progress 
ORR has made in implementing pro bono pilot programs. The 
Committee's recommendation includes funds to expand the pilot 
program as a national pro bono legal services program to ensure 
representation of all UAC in adversarial immigration removal 
proceedings and affirmative asylum proceedings. The Committee 
expects these funds to be matched with non-Federal funds 
through a public-private partnership. The Committee intends 
that pro bono attorneys participating in this program shall be 
trained by experts in immigration law and provided with mentors 
to ensure effective representation. Additionally, in light of 
the time attorneys will be expected to spend with their UAC 
clients, the Committee intends these funds to be used to train 
the attorneys to detect abuse, mistreatment, labor 
exploitation, and trafficking. Finally, the Committee intends 
these funds to be used to train the attorneys in methods to 
ensure the appearance of UAC at immigration court hearings. In 
fiscal year 2006 approximately 93 percent of children released 
from custody appeared at their hearings when represented by 
counsel. Furthermore, according to the U.S. Commission for 
International Religious Freedom, asylum-seekers represented by 
counsel are more than eight times as likely to be granted 
asylum as those unrepresented by counsel.

Victims of torture

    The Committee recommends $9,817,000 to provide a 
comprehensive program of support for domestic centers and 
programs for victims of torture. This is the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $100,000 more than the budget 
request.

   PAYMENTS TO STATES FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT

    The Committee recommends $2,137,081,000 for the 
discretionary portion of the child care and development block 
grant program, which provides child care services for low-
income families. The Committee recommendation provides an 
$75,000,000 increase over the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
and the budget request. The recommendation is part of its 
initiative to help reduce the number of abortions in America by 
alleviating the economic pressures and other real life 
conditions that can sometimes cause women to decide not to 
carry their pregnancies to term.
    The discretionary portion of this block grant has remained 
essentially frozen since fiscal year 2002, resulting in a 
severe drop in the number of children served. The Committee's 
recommendation takes a step toward reversing this trend.
    The Committee believes that child care is an important 
investment for two reasons. First, child care assistance is key 
if low-income parents are to be able to work and become self-
sufficient. Single mothers who receive child care assistance 
are 40 percent more likely to remain employed after two years 
than those who do not receive assistance in paying for child 
care. Second, studies have shown that high-quality child care 
helps ensure that children enter school ready to succeed. By 
second grade, children who had received high-quality care 
demonstrated greater mathematical ability, greater thinking and 
attention skills, and fewer behavioral problems than the 
children who had received lower-quality care.

                      SOCIAL SERVICES BLOCK GRANT

    The Committee recommends $1,700,000,000 for the social 
services block grant (SSBG). This amount is the same as the 
fiscal year 2007 level. The Committee rejects the 
Administration's proposal to cut SSBG by $500,000,000. The 
Committee continues to provide this flexible source of funding 
to help local communities provide a variety of social services 
to needy individuals and their families, including services 
that help prevent dependency, inappropriate institutional care, 
and neglect and abuse of children and adults.

                CHILDREN AND FAMILIES SERVICES PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends a program level total of 
$9,127,110,000 for children and families services programs. 
This is $178,140,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $877,021,000 more than the budget request. Within the 
total provided, $10,500,000 is provided through the evaluation 
set-aside. This account finances a number of programs aimed at 
enhancing the well-being of the nation's children and families, 
particularly those who are disadvantaged or troubled.

Head Start

    The Committee recommends $6,963,571,000 for the Head Start 
program, which is $75,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $175,000,000 more than the budget request. Of 
this total, the Committee recommends advancing $1,388,800,000 
of this account for fiscal year 2008.
    The Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2007, granted 
Head Start its first increase since fiscal year 2002. After 
five years of level funding, centers across the country were 
forced to cut hours, transportation, and educational 
instruction, which have threatened the quality of the programs. 
In this recommendation, the Committee takes another step to 
restore a portion of those deep cuts in real terms and permit 
communities to enhance the quality of comprehensive child 
development services to economically disadvantaged children and 
their families. The Committee continues its strong support for 
this program that promotes school readiness by enhancing the 
social and cognitive development of children through 
educational, health, nutritional, social, and other services. 
The Committee's $75,000,000 increase over fiscal year 2007 is 
part of its initiative to help reduce the number of abortions 
in America by alleviating the economic pressures and other real 
life conditions that can sometimes cause women to decide not to 
carry their pregnancies to term.
    The Committee recognizes that a recent study showed that 
children who participated in early Head Start had a higher 
cognitive development score, demonstrated a higher level of 
social-emotional development, a higher vocabulary, and higher 
rates of immunization than children not enrolled in early Head 
Start. The Committee further recognizes that only 2 percent of 
children eligible for early Head Start are currently served by 
this program. Therefore, the Committee urges the Office of Head 
Start to consider its value to children, families, and our 
communities and increase the level of funding available for 
grants for early Head Start programs.

Consolidated runaway and homeless youth programs

    The Committee recommends $97,837,000 for runaway and 
homeless youth activities (RHYA). This is an increase of 
$10,000,000 over the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the 
budget request. Funds for this program are distributed between 
the basic center program and the transitional living program 
under a statutory formula.
    The runaway and homeless youth programs provide grants to 
local public and private organizations to establish and operate 
runaway and homeless youth shelters to address the crisis needs 
of runaway and homeless youth and their families. Grants are 
used to develop or strengthen community-based shelters, which 
are outside the law enforcement, juvenile justice, child 
welfare, and mental health systems.
    The Committee supports the Department's efforts to place 
greater emphasis on runaway prevention activities under the 
RHYA program. The Committee encourages the Secretary to explore 
additional methods to promote and expand these prevention 
efforts.
    The Committee's recommendation includes a $10,000,000 
increase as part of its initiative to help reduce the number of 
abortions in America by alleviating the economic pressures and 
other real life conditions that can sometimes cause women to 
decide not to carry their pregnancies to term. The increase 
will fund approximately 70 new shelters that will provide youth 
essential life-skills, connect youth to education, workforce 
and other supports, and expand services to pregnant/parenting 
youth.

Prevention grants to reduce abuse of runaway youth

    The Committee recommends $15,027,000 for prevention grants 
to reduce abuse of runaway youth. This is the same as the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. This 
program provides grants to support street-based outreach and 
education to runaway, homeless, and street youth who have been 
sexually abused or who are at-risk of sexual abuse. The street 
outreach program ensures rapid engagement with young people in 
an effort to prevent the most terrible situations that take 
place when they are subjected to life on the streets, including 
physical and sexual abuse, assault, commercial sexual 
exploitation, disease, long-term homelessness, and even death.

Child abuse State grants and discretionary activities

    For child abuse State grants and discretionary activities, 
the Committee recommends $63,840,000. This is $11,053,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $695,000 more than 
the budget request. Within this total, the recommendation 
includes $27,007,000 for State grants and $36,833,000 for child 
abuse discretionary activities.
    The Committee's recommendation includes the $10,000,000 
increase as part of its initiative to help reduce the number of 
abortions in America by alleviating the economic pressures and 
other real life conditions that can sometimes cause women to 
decide not to carry their pregnancies to term. The Committee 
intends the increased funding to be dedicated to support State 
use of research- and evidence-based home visitation models that 
use professionals, nurses, paraprofessionals, and trained 
volunteers from the community to improve parenting and family 
health. The Committee has funded the Administration's request 
for this activity after reviewing the research supporting the 
value of a range of early childhood home visitation models and 
their positive affect on prenatal health, preventing child 
maltreatment, and improvement in other important outcomes for 
these young families
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Children Uniting Nations, Los Angeles, CA for a                 $100,000
 foster child mentoring program in Los Angeles.......
Crisis Nursery of the Ozarks, Springfield, MO for a              245,000
 child abuse prevention program......................
Jefferson County, Golden, CO for child abuse                     100,000
 prevention and treatment programs...................
New York Center for Children, New York, NY for                   150,000
 comprehensive support and services to abused
 children and their families.........................
Shelter for Abused Women, Winchester, VA to enhance              100,000
 community efforts to address domestic violence......
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Community-based child abuse prevention

    The Committee recommends $42,430,000 for community-based 
child abuse prevention. This amount is the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and the budget request. Funds are 
provided to State agencies and are used to develop, operate, 
expand, and enhance community-based efforts to strengthen and 
support families in an effort to prevent child abuse and 
neglect.

Abandoned infants assistance

    The Committee recommends $11,835,000 for the abandoned 
infants assistance program. This amount is the same as the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. The 
purpose of this program is to provide financial support to 
public and private community and faith-based entities to 
develop, implement, and operate demonstration projects that 
will prevent the abandonment of infants and young children 
exposed to HIV/AIDS and drugs; identify and address their 
needs; assist such children to reside with their natural 
families or in foster care; recruit, train, and retain foster 
parents as well as health and social services personnel; 
provide respite care for families and foster families; and 
prevent the abandonment of infants and young children.

Child welfare services and training

    The Committee recommends $286,754,000 for child welfare 
services. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the budget request. This program provides 
grants to States to assist public welfare agencies to improve 
child welfare services. State services include preventive 
intervention in order for children to stay in their homes, 
alternative placement like foster care or adoption if it is not 
possible for children to remain at home, and reunification 
programs so that, if appropriate, children can return home.
    The Committee recommends $7,335,000 for child welfare 
training. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the budget request. The Committee recognizes 
the need for trained, skilled, and qualified child welfare 
service workers. This program provides grants to institutions 
of higher education to develop and improve education and 
training programs and resources for child welfare service 
providers as well as students seeking degrees in social work.

Adoption opportunities

    The Committee recommends $26,848,000 for adoption 
opportunities. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the budget request. This program provides 
funding specifically targeted to improving the adoption of 
children, particularly those with special needs, and for 
providing innovative services that support families involved in 
adoption.

Adoption incentives

    The Committee recommends $9,500,000 for the adoption 
incentives program. This is $4,500,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $4,000,000 less than the budget 
request. This program targets incentives specifically for older 
children. Funds are awarded to States using three baselines: 
one for the total number of children adopted, one for children 
with special needs under the age of nine, and one for children 
aged nine and older. The goal of this program is to increase 
the number of adoptions nationwide.

Adoption awareness

    The Committee recommends $14,674,000 for the adoption 
awareness program. This is a $2,000,000 increase above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. The 
Committee's recommended increase is part of its initiative to 
help reduce the number of abortions in America. The increase 
for adoption awareness will expand training activities for 
adoption agency staff, resulting in enhanced information to and 
counseling of young pregnant women about adoption as one of 
their options, as well as expanded referrals to adoption 
agencies. Funds will also be used to develop best practice 
guidelines in adoption counseling.

Compassion capital fund

    The Committee recommends $64,350,000 for the compassion 
capital fund. This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $10,650,000 less than the budget request. This 
program provides grants to intermediary organizations that in 
turn provide training and technical assistance to faith-and-
community-based organizations. The program also provides 
capacity-building grants directly to the latter organizations, 
which include organizations that foster supportive 
relationships with youth.

Social services and income maintenance research

    The Committee recommends $8,635,000 for social services and 
income maintenance research, $6,000,000 of which is through the 
evaluation set-aside. This is the same as the President's 
request. These funds support research, demonstration, 
evaluation, and dissemination activities. Recent topics funded 
through this program include welfare-to-work strategies and 
programs to strengthen family relationships and promote healthy 
marriages.
    In 2006, Congress reauthorized the temporary assistance for 
needy families program, imposing new administrative mandates on 
States with regard to tracking and verifying work participation 
rates. As a result, each State must now design and implement 
new systems and procedures for tracking work-eligible 
participants or risk financial penalties. ACF is currently 
working collaboratively with States to pilot-test the most 
cost-efficient ways to meet new monitoring and verification 
requirements. The Committee encourages ACF to continue to work 
with the States to ensure that needy families receive 
assistance in a timely manner. Similarly, new administrative 
requirements contained in the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 
call upon States to broaden their child support collection 
efforts, including seeking medical insurance coverage for 
children from non-custodial parents, and mandatory review and 
adjustment of support orders. ACF is currently working to 
increase the exchange of critical case information among State 
child support agencies, their courts, and the Federal 
government. The Committee encourages ACF to continue to augment 
the ability of States to collect and distribute child support 
payments.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Arrowhead Economic Opportunity Agency, Virginia, MN             $250,000
 for the Family-to-Family community based mentoring
 program to assist low-income families...............
Augusta Levy Learning Center, Wheeling, WV for                    75,000
 services to children with Autism....................
Beth EI House, Alexandria, VA for social services and             75,000
 transitional housing for formerly homeless women and
 their children......................................
Children's Home Society of South Dakota, Sioux Falls,            250,000
 SD for services related to domestic violence, child
 abuse, and neglect..................................
Christian Outreach of Lutherans, Waukegan, IL for                125,000
 Latino leadership development in underserved areas..
City of Detroit, MI for an Individual Development                350,000
 Account initiative..................................
City of Fort Worth, TX for programming at                        200,000
 neighborhood-based early childhood resource centers.
City of San Jose, CA for its Services for New                    200,000
 Americans program, including assistance with job
 seeking skills, citizenship, family safety and
 resettlement........................................
Cliff Hagan Boys and Girls Club - Mike Horn Unit,                175,000
 Owensboro, KY for purchase of equipment.............
Communities In Schools, Bell-Coryell Counties, Inc.,             260,000
 Killeen, TX for youth counseling services...........
Covenant House Florida, Ft. Lauderdale, FL for a                 200,000
 program for pregnant and parenting teens and young
 adults..............................................
Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center, Los                  125,000
 Angeles, CA for the Parent-Child Home Program.......
Every Citizen Has Opportunities, Inc., Leesburg, VA              100,000
 for services to disabled individuals................
Family Center of Washington County, Montpelier, VT               200,000
 for childcare and related services..................
First 5 Alameda County, San Leandro, CA for                      175,000
 development and support of postsecondary early
 childhood education and training programs, which may
 include student scholarships........................
Friendship Circle of the South Bay, Redondo Beach, CA            275,000
 for services for children with developmental
 disabilities........................................
Greater New Britain Teen Pregnancy Prevention, Inc.,             125,000
 New Britain, CT for the Pathways/Senderos Center for
 education and outreach..............................
Hamilton-Madison House, New York, NY for services and            100,000
 equipment for a social services program.............
Healthy Learners Dillon, Columbia, SC for social                 200,000
 services for economically disadvantaged children....
Helping Children Worldwide, Herndon, VA to assist                250,000
 students and families...............................
Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health                 285,000
 Department, Minneapolis, MN for the Family Healing
 and Restoration Network Project.....................
Hillside Family of Agencies, Rochester, NY for the               100,000
 Hillside Children's Center for adoption services....
Hope Village for Children, Meridian, MS for a program            215,000
 to assist foster children...........................
Horizons for Homeless Children, Boston, MA for                    50,000
 Playspace Programs for homeless children............
Kingsborough Community College, Brooklyn, NY for the             100,000
 New American's Center...............................
L.I.F.T. Women's Resource Center, Detroit, MI for                100,000
 services to improve self-sufficiency and life skills
 of women transitioning from substance abuse,
 domestic violence, or homelessness..................
Lawrence County Social Services, New Castle, PA for              125,000
 early childhood, parental training, and life skills
 programs............................................
Lutheran Social Services, Duluth, MN for services to             350,000
 runaway, homeless, and other at-risk youth and their
 families............................................
Marcus Institute, Atlanta, GA for services for                   400,000
 children and adolescents with developmental
 disabilities and severe and challenging behaviors...
Mary's Family, Orlean, VA to develop a respite                   100,000
 program for Winchester-area special needs families..
Mecklenburg County, Charlotte, NC, for a program to              200,000
 combat domestic violence............................
Missouri Bootheel Regional Consortium, Portageville,             250,000
 MO for the Fatherhood First program.................
Monterey County Probation Department, Salinas, CA for            350,000
 the Silver Star gang prevention and intervention
 program.............................................
Nashua Adult Learning Center, Nashua, NH for a Family            100,000
 Resource Center.....................................
National Energy Assistance Directors' Association,               200,000
 Washington, DC for research and information
 dissemination related to the Low-Income Home Energy
 Assistance Program..................................
Network for Instructional TV, Inc., Reston, VA for a              50,000
 training program for child care providers...........
Nurses for Newborns Foundation, St. Louis, MO for                300,000
 nurse home visiting program.........................
Organization of the NorthEast, Chicago, IL for                    50,000
 development of a local homeless services continuum..
Pediatric Interim Care Center, Kent, WA for the Drug-            150,000
 Exposed Infants Outreach and Education program......
Public Health Department, Solano County, Fairfield,              100,000
 CA for a program to support pregnant women and new
 mothers.............................................
Sephardic Bikur Holim of Monmouth County, Deal, NJ               100,000
 for social services programs........................
Services, Immigrant Rights and Education Network, San            100,000
 Jose, CA for assistance to immigrants seeking
 citizenship.........................................
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL for the             150,000
 Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders................
Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX              150,000
 for coordination of family and child services.......
Susan Wesley Family Learning Center, East Prairie, MO            100,000
 for programs to assist at-risk youth and their
 families............................................
TLC for Children and Families, Inc., Olathe, KS for a            200,000
 transitional living program for at-risk and homeless
 youth...............................................
United Way Southeastern Michigan, Detroit, MI for the            200,000
 Communities of Early Learning initiative............
University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO for              250,000
 the treatment of autism spectrum disorders..........
Visitation Home, Inc., Yardville, NJ for programs to             100,000
 assist developmentally disabled residents...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Developmental disabilities

    For programs authorized by the Developmental Disabilities 
Assistance and Bill of Rights Act and the Help America Vote 
Act, the Committee recommends $175,836,000. This is $5,001,000 
more than the fiscal year 2007 level and $5,000,000 more than 
the budget request.
    The account total includes $76,771,000 for allotments to 
States to fund State councils, which is $5,000,000 more than 
the budget request and the fiscal year 2007 funding level. 
These councils develop, improve, and expand the system of 
services and supports for people with developmental 
disabilities. Through their activities, Councils on 
Developmental Disabilities provide for the inclusion and 
integration of individuals with developmental disabilities in 
the economic, political, social, cultural, religious and 
educational mainstream of our nation.
    Within the total, $38,718,000 will be available to States 
for operating a protection and advocacy system to protect the 
legal and human rights of the developmentally disabled. This 
amount is the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 
2007 funding level.
    The Committee recommends $15,720,000 for voting access for 
individuals with disabilities programs. This amount is the same 
as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. 
Within the funds provided, $10,890,000 is for payments to 
States to promote access for voters with disabilities and 
$4,830,000 is for State protection and advocacy systems. These 
programs are intended to make polling places accessible and 
provide equal access and participation for individuals with 
disabilities. The protection and advocacy program will ensure 
that individuals can fully participate in the electoral 
process, including registering to vote, accessing polling 
places, and casting a vote.
    The Committee recommends $11,414,000 for developmental 
disabilities projects of national significance. This amount is 
the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget 
request.
    The Committee recommends $33,213,000 for the university 
centers for excellence in developmental disabilities. This is 
$1,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 level and the same as the 
budget request. This funding provides discretionary grants to 
public or not-for-profit entities associated with universities. 
The grants provide basic operational and administrative core 
support for these agencies. In addition, these funds support 
interdisciplinary training, community services, research and 
technical assistance, and information dissemination.

Native American programs

    The Committee recommends $47,332,000 for Native American 
programs. This is $3,000,000 more than the budget request and 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level. The Native American 
programs assist tribal and village governments, Native American 
institutions and organizations to support and develop stable, 
diversified local economies. In promoting social and economic 
self-sufficiency, this program provides financial assistance 
through direct grants for individual projects, training and 
technical assistance, and research and demonstration programs.
    The Committee intends that the $3,000,000 increase be 
available to fund the activities authorized under section 
803C(b)(7)(A)-(C) of the Native American Programs Act (as added 
by the Esther Martinez Native American Languages Preservation 
Act of 2006).

Community services

    The Committee recommends $730,959,000 for community 
services activities. This is $706,507,000 more than the budget 
request and $36,385,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level.

Community services block grants

    For the community services block grants, the Committee 
recommends $660,425,000. This is $30,000,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level. No funds were requested for 
this program. This program provides grants to over 1,000 
counties, territories, and Indian tribes for services such as 
employment, housing, nutrition, energy, emergency services, 
child care, job training and job placement, parenting 
education, adult literacy classes, domestic violence 
prevention, emergency food assistance, and health needs of low-
income people.
    The Committee's recommended 4.8 percent increase is part of 
its initiative to help reduce the number of abortions in 
America by alleviating the economic pressures and other real 
life conditions that can sometimes cause women to decide not to 
carry their pregnancies to term. Increased services will help 
struggling, low-income families raise their children.

Community economic development

    The Committee recommends $32,700,000 for community economic 
development. This is $5,678,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. No funds were requested for this program. This 
program provides assistance to private, locally initiated 
community development corporations (CDCs) that sponsor 
enterprises providing employment, training, and business 
development opportunities for low-income residents in poor 
communities.
    The Committee's recommendation reflects its commitment to 
helping CDCs continue their good work in transforming the low 
income communities in which they serve. CDCs help capitalize 
nearly 60,000 small businesses a year and provide approximately 
$2,000,000,000 in loan assistance to entrepreneurs and 
residents in low income communities a year. The increase over 
fiscal year 2007 will fund approximately 9 new grants, totally 
45.

Job opportunities for low-income individuals

    The Committee recommends $5,382,000, the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level, for job opportunities for low-income 
individuals (JOLI). No funds were requested for this program. 
This program provides competitive grants to non-profit 
organizations to create new employment and business 
opportunities for TANF recipients and other low-income 
individuals.

Individual development accounts

    The Committee recommends $24,452,000 for individual 
development accounts. This amount is the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and the budget request. Individual 
development accounts are dedicated savings accounts that can be 
used by families with limited means for purchasing a first 
home, paying for postsecondary education or capitalizing a 
business. The intent of the program is to encourage 
participants to develop and reinforce strong habits for saving 
money. Section 501(c)(3) organizations are eligible to apply 
for the funds and applicants must match Federal funds with non-
Federal funds.

Rural community facilities

    The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for the rural community 
facilities program. This amount is $707,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level. No funds were requested for 
this program. The Committee includes these funds to be used 
solely for the purpose of improving water and wastewater 
facilities in poor, rural communities. As in the past, these 
funds should be allocated to regional rural community 
assistance programs.

Violent crime reduction programs

    The Committee recommends $134,731,000 for family violence 
prevention and services and battered women's shelters. This is 
$10,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
the budget request. This program is designed to assist States 
and Indian Tribes in efforts to prevent family violence and to 
provide immediate shelter and related assistance for victims of 
family violence and their dependents.
    The Committee also includes $2,970,000 to fund a domestic 
violence hotline. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and the budget request.
    The Committee's recommended 8 percent increase is part of 
its initiative to help reduce the number of abortions in 
America by alleviating the economic pressures and other real 
life conditions that can sometimes cause women to decide not to 
carry their pregnancies to term. Increased funding will permit 
States to expand domestic violence prevention services to more 
at-risk women.

Mentoring children of prisoners

    The Committee recommends $49,493,000 for the mentoring 
children of prisoners program. This is the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $507,000 less than the budget 
request. This program supports competitively awarded grants to 
States and local governments, Indian tribes and consortia, and 
faith- and community-based organizations to mentor children of 
prisoners and those recently released from prison.

Independent living training vouchers

    The Committee recommends $46,157,000 for independent living 
training vouchers. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and the budget request. These funds support 
vouchers for college tuition or vocational training for 
individuals who age out of the foster care system so they can 
be better prepared to live independently.

Abstinence education

    The Committee recommends a program level total of 
$141,164,000 for the community-based abstinence education 
program, which is the same as the budget request and 
$27,764,000 above the fiscal year 2007 level. As requested, 
$4,500,000 is provided within the total through the evaluation 
set-aside. The program provides support to public and private 
entities for implementation of community-based abstinence 
education programs for adolescents aged 12 through 18 (as 
defined in Section 510(b)(2) of the Social Security Act). The 
entire focus of these programs is to educate young people and 
create an environment within communities that supports teen 
decisions to postpone sexual activity until marriage. There is 
no funding match requirement for these grants. The Committee 
intends that up to 5 percent of these funds be used to provide 
technical assistance and capacity-building support to grantees. 
Within the total, up to $10,000,000 may be used to carry out a 
national Abstinence Education Campaign.
    The Committee's recommended increase is part of its 
initiative to help reduce the number of abortions in America by 
alleviating the economic pressures and other real life 
conditions that can sometimes cause women to decide not to 
carry their pregnancies to term. The increase will provide 
support for an additional 63 grants over fiscal year 2007. The 
$27,764,000 increase for the community-based abstinence 
education program is identical to that recommended for the family 
planning program.
    The Committee urges the Administration for Children and 
Families (ACF) to utilize the set-aside to ensure that programs 
around the country are using appropriate and approved curricula 
that are evidence-based and comply with the appropriate Federal 
legislation. To that end, the Committee requests ACF to issue a 
report to the Committees on Appropriation of the House and 
Senate no later than 90 days after enactment of this Act on the 
use of the 5 percent set-aside and the intended use of the 
fiscal year 2008 funds. The Committee also requests ACF to 
include in this report the funds from the national abstinence 
education campaign that are being used for training and 
technical assistance. The Committee reinforces the guidance 
from its report accompanying the fiscal year 2005 appropriation 
with respect to the abstinence messages given by the public 
health entities that are grantees in the community-based 
abstinence education program and to the conduct of evaluation 
activities for the program.
    The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall require 
each applicant for financial assistance under the abstinence 
education program funded under this heading to certify that all 
materials proposed in the application and funded during the 
project period of the grant are medically accurate; and a panel 
of medical experts shall review such grant applications and 
assess whether the materials proposed are medically accurate.

Faith-based center

    The Committee recommends $1,386,000 for the faith-based 
center. This amount is the same as the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level. The center will support 
implementation of faith-based and community initiatives in 
accordance with the President's executive order.

Program direction

    The Committee recommends $187,776,000 for program direction 
expenses for ACF. This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $9,449,000 less than the budget request.

Promoting safe and stable families

    The Committee recommends $345,000,000 in mandatory funds 
for the promoting safe and stable families program, which is 
the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget 
request. The Committee recommends $89,100,000 in discretionary 
funds for this program, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and the budget request.

Payments to States for foster care and assistance

    The Committee recommends $5,082,000,000 for payments to 
States for foster care and adoption assistance. This is 
$170,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
the same as the budget request. The Committee also includes an 
advance appropriation of $1,776,000,000 for the first quarter 
of fiscal year 2009 to ensure timely completion of first 
quarter grant awards.
    Within the total appropriation, including the advance 
appropriation from the prior year, the Committee recommends 
$4,593,000,000 for the foster care program to provide 
maintenance payments to States on behalf of children who must 
live outside their homes. This amount is the same as the budget 
request and $118,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level.
    Within the total appropriation, the Committee recommends 
$2,159,000,000 for adoption assistance. This is $132,000,000 
more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the same as 
the budget request. This program provides training for parents 
and State administrative staff as well as payments on behalf of 
categorically eligible children considered difficult to adopt. 
This annually appropriated entitlement is designed to provide 
alternatives to long, inappropriate stays in foster care by 
developing permanent placements with families.
    Within the total appropriation for this account, the 
Committee recommends $140,000,000 for the independent living 
program. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the budget request. The program is designed 
to assist foster children age 16 or older to make successful 
transitions to independence. Funds assist children to earn high 
school diplomas, receive vocational training, and obtain 
training in daily living skills. Funds are awarded to States on 
the basis of the number of children on behalf of whom Federal 
foster care payments are received.

                        Administration on Aging


                        AGING SERVICES PROGRAMS

    For programs administered by the Administration on Aging 
(AoA), the Committee recommends a total of $1,417,189,000. This 
is $34,182,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$82,043,000 more than the budget request. This agency 
administers the programs under the Older Americans Act except 
for the Community Services Employment Program, which is 
administered by the Department of Labor.
    The majority of the funding appropriated to AoA is 
distributed via statutory formula to States or tribal 
organizations, including programs for nutrition and family 
caregiver services. Virtually all other programs award funding 
as grants using an outside peer review process.

Supportive services and centers

    The Committee recommends $357,595,000 for supportive 
services and centers. This is $7,000,000 above both the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and the budget request. Funds for 
supportive services and centers are awarded to States and 
territories for in-home and community-based services for frail 
elderly persons who are at risk of losing their self-
sufficiency due to physical or mental impairments. The funds 
contained in the bill will support a variety of activities 
including transportation services, information and assistance, 
and personal care services.

Preventive health

    The Committee recommends $21,400,000 for preventive health 
services. This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level. No funds were requested for this program. These funds 
are awarded to States and territories to support activities 
that educate older adults about the importance of healthy 
lifestyles and promote healthy behaviors that can prevent or 
delay chronic disease and disability.
    The Committee supports strengthening the capacity of 
community-based organizations dedicated to promoting preventive 
healthcare services and minimizing health disparities for Asian 
American and Pacific Islander elders and encourages AoA to 
continue to work with national organizations to that end.

Protection of vulnerable older Americans

    The Committee recommends $20,156,000 for the protection of 
vulnerable older Americans. This is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $990,000 more than the budget request. 
This amount includes funding for both the long-term care 
ombudsman program and the prevention of elder abuse, neglect, 
and exploitation program. The former program protects the 
rights and interests of residents in nursing homes, board and 
care homes, assisted living facilities, and similar adult care 
facilities. The latter program trains law enforcement and 
medical professionals in recognition of and response to elder 
abuse.

National family caregiver support program

    The Committee recommends $156,167,000 for the family 
caregivers program. This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $1,980,000 more than the budget request. The 
family caregiver program provides formula grants to States to 
provide a support system in each State for family caregivers. 
All States are expected to put in place five basic system 
components as follows: individualized information on available 
resources; assistance to families in locating services from 
private and voluntary agencies; caregiver counseling, training 
and peer support; respite care; and other supplemental 
services.
    The Committee recognizes the efforts of AoA in supporting 
caregivers of older individuals and older relative caregivers 
through the national family caregiver support program. Based on 
recommendations from the 2005 White House conference on aging, 
the Older Americans Act Amendments of 2006 expanded the 
national family caregiver support program to include older 
relative caregivers of adults with disabilities. There are 
approximately 711,000 caregivers over 60 years of age who are 
providing care to their adult relatives with life-long 
developmental disabilities at home. These caregivers include 
parents, siblings, and other older relatives. Congress intended 
to include this broad population of older relative caregivers 
and not limit the program to grandparent caregivers in the case 
of adult relatives with disabilities. The Committee urges AoA 
to provide sufficient funds to serve this population of older 
relative caregivers of adults with disabilities within the 
national family caregiver support program.

Native American caregiver support program

    The Committee recommends $6,428,000 for the Native American 
caregiver support program. This is $187,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. The 
program assists Tribes in providing multifaceted systems of 
support services for family caregivers as well as for 
grandparents caring for grandchildren.

Nutrition programs

    For congregate and home-delivered meals, as well as the 
nutrition services incentive program, the Committee recommends 
$758,599,000. This is $23,529,000 more than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $47,090,000 more than the budget 
request. The funding distribution for these programs is 
included in the detailed table accompanying this report. These 
programs are intended to address some of the difficulties 
confronting older individuals; namely, nutrition deficiencies 
due to inadequate income, lack of adequate facilities to 
prepare food, and social isolation.
    The increase provided for congregate and home-delivered 
nutrition programs, and for the nutrition services incentive 
program is intended to be a significant first step in properly 
investing in the care of the nation's frail elderly. Over the 
past several years the funding for aging nutrition programs has 
remained flat despite the fact that the fastest growing 
population of Americans is those aged 85 and older. The level 
provided will pay for approximately 3 million additional meals 
compared to fiscal year 2007 estimates.

Grants for Native Americans

    The Committee recommends $26,918,000 for grants for Native 
Americans. This is $784,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the budget request. Grants are distributed to 
tribal organizations to be used to help Native American elders 
remain healthy and independent by providing transportation, 
nutrition, health screening, and other services.
    The increase provided for congregate and home-delivered 
nutrition programs, and for the nutrition services incentive 
program is intended to be a significant first step in properly 
investing in the care of the nation's frail elderly. Over the 
past several years the funding for aging nutrition programs has 
remained flat despite the fact that the fastest growing 
population of Americans is those aged 85 and older.

Program innovations

    The Committee recommends $10,240,000 for program 
innovations. This is $13,818,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $25,245,000 less than the budget request. 
Funds under this program are used for competitive grants and 
contracts to support projects that develop new and promising 
practices to serve older adults and their families.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Allied Jewish Federation of Colorado, Denver, CO for            $100,000
 a naturally occurring retirement communities
 demonstration project...............................
Amalgamated Warbasse Houses, Inc., Brooklyn, NY for a            200,000
 demonstration project focusing on supportive service
 programs in naturally occurring retirement
 communities.........................................
California Senior Legal Hotline, Sacramento, CA for a             80,000
 demonstration project to increase services to non-
 English-speaking seniors............................
Durham-Chapel Hill Jewish Federation, Durham, NC for              75,000
 a demonstration program to improve assistance to
 family caregivers...................................
Howard Brown Health Center, Chicago, IL for the                  200,000
 Chicago Elder Project...............................
Jewish Community Services of South Florida, North                100,000
 Miami, FL for a naturally occurring retirement
 communities demonstration project...................
Jewish Family and Children's Service of Minneapolis,             200,000
 Minnetonka, MI for a naturally occurring retirement
 community demonstration project.....................
Jewish Family Service of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM             100,000
 for a naturally occurring retirement community
 demonstration project...............................
Jewish Family Service, Los Angeles, CA for a                     300,000
 naturally occurring retirement communities
 demonstration project in Park La Brea and the San
 Fernando Valley.....................................
Jewish Family Services of Delaware, Inc., Wilmington,            100,000
 DE for a naturally occurring retirement community
 demonstration project...............................
Jewish Federation of Central New Jersey, Scotch                  200,000
 Plains, NJ for the naturally occurring retirement
 community demonstration project.....................
Jewish Federation of Greater Monmouth County, NJ for             200,000
 a naturally occurring retirement communities
 demonstration project...............................
Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven, Woodbridge,              150,000
 CT to develop, test, evaluate, and disseminate an
 innovative community-based approach to caregiver
 support services....................................
Jewish Federation of Middlesex County, South River,              100,000
 NJ for a naturally occurring retirement communities
 demonstration project...............................
Jewish Social Service Agency, Fairfax, VA for a                  150,000
 naturally occurring retirement community
 demonstration project...............................
Shenandoah Area Agency on Aging, Front Royal, VA for             150,000
 a model group respite center for persons with
 Alzheimer's disease and dementia....................
United Jewish Communities of MetroWest, NJ,                      250,000
 Parsippany, NJ for the Lifelong Involvement for
 Vital Elders Aging in Place initiative..............
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL for a                     100,000
 technology demonstration project to assist seniors..
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aging network support activities

    The Committee recommends $29,633,000 for aging network 
support activities. This is $16,500,000 more than both the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. Included 
within this funding are five ongoing programs: the national 
eldercare locator, pension counseling, senior Medicare patrols, 
the national long-term care ombudsman resource center, and the 
national center on elder abuse. The Committee is funding the 
components of the choices for independence initiative within 
aging network support activities rather than program 
innovations. These established programs, which began as 
demonstration projects, provide critical support for the 
national aging services network.
    Within this total, the Committee provides $16,500,000 to 
implement the newly authorized provisions of the Older 
Americans Act related to aging and disability resource centers, 
evidence-based prevention programs, and consumer-directed 
services targeted at individuals who are at high risk of 
nursing home placement and spend-down to Medicaid. This is the 
same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level. The funding 
included in the budget request for the choices for independence 
demonstration is for these same activities. This effort builds 
on and expands support for these successful program innovations 
administered by AoA over the last four years. The Committee 
requests that AoA report to the House Committee on 
Appropriations on the establishment of national standards that 
will be used to evaluate these three programs, including the 
performance measures and indicators States must use to track 
and report on the outcomes and outputs they achieve. AoA should 
include in future Congressional budget submissions, the number 
of people served by these programs, funding breakdowns for each 
program, and on the progress States are making in implementing 
these activities.
    Aging and disability resource centers are currently 
operating in 43 States and evidence-based disease prevention 
programs are being implemented in 24 States. The funding 
provided is intended to sustain and expand these efforts 
through a coordinated approach that will provide States with 
enhanced tools for redirecting their long-term care systems to 
make them more responsive to the needs and preferences of older 
people and their caregivers. In implementing these activities, 
the Committee encourages AoA to continue its close partnership 
efforts with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 
the National Institute on Aging, the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention, and other agencies.

Alzheimer's disease demonstration grants

    The Committee recommends $11,668,000 for Alzheimer's 
disease demonstration grants. This is the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level. No funds were requested for this 
program. The program provides competitive grants to States to 
help them plan and establish programs to provide models of care 
to individuals with Alzheimer's disease. Funds are used for 
respite care and supportive services, clearinghouses, training, 
and administrative costs for State offices. An estimated 70 
percent of Americans with Alzheimer's disease live at home, 
where family members provide the preponderance of care. The 
Alzheimer's disease demonstration grant program currently 
supports matching grants to 36 States to help stimulate and 
coordinate services to assist families caring for Alzheimer 
patients, particularly those living in underserved rural 
communities and minorities. Unlike other AoA general service 
activities, this program is designed to address the unique 
demands Alzheimer's disease places on families and emphasizes 
systems change to meet those demands.

Program administration

    The Committee recommends $18,385,000 for program 
administration expenses. This is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $311,000 less than the budget request. 
This activity provides administrative and management support 
for all programs administered by AoA.

                        Office of the Secretary


                    GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    The Committee provides $369,075,000 for general 
departmental management, which is $12,837,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 level and $23,481,000 below the budget request. 
Included in this amount is authority to spend $5,851,000 from 
the Medicare trust funds, which is the same as the 
Administration's request. In addition, the Office of the 
Secretary has access to $46,756,000 for policy evaluation 
funding activities under section 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act.
    This appropriation supports those activities that are 
associated with the Secretary's roles as policy officer and 
general manager of the Department. The Office of the Secretary 
also implements Administration and Congressional directives, 
and provides assistance, direction and coordination to the 
headquarters, regions and field organizations of the 
Department. This account also supports the Office of the 
Surgeon General and several small health promotion and disease 
prevention activities that are centrally administered.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alma Family Services, Monterey Park, CA to increase              $75,000
 access to culturally competent health information to
 minority populations, which may include the purchase
 of a fully equipped mobile computer lab/resource
 unit................................................
Bronx-Lebanon Hospital, New York, NY for                         350,000
 demonstration project to increase access to health
 care for low-income minority men in South and
 Central Bronx.......................................
Community-Health Partnership, Santa Clara, CA for its            200,000
 Healthy Women, Healthy Choices project to provide
 comprehensive health education to underserved women.
Hunterdon Medical Center, Flemington, NJ for its                  50,000
 Latino Healthcare Initiative........................
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center,               250,000
 Shreveport, LA for a health literacy program........
Marymount University, Arlington, VA for a project to              70,000
 provide health screenings, referrals and health
 education at a nurse managed health center for
 minority populations................................
Nassau University Medical Centers, East Meadow, NY               200,000
 for a minority health institute.....................
National Hispanic Medical Association, Washington, DC            250,000
 for a Hispanic health portal to provide online
 health education materials..........................
Prince George's County, Upper Marlboro, MD for a                 100,000
 media campaign for pregnant women about health
 insurance for prenatal care.........................
St. Luke's Community Free Clinic, Front Royal, VA for            300,000
 activities focused on adult hypertension and dental
 care................................................
Thurston-Mason County Medical Society, Olympia, WA                50,000
 for a demonstration project to increase care for non-
 English-speaking patients...........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation includes $19,157,000 for 
transformation, readiness and training of the Commissioned 
Corps, which is $15,000,000 above the fiscal year 2007 level. 
These additional funds will be used to create and equip 
dedicated health and medical response teams, and support 
training, information technology and other transformation 
activities that will enable the Corps to better respond to 
public health emergencies.
    Area poverty research centers.--The conferees are aware 
that the area poverty research center grants will expire on 
September 30, 2008, and expect the Secretary to award new 
grants on a competitive basis. The bill includes sufficient 
funds to continue the support of multiple area poverty centers 
at no less than the fiscal year 2007 level.
    Healthcare access for special populations.--The Committee 
is aware that culturally and linguistically appropriate models 
of care are critical to reducing health disparities and 
improving access to healthcare. Furthermore, the Committee 
understands that Federal agencies are expected to ensure 
language access in all programs. The Committee requests the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services (HSS) to submit a report 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations not later 
than one year after the enactment of this Act that includes a 
description and evaluation of the activities carried out across 
HHS to ensure that every sector of society has knowledge of and 
access to health and human services programs; a description and 
analysis of best practices, model programs, guidelines, and 
other effective strategies to improve cultural and linguistic 
access; a description of the effect of providing language 
services on quality of healthcare and access to care; and a 
description of the costs associated with and savings related to 
the provision of language services.
    Interagency autism coordinating committee.--The Committee 
recommendation includes funds to support the Interagency Autism 
Coordinating Committee (IACC) that will coordinate all efforts 
with the Department of Health and Human Services concerning 
autism spectrum disorders, as authorized under the Combating 
Autism Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-416). The IACC will be responsible 
for developing a strategic plan for autism spectrum disorder 
research. The Committee looks forward to reviewing this 
strategic plan after it is developed.
    Food allergy.--The Committee notes that approximately three 
million children under the age of eighteen suffer from food 
allergies. There are no federal guidelines concerning the 
management of life-threatening food allergies in a school 
setting. The Committee encourages the Secretary, working with 
the Secretary of Education, to develop a policy to be used on a 
voluntary basis to manage the risk of food allergy and 
anaphylaxis in schools within six months of the enactment of 
this law. These guidelines should include but not be limited to 
detailing emergency treatment procedures in the event of 
anaphylaxis or other food allergy reaction, strategies to 
reduce the risk of exposure to anaphylactic causative agents in 
classrooms and common school areas such as the cafeteria, and 
the authorization of school personnel to administer epinephrine 
when the school nurse is not immediately available. Funding is 
provided under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
to support these activities.
    Preterm birth.--The Committee encourages the Surgeon 
General to convene a conference on preterm birth and produce a 
report establishing a public-private agenda to expedite the 
identification of and treatments for the causes and risk 
factors for preterm labor and delivery as authorized by the 
PREEMIE Act (P.L. 109-450).
    Sodium.--The Committee encourages the Secretary to explore 
funding a study by the Institute of Medicine of the National 
Academy of Sciences that will examine and make recommendations 
regarding various means that could be employed to reduce 
dietary sodium intake to levels recommended by the Dietary 
Guidelines for Americans. These should include, but not be 
limited to, actions by food manufacturers, such as new product 
development and food reformulation, and governmental 
approaches, such as regulatory, legislative approaches, and 
public and professional information and education. In addition, 
the Committee encourages the Secretary to request a report from 
the Surgeon General on ways in which the department could 
strengthen its activities pertaining to health issues related 
to salt.
    Steroid use.--The Committee supports education efforts to 
demonstrate the consequences of using performance-enhancing 
drugs. The Department of Health and Human Services should 
undertake a comprehensive campaign to educate youth on the 
dangers of steroid use for 5th through 8th graders, an 
education campaign authorized in the Anabolic Steroid Control 
Act of 2004.

Adolescent family life

    The Committee provides $30,307,000 for the Adolescent 
Family Life program, which is the same as the 2007 level and 
the budget request. The program provides comprehensive and 
integrated approaches to the delivery of care services for 
pregnant and parenting adolescents, and prevention services 
that promote abstinence from sexual activity among non-
parenting teens. Under the Committee recommendation, the 
Administration will be able to support approximately 76 
discretionary demonstration grants in fiscal year 2008. The 
bill includes a provision requiring funds for prevention 
demonstrations to be available for abstinence education 
activities under section 510(b)(2) of the Social Security Act, 
as requested by the Administration.

Office of minority health

    The Committee provides $49,284,000 for the Office of 
Minority Health (OMH), which is $4,171,000 below the fiscal 
year 2007 amount and $5,509,000 above the budget request. The 
bill does not include funding for a one-time project costing 
$5,000,000 in fiscal year 2007. Excluding this project, the 
bill provides a $829,000 increase over fiscal year 2007 for 
ongoing activities.
    The OMH works with Public Health Service agencies and other 
agencies of the Department to address the health status and 
quality of life for racial and ethnic minority populations in 
the United States. OMH develops and implements new policies; 
partners with States, tribes, and communities through 
cooperative agreements; supports research, demonstration, and 
evaluation projects; and disseminates information.
    Historically black medical schools.--The Committee 
continues to be concerned about the diminished partnership 
between OMH and the nation's historically black medical 
schools. Consistent with previous recommendations, the 
Committee encourages OMH to: (1) re-establish its unique 
cooperative agreement with Meharry Medical College; (2) develop 
a formal partnership with the Morehouse School of Medicine and 
its National Center for Primary Care; and (3) coordinate a 
response to the challenges facing the Charles R. Drew 
University of Medicine and Science, including expanded 
opportunities for biomedical research and support for residency 
training faculty. The Committee requests a report on the status 
of these activities by January 1, 2008.
    Minority male consortium.--The Committee continues to 
recognize the importance of the educational and preventive 
health work being undertaken and implemented in campus and 
community-based projects by the five historically black 
colleges and universities in the New Minority Males Consortium, 
Inc. The Committee bill includes additional resources over the 
budget request to enable the OMH to expand the number of 
participating institutions, as well as to enhance the resources 
received by each of the institutions to increase their 
activities and to conduct the national comparative study of the 
incidence of certain health conditions and diseases among 
minority males.
    Obesity awareness and prevention.--The Committee encourages 
the OMH to continue its effort to partner with organizations 
that are focused on collaborative efforts to eliminate health 
disparities by, among other things, raising awareness of 
obesity as a public health epidemic and removing barriers to 
obesity prevention through culturally competent community 
education and helping to create community environments that 
facilitate equal access to healthy lifestyles.

Office on women's health

    The Committee provides $28,800,000 for the Office on 
Women's Health (OWH), which is $554,000 above the fiscal year 
2007 level and $1,431,000 above the budget request. The (OWH) 
advises the Secretary and provides Department-wide coordination 
of programs focusing specifically on women's health.
    Centers of excellence.--Multidisciplinary centers of 
excellence in women's health were established in 1996 to 
develop standards of excellence in women's health care, 
research, leadership, training and education. The 48 
institutions from 40 States and Puerto Rico that have been 
designated as centers of excellence participate in one of five 
model programs developed by the OWH to provide comprehensive, 
integrated, interdisciplinary and coordinated women's health 
care: national centers of excellence in women's health, 
national community centers of excellence in women's health, 
ambassadors for change, region VIII demonstration projects, and 
rural frontier women's health coordinating centers. This 
network has successfully leveraged significant public and 
private funding across all 48 sites. The Committee urges OWH to 
maintain the center of excellence designation and the existing 
structure of this innovative initiative, and to reconsider its 
decision to discontinue funding for these centers of 
excellence.

HIV/AIDS in minority communities

    The Committee provides $51,891,000 to be available to the 
Secretary to transfer to the Department's operating agencies 
for specific program activities to address the high-priority 
HIV prevention and treatment needs of minority communities. 
This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 level and the budget 
request. These funds are provided to promote an effective 
culturally competent and linguistically appropriate public 
health response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
    Within the total provided, the Committee expects that 
activities that are targeted to address the growing HIV/AIDS 
epidemic and its disproportionate impact upon communities of 
color, including African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, 
Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders, will 
be supported at no less than last year's funding level.

Afghanistan

    The Committee recommends $5,941,000, which is $49,000 above 
the fiscal year 2007 level and the same as the budget request. 
These funds will be used for the joint Department of Defense 
and HHS initiative to improve the largest women's hospital in 
Kabul, Afghanistan and to create four satellite teaching 
clinics. Bill language is included identifying the amount of 
assistance and citing as authority the Afghanistan Freedom 
Support Act of 2002.

Embryo adoption awareness campaign

    The Committee includes $1,980,000 for the embryo adoption 
awareness campaign, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
level and the Administration request. These funds will be used 
to educate Americans about the existence of frozen embryos 
(resulting from in-vitro fertilization) which may be available 
for donation/adoption.

                OFFICE OF MEDICARE HEARINGS AND APPEALS

    The Committee provides $65,000,000 for this Office, which 
is $5,273,000 above the fiscal year 2007 level and $5,000,000 
below the Administration request. This office supports hearings 
at the administrative law judge level, the third level of 
Medicare claims appeals. The increase over the 2007 level will 
support an additional administrative law judge and attorneys, 
as well as legal and administrative activities, to continue the 
timely adjudication of all Medicare appeals.

  OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL COORDINATOR FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee provides $61,302,000 for the health 
information technology office, of which $13,302,000 is 
available in budget authority and $48,000,000 is available in 
program evaluation tap funding. This total is the same as the 
amount made available in fiscal year 2007 and $56,570,000 below 
the Administration request. In addition, $45,000,000 is 
provided for health information technology activities in the 
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This AHRQ 
activity is the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 
2007 level.
    This program was established to bring together decision-
makers to develop standards for modern health information 
technology, to devise certification procedures for health IT 
solutions, to develop a secure nationwide health information 
network architecture, and to develop policy and technology 
solutions that provide adequate privacy protections for 
personal health information. The ultimate goal is the secure, 
accurate, and rapid exchange of interoperable electronic health 
information throughout a nationwide health information network. 
The office of the national coordinator for health information 
technology is responsible for promoting the use of electronic 
health records in clinical practice, coordinating federal 
health information systems, and collaborating with the private 
sector to develop standards for a nationwide interoperable 
health information technology infrastructure.
    The Committee has not provided the full budget request for 
health information technology due to concerns that this office 
has yet to develop a detailed and integrated implementation 
plan for achieving the health information technology program's 
strategic goals, as recommended by the General Accounting 
Office. The Committee requests that, no later than March 1, 
2008, the Secretary submit a report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations that provides an implementation 
plan for health information technology (including related 
activities funded through the Agency for Healthcare Research 
and Quality and the Centers for Disease Control), which 
includes performance benchmarks, milestones, and timelines for 
achieving program objectives. This report should also identify 
the resource requirements for achieving specific performance 
benchmarks.
    In addition, the Committee requests that the Secretary 
develop and make available for public comment, not later than 
March 1, 2008, a privacy and security framework that will 
establish trust among consumers and users of electronic 
personal health information and will govern all efforts to 
advance electronic health information exchange. The framework 
shall address generally accepted fair information practices, 
including transparency; specifying the purposes of any data 
collection; collecting only what is necessary for that purpose; 
adhering to the uses agreed to by the individual; allowing 
individuals to know and have a say in who and how their 
information is used; maintaining the integrity of the data; 
security; audit; strong oversight; and appropriate remedies in 
the event of breach or misuse. The development of this 
framework should include participation by affected stakeholders 
and be conducted with adequate opportunity for public comment 
and review.
    The Committee requests that the Secretary report to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on the 
development and implementation of this framework by no later 
than June 30, 2008. This report shall describe the appropriate 
enforcement mechanisms to assure general conformity with the 
privacy and security framework, including how various 
enforcement tools, such as federal and state statutes, 
government procurement policy, third-party certification, self-
attestation, business contracts, and FTC enforcement of public 
claims, may assist in achieving general adoption of the privacy 
framework. The Secretary's report should also include any 
appropriate recommendations for Congressional or executive 
action.
    The Committee requests that the Secretary issue, after an 
appropriate public comment and review period, such rules, 
regulations, and technical requirements as may be needed to 
assure implementation of the privacy and security framework, 
consistent with the report to Congress. The Committee further 
requests that the Secretary ensure that any Federally endorsed 
or funded standards development and harmonization or product 
certification products be developed consistent with all 
elements of the privacy and security framework.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee provides $44,687,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General (OIG), which is $4,879,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 level and the same as the budget request. Permanent 
appropriations for this office are contained in the Health 
Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as well 
as the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. Total funds provided 
between this bill and the permanent appropriations would be 
$266,105,000 in fiscal year 2008.
    The OIG was created by law to protect the integrity of 
Departmental programs as well as the health and welfare of 
beneficiaries served by those programs. Through a comprehensive 
program of audits, investigations, inspections and program 
evaluations, the OIG attempts to reduce the incidence of fraud, 
waste, abuse and mismanagement, and to promote economy, 
efficiency and effectiveness throughout the Department.

                        OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

    The Committee provides $37,062,000 for the Office of Civil 
Rights (OCR), which is $2,153,000 more than the fiscal year 
2007 level and the same as the budget request. This includes 
authority to transfer $3,314,000 from the Medicare trust funds.
    The OCR is responsible for enforcing civil rights statutes 
that prohibit discrimination in health and human services 
programs. OCR implements the civil rights laws through a 
compliance program designed to generate voluntary compliance 
among all HHS recipients.

                       NONRECURRING EXPENSES FUND

    The bill does not include new language proposed by the 
Department to establish a nonrecurring expenses fund to capture 
unobligated balances from discretionary accounts prior to 
cancellation. While the existence of these balances points to 
the need for better management of grants and contracts by the 
Department's various operating divisions, the Committee may 
reconsider this proposal in the future.

               MEDICAL BENEFITS FOR COMMISSIONED OFFICERS

    The Committee provides an estimated $402,542,000 for 
medical benefits for commissioned officers of the U.S. Public 
Health Service. This is the same as the Administration request 
and $31,844,000 above the fiscal year 2007 amount.
    This account provides for retirement payments to U.S. 
Public Health Service officers who are retired for age, 
disability or length of service; payments to survivors of 
deceased officers; medical care for active duty and retired 
members and dependents and beneficiaries; and for payments to 
the Social Security Administration for military service 
credits.

            PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES EMERGENCY FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee provides $1,705,382,000 for the public health 
and social services emergency fund (PHSSEF) to support a 
comprehensive program to prepare for and respond to the health 
and medical consequences of all public health emergencies, 
including bioterrorism, and to support the activities in 
preparing for an influenza pandemic. This is $988,062,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $48,355,000 less 
than the budget request.
    The Office of the Assistant Secretary of Preparedness and 
Emergency Response (ASPR) administers programs funded through 
the PHSSEF via competitive contract, grant, or cooperative 
agreement to States or private organizations. Some programs are 
funded through administratively-determined formulas to States, 
such as the hospital preparedness cooperative agreement grants 
program. Small amounts of funding have been awarded on a non-
competitive basis where there was only one natural partner or 
at the behest of Congress.

Office of the Assistant Secretary for preparedness and response

    The Committee recommends $738,909,000 for activities 
administered by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for 
preparedness and response (ASPR). This is $42,897,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $11,842,000 less than 
the budget request. The Pandemic Preparedness and All-Hazards 
Preparedness Act, enacted into law in December of 2006, created 
this new Assistant Secretary and office. Additionally, many of 
the programs and activities funded in this appropriation were 
funded elsewhere in previous years. ASPR is responsible for 
coordinating national policies and plans for medical and public 
health preparedness and for administering a variety of public 
health preparedness programs, including the national disaster 
medical system, the hospital preparedness cooperative agreement 
program, BioShield management, and the advanced research 
development program authorized by the biomedical advanced 
research and development authority (BARDA).
    Within the total provided for ASPR, the Committee 
recommends the following amounts:
          $53,000,000 for the national disaster medical system, 
        as requested--this activity was transferred from the 
        Department of Homeland Security in fiscal year 2007;
          $450,991,000 for the hospital preparedness 
        cooperative agreement grants program, which is 
        $43,148,000 more than the budget request--this program 
        was transferred from the Health Resources and Services 
        Administration in fiscal year 2007 (not included within 
        the total is funding for a surge capacity demonstration 
        program);
          $6,000,000 for the emergency systems for advance 
        registration of volunteer health professionals program, 
        as requested--this program was transferred from the 
        Health Resources and Services Administration in fiscal 
        year 2007;
          $139,500,000 for advanced research and development, 
        which is $49,500,000 less than the budget request--this 
        activity, including $99,000,000 in funding, is being 
        transferred from the National Institutes of Health in 
        the fiscal year 2007 emergency supplemental bill (P.L. 
        110-28); and,
          $22,363,000 for BioShield management, as requested--
        this activity previously had been funded through the 
        strategic national stockpile appropriation within the 
        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    Anthrax.--The Committee is concerned about significant 
biological threats facing the nation, particularly anthrax. The 
Committee is further concerned that the Department of Health 
and Human Services (HHS) seems to be far away from filling the 
Strategic National Stockpile as authorized by Project 
BioShield. The Committee recognizes HHS's efforts to develop a 
next generation anthrax vaccine. However, given the recent 
failure to add doses of an experimental anthrax vaccine to the 
Strategic National Stockpile, the Committee urges HHS to 
continue to give FDA-approved projects priority in procurement. 
Furthermore, the Committee recognizes the importance of 
maintaining a domestic supply of vaccine and building a 
diversified manufacturing base and encourages HHS to continue 
to support the development of a domestic biodefense 
infrastructure and urges ASPR to accelerate the issuance of 
anthrax therapy and vaccine requests for proposals under 
project BioShield.
    Preparedness data.--Ensuring national preparedness requires 
regular review of the preparedness efforts of each State. The 
Committee urges ASPR to collect and review State-by-State data 
on benchmarks and performance measures developed pursuant to 
the provisions of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act 
and to make these data available to Congress, State and local 
public health departments and governments, and the public. The 
Committee further urges that as ASPR collects and evaluates 
State pandemic response plans that results of these evaluations 
be made available to the Congress and to the public.
    Surge capacity.--The Committee is concerned that not enough 
is being done at the State or Federal level to build up medical 
surge capacity for use during a pandemic or other public health 
emergency. The Committee urges ASPR, in consultation with 
medical and public health experts, to develop benchmarks of 
State readiness for medical surge capacity.
    Trauma centers.--In its CDC-funded September 2006 report, 
``U.S. Trauma Center Preparedness for a Terrorist Attack,'' a 
panel of experts assessed 175 trauma centers and made a number 
of recommendations with regard to planning and preparedness, 
communication and information sharing, resource allocation, and 
surge and decontamination capacities, among others. The report 
also noted the need to create sources of sustainable 
prospective funding for these purposes. The Committee strongly 
urges ASPR to review these recommendations and to incorporate 
them into the hospital preparedness cooperative agreement 
grants program.

Office of public health and science

    The Committee recommends $9,318,000 for the medical reserve 
corps (MRC) program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $5,795,000 less than the budget request. The 
mission of the MRC is to improve the health and safety of 
communities across the country by organizing and utilizing 
public health, medical, and other volunteers. MRC members are 
identified, credentialed, trained, and prepared in advance of 
an emergency, and are utilized throughout the year to improve 
the public health system.

Assistant Secretary for resources and technology

    The Committee recommends $9,064,000 for the Office of the 
Chief Information Officer, under the Assistant Secretary for 
resources and technology, for information technology cyber-
security. This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $918,000 less than the budget request. This funding 
goes to projects aimed at preventing, detecting, and responding 
to security events.

Office of the Secretary

    The Committee recommends $948,091,000 for public health 
preparedness activities administered by the Office of the 
Secretary, which is $29,800,000 less than the budget request. 
No funding was provided for the Office of the Secretary within 
this account in fiscal year 2007.
            Pandemic influenza
    The Committee recommends $948,091,000 for pandemic 
influenza preparedness activities of the Secretary of HHS, 
which is the same as the budget request. No funding has been 
provided to the Office of the Secretary for pandemic influenza 
in previous regular appropriation bills, although the Congress 
included $5,657,000,000 for Department of Health and Human 
Services pandemic influenza preparedness and response 
activities in the fiscal year 2006 emergency supplemental 
appropriations bills. Of that total, approximately 
$2,500,000,000 remains available for obligation. In addition, 
the Committee provides $193,081,000 for non-emergency, on-going 
pandemic influenza activities within the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health. 
The Committee includes bill language, as requested, that 
permits the Secretary to transfer funds to other HHS accounts 
for the purpose of pandemic influenza preparedness and 
response.
    Within the total, the Committee recommends $870,000,000, to 
be available until expended, for activities including the 
development and purchase of vaccine, antivirals, necessary 
medical supplies, diagnostics, and other surveillance tools. 
The Committee also includes bill language, as requested, that 
permits the Secretary to deposit products purchased with these 
funds in the strategic national stockpile and that funds may be 
used, as deemed necessary by the Secretary, for the 
construction or renovation of privately owned facilities for 
the production of pandemic vaccine and other biologicals.
    Within the total, the Committee recommends $78,091,000 to 
support ongoing activities, including: ensuring effective 
communications, global and domestic pandemic preparedness and 
planning, international in-country advanced development and 
industrialization of human pandemic influenza vaccines, 
advanced development of rapid tests and detection, and 
management and administration.
            World Trade Center
    The Committee does not include funding within the Office of 
the Secretary for treatment of World Trade Center responders; 
instead $50,000,000 is provided under the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention's National Institute for Occupational 
Safety and Health (NIOSH). Current Federal funding for the 
treatment and monitoring activities of rescue and recovery 
personnel who responded to the World Trade Center site of the 
September 11, 2001 attacks are administered by NIOSH. Further, 
the Congress provided an additional $50,000,000 for World Trade 
Center health monitoring and treatment to NIOSH in the fiscal 
year 2007 emergency supplemental appropriation (P.L. 110-28).
    The Committee is concerned that, more than five years after 
the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the U.S. and after 
multiple requests from Members of Congress, the Department of 
Health and Human Services still has not developed a long-term, 
comprehensive plan to medically monitor all individuals who 
were exposed to the toxins at the World Trade Center (WTC) site 
following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 and provide 
comprehensive medical services for those experiencing illnesses 
or injuries as a result of the WTC exposures.
    Accordingly, the Committee directs the Secretary of Health 
and Human Services, together with the Director of NIOSH, and in 
consultation with the Secretary of Labor, to submit a report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, and relevant 
authorizing committees, that includes a long-term, 
comprehensive Federal plan for monitoring, screening, analysis, 
and medical treatment for all individuals who were exposed to 
the toxins at the World Trade Center site, using a centers of 
excellence model of service delivery, as already established 
under the current program. This plan shall also address issues 
of long-term medical care, worker compensation, income 
security, and disability benefits for affected individuals and 
liability issues for the city of New York and its contractors. 
The Committee intends that this plan take into account all 
affected individuals, including emergency rescue, recovery, and 
clean up personnel; volunteers who responded to the attacks on 
the World Trade Center, including police officers, 
firefighters, emergency medical technicians, and transit 
workers; and other individuals who lived, worked, or attended 
school, child care, or adult day care in the New York City 
disaster area; and any other individuals whom the Secretary 
determines to be appropriate for inclusion.
    The report shall include annual and long-term cost 
estimates of providing monitoring, screening, analysis, medical 
treatment, workers' compensation, income security, and 
disability services. In addition, the report shall include 
recommendations for new legislation, as appropriate, and be 
submitted not later than four months after the enactment of 
this Act.
            Healthcare provider credentialing
    The Committee does not include funding to start a new 
program for healthcare provider credentialing. The budget 
requested $3,300,000 for this activity. The Committee believes 
a better use of resources is the expansion of the ongoing 
credentialing program operated by ASPR (formerly HRSA) to 
permit cross-State credentialing.
            Covered countermeasure process fund
    The Committee includes $5,000,000, to remain available 
until expended, for the compensation fund established by the 
Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness (PREP) Act. The 
Committee intends that funding be used to provide compensation 
to individuals harmed by the administration or use of the H5N1 
influenza vaccine covered by the PREP Act declaration made by 
the Secretary of Health and Human Services on January 26, 2007.

                           General Provisions

    Sec. 201. The Committee continues a provision to limit the 
amount available for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    Sec. 202. The Committee continues a provision to limit the 
number of Public Health Service employees assigned to assist in 
child survival activities and to work in AIDS programs through 
and with funds provided by the Agency for International 
Development, the United Nations International Children's 
Emergency Fund, or the World Health Organization.
    Sec. 203. The Committee continues a provision to limit the 
salary of an individual through an NIH, AHRQ, or SAMHSA grant 
or other extramural mechanism to not more than the rate of 
Executive Level I.
    Sec. 204. The Committee includes a provision limiting the 
compensation of an individual working in Head Start to the 
Federal Executive Level II salary.
    Sec. 205. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the Secretary from using evaluation set-aside funds until the 
Committee receives a report detailing the planned use of such 
funds.
    Sec. 206. The Committee continues a provision permitting 
the Secretary to use up to 2.4 percent of funds authorized 
under the PHS Act for the evaluation of programs.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 207. The Committee continues a provision permitting 
the Secretary of HHS to transfer up to one percent of any 
discretionary appropriation from an account, provided that no 
appropriation is increased by more than three percent by any 
such transfer.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 208. The Committee continues a provision to provide 
the Director of NIH, jointly with the Director of the Office of 
AIDS Research, the authority to transfer up to three percent of 
human immunodeficiency virus funds.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 209. The Committee continues a provision to make NIH 
funds available for human immunodeficiency virus research 
available to the Office of AIDS Research.
    Sec. 210. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of Title X funds unless the applicant for the award 
certifies to the Secretary that it encourages family 
participation in the decision of minors to seek family planning 
services and that it provides counseling to minors on how to 
resist attempts to coerce minors into engaging in sexual 
activities.
    Sec. 211. The Committee continues a provision stating that 
no provider of services under title X shall be exempt from any 
state law requiring notification or the reporting of child 
abuse, child molestation, sexual abuse, rape, or incest.
    Sec. 212. The Committee continues a provision related to 
the Medicare Advantage program.
    Sec. 213. The Committee continues a provision to exempt 
States from Synar provisions if certain funding criteria are 
met.
    Sec. 214. The Committee continues a provision to allow 
funding for CDC international HIV/AIDS and other infectious 
disease, chronic and environmental disease, and other health 
activities abroad to be spent under the State Department Basic 
Authorities Act of 1956.
    Sec. 215. The Committee continues a provision granting 
authority to the Office of the Director of the National 
Institutes of Health (NIH) to enter directly into transactions 
in order to implement the NIH Roadmap for medical research and 
permitting the Director to utilize peer review procedures, as 
appropriate, to obtain assessments of scientific and technical 
merit.
    Sec. 216. The Committee continues a provision that permits 
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency 
for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry to transfer funds 
that are available for Individual Learning Accounts to 
``Disease Control, Research, and Training''.
    Sec. 217. The Committee includes a provision requiring NIH-
funded authors to deposit final, peer-reviewed manuscripts in 
the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central database 
within twelve months of the official date of publication.
    The provision also requires that NIH implement the policy 
in a manner consistent with copyright law.
    Sec. 218. The Committee includes a provision requested by 
the Administration clarifying that funds appropriated to NIH 
institutes and centers may be used for minor repairs or 
improvements to their buildings, up to $2,500,000 per project 
with a total limit for NIH of $35,000,000.
    Sec. 219. The Committee recommends new language precluding 
funds to administer an influenza vaccine to children under 3 
years of age during the 2008-2009 influenza season that 
contains thimerosal.

                   TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


                    Education for the Disadvantaged

    The Committee recommends $16,016,318,000 for the education 
for the disadvantaged programs. This amount is $1,290,725,000 
more than the fiscal year 2007 appropriation. Of the total 
amount available, $7,698,807,000 is appropriated for fiscal 
year 2008 for obligation after July 1, 2008 and $8,136,218,000 
is appropriated for fiscal year 2009 for obligation on or after 
October 1, 2008. This appropriation account includes 
compensatory education programs authorized under title I of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 and title IV of 
the Higher Education Act.

Grants to local educational agencies

    Of the amounts provided for title I programs, 
$6,808,971,000 is available for basic grants to local education 
agencies. This amount is $563,000 more than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and the budget request.
    Funding for concentration grants, which targets funds to 
local educational agencies in school districts with high levels 
of disadvantaged children, is $1,365,031,000, which is the same 
as last year and the request level.
    The Committee recommends $3,094,562,000 for targeted 
grants, which is $762,219,000 more than last year and 
$372,056,000 less than the request.
    A total of $3,094,260,000 is included for education finance 
incentive grants, which is $761,917,000 more than last year's 
level and $824,417,000 more than the budget request.
    The Committee recommends an increase of $1,524,699,000 for 
title I grants to school districts for low-income children. 
These funds, together with an additional $375,000,000 included 
in the bill for the title I school improvement fund, provide a 
total increase of $1,899,699,000 for title I schools--the 
largest increase in the history of the program. More than 8 
million low-income children qualify for title I assistance, but 
fewer than half of these children are fully funded under NCLB. 
Providing additional resources so that these children can 
overcome the effects of poverty to succeed in school and in 
life is one of the Committee's highest priorities in the bill.
    Title I grants are the engine behind NCLB reforms, which 
were enacted in January 2002 to ensure that all children 
receive a high quality public education. NCLB requires public 
schools to steadily raise achievement and to close the 
achievement gap for minority, poor, and special needs children. 
However, since the bipartisan enactment of NCLB, the gap 
between the resources promised for reforms and the resources 
actually provided has grown larger each year. The Committee's 
recommendation is another step toward reversing these funding 
shortfalls by providing resources to serve an additional 
161,000 low-income children.
    The Committee's recommended increase for title I should be 
used to support scientifically-based reading instruction for 
low-income, low-performing students most in need of those 
programs. The Committee expects the Department to take the 
necessary steps to ensure that high quality reading instruction 
is provided in all title I schools. The Committee prefers to 
support reading programs under title I rather than under 
reading first State grants because of its extreme 
dissatisfaction with the Department's mismanagement of the 
reading first program which has resulted in serious conflicts 
of interest and violations of Federal law.

Even start

    The Committee provides $99,000,000 for even start, which is 
$16,717,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level. The 
Administration did not request funding for this program. Even 
start provides grants to States for programs focusing on the 
education of low-income families, including parents eligible 
for services under the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act 
and their children, aged birth-7 years. These parents are not 
in school, are above the State's compulsory school attendance 
age limit, and have not earned a high school diploma (or 
equivalent). The Committee does not agree with the funding cut 
implemented by the Administration in fiscal year 2007 or the 
Administration's proposal to terminate the program in fiscal 
year 2008. The funds included in the bill will restore even 
start funding to its fiscal year 2006 level.

School improvement grants

    The Committee provides $500,000,000 for school improvement 
grants, which is $375,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the same as the budget request. This formula 
grant program will make awards to States to provide assistance 
for local school improvement activities required for title I 
schools that do not make adequate yearly progress for at least 
two consecutive years.
    The Committee provides the $500,000,000 for school 
improvement grants in anticipation of a rising number of 
schools identified for improvement. The Department of Education 
reports that the number of schools identified for improvement 
nationwide grew from 9,071 in the 2005-2006 school year to 
10,214 in the 2006-2007 school year. The Department projects 
that the number of schools identified for restructuring alone 
could double by fiscal year 2008. The resources provided in the 
bill demonstrate the Committee's commitment to ensuring that 
chronically low-performing schools that have the greatest 
challenges--the least experienced teachers, lower teacher 
salaries, and higher teacher turnover--have the assistance they 
need to improve student performance. Under the Committee 
recommendation, as many as 10,000 school districts could 
receive additional funds for these struggling schools.

Reading first State grants

    The Committee recommends $400,000,000 for reading first 
State grants, which is $629,234,000 less than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $618,692,000 less than the budget 
request. This program provides assistance to States and school 
districts in establishing research-based reading programs for 
children in kindergarten through grade three.
    The Committee's recommendation reflects its extreme 
dissatisfaction with the Department's mismanagement of this 
program, which has resulted in serious conflicts of interest 
and violations of Federal law. These unacceptable problems have 
been documented by the Department of Education, Office of 
Inspector General (OIG). For example, in September, 2006, the 
OIG analyzed hundreds of Department emails and concluded that 
the Department's program officials failed to maintain a 
controlled environment that exemplified management integrity 
and accountability (Office of Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Education, Final Inspection Report, The Reading 
First Program's Grant Application Process (2006)).
    After further investigation of reading first, the OIG found 
that program administrators improperly promoted commercial 
reading programs potentially in violation of Federal law 
(Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of Education, 
Final Inspection Report, The Department's Administration of 
Selected Aspects of the Reading First Program (2007)).
    For example, the Madison School District in Wisconsin had 
substantial data demonstrating that its students were learning 
at the rate that reading first was aiming for. Nonetheless, the 
district lost its $2,000,000 reading first grant when the 
district would not purchase the unproven commercial reading 
program promoted by the Department of Education's contractors. 
Across the country, including in Illinois, Kentucky, 
Massachusetts, Maine and New Jersey, States and districts with 
programs that were not on the Department's preferential list 
were either rejected for grants or pressured to change their 
methods even though some argued, as did Wisconsin, that their 
programs met the law's standard. This is the type of pressure 
that the OIG found to be in potential violation of Federal law.
    Finally, the OIG found significant bias and conflicts of 
interest on the part of those hired to provide technical 
assistance to States, potentially in violation of Federal law 
(Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of Education, 
Final Inspection Report, RMC Research Corporation's 
Administration of Reading First Program Contracts (2007)). The 
Committee is particularly disturbed by the OIG's findings that 
indications of bias relating to technical assistance providers 
were prevalent as early as 2002 (Id.).
    The seriousness of the OIG's findings is underscored by 
reports that the office has made criminal referrals to the 
Justice Department as a result of his investigation.
    At the same time that the Department of Education was 
promoting certain reading products that lacked evidence of 
their validity, reading programs such as Reading Recovery and 
Success for All with strong evidence of effectiveness, 
according to the Department's own What Works Clearinghouse, 
were virtually shut out of reading first. In fact, Department 
of Education data show that schools without Reading First funds 
were more likely to use Reading Recovery and Success for All--
proven approaches--than were schools receiving reading first 
grants.
    The Committee is displeased that the Department has 
attempted to paper over these transgressions by pointing to a 
modest rise in the nation's reading scores. Because only a tiny 
share--about 6 percent--of all schools in the country receive 
reading first funds, the Committee questions the suggestion 
that reading first is responsible for those results. The 
Committee notes that the reading first program currently is 
being evaluated based on its performance in raising student 
achievement. That evaluation is not yet complete. Further, the 
Committee does not know how effective the program would have 
been had States and school districts been permitted to choose 
from a wider array of reading programs that are, in fact, based 
on solid evidence of effectiveness.
    The Committee finds that (1) Congress must fundamentally 
reform the reading first program through the reauthorization of 
the No Child Left Behind Act; (2) the Department must reform 
its management of the program, including the removal of 
individuals, contractors, and subcontractors who have a 
financial interest in products or services purchased with 
reading first funds; and (3) there must be a final, 
scientifically rigorous impact evaluation of the program before 
the Committee will make another large investment of valuable 
resources into the program.
    The Committee notes that, as the program is subject to 
reauthorization this year, fiscal year 2007 is the final year 
of funding for the current cohort of reading first schools. 
Therefore, the Committee's recommendation should not impact 
funding for existing grantees. Fiscal year 2008 funds will 
support a new cohort of schools that will be selected based on 
new State competitions. Further, the Committee expects that the 
significant increase recommended for title I grants will be 
used to support scientifically-based reading instruction for 
low-income, low-performing students most in need of those 
programs.

Early reading first

    The Committee recommends $114,550,000 for early reading 
first, which is $3,116,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the budget request. This is a competitive 
grant program targeted toward children from birth through age 
five, and supports the development of verbal skills, phonetic 
awareness, pre-reading development, and assistance for 
professional development for teachers in evidence-based 
strategies of instruction. All of the fiscal year 2008 funds 
will be used for up to 36 new discretionary awards, which will 
serve approximately 7,300 children and 600 teachers.
    The Committee agrees with the Administration's finding that 
there is substantial overlap between early reading first and 
the early childhood educator professional development program, 
and that the two programs should be consolidated. Therefore, 
the Committee recommendation does not provide fiscal year 2008 
funding for the early childhood educator professional 
development program. The Committee expects the Department to 
strengthen professional development partnerships for early 
childhood educators through grants awarded under early reading 
first.
    The Committee has learned that several school districts 
were not informed of their eligibility to compete for early 
reading first grants until March 7, 2007, yet were given a 
preapplication deadline of March 23, 2007--a mere two weeks 
later. When the Department of Education originally announced 
national grant eligibility on January 22, 2007, some school 
districts were mistakenly not included on the list of eligible 
districts. Following the original application deadline on 
February 21, 2007, the Department issued a modification on 
March 7, 2007, announcing an error in the list of eligible 
districts and reopened the preapplication phase of the 
competition for a only 16 days.
    The Committee understands that the Department may not have 
been at fault for the omission of several eligible districts. 
However, once the Department was made aware of the omission, it 
should have extended the deadline for a reasonable period. The 
Committee requests that the Department inform it, in writing, 
prior to the next grant competition of what it believes to be 
the best practice for determining whether, and for how long, 
grant deadlines should be extended to accommodate error and 
thus ensure a fair competition.
    The Committee supports and understands the need for the 
early reading first program. The program has a strong research 
component. The Committee notes that research on the 
effectiveness of preschool curricula is one of the research 
priorities identified by the Institute of Education Sciences 
(IES). The bill provides $157,552,000 for research conducted by 
IES. The Committee believes that IES should be the primary 
place within the Department where research on educational 
interventions is conducted and has provided sufficient 
resources within the IES account to continue its research on 
preschool education.

Striving readers

    The Committee recommends $31,870,000 for striving readers, 
which is $68,130,000 less than the budget request and the same 
as the fiscal year 2007 funding level. Striving readers makes 
competitive grants to develop, implement, and evaluate reading 
interventions for middle- or high-school students who are 
reading significantly below grade level. These funds will 
support all continuation awards.
    The Committee supports and understands the need for the 
striving readers program, but it believes that it is 
essentially a research activity. The Committee notes that 
research on interventions for struggling adolescent and adult 
readers is one of the research priorities identified by the 
Institute of Education Sciences (IES). The bill provides 
$157,552,000 for research conducted by IES. The Committee 
believes that IES should be the primary place within the 
Department where research on educational interventions is 
conducted and has provided sufficient resources within the IES 
account to expand research on adolescent reading.

Math now

    The bill does not provide $250,000,000 as requested by the 
Administration for two new programs, math now for elementary 
school students and math now for middle school students. The 
Committee supports efforts to improve mathematics instruction 
but has concerns about beginning additional programs when 
ongoing programs exist that target math and science 
instruction. In addition, the Committee provides funding for 
the national mathematics panel to develop mathematics content 
and principles for programs like math now.
    The Committee notes that research on mathematics 
instruction and assessments is one of the research priorities 
identified by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES). The 
bill provides $157,552,000 for research conducted by IES. The 
Committee believes that IES should be the primary place within 
the Department where research on educational interventions is 
conducted and has provided sufficient resources within the IES 
account to expand research on mathematics interventions.

Literacy through school libraries

    The Committee recommends $19,486,000 for literacy through 
school libraries, the same as the budget request and $1,000 
more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level. This program 
helps school districts provide students with increased access 
to up-to-date school library materials; a well-equipped, 
technologically advanced school library media center; and well-
trained and professionally certified school library media 
specialists.

America's opportunity scholarships and promise scholarships

    The Committee does not recommend funding for the promise 
scholarships and America's opportunity scholarships program 
proposed by the Administration at $250,000,000 and $50,000,000, 
respectively. These proposed programs would provide parents 
with funds either to send their children to private schools or 
receive intensive tutoring assistance. Instead, the Committee 
demonstrates its commitment to improving low-performing schools 
by investing $500,000,000 to turn those schools around not only 
for the benefit of current students but for the benefit of 
younger children progressing through the school system.

State agency programs: migrant

    The Committee recommends $393,900,000 for the migrant 
education program. This amount is $7,376,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $13,605,000 more than the 
budget request. This program supports special educational and 
related services to children of migratory agricultural workers 
and fishermen, including (1) supplementary academic education; 
(2) remedial or compensatory instruction; (3) English for 
limited English proficient students; (4) testing; (5) guidance 
counseling; and (6) other activities to promote coordination of 
services across States for migrant children whose education is 
interrupted by frequent moves.

State agency programs: neglected and delinquent

    For the State agency program for neglected and delinquent 
children, the Committee recommends $49,797,000, which is the 
same as the budget request and the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation. This formula grant program provides educational 
services for children and youth under age 21 in institutions 
for juvenile delinquents, adult correctional institutions, or 
institutions for the neglected. A portion of these funds may be 
used for projects that support the successful re-entry of youth 
offenders into postsecondary and vocational programs.

Evaluation

    The Committee provides $9,330,000 for evaluation. This is 
the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $3,000 more 
than the budget request. Title I evaluation supports large 
scale national evaluations that examine how title I is 
contributing to improved student performance at the State, 
local education agency, and school levels. It also supports 
short-term studies that document promising models.
    The Committee supports the Department's efforts to carry 
out congressionally authorized evaluations of Federal education 
programs using rigorous methodologies, particularly random 
assignment, that are capable of producing scientifically valid 
knowledge regarding which program activities are effective. To 
ensure that authorized evaluations are conducted in a rigorous 
manner, are independent of the program office, and include 
scientific peer review, the Committee believes that the 
Institute of Education Sciences should be the lead agency for 
the design and implementation of these evaluations. The 
Committee believes further that it is essential for program 
offices to work collaboratively with the Institute to include a 
priority or requirement in program solicitations for grantee 
participation in such evaluations, including random assignment, 
to the extent the Institute deems appropriate and where not 
specifically prohibited by law.

Comprehensive school reform

    The Committee recommends $1,634,000 for the comprehensive 
school reform program. This is $718,000 less than the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level. The budget request did not include 
funding for this program. The amount recommended will provide 
continuation funding for the comprehensive school reform 
clearinghouse, which disseminates information about research-
based school reforms to education practitioners and 
policymakers.

Migrant education, high school equivalency program

    The Committee recommends $18,550,000 for the high school 
equivalency program. This amount is the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2007 level. The high school 
equivalency program recruits migrant students age 16 and over 
and provides academic and support services to help those 
students obtain a high school equivalency certificate and 
subsequently to gain employment or admission to a postsecondary 
institution or training program.

College assistance migrant programs

    The Committee recommends $15,377,000 for the college 
assistance migrant programs (CAMP). This amount is the same as 
the fiscal year 2007 level and the budget request. CAMP 
provides tutoring and counseling services to first-year, 
undergraduate migrant students and assists those students in 
obtaining student financial aid for their remaining 
undergraduate years.

                               Impact Aid

    The Committee recommends $1,278,453,000 for Federal impact 
aid programs in fiscal year 2008, which is $50,000,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $50,353,000 more 
than the budget request. This account supports payments to 
school districts affected by Federal activities, such as those 
that educate children whose families are connected with the 
military or who live on Indian land.
    The Committee recommendation also repeats language, as 
requested by the Administration, ensuring that schools serving 
the children of military personnel continue to receive impact 
aid funds when the military parents who live on-base are 
deployed and the child continues to attend the same school and 
in cases in which an on-base military parent is killed while on 
active duty and the child continues to attend the same school.

Basic support payments

    The Committee recommends $1,140,517,000 for basic support 
payments to local educational agencies, $48,650,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request. 
Basic support payments compensate school districts for lost tax 
revenue and are made on behalf of Federally-connected children, 
such as children of members of the uniformed services who live 
on Federal property.

Payments for children with disabilities

    The Committee recommends $49,466,000 for payments on behalf 
of Federally-connected children with disabilities, the same as 
the budget request and the fiscal year 2007 appropriation. 
These payments compensate school districts for the increased 
costs of serving Federally-connected children with 
disabilities.

Facilities maintenance

    The Committee recommends $4,950,000 for facilities 
maintenance, the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$353,000 more than the budget request. These capital payments 
are authorized for maintenance of certain facilities owned by 
the Department of Education.

Construction

    The Committee recommends $17,820,000 for the construction 
program, which is the same as the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2007 level. This program provides formula and competitive 
grants to local educational agencies that educate Federally 
connected students or have Federally owned land for building 
and renovating school facilities. The Committee provides 
funding for the competitive program, as requested by the 
Administration.

Payments for Federal property

    The Committee recommends $65,700,000 for payments related 
to Federal property, $1,350,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
level and the budget request. Funds are awarded to school 
districts to compensate for lost tax revenue as the result of 
Federal acquisition of real property since 1938.

                      School Improvement Programs

    The Committee recommends $5,678,002,000 for school 
improvement programs. This amount is $422,524,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $979,726,000 more than the 
budget request. This appropriation account includes programs 
authorized under titles II, IV, V, VI, and VII of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act; the McKinney-Vento 
Homeless Assistance Act, title IV-A of the Civil Rights Act, 
section 203 of the Educational Technical Assistance Act of 
2002, and section 105 of the Compact of Free Association 
Amendments Act of 2003.

State grants for improving teacher quality

    The Committee recommends $3,187,439,000 for State grants 
for improving teacher quality, which is $300,000,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $399,951,000 more than 
the budget request. This program gives States and districts a 
flexible source of funding with which to meet their particular 
needs in strengthening the skills and knowledge of teachers and 
administrators to enable them to improve student achievement. 
States are authorized to retain 2.5 percent of funds for State 
activities, including reforming teacher certification, re-
certification or licensure requirements; expanding, 
establishing, or improving alternative routes to State 
certification. This program also helps States carry out 
activities that include support during the initial teaching and 
leadership experience, such as mentoring programs; assisting 
school districts in effectively recruiting and retaining highly 
qualified and effective teachers and principals; reforming 
tenure and compensation systems; and developing professional 
development programs for principals. The Committee 
recommendation will provide for high quality professional 
development for an additional 51,000 teachers than in fiscal 
year 2007.
    The Committee rejects the Administration's proposal to move 
$100,000,000 from this program to the teacher incentive fund 
under the Innovation and Improvement account. Research shows 
that teacher quality is the most important school-related 
factor in determining student achievement growth. To ensure a 
high-quality teacher workforce, the Committee believes that the 
better investment is in providing States and local education 
agencies the flexibility to choose the initiatives that work 
best for them to promote retention of highly qualified teachers 
and principals and to improve the quality of the teachers 
through professional development activities. Also, the 
Committee believes that maximum flexibility is the best course 
of action while various teacher quality initiatives are 
examined in the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind 
Act.

Early childhood educator professional development

    The Committee does not recommend funding early childhood 
educator professional development. The budget request also did 
not recommend funding this program. In fiscal year 2007, the 
funding level was $14,550,000. The Committee expects the 
Department to continue to strengthen professional development 
partnerships for early childhood educators through grants 
awarded under early reading first. To that end, the Committee 
has provided sufficient funding for the early reading first 
program.

Mathematics and science partnerships

    The Committee recommends $182,160,000 for mathematics and 
science partnerships. This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $36,000 more than the request. This program 
promotes strong math and science teaching skills for elementary 
and secondary school teachers. Grantees may use program funds 
to develop rigorous math and science curricula; establish 
distance learning programs; and recruit math, science, and 
engineering majors into the teaching profession. They may also 
provide professional development opportunities. Grants are made 
to States by formula based on the number of children aged 5 to 
17 who are from families with incomes below the poverty line. 
States then award the funds competitively to partnerships that 
must include the State agency; an engineering, math, or science 
department of an institution of higher education; and a high-
need school district. Other partners may also be involved.

State grants for innovative programs

    The Committee recommends $99,000,000 for State grants for 
innovative programs. This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request did not include funding for 
this program. This program provides flexible funding to State 
and local educational agencies for 27 purposes identified in 
statute, including obtaining technology and technology-related 
training, combating illiteracy among children and adults, 
addressing the educational needs of gifted and talented 
children, and implementing school improvement and parental 
involvement activities under ESEA title I.

Educational technology State grants

    The Committee recommends $272,250,000 for education 
technology State grants. This is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level. The budget request did not include funding 
for this program. The Committee recognizes that technology is 
critical to our schools to ensure students are prepared to 
compete in the 21st century.
    The Committee notes with interest the finding of the 
Department of Education that K-12 student test scores on State 
math and reading tests were not significantly impacted when 
students used, for one-year, various educational software 
products. The Committee looks forward to the Department's 
second report that measures the software's efficacy over the 
course of two years. The Committee expects that report to 
address more than the 16 educational software titles addressed 
in the first report because there are hundreds of such titles 
commercially available. It also expects the report to address 
how inadequate teacher training impacts the efficacy of 
software implementation in the classroom. The Committee 
encourages the Department to promote software training so that 
these programs may be implemented in the classrooms to achieve 
maximum benefit.
    The Committee continues to support all aspects of 
educational technology grants, which cover a much wider array 
of applications and services than software, such as 
professional development, well-equipped classrooms, 
administrative structures, and a curriculum that recognizes the 
role technology plays in all disciplines.

Supplemental education grants

    The Committee recommends $18,001,000 for supplemental 
education grants to the Federated States of Micronesia and the 
Republic of the Marshall Islands, which is the same as the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2007 funding level. The 
Compact of Free Association Amendments Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-
188) authorizes these entities to receive funding for general 
education assistance. The Committee recommendation includes a 
consolidated amount for supplemental education grants because 
the underlying statute determines the allocation between 
Micronesia and the Marshall Islands.

21st century community learning centers

    The Committee recommends $1,106,166,000 for 21st century 
community learning centers, $125,000,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $124,986,000 more than the budget 
request. This program is a formula grant to States, which in 
turn distribute 95 percent of the funds on a competitive basis 
to local school districts, community-based organizations, and 
other public entities and private organizations. Grantees must 
target students who attend low-performing schools. Funds may be 
used for before and after school activities that advance 
student academic achievement including remedial education and 
academic enrichment activities; math, science, arts, music, 
entrepreneurial and technology education; tutoring and 
mentoring; recreational activities; and expanded library 
service hours.
    The Committee's recommendation is part of its initiative to 
help reduce the number of abortions in America. Youth who do 
not spend time in structured activities after school are 37 
percent more likely to become teen parents than are youth who 
spend time in after school programs. After-school programs help 
prevent teen pregnancy by encouraging good decision-making and 
providing youth health education and positive role models in a 
supervised setting after school. After-school programs can also 
provide greater enrichment opportunities to help teenagers 
remain in school and prepare for postsecondary education or 
employment.
    In addition, the Committee's recommendation reflects its 
concern that, between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., the rate of juvenile 
crime triples, as well as the likelihood that unsupervised 
students will become victims of crime. Lack of supervision and 
boredom can increase the likelihood that a young person will 
experiment with drugs and alcohol.
    The $125,000,000, or 12.7 percent, increase over fiscal 
year 2007 will help communities provide after-school programs 
serving 1.4 million students, approximately 163,000 more than 
in fiscal year 2007. The Committee intends that the Department 
encourage States to use 40 percent of their additional 
allocations over fiscal year 2007 (equal to $50,000,000 across 
all States), as practicable, to provide supervised and 
supportive after-school activities to approximately 65,000 
middle and high school students.

State assessments

    The Committee recommends $411,630,000 for State 
assessments, the same as the budget request and $4,067,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2007 level. This program provides States 
with funding to develop annual assessments and to carry out 
activities related to ensuring accountability for results in 
the State's schools and school districts.

Javits gifted and talented education

    The Committee recommends $7,596,000 for gifted and talented 
education, the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level. The 
budget request did not include funding for this program. This 
program supports grants to build and enhance the ability of 
elementary and secondary schools to meet the needs of gifted 
and talented students. Competitive grants are awarded to States 
and school districts, institutions of higher education and 
other public and private entities.

Foreign language assistance grants

    The Committee recommends $26,780,000 for foreign language 
assistance grants, which is $3,000,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $3,025,000 more than the budget 
request. The program supports competitive grants to school 
districts and States to increase the quality and quantity of 
elementary and secondary-level foreign language instruction in 
the United States.
    The bill provides that $3,000,000 shall be available for 
five-year grants to local educational agencies that would work 
in partnership with one or more institutions of higher 
education to establish or expand articulated programs of study 
in languages critical to U.S. national security. The programs 
would be designed to enable successful students, as they 
advance through college, to achieve a superior level of 
proficiency or professional working proficiency in critical 
need languages such as Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and 
Russian, as well as the Indic, Iranian, and Turkic language 
families. The Committee encourages school districts applying 
for this funding to reach out to institutions and centers 
funded under the Department's International Education programs 
under Title VI of the Higher Education Act.

Education for homeless children and youth

    The Committee recommends $66,878,000 for the education of 
homeless children and youth program, which is $5,000,000 more 
than the budget request and $5,007,000 more than the fiscal 
year funding 2007 level. Grants are allocated to States in 
proportion to the total that each State receives under the 
title I program. For local grants, at least 50 percent must be 
used for direct services to homeless children and youth, 
including tutoring or remedial or other educational services. 
The Committee notes that funding for this program has been 
essentially frozen since fiscal year 2004 while the number of 
homeless children has increased approximately 50 percent to 
914,225. The Committee's recommendation reflects its commitment 
to these particularly disadvantaged students. The $5,000,000 
increase will enable States and school districts to identify 
and serve an additional 74,000 children.

Training and advisory services

    The Committee recommends $7,113,000 for training and 
advisory services authorized by title IV-A of the Civil Rights 
Act. This amount is the same as the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level. Title IV-A authorizes technical 
assistance and training services for local educational agencies 
to address problems associated with desegregation on the basis 
of race, sex, or national origin. The Department awards three-
year grants to regional equity assistance centers (EACs) 
located in each of the 10 Department of Education regions. The 
EACs provide services to school districts upon request. Typical 
activities include disseminating information on successful 
education practices and legal requirements related to 
nondiscrimination on the basis of race, sex, and national 
origin in educational programs. Activities also include 
training designed to develop educators' skills in specific 
areas, such as the identification of race and sex bias in 
instructional materials; increasing the skills of educational 
personnel in dealing with race-based confrontations such as 
hate crimes; and providing technical assistance in the 
identification and selection of appropriate educational 
programs to meet the needs of limited English proficient 
students.

Education for Native Hawaiians

    The Committee recommends $33,907,000 for education for 
Native Hawaiians, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request did not include funding for 
this program. A number of authorized programs limited to Native 
Hawaiians are supported with these funds, including a model 
curriculum project, family-based education centers, 
postsecondary education fellowships, gifted and talented 
education projects, and special education projects for disabled 
pupils.

Alaska Native education equity

    The Committee recommends $33,907,000 for the Alaska Native 
education equity program, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level. The budget request did not include funding 
for this program. These funds are used to develop supplemental 
educational programs to benefit Alaska Natives.

Rural education

    The Committee recommends $168,918,000 for rural education 
programs, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $67,000 more than the budget request. This fund 
includes two programs to assist rural school districts to 
improve teaching and learning in their schools. The small, 
rural schools achievement program provides funds to rural 
districts that serve a small number of students. The rural and 
low-income schools program provides funds to rural districts 
that serve concentrations of poor students, regardless of the 
number of students served by the district.

Comprehensive centers

    The Committee recommends $56,257,000 for comprehensive 
centers, the same as the fiscal year 2007 level and $1,000 more 
than the budget request.
    These funds are used for the 21 comprehensive centers first 
funded in fiscal year 2005. The centers include 16 regional 
centers that will provide training and technical assistance to 
State educational agencies within their geographic regions to 
help them implement provisions of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act and 5 content centers, each specializing in a 
different area.

                            Indian Education

    The Committee recommends $124,000,000 for Indian education. 
This amount is $5,310,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $5,317,000 more than the budget request. This 
account supports programs authorized by part A of title VII of 
the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
     Although the number of Indian students enrolling in 
colleges and universities has more than doubled in the last two 
and a half decades, the Department of Education finds that the 
Indian student population remains subject to significant risk 
factors that threaten their ability to improve their academic 
achievement. The Committee provides the first increase to this 
program since fiscal year 2002 in order to demonstrate its 
commitment to help Indian students achieve academic success. 
This increase will enable eligible schools to address the 
unique educational and culturally related academic needs of 
26,156 more students than last year.
    The Committee recognizes that the purpose of title VII is 
to support the efforts of local educational agencies (LEAs), 
Indian tribes, and organizations ``to meet the unique 
educational and culturally related academic needs of American 
Indian and Alaska Native students'' and is a part of the United 
States' trust relationship with Indian people. Title VII 
programs ensure that Native students receive an education 
consistent with tribal traditions, languages, and culture. In 
its administration of title VII funds, the Committee directs 
the Department to continue to adhere to the Statement of Policy 
set forth in section 7101 of the ESEA.

Grants to local educational agencies

    The Committee recommends $100,057,000 for grants to local 
education agencies. This program provides assistance through 
formula grants to school districts and schools supported or 
operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The purpose of this 
program is to reform elementary and secondary school programs 
that serve Indian students, including preschool children. 
Grantees must develop a comprehensive plan and assure that the 
programs they carry out will help Indian students reach the 
same challenging standards that apply to all students. This 
program supplements the regular school program to help Indian 
children sharpen their academic skills, bolster their self-
confidence, and participate in enrichment activities that would 
otherwise be unavailable.

Special programs for Indian children

    The Committee recommends $19,884,000 for special programs 
for Indian children. These programs make competitive awards to 
improve the quality of education for Indian students. This 
program also funds the American Indian Teacher Corps and the 
American Indian Administrator Corps to recruit and support 
American Indians as teachers and school administrators.

National activities

    The Committee recommends $4,059,000 for national 
activities. Funds under this authority support research, 
evaluation and data collection to provide information on the 
status of education for the Indian population and on the 
effectiveness of Indian education programs.

                       Innovation and Improvement

    The Committee recommends $992,354,000 for innovation and 
improvement programs. This amount is $154,668,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $70,336,000 above the budget 
request. This appropriation account includes programs 
authorized under part G of title I and portions of titles II 
and V of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
    The Committee urges the Department, in the development and 
execution of its programs, to be mindful of the alarming 
national dropout rates for African American males.

Troops-to-teachers and Transition to Teaching

    The Committee recommends $14,645,000 for troops to 
teachers, the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 
2007 funding level. This program is designed to assist eligible 
members of the armed forces to obtain certification or 
licensure as elementary and secondary school teachers, or 
vocational or technical teachers.
    The Committee recommends $44,484,000 for transition to 
teaching, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $2,000 more than the budget request. Transition to 
teaching is designed to help mitigate the shortage of qualified 
licensed or certified teachers. The program provides 
competitive grants to help support State and local educational 
agencies' efforts to recruit, train, and place talented 
individuals into teaching positions and to support them during 
their first years in the classroom. In particular, the program 
focuses on mid-career professionals, including former military 
personnel, who have substantial career experience and are 
recent college graduates. Grants are made on a competitive 
basis.

Writing instruction

    The Committee recommends $23,533,000 for the writing 
instruction. This is $2,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The President's budget did not include funding 
for this program. Funds are provided to support training 
programs to teach writing effectively. Federal funds support 50 
percent of the costs of these programs, and recipients must 
contribute an equal amount.

Teaching of traditional American history

    The Committee recommends $119,790,000 for the teaching of 
traditional American history, $69,790,000 more than the budget 
request and the same as the fiscal year 2007 level. This 
program supports competitive grants to school districts to 
promote the teaching of American history in elementary and 
secondary schools as a separate academic subject.

School leadership

    The Committee recommends $14,731,000 for school leadership 
activities, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level. The budget request did not include funding for this 
program. The program provides competitive grants to assist 
high-need school districts with recruiting, training, and 
retaining principals and assistant principals.

Advanced credentialing

    The Committee recommends $10,695,000 for advanced 
credentialing. This is $6,000,000 less than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level. The budget request did not include funding 
for this program. The program supports activities to encourage 
and support teachers seeking advanced certification or 
credentialing. The Committee recommendation continues funding 
to help support an unprecedented number of teachers seeking 
advanced certification. These funds also will support expanded 
recruitment and certification of teachers to work in high-need 
schools.

Charter school grants and credit enhancement for charter school 
        facilities

    The Committee recommends $251,394,000 for support of 
charter schools. This is $1,000 more than the budget request 
and the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level for the 
charter school grants and the credit enhancement for charter 
school facilities, which are combined in the Committee 
recommendation to enhance administrative efficiency.
    Charter schools are developed and administered by 
individuals or groups of individuals, which may include 
teachers, administrators, and parents. These groups enter into 
charters for operation of their schools, which must be granted 
exemptions from State and local rules that limit flexibility in 
school operation and management. Under this program, grants are 
made to State educational agencies in States that have charter 
school laws. The State educational agencies in turn make sub-
grants to authorized public chartering agencies in partnerships 
with developers of charter schools. The Committee intends the 
Department to entertain applications for credit enhancement 
assistance for funding under this account.
    The Committee notes that recent studies of the 
effectiveness of charter schools have shown mixed results and 
awaits the final evaluation report that will test more 
rigorously their promise. In the meantime, the Committee has 
recommended continued funding.

Voluntary public school choice

    The Committee recommends $26,278,000 for voluntary public 
school choice, the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
and $3,000 more than the budget request. This program supports 
efforts to establish intra-district and inter-district public 
school choice programs to provide students in participating 
schools with the widest variety of options for their education. 
Funds are used to make competitive awards to States, school 
districts or partnerships.

Magnet schools assistance

    The Committee recommends $106,693,000 for the magnet 
schools assistance program. This is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $8,000 more than the budget request. The 
magnet schools assistance program awards competitive grants to 
local educational agencies for use in establishing or operating 
magnet schools that are part of a desegregation plan approved 
by a court or by the Department of Education's Office for Civil 
Rights. A magnet school is defined by the statute as ``a school 
or education center that offers a special curriculum capable of 
attracting substantial numbers of students of different racial 
backgrounds.''

Fund for the improvement of education

    The Committee recommends $205,402,000 for the fund for the 
improvement of education (FIE), which is $46,894,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $147,294,000 more than 
the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation reflects an investment in 
activities that have proven to be effective. As such, the 
Committee's recommendation does not include funding for the 
language teacher corps; choice incentive fund; adjunct teacher 
corps initiative; State scholars capacity building; exchanges 
for historic whaling and trading partners; and excellence in 
economic education.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee recommends 
$2,000,000 for the evaluation and data quality initiative; 
$3,000,000 for teacher to teacher; $25,043,000 for reading is 
fundamental; $11,513,000 for star schools; $10,890,000 for 
ready to teach; $2,000,000 for foundations for learning; 
$38,777,000 for arts in education; $39,600,000 for parental 
assistance information centers; $3,000,000 for women's 
educational equity, $10,000,000 for full service community 
schools and $11,800,000 for other programs.
    The Committee does not recommend funding for mental health 
integration in public schools. However, the Committee strongly 
supports the purpose of this program, which is to link school 
systems with the local mental health system. To accomplish that 
end, the Committee has recommended significant increases in 
other programs to support mental health services in the 
schools. Particularly, the Committee has recommended that 
grantees of elementary and secondary school counseling and safe 
schools/healthy students collaborate with local mental health 
service agencies.
    The Committee's recommendation includes $10,000,000 to help 
establish full-service community schools (FSCS). A FSCS is a 
public elementary or secondary school that coordinates with 
community-based organizations and public/private partnerships 
to provide students, their families, and the community access 
to comprehensive services. These services include early 
childhood education; remedial education and academic enrichment 
activities; programs that promote parental involvement and 
family literacy; mentoring and other youth development 
programs; parent leadership and parenting education activities; 
community service and service learning opportunities; programs 
that provide assistance to students who have been truant, 
suspended, or expelled; job training and career counseling 
services; nutrition services; primary health and dental care; 
mental health counseling services; and adult education 
including instruction in English as a second language.
    The Committee intends these funds to be allocated on a 
competitive basis to eligible entities. An eligible entity is a 
consortium of a local educational agency and one or more 
community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, or 
other public or private enti
ties, to assist public elementary or secondary schools to 
function as a FSCS. Grants shall be used to coordinate or 
provide not less than three services at one or more public 
elementary or secondary schools.
    The Secretary shall require that each grant application 
include a list of partner entities that will assist the 
eligible entity to coordinate or provide services; a memorandum 
of understanding between the eligible entity and all partner 
entities describing the role the partner entities will assume; 
a description of the capacity of the eligible entity to provide 
and coordinate qualified services at a FSCS; and a 
comprehensive plan that includes descriptions of the student, 
family, and school community to be served, including 
information about the demographic characteristics and needs of 
students, families, and community residents, the number of 
individuals to be served, and the frequency of services. It 
shall also include qualified services to be provided or 
coordinated by the eligible entity and its partner entities.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
ABC Unified School District, Cerritos, CA for an                $100,000
 after-school program at Melbourne Elementary School.
Academy for Urban School Leadership, Chicago, IL for             200,000
 Chicago Academy and Chicago Academy High School,
 which may include support for resident teachers.....
Action for Bridgeport Community Development, Inc.,               300,000
 Bridgeport, CT for teacher training programs........
African-American Male Achievers Network, Inc.,                    40,000
 Inglewood, CA for its Project STEP program for at-
 risk youth..........................................
Akron Public Schools, OH for a Math, Science, and                200,000
 Technology Community Learning Center, which may
 include equipment...................................
Alamance-Burlington School District, Burlington, NC              150,000
 for the Professional Development Academy............
All Kinds of Minds, Chapel Hill, NC for teacher                  150,000
 training programs...................................
American Ballet Theatre, New York, NY for educational            150,000
 activities..........................................
Amistad America, New Haven, CT for the Atlantic                  250,000
 Freedom Tour of the Armistad educational programs...
An Achievable Dream, Inc., Newport News, VA for                  150,000
 education and support services for at-risk children,
 which may include teacher stipend scholarships......
Angelo State University, San Angelo, TX for a teacher            200,000
 training initiative.................................
Apache County Schools, S1. Johns, AZ for a teacher               100,000
 training initiative.................................
Arab City Schools, Arab, AL for technology upgrades..            200,000
AVANCE, Inc, EI Paso, TX for parenting education                 100,000
 programs............................................
AVANCE, Inc., Del Rio, TX for a family literacy                  100,000
 program.............................................
AVANCE, Inc., Waco, TX for parenting education                   100,000
 programs............................................
Barat Education Foundation, Lake Forest, IL for the              250,000
 American Citizen Initiative pilot program...........
Bay Haven Charter Academy Middle School, Lynn Haven,             150,000
 FL for its physical education program, which may
 include equipment...................................
Baylor University, Waco, TX for its Language and                 100,000
 Literacy Center.....................................
Best Buddies International, Miami, FL for mentoring              300,000
 programs for persons with intellectual disabilities.
Best Buddies Maryland, Baltimore, MD for mentoring               300,000
 programs for persons with intellectual disabilities.
Best Buddies Rhode Island, Providence, RI for                    150,000
 mentoring programs for persons with intellectual
 disabilities........................................
Big Top Chautauqua, WI for educational activities....            250,000
Boise State University, Boise, ID for the Idaho                  200,000
 SySTEMic Solution program...........................
Bowie State University, Bowie, MD for establishment              200,000
 of a Principal's Institute..........................
Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI for a multi-           300,000
 media center, which may include equipment...........
Boys & Girls Town of Missouri, Columbia, MO for                  150,000
 technology upgrades.................................
Boys and Girls Club of San Bernardino, CA for an                 140,000
 after-school program in the Delman Heights
 community, which may include equipment..............
Bradford Area School District, Bradford, PA for the              100,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Brookdale Community College, Lincroft, NJ for a                  200,000
 Student Success Center in Asbury Park, NJ which may
 include equipment...................................
Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts, Hartford, CT            100,000
 for arts education programs.........................
California State University Northridge, CA for                   250,000
 development of an assessment and accountability
 system for teacher education........................
California State University, San Bernardino, CA for a            260,000
 leadership training program for urban youth.........
Canton Symphony Orchestra Association, Canton, OH for            100,000
 the Northeast Ohio Arts Education Collaborative,
 including teacher training and curriculum
 development.........................................
Carnegie Hall, New York, NY for its National Music               150,000
 Education Program...................................
Central County Occupational Center, San Jose, CA for             100,000
 a first responder career and technical training
 program for high school students....................
Central Pennsylvania Institute of Science and                    600,000
 Technology, State College, PA for curriculum and
 equipment at its vocational training program........
Centro de Salud Familiar Le Fe, El Paso, TX for an               200,000
 elementary charter school, which may include
 equipment...........................................
Charlotte County School District, Port Charlotte, FL             250,000
 for an instructional system for English language
 learners, which may include equipment and software..
Charter School Development Foundation, Las Vegas, NV             200,000
 for the Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy....
City of Fairfield, CA for after-school programs......            325,000
City of Gadsden, AL for technology upgrades in city              250,000
 schools.............................................
City of Hayward, Hayward, CA for after-school                    200,000
 programs............................................
City of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN for the                   150,000
 Indianapolis Center for Education Entrepreneurship
 to recruit leaders to implement educational reform..
City of Newark, Newark, CA for after-school programs.             25,000
City of Pawtucket School Department, Pawtucket, RI               300,000
 for the Jacqueline Walsh School of the Performing
 and Visual Arts, which may include equipment........
City of Pembroke Pines, FL for the autism program at             200,000
 the Pembroke Pines-Florida State University Charter
 School..............................................
City of San Jose, CA for development of a Smart Start            150,000
 early childhood development training and
 certification program at National Hispanic
 University..........................................
City of San Jose, CA for early childhood education               172,000
 programs, including parental involvement............
City of Springfield, MO for the Ready to Learn                   300,000
 Program.............................................
City of Whittier, Whittier, CA for after-school                  200,000
 programs, which may include equipment...............
City School District of New Rochelle, New Rochelle,              225,000
 NY for after-school learning centers................
Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV for the              200,000
 Education Executive Leadership Program..............
Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV for the              200,000
 Newcomer Academy....................................
Clovis Unified School District, Clovis, CA for                   190,000
 curriculum development..............................
College Summit, Inc., Washington, DC for an                      135,000
 initiative to increase college enrollment of low
 income youth in South Carolina......................
Communities In Schools-Northeast Texas, Mount                    200,000
 Pleasant, TX for dropout prevention programs........
Communities in Schools of Cochran and Bleckley                    40,000
 County, Cochran, GA for after-school programs.......
Communities in Schools of Coweta, Inc., Newnan, GA               100,000
 for education technology upgrades...................
Communities in Schools of Fitzgerald-Ben Hill County,             50,000
 Fitzgerald, GA for after-school programs............
Communities In Schools of Tacoma, Tacoma, WA for                  50,000
 after-school programs...............................
Communities in Schools, Austin, TX for mentoring,                200,000
 dropout prevention and college preparatory programs.
Communities in Schools, San Fernando Valley, Inc.,               200,000
 North Hills, CA to implement full service community
 schools.............................................
Community Development Commission of the County of Los            100,000
 Angeles, Monterey Park, CA for the South Whitter
 community education and computer center.............
Community Service Society, New York, NY for a program            100,000
 that utilizes seniors as literacy mentors and in-
 class assistants to elementary students.............
Connecticut Technical High School System, Middletown,            250,000
 CT for equipment for the Manufacturing Technologies
 Department of Platt Technical High School in
 Milford, CT.........................................
Contra Costa College, San Pablo, CA for its Bridges              100,000
 to the Future Program...............................
Cooperative Educational Service Agency No. 11 for                450,000
 after-school programs...............................
Cooperative Educational Service Agency No. 12,                   650,000
 Ashland, WI for after-school programs...............
Cooperative Educational Service Agency No. 5,                    400,000
 Portage, WI for after-school programs...............
Cooperative Educational Service Agency No. 9,                    400,000
 Tomahawk, WI for after-school programs..............
County of San Diego, San Pasqual Academy, Escondido,             200,000
 CA for purchase of equipment........................
Cuyahoga County Board of County Commissioners,                   300,000
 Cleveland, OH for an early childhood initiative.....
Delaware Department of Education, Dover, DE for the              200,000
 Starting Stronger Early Learning Initiative.........
Detroit Youth Foundation, Detroit, MI for                         75,000
 comprehensive educational and enrichment activities
 for middle and high school youth....................
DNA EpiCenter, Inc., New London, CT for a learning                75,000
 center for students and teachers....................
Duval County Public Schools, Jacksonville, FL for                200,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Edgar School District, Edgar, WI for equipment and               100,000
 technology for a new computer technology center.....
Edison and Ford Winter Estates Education Foundation              150,000
 for educational programming.........................
Education Partnership, Providence, RI for school                 200,000
 leadership professional development.................
Education Service Center, Region 12, Hillsboro, TX               100,000
 for a GEAR UP college preparedness program..........
Ennis Independent School District, Ennis, TX for                 200,000
 English as a second language instruction, including
 purchase of equipment...............................
Envision Schools, San Francisco, CA for the                      250,000
 Metropolitan Arts and Technology High School, which
 may include equipment...............................
Erskine College, Due West, SC for an elementary and              250,000
 secondary school arts initiative....................
Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA for its Bay Area                300,000
 Science Teacher Recruitment, Retention, and
 Improvement Initiative..............................
Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA for                   250,000
 language programs in Franklin Sherman Elementary
 School and Chesterbrook Elementary School in McLean,
 Virginia............................................
Fairfax County Public Schools, Falls Church, VA for              200,000
 emergency medical services curriculum development...
Fairhope Center for the Arts, Bay Minette, AL for                205,000
 arts education programs, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Families In Schools, Los Angeles, CA for its Read                150,000
 with Me/Lea Conmigo family literacy program.........
Fayetteville Technical Community College,                        250,000
 Fayettevile, NC for teacher training and
 professional development programs...................
Forward in the Fifth, Somerset, KY for a civic                   250,000
 literacy program....................................
Friends of the Children National, Portland, OR for               200,000
 mentoring programs..................................
George B. Thomas, Sr. Learning Academy, Inc.,                    250,000
 Bethesda, MD for tutoring services for at-risk
 students............................................
Girl Scouts of the USA, New York, NY for the Fair                250,000
 Play initiative to engage girls in science,
 technology, engineering and math....................
Graham County Schools, Safford, AZ for a teacher                 100,000
 training initiative.................................
Guam Public School System, Hagatna, GU for                       150,000
 development and implementation of Chamorro language
 instructional programs..............................
Hamilton Wings, Elgin, IL for arts education programs            150,000
Harris County Department of Education, Houston, TX               250,000
 for an after-school safety program, which may
 include the purchase of software....................
Harvey Public School District 152, Harvey, IL for an             200,000
 early literacy program, which may include equipment.
Hawaii Department of Education, Honolulu, HI for                 300,000
 educational activities..............................
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Association, Kempton, PA for             150,000
 curriculum development..............................
Helen Keller International, New York, NY for the               1,000,000
 Child Sight Vision Screening Program and to provide
 eyeglasses to children whose educational performance
 may be hindered because of poor vision..............
High Plains Regional Education Cooperative, Raton, NM            500,000
 for its Cooperative Broadband Education project,
 which may include equipment.........................
Hillside Family of Agencies, Rochester, NY for the               250,000
 Work-Scholarship Connection Youth Employment
 Training Academy....................................
Hoke County Schools, Raeford, NC for instructional               100,000
 technology..........................................
Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX for             250,000
 a teacher incentive program.........................
I KNOW I CAN, Columbus, OH for college preparatory               100,000
 programs............................................
In Tune Foundation Group, Washington, DC for                     450,000
 educational activities..............................
Independent School District 181, Brainerd, MN for its            150,000
 Teacher Support System..............................
Institute for Student Achievement, Lake Success, NY              250,000
 for school reform activities at Wyandanch High
 School..............................................
Institute for Student Achievement, Lake Success, NY               50,000
 to implement small learning communities at one or
 more high schools in the Bronx......................
Iowa City Community School District, Iowa City, IA               350,000
 for an early literacy program.......................
Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana-Southeast,                 100,000
 Madison, IN for an early college and middle college
 program.............................................
Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville, NY for                   225,000
 education programs..................................
Jazz at Lincoln Center, New York, NY for music                   150,000
 education programs..................................
Jefferson County Public Schools, Golden, CO for                  300,000
 technological instruction, testing, and support,
 which may include equipment.........................
Jersey Shore Area School District, Jersey Shore, PA              100,000
 for equipment to create a digital classroom.........
JFYNetWorks, Boston, MA for academic support for                 250,000
 Adequate Yearly Progress initiative, including
 educational software, professional development
 instruction, and technical assistance...............
JFYNetWorks, Boston, MA for implementation of its                250,000
 computer-based JFYNet: Academic Support for Adequate
 Yearly Progress initiative in Malden, Revere, and
 Framingham, MA, which may include the purchase of
 software............................................
Joplin School District, Joplin, MO for the Smart                 100,000
 Board initiative, including purchase of equipment...
Jumpstart for Young Children, Inc., Boston, MA for an            200,000
 early literacy program for at-risk children.........
Jumpstart for Young Children, San Francisco, CA for              250,000
 an early childhood enhancement project to provide
 student mentors to preschool children...............
Kelberman Center, Utica, NY to expand programs for                75,000
 pre-school and school age children with autism
 spectrum disorder...................................
KIPP Foundation, San Francisco, CA for a subgrant to             150,000
 the KIPP Delta College Preparatory School in Helena,
 AR..................................................
KIPP Foundation, San Francisco, CA for curriculum                100,000
 development and the recruitment and professional
 development of school leaders, teachers, and
 administrators......................................
KIPP Foundation, San Francisco, CA for KIPP Reach                250,000
 College Preparatory School in Oklahoma City, OK.....
La Crosse School District, La Crosse, WI for a 21st               50,000
 Century Community Learning Center at Logan Middle
 School, including parental involvement..............
Learning Point Associates/North Central Regional                 250,000
 Education Laboratory, Naperville, IL to help schools
 implement No Child Left Behind......................
Lee Pesky Learning Center, Boise, ID to provide                  300,000
 educational materials for the Literacy Matters!
 Program.............................................
Lemay Child & Family Center, St. Louis, MO for early             100,000
 childhood education and family literacy programs....
Los Angeles Conservation Corps, Los Angeles, CA for a             50,000
 hands-on, science-based program for public school
 students............................................
Louisiana Arts and Sciences Museum, Baton Rouge, LA              200,000
 for curriculum development and purchase of equipment
Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA for IDEA Place             250,000
 and the SciTech Classroom, including purchase of
 equipment and curriculum development................
Lower East Side Conservancy, New York, NY for                    200,000
 education programs and outreach.....................
Madison County Schools, Richmond, KY for a computer               75,000
 lab, which may include equipment....................
Mesa Unified School District, Mesa, AZ. for after-               150,000
 school educational and enrichment activities for at-
 risk youth..........................................
Military Heritage Center Foundation, Carlisle, PA for            100,000
 the Voices of the Past Speak to the Future program,
 including purchase of equipment.....................
Miller County Development Authority, Colquit, GA for             100,000
 a video/television production training program for
 high school drop-outs and at-risk youth in Miller
 County..............................................
Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation, Washington, DC for a            150,000
 full service school demonstration project in the
 Canton City, OH public school district..............
Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, WI for after-               100,000
 school or summer community learning centers.........
Minnesota Humanities Commission, St. Paul, MN to                 500,000
 implement curricula and classroom resources on
 Native Americans....................................
Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS for               250,000
 strengthening partnerships between K-12 parents and
 their children's teachers, principals,
 superintendents and other school officials..........
Missouri State University, Springfield, MO for a                 100,000
 college preparatory pilot program...................
Monroe County School District, Key West, FL for                  200,000
 technology upgrades.................................
Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD to               300,000
 recruit and certify postdoctoral scientists,
 mathematicians, or engineers from the National
 Institutes of Health to become teachers.............
Mote Marine Laboratory, Sarasota, FL for marine                  200,000
 science curriculum development......................
Mount Hood Community College, Gresham, OR for early              200,000
 childhood education and training activities, which
 may include equipment...............................
National Center for Electronically Mediated Learning,            150,000
 Inc., Milford, CT for the P.E.B.B.L.E.S. Project,
 which may include equipment and technology..........
National Council on Crime and Delinquency, Oakland,              200,000
 CA for a school-based model on violence prevention..
National Cued Speech Association, Bethesda, MD for               175,000
 parent, teacher, and transliterator training and
 certification in cued speech for preschool and
 school-aged children................................
National Flight Academy, Naval Air Station Pensacola,            150,000
 FL for technology upgrades..........................
National Resource Center for Deafblindness, East                 150,000
 Greenville, PA for curriculum development...........
National Teacher's Hall of Fame, Emporia, KS for                 150,000
 teacher professional development and retention
 programs............................................
Neighborhood Youth Association, Venice, CA for                    75,000
 academic support to ensure college readiness........
New Mexico Public Education Department, Santa Fe, NM             500,000
 for summer reading and math institutes throughout
 the State...........................................
Newton Public Schools, Newton, KS for an educational             100,000
 technology initiative, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University,            300,000
 Greensboro, NC for a project to reduce suspension
 rates of students in the Guilford County School
 System..............................................
North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC for                100,000
 academic enrichment activities, including parental
 involvement.........................................
North Carolina Symphony, Raleigh, NC for musical and             175,000
 artistic residency activities for elementary and
 secondary students..................................
North Carolina Technology Association Education                  100,000
 Foundation, Raleigh, NC for school technology
 demonstration projects, including subgrants.........
North Philadelphia Youth Association, Philadelphia,               50,000
 PA for education and enrichment services for youth..
Northeast Louisiana Family Literacy Interagency                  200,000
 Consortium to provide children's literacy services..
Northern Tier Industry & Education Consortium,                    50,000
 Dimock, PA to expand the activities of its Advisory
 and Assessment Committees...........................
Norwich Public School System, Norwich, CT for English            250,000
 language instruction................................
Oakland Unified School District, Oakland, CA for a               200,000
 technology integration project to implement a new
 data system, which may include equipment............
O'Neill Sea Odyssey, Santa Cruz, CA for science                  100,000
 education programs for elementary school children...
OneWorld Now!, Seattle, WA for after-school programs             200,000
 and student scholarships............................
Ossining Union Free School District, Ossining, NY for            225,000
 after-school, literacy, or school reform initiatives
Parent Institute for Quality Education, San Diego, CA            350,000
 for a parent training program.......................
PE4life, Kansas City, MO for physical education                  200,000
 programs in the Titusville, Pennsylvania School
 District, including purchase of equipment...........
PE41ife, Kansas City, MO to establish a P.E. program             250,000
 in Mississippi, including purchase of equipment.....
People for People, Philadelphia, PA for after-school              75,000
 programs............................................
Peru State College, Peru, NE for the Adopt a High                100,000
 School initiative...................................
Philadelphia Academies, Inc., Philadelphia, PA for a             100,000
 longitudinal study on the impact of the
 organization's career-based education model.........
Pinal County Education Service Agency, Florence, AZ              100,000
 for a teacher training initiative...................
Polk County Public Schools, Bartow, FL for purchase              100,000
 of assistive technologies...........................
Port Chester-Rye Union Free School District, Port                225,000
 Chester, NY for academic enrichment, professional
 development, family engagement, or other activities
 to implement full service community schools.........
Project GRAD USA, Philadelphia, PA for college                   100,000
 readiness programs..................................
Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, IN for equipment             250,000
 and start-up expenses for a magnet school...........
Queens Theatre in the Park, Flushing, NY for a                   150,000
 project to provide youth with career planning and
 development in the performing arts industry.........
Renwick Public Schools, Andale, KS for an educational            150,000
 technology initiative, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Rio Rancho Public Schools, Rio Ranch, NM for distance            500,000
 learning, which may include equipment...............
Riverside Community College, Riverside, CA for the               250,000
 Fast-Track to the Associate Degree Nursing Program..
Riverside County Office of Education, Riverside, CA              210,000
 for the High School Science Initiative..............
Rockdale County Public Schools, Conyers, GA for a                200,000
 credit recovery program, which may include the
 purchase of software................................
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute, IN             200,000
 for a K-12 STEM Immersion Initiative................
Salesian Boys and Girls Club of Los Angeles, CA for              100,000
 education and support services for middle and high
 school students.....................................
San Bernardino City Unified School District, San                 250,000
 Bernardino, CA for the English Learners program.....
San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools, San             300,000
 Bernardino, CA to expand the Science, Technology,
 Engineering, and Mathematics initiative.............
San Joaquin County, Stockton, CA for its San Joaquin             350,000
 A Plus tutoring program.............................
San Mateo County, Redwood City, CA for its Preschool             200,000
 for All program.....................................
School Board of Broward County, Fort Lauderdale, FL              300,000
 for teacher support and development.................
Schultz Center for Teaching and Leadership,                      250,000
 Jacksonville, FL for purchase of equipment..........
Selden/Centereach Youth Association, Selden, NY for              100,000
 after-school programs...............................
Silver Crescent Foundation, Charleston, SC for a                 200,000
 middle and high school academic engineering and
 technology program..................................
Sociedad Latina, Roxbury, MA for its Mission                     100,000
 Community Enrichment Program........................
Southwestern University, Georgetown, TX for a college            100,000
 preparatory initiative..............................
Springboard for Improving Schools, San Francisco, CA             250,000
 for a professional development center to serve
 Central Valley, CA teachers and administrators......
Springfield Public School District No. 19,                       100,000
 Springfield, OR for an Academy of Arts and Academics
St. Mary's County Public Schools, Leonardtown, MD for            500,000
 a mathematics, science, and technology academy......
State of Nevada Department of Education for                      250,000
 technology upgrades in the Elko, Nye, Douglas, Lyon
 and Churchill school districts, including subgrants.
Summit Educational Resources, Getzville, NY for                  100,000
 service coordination and support for children with
 developmental disabilities..........................
Susannah Wesley Community Center, Honolulu, HI for               100,000
 computers and technology to serve at risk high
 school students, and other students in an after-
 school program......................................
Tampa Metropolitan YMCA, Tampa, FL for after-school              125,000
 programs............................................
Texas Southern University, Houston, TX for the TSU               250,000
 Lab School, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
Tomas Rivera Policy Institute, Los Angeles, CA for a             100,000
 longitudinal study on high school graduation rates..
Town of Cumberland, Cumberland, RI for the Mayor's               150,000
 Office of Children and Learning for evidence-based
 innovative K-12 education programs..................
Towson University, Towson, MD for an education                   300,000
 partnership with the City of Baltimore, Baltimore
 City Public School System and the Cherry Hill
 community...........................................
Tracy Joint Unified School District, Tracy, CA for               125,000
 English language learner initiatives................
Tri-County Educational Service, Wooster, OH for the              150,000
 Olweus Bullying Prevention program..................
Trumbull County Educational Service Center, Niles, OH            185,000
 for school robotics programs, which may include
 subgrants...........................................
Tulsa Public Schools, Tulsa, OK for innovative                   200,000
 programming for students at risk of dropping out,
 including curriculum development....................
Union County Public Schools, Monroe, NC for equipment            100,000
 and technology needs for the information technology
 academy.............................................
Union Free School District of the Tarrytowns, Sleepy             225,000
 Hollow, NY for family literacy activities and
 professional development to support literacy
 instruction.........................................
University of Akron, Akron, OH to link regional                  150,000
 school districts with industry to promote STEM
 academic and career pathways........................
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL to implement a             300,000
 manufacturing engineering curriculum for high
 schools students....................................
USD 259, Wichita Public Schools, Wichita, KS for                 200,000
 technology upgrades.................................
Valle Lindo School District, South El Monte, CA for               75,000
 technology upgrades.................................
Venango Technology Center, Oil City, PA for the                  100,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Vision Therapy Project, Casper, WY for a teacher                 250,000
 training initiative.................................
Visually Impaired Preschool Services, Louisville, KY             100,000
 for programs to address school readiness needs of
 visually impaired children..........................
Washington College, Chestertown, MD for K-12 science,            350,000
 technology, engineering and mathematics outreach
 programs............................................
Washington State University, Tacoma, WA for education            250,000
 and enrichment services for youth at its Center for
 Community Education, Enrichment and Urban Studies...
WE CARE San Jacinto Valley, Inc., San Jacinto, CA for            100,000
 the after school tutoring program...................
West Contra Costa Unified School District, Richmond,             100,000
 CA for high school architecture, construction, and
 engineering curricula...............................
White-Williams Scholars, Philadelphia, PA for a                   75,000
 college preparation initiative, which may include
 student scholarships................................
Widener University, Chester, PA for school-readiness             150,000
 programs............................................
Wildlife Information Center, Inc., Slatington, PA for            100,000
 an environmental education initiative...............
Williamsburg County First Steps, Kingstree, SC for a              87,000
 school-readiness program............................
Yonkers Public Schools, Yonkers, NY for after-school             250,000
 and summer academic enrichment, literacy, and
 professional development services, and for parental
 involvement activities..............................
Youngstown City School District, OH for a Pathways to            225,000
 Building Trades Program in the Youngstown and
 Warren, OH school districts.........................
Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH for a                100,000
 pilot K-12 attention enhancement for learning
 project.............................................
YWCA of Gary, Gary, IN for after-school and summer               200,000
 programs, which may include equipment...............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Advanced placement program grants

    The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for the advanced 
placement program. This recommendation is $12,974,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $72,175,000 less than 
the budget request. These funds support the advanced placement 
test fee program, which awards grants to States to enable them 
to cover part or all of the cost of advanced placement test 
fees of low-income students who are enrolled in advanced 
placement classes and plan to take the advanced placement test. 
These funds also support competitive grants to States, school 
districts, and national nonprofit educational agencies for 
programs that encourage greater participation by low-income 
students in advanced placement courses.

                 Safe Schools and Citizenship Education

    The Committee recommends $714,075,000 for safe schools and 
citizenship education programs. This amount is $15,443,000 less 
than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $389,827,000 more 
than the budget request. This appropriation account includes 
programs authorized under parts of titles II, IV, and V of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Safe and drug-free schools and communities: State grants

    The Committee recommends $300,000,000 for the State grants 
program, $46,500,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $200,000,000 more than the budget request. Of the 
funds provided, 80 percent flows to State and local agencies 
and 20 percent goes to governors offices for such activities as 
youth drug prevention, violence prevention, and school safety 
and security. The Committee's recommendation reflects its 
expectation that the structure of the program may be 
significantly altered in the reauthorization of the No Child 
Left Behind Act to focus on State capacity to assist school 
districts in creating a safe, drug-free, and secure school 
environment.

Safe and drug-free schools and communities: National programs

    The Committee recommends $141,112,000 for the national 
programs under the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities 
Act, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level 
and $58,888,000 less than the budget request. Under this 
program, the Secretary of Education administers a variety of 
activities to prevent the illegal use of drugs and violence 
among students at all educational levels, preschool through 
postsecondary.
    The Committee's recommendation does not include the 
Administration's request for funding for research-based grant 
assistance to local educational agencies. The Committee denies 
this request because it has restored most of the 71 percent cut 
to safe and drug free State grants proposed by the 
Administration.
    The Committee's recommendation includes at least the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level for the student drug testing pilot 
program. The Committee is concerned about rising levels of drug 
use in America's schools and its disastrous impact on our 
children and their future. The Committee reminds the Department 
that testing must be conducted in strict compliance with 
Supreme Court rulings on student drug testing.
    The Committee's recommendation reflects its support of the 
work that the Department has done in recent years through the 
readiness and emergency management for school grants, and the 
safe schools/healthy students initiative. These programs have 
helped school districts prevent, prepare for, and respond to 
catastrophic events and other emergencies, as well as implement 
more comprehensive approaches to preventing drug use and 
violence with community partners. The Committee believes that 
the Department should expand its assistance under these 
programs to colleges and universities to assist them in 
responding to traumatic events and emergencies within the 
context and needs of higher education.
    The Committee's recommendation includes $35,175,000 for 
school emergency preparedness activities, which is $7,000,000 
more than the fiscal year 2007 level. The Committee intends the 
increase to be used for new grants for higher education 
institutions. Together with $3,000,000 provided under the 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration 
(SAMHSA), a total of $10,000,000 shall be available in fiscal 
year 2008 for a jointly funded initiative administered by the 
Department of Education and SAMHSA. The funds will support 
competitive grants to institutions of higher education to 
develop and implement emergency management plans for preventing 
campus violence (including assessing and addressing the mental 
health needs of students) and for responding to threats and 
incidents of violence or natural disaster in a manner that 
ensures the safety of the campus community. The Committee 
intends that these funds be available to help colleges and 
universities plan and prepare for the entire constellation of 
threats (terrorist attacks, natural disasters, shootings, and 
gang-related activity). The Committee requests that the 
Department and SAMHSA brief the Committee on its plan for the 
implementation of this initiative within 90 days of enactment 
of this Act. In addition to the new higher education emergency 
preparedness grants, the Committee's recommended funding will 
permit the Department to continue to support emergency 
preparedness grants for elementary and secondary schools and 
expand its examination of a variety of school safety 
initiatives.
    The Committee's recommendation also includes $79,200,000 
for safe schools/healthy students initiative. The bill also 
provides $80,868,000 for the safe schools/healthy students 
initiative under SAMSHA. In total, $160,068,000 will be 
available in fiscal year 2008 for these comprehensive grants, 
which require the commitment of local partners--school 
districts, local law enforcement, juvenile justice agencies, 
and public mental health authorities--to develop joint 
strategies and services to prevent youth violence and provide 
needed student mental health services. A key feature of this 
program is its collaborative planning among the Department of 
Education, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the 
Department of Justice and joint funding between the Department 
of Education and SAMSHA.

Alcohol abuse reduction

    The Committee recommends $32,409,000 for grants to reduce 
alcohol abuse, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request did not include funding for 
this program. This program awards competitive grants to school 
districts to develop and implement programs to reduce alcohol 
abuse in secondary schools.

Mentoring programs

    The Committee recommends $48,814,000 for mentoring 
programs. This is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level. The budget request did not include funding for this 
program. This program provides competitive grants to school 
districts and community-based organizations to promote 
mentoring programs for children with the greatest need.

Character education

    The Committee recommends $24,248,000 for character 
education, the same as the fiscal year funding 2007 level and 
the budget request. This program provides support for the 
design and implementation of character education programs in 
elementary and secondary schools. Grantees may select the 
elements of character that will be taught and must consider the 
views of parents and students to be served by the program.

Elementary and secondary school counseling

    The Committee recommends $61,500,000 for elementary and 
secondary school counseling, $26,850,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2007 level. The budget request did not include funding for 
this program. This program provides grants to school districts 
to enable them to establish or expand elementary school and 
secondary school counseling programs. School counselors are 
primarily supported with non-Federal funds.
    The Committee's 77.5 percent increase in the elementary and 
secondary school counseling program demonstrates its commitment 
to a comprehensive school counseling program that includes 
counselors, psychologists, social workers, and appropriately 
trained psychiatrists. The Department is encouraged to give 
priority to local educational agencies that can demonstrate a 
strong involvement with community groups, social service 
agencies, or other public or private entities in collaborative 
efforts to enhance school counseling services and promote 
school-linked integration of services.
    The program is also part of the Committee's initiative to 
help reduce the number of abortions in America. The Committee's 
increase will provide 76 new grants to expand academic, mental, 
emotional, social, developmental, and behavioral services to 
middle- and high-school students.

Carol M. White physical education program

    The Committee recommends $72,674,000 for the physical 
education program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request did not include funding for 
this program, which provides grants to local educational 
agencies and community-based organizations to initiate, expand, 
and improve physical education programs for students in 
kindergarten through 12th grade.
    The Committee directs the Department to work with the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to incorporate the 
school health index into this program. For fiscal year 2008 
awards, the Department shall grant priority to those 
applications that have completed physical education and 
nutritional assessments as part of the school health index or 
propose to implement the school health index. Awards should 
support the implementation of science-based curriculum tools to 
encourage physical education and healthy eating. The Committee 
notes with interest the statement of the Department of 
Education that it has already invested heavily in traditional 
physical education equipment. As such, it agrees with the 
Department's efforts to focus on grants that propose other 
effective means of promoting physical activity and reducing 
obesity, including innovative equipment targeting at-risk 
children not typically motivated by traditional physical 
education classes.

Civic education

    The Committee recommends $33,318,000 for civic education, 
$4,207,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 level. The budget 
request did not include funding for this program. Program funds 
support the ``We the People'' and the cooperative education 
exchange programs. ``We the People'' seeks to promote civic 
competence and responsibility among students. Cooperative 
education exchange provides support for education exchange 
activities in civics and economics between the United States 
and eligible countries in Central and Eastern Europe, the 
Commonwealth of Independent States, any country that was 
formerly a republic of the Soviet Union, the Republic of 
Ireland, the province of Northern Ireland and developing 
countries with a democratic form of government.
    The Committee intends that most of the increase provided 
over fiscal year 2007 be used to enhance civics instruction in 
the middle and high school grades. The recently released 2006 
National Assessment of Educational Progress Civics shows that 
knowledge about civic life, politics, and government of 4th 
graders has improved, while the performance of 8th and 12th 
graders is flat at best. The Committee hopes that increased 
support for civics instruction and materials in secondary 
schools will address the declining civics knowledge of students 
as they progress through the educational pipeline. The bill 
permits funds to be used for a comprehensive program to improve 
public knowledge, understanding, and support of American 
democratic institutions.

                      English Language Acquisition

    The Committee recommends $774,614,000 for English language 
acquisition programs. This amount is $105,607,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $103,795,000 more than the 
budget request. This program provides formula grants to States 
to serve limited English proficient (LEP) students. Grants are 
based on each State's share of the national limited English 
proficient and recent immigrant student population. Funds under 
this account also support professional development to increase 
the pool of teachers prepared to serve limited English 
proficient students as well as evaluation activities.
    The Committee provides a $105,607,000 increase for this 
program--the first significant increase since fiscal year 
2002--to assist States and school districts with the No Child 
Left Behind requirement that the LEP students learn to read and 
speak English quickly.
    High rates of immigration over the last two decades have 
resulted in dramatic increases in the number of LEP students 
identified by States. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the 
number of LEP students has risen from less than 1 million in 
1980 to more than 4.6 million in 2004. According to the 
Department, the overall increase in LEP students and the rapid 
growth in the LEP population in States lacking an 
infrastructure for serving LEP students underscore the need for 
this program.

                           Special Education

    The Committee recommends $12,310,831,000 for programs for 
children with disabilities authorized under the Individuals 
with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This funding level is 
$825,684,000 above the budget request and $507,964,000 above 
the fiscal year 2007 level. These grants help States and 
localities pay for the rising costs of special education for 
6.9 million children with disabilities.

State grants: grants to States

    The Committee recommends $11,292,425,000 for grants to 
States, which is $800,484,000 above the budget request and 
$509,464,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 level. Of the funds 
provided for the 2008-2009 academic year, $4,650,443,000 is 
appropriated for fiscal year 2008 for obligation after July 1, 
2008 and $6,641,982,000 is appropriated for fiscal year 2009 
for obligation on, or after, October 1, 2008.
    This program provides formula grants to assist the States 
in meeting the excess costs of providing special education and 
related services to children with disabilities. In order to be 
eligible for funds, States must make free appropriate public 
education available to all children with disabilities. Funds 
are distributed based on the amount that each State received 
from the fiscal year 1999 appropriation, and the numbers of 
children in the general population and who live in poverty in 
the age range for which each State mandates free appropriate 
public education for children with disabilities.
    Over the past 10 years, the number of students enrolled in 
special education programs has risen 18 percent. Almost 14 
percent of public school students receive special education 
services because they have a disability. Nearly every regular 
education classroom across the country includes students with 
disabilities. As such, the Committee rejects the deep cut in 
IDEA part B State grants proposed by the Administration, and 
stops the decline in the Federal percentage share of special 
education costs, in order to sustain educational and related 
services for these special needs children who are most at risk 
of being left behind.
    The Committee includes language proposed in the budget 
request to limit the increase in the amount of funds required 
to be transferred to the Department of the Interior to the 
lesser amount equal to the amount transferred in 2007 plus 
inflation or the percentage increase in the appropriation for 
the grants to States program.

State grants: preschool grants

    The Committee recommends $380,751,000 for preschool grants, 
the same as the fiscal year 2007 level and the budget request. 
These funds provide additional assistance to States to help 
them make a free appropriate public education available to all 
children with disabilities in the three through five age range.

State grants: grants for infants and families

    The Committee recommends $436,400,000 for grants for 
infants and families, the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $13,333,000 more than the budget request. This 
formula grant program assists States in developing and 
implementing Statewide systems of coordinated, comprehensive, 
multidisciplinary, interagency programs to make available early 
intervention services to all children with disabilities, aged 
birth through two, and their families.

IDEA national activities: technical assistance and dissemination

    The Committee recommends $48,903,000 for technical 
assistance and dissemination, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $1,000 more than the budget 
request. This program provides funding for technical 
assistance, demonstration projects and information 
dissemination. These funds support efforts by State and local 
education agencies, institutions of higher education, and other 
entities to build State and local capacity to make systemic 
changes and improve results for children with disabilities.

IDEA national activities: personnel preparation

    The Committee recommends $89,720,000 for personnel 
preparation, which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $1,000 more than the budget request. This program 
supports competitive awards to help address State-identified 
needs for qualified personnel to work with children with 
disabilities, and to ensure that those personnel have the 
skills and knowledge they need to serve those children. Awards 
focus on addressing the need for personnel to serve low-
incidence populations and leadership personnel.

IDEA national activities: parent information centers

    The Committee recommends $25,704,000 for parent information 
centers, the same as the fiscal year 2007 level and the budget 
request. This program makes awards to parent organizations to 
support parent training and information centers, including 
community parent resource centers. These centers provide 
training and information to meet the needs of parents of 
children with disabilities living in the areas served by the 
centers, particularly underserved parents and parents of 
children who may be inappropriately identified. Technical 
assistance is also provided under this program for developing, 
assisting, and coordinating centers receiving assistance under 
this program.

IDEA national activities: technology and media services

    The Committee recommends $36,928,000 for technology and 
media services, which is $1,500,000 less than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $11,865,000 more than the budget 
request. This program makes competitive awards to support the 
development, demonstration, and use of technology and 
educational media activities of educational value to children 
with disabilities.
    These funds support continued production and circulation of 
recorded textbooks, increased outreach activities to print-
disabled students and their teachers, and accelerated use of 
digital technology. The Committee believes that the funds 
recommended will enable the expansion of service to students 
with print disabilities, the continuation of digital 
production, and use of extensive libraries of educational 
materials.

            Rehabilitation Services and Disability Research

    The Committee recommends $3,279,193,000 for rehabilitation 
services and disability research. This reflects the amount 
authorized by law. The Committee rejects the Administration's 
proposal to deny this program its authorized cost-of-living 
adjustment. The programs in this account are authorized by the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Helen Keller National Center 
Act, and the Assistive Technology Act of 1998.

Vocational rehabilitation grants to States

    For vocational rehabilitation State grants, the Committee 
recommends $2,874,043,000 which is $36,883,000 more than fiscal 
year 2007. This program supports basic vocational 
rehabilitation services through formula grants to the States. 
These grants support a wide range of services designed to help 
persons with physical and mental disabilities prepare for and 
engage in gainful employment to the extent of their 
capabilities. Emphasis is placed on providing vocational 
rehabilitation services to persons with the most significant 
disabilities. The Committee's recommendation provides the cost-
of-living adjustment (COLA) for these State grants, as 
authorized. The budget request did not include this COLA 
increase.

Client assistance

    The Committee recommends $11,782,000 for the client 
assistance program, the same as the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2007 amount. A client assistance program is 
required in each State as a condition of receipt of a basic 
State grant. State formula grants are used to help persons with 
disabilities overcome problems with the service delivery system 
and improve their understanding of services available to them 
under the Rehabilitation Act.

Training

    For training personnel to provide rehabilitation services 
to persons with disabilities, the Committee recommends 
$38,438,000, the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 
2007 level. The program supports long-term and short-term 
training, in-service personnel training, and training of 
interpreters for deaf persons. Projects in a broad array of 
disciplines are funded to ensure that skilled personnel are 
available to serve the vocational needs of persons with 
disabilities.

Demonstration and training programs

    The Committee recommends $6,511,000 for demonstration and 
training programs, which is $329,000 less than the budget 
request and the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level. 
These programs authorize discretionary awards on a competitive 
basis to public and private organizations to support 
demonstrations, direct services, and related activities for 
persons with disabilities.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Advocating Change Together, Inc., St. Paul, MN for a            $100,000
 disability rights training initiative...............
City of North Miami Beach, FL, North Miami Beach, FL             100,000
 for fitness and other programs for the disabled.....
Jewish Vocational and Career Counseling Service, San             250,000
 Francisco, CA for a Transition Services Project to
 provide vocational training and job placement for
 youth and adults with disabilities..................
Vocational Guidance Services, Cleveland, OH for                  100,000
 equipment and technology in order to increase
 employment for persons with disabilities............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Migrant and seasonal farmworkers

    For programs serving migrant and seasonal farmworkers, the 
Committee recommends $2,279,000, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2007 level. The budget request did not include 
funding for this program. This program provides discretionary 
grants to make comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services 
available to migrant and seasonal farmworkers with vocational 
disabilities. Projects emphasize outreach activities, 
specialized bilingual rehabilitation counseling, and 
coordination of vocational rehabilitation services with 
services from other sources.

Recreational programs

    For recreational programs, the Committee recommends 
$2,518,000, the same as the fiscal year 2007 level. The budget 
request did not include funding for this program. This program 
provides individuals with recreation and related activities to 
aid in their employment, mobility, independence, socialization, 
and community integration. Discretionary grants are made on a 
competitive basis to States, public agencies, and nonprofit 
private organizations, including institutions of higher 
education.

Protection and advocacy of individual rights

    For protection and advocacy for persons with disabilities, 
the Committee recommends $16,489,000, the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2007 level. Grants are awarded to 
entities that have the authority to pursue legal, 
administrative, and other appropriate remedies needed to 
protect and advocate the rights of persons with disabilities.

Projects with industry

    For projects with industry, the Committee recommends 
$19,538,000, the same as the fiscal year 2007 amount. The 
budget request did not include funding for this program. This 
program promotes greater participation of business and industry 
in the rehabilitation process. The program provides placement 
and job development services to assist persons with 
disabilities to prepare them for employment in the competitive 
labor market. Awards are made to a variety of agencies and 
organizations, including business and industrial corporations, 
rehabilitation facilities, labor organizations, trade 
associations, and foundations.

Supported employment State grants

    For supported employment State grants, the Committee 
recommends $29,700,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 level. The budget request did not include funding for this 
program. These formula grants assist States in developing 
collaborative programs with public agencies and nonprofit 
agencies for training and post-employment services leading to 
supported employment. In supported employment programs, persons 
with the most significant disabilities are given special 
supervision and assistance to enable them to work in an 
integrated setting.

Independent living: State grants

    For State grants for independent living, the Committee 
recommends $22,588,000. This amount is the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2007 level. This program supports 
formula grants to the States to provide services for 
independent living for persons with significant disabilities.

Independent living: centers

    For centers for independent living, the Committee 
recommends $74,638,000, which is the same as the budget request 
and the fiscal year 2007 level. A population-based formula 
determines the total amount that is available for discretionary 
grants to centers in each State. These discretionary grants 
support a network of consumer-controlled, nonresidential, 
community-based private nonprofit centers that provide a wide 
range of services to help persons with significant disabilities 
live more independently in family and community settings. 
Centers provide information and referral services, independent 
living skills training, peer counseling, and individual and 
systems advocacy. Discretionary grants are made to private 
nonprofit organizations.

Independent living: services for older blind persons

    For independent living services for older blind 
individuals, the Committee recommends $32,895,000. This amount 
is the same as the fiscal year 2007 level and the budget 
request. Funds are distributed to States according to a formula 
based on the population of individuals who are 55 or older, and 
grants support services for persons 55 years old or over whose 
severe visual impairment makes gainful employment extremely 
difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are 
feasible.

Program improvement

    For program improvement activities, the Committee 
recommends $633,000, which is the same as the budget request 
and $202,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 funding level. The 
program: (1) provides technical assistance and consultative 
services to public and non-profit private agencies and 
organizations; (2) provides short-term training and technical 
instruction; (3) conducts special demonstrations; (4) collects, 
prepares, publishes and disseminates educational or 
informational materials; and (5) carries out monitoring and 
conducts evaluations.

Evaluation

    The Committee recommends $1,473,000 for program evaluation, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$500,000 less than the budget request. These funds are used to 
evaluate the impact and effectiveness of individual programs 
authorized under the Rehabilitation Act. Contracts are awarded 
on an annual basis for studies to be conducted by persons not 
immediately involved in the administration of the programs 
authorized by the Act.

Helen Keller National Center

    For the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth 
and Adults, the Committee recommends $8,511,000, the same as 
the fiscal year 2007 level and $500,000 more than the budget 
request. These funds are used for the operation of a national 
center that provides intensive services for deaf-blind 
individuals and their families at Sands Point, New York, and a 
network of 10 regional offices that provide referral, 
counseling, transition services, and technical assistance to 
service providers.

National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

    The Committee recommends $106,705,000 for the National 
Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the same 
as the budget request and the fiscal year 2007 level. The 
Institute supports research, demonstration, and training 
activities that are designed to maximize the employment and 
integration into society of individuals with disabilities of 
all ages.

Assistive technology

    For assistive technology activities, the Committee 
recommends $30,452,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 amount and $4,341,000 more than the budget request. 
Technology assistance activities are authorized under the 
Assistive Technology Act of 1998. This Act authorizes 
population-based formula grants to the States to assist them in 
supporting alternative financing programs and assistive 
technology device demonstrations, loan, and reutilization 
programs. In addition, the funds support protection and 
advocacy services related to assistive technology and national 
technical assistance activities are supported.
    Of the funds provided, $25,058,000 is for the State grant 
program, $4,341,000 is for the protection and advocacy program, 
and $1,053,000 is for national activities. Consistent with the 
authorizing statute, the Committee does not provide separate 
funding for the alternative financing program. Instead, funds 
provided for alternative financing are included in the State 
grant program.

           Special Institutions for Persons With Disabilities


American Printing House for the Blind

    The Committee recommends $17,573,000 for the American 
Printing House for the Blind, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and the budget request. This 
appropriation subsidizes the production of educational 
materials for legally blind persons enrolled in pre-college 
programs. The Printing House, which is chartered by the State 
of Kentucky, manufactures and maintains an inventory of 
educational materials in accessible formats that are 
distributed free of charge to schools and States based on the 
number of blind students in each State. The Printing House also 
conducts research and field activities to inform educators 
about the availability of materials and how to use them.

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

    The Committee recommends $60,757,000 for the National 
Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), an increase of 
$4,616,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$4,495,000 more than the budget request. The NTID was 
established by Congress in 1965 to provide a residential 
facility for postsecondary technical training and education for 
deaf persons with the purpose of promoting the employment of 
these individuals. The Institute also conducts applied research 
and provides training in various aspects of deafness. The 
Secretary of Education administers these activities through a 
contract with the Rochester Institute of Technology in 
Rochester, New York.

Gallaudet University

    The Committee recommends $109,952,000 for Gallaudet 
University, an increase of $2,954,000 above the fiscal year 
2007 appropriation and the budget request. The Committee does 
not provide the $600,000 requested by the Administration for 
evaluation, which is no longer needed because the Office of 
Management and Budget has already conducted a second PART 
review of Gallaudet and is working with the University to 
improve its performance. Gallaudet is a private, non-profit 
educational institution Federally-chartered in 1864 providing 
elementary, secondary, undergraduate, and continuing education 
for deaf persons. In addition, the University offers graduate 
programs in fields related to deafness for deaf and hearing 
students, conducts research on deafness, and provides public 
service programs for deaf persons.

           Career and Technical Education and Adult Education

    The Committee recommends $2,046,220,000 for career and 
technical education and adult education programs. This amount 
is $46,684,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$849,046,000 more than the budget request. This appropriation 
account includes vocational education programs authorized by 
the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006. 
The account also includes adult education programs authorized 
under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.

Career and technical education State grants

    The Committee recommends $1,206,553,000 for basic grants to 
States under the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education 
Act of 2006, which is $25,000,000 more than as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $606,553,000 more than the budget 
request. Of the total for basic grants to States made available 
for school year 2008-2009, $415,553,000 is available for 
obligation on July 1, 2008 and $791,000,000 is available for 
obligation on October 1, 2008.
    State grants support a variety of vocational education 
programs developed in accordance with the State plan. The Act 
concentrates Federal resources on institutions with high 
concentrations of low-income students. The populations assisted 
by basic grants range from secondary students in pre-vocational 
courses to adults who need retraining to adapt to changing 
technological and labor markets.
    The Committee strongly disagrees with the Administration's 
proposal to cut funding for career and technical education by 
49 percent in fiscal year 2008, just after the recent reform 
and reauthorization of the program. Funding for basic grants to 
States will continue support for state-of-the art vocational 
training to approximately 5 million students in secondary 
schools and 3 million students in community and technical 
colleges.

Tech-prep

    The Committee recommends $104,753,000 for tech-prep, the 
same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level. The budget request 
did not include funding for this program. This appropriation 
includes activities under title II of the Carl D. Perkins 
Career and Technical Education Act of 2006.
    The tech-prep education program provides planning and 
demonstration grants to consortia of local educational agencies 
and postsecondary institutions to develop and operate model 
technical education programs that integrate academic and 
vocational education. These programs begin in high school and 
provide students with the mathematical, science, 
communications, and technological skills needed to enter a two-
year associate degree or two-year certificate program in a 
given occupational field. They also help students make a 
successful transition into further postsecondary education or 
begin their careers. The funds in the bill will assist 
approximately 2 million students to make the successful 
transition from school to careers.

National programs

    For national programs, the Committee provides $8,000,000, 
which is $2,000,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and the budget request. This authority supports the 
conduct and dissemination of research in vocational education. 
It also includes support for the National Centers for Research 
and Dissemination in Career and Technical Education and other 
discretionary research.

Tribally controlled postsecondary vocational and technical institutions

    The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for grants for tribally 
controlled postsecondary vocational and technical institutions, 
a $634,000 increase over the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
the budget request. This program provides grants to two 
tribally controlled postsecondary career and technical 
institutions to provide career and technical education to 
Indian students. This program was funded under the ``Higher 
Education'' account in fiscal year 2007.

State programs for adult education

    For State grants, the Committee recommends $588,975,000, 
which is $25,000,000 more than the fiscal year funding 2007 
level and $24,901,000 more than the budget request. State 
formula grants support programs to enable all adults to acquire 
basic literacy skills, to enable those who so desire to 
complete a secondary education, and to make available to adults 
the means to become more employable, productive, and 
responsible citizens. Grants are provided on a formula basis to 
States under the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act.
    According to the Department of Education, there is a 
significant and ongoing need for adult education services given 
the number of high school dropouts and the growing population 
of adult immigrants without the English language skills that 
are needed to succeed in school and the workplace. Moreover, 
the adult education program is one of a relatively few number 
of programs rated as effective under the Administration's 
Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART). Accordingly, the 
Committee provides a $25,000,000 increase over the request to 
begin to address these needs. The Committee intends that the 
set aside for English literacy and civics education State 
grants within the adult education program be increased by 
$3,040,000, from $68,582,000 in fiscal year 2007 to $71,622,000 
in fiscal year 2008.

National Programs--national leadership activities

    The Committee provides $7,000,000 for national leadership 
activities. This amount is $2,005,000 less than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $2,096,000 less than the budget request. 
Through applied research, development, dissemination, 
evaluation, and program improvement activities, this program 
assists State efforts to improve the quality of adult 
education. The funds support such projects as evaluations on 
the status and effectiveness of adult education programs, 
national and international adult literacy surveys, and 
technical assistance on using technology to improve instruction 
and administration that show promise of contributing to the 
improvement and expansion of adult education.

National Institute for Literacy

    For the National Institute for Literacy, the Committee 
recommends $6,638,000, which is $55,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
Institute supports research and development projects, tracks 
progress made toward national literacy goals, supports research 
fellowships, disseminates information through a national 
clearinghouse, and coordinates literacy information data from 
national and State sources.

Smaller learning communities

    The Committee recommends $93,531,000 for the smaller 
learning communities program, the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request did not include funding for 
this program. As in past years, the bill specifies that these 
funds shall be used only for activities related to the redesign 
of large high schools enrolling 1,000 or more students. The 
funds provided in the bill will help school districts to 
implement smaller, more personalized learning environments in 
large high schools benefitting approximately 550,000 students 
in fiscal year 2008.
    The Committee directs that the Department consult with the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations prior to the 
release of program guidance for the fiscal years 2007 and 2008 
smaller learning communities grant competition. The Committee 
directs that the Department submit to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations an operating plan outlining the 
planned use of the five percent set-aside prior to the 
obligation of these funds. Further, the Committee urges the 
Department to enter into a jointly funded program with a 
private or public foundation with expertise in designing and 
implementing small schools in order to further leverage the 
Federal investment in smaller learning communities.

State grants for incarcerated youth offenders

    The Committee recommends $22,770,000 for State grants for 
incarcerated youth offenders, the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The budget request did not include funding for 
this program. This program makes grants to State correctional 
agencies to assist and encourage incarcerated youths to acquire 
functional literacy skills and life and job skills.

                      Student Financial Assistance

    The Committee recommends $17,464,883,000 for student 
financial assistance programs, an increase of $1,922,427,000 
above the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and $3,070,391,000 
above the budget request.
    Pell Grants.--The Committee recommends $15,583,000,000 for 
the Pell Grant program, $1,922,289,000 above the fiscal year 
2007 level and $2,169,000,000 above the Administration's 
request. The bill also includes new language permitting 
mandatory funds not needed for academic competitiveness and 
SMART grants in the prior fiscal year to be used for Pell 
grants in the current fiscal year.
    Providing these additional resources in order to raise the 
maximum Pell Grant to $4,700 for the 2008-2009 academic year is 
one of the Committee's highest priorities. The Committee 
recommendation will help over 5.5 million low- and middle-
income students obtain a college degree. Approximately 79 
percent of all Pell Grant recipients have annual family incomes 
of $30,000 or less.
    Between 2001 and 2006, the cost of attending a four-year 
public college increased by $3,764 or 42 percent; however, the 
maximum Pell grant increased by just $300--only 8 percent of 
the college cost increase. The 2007 Continuing Appropriations 
Resolution raised the Pell maximum grant by $260, from $4,050 
to $4,310, providing the first increase in four years to help 
disadvantaged students pay for rising college costs. This bill 
will raise the maximum Pell award by another $390 to $4,700. 
Over two years, the maximum Pell Grant will have increased by 
$650--one of the largest expansions of the Pell Grant program 
in its history. The Committee recommendation is another step 
forward in expanding college access and opportunity for more 
Americans.
    Federal supplemental educational opportunity grants 
(SEOG).--The Committee recommends $770,933,000 for SEOG, the 
same as fiscal year 2007 appropriation. The Committee strongly 
disagrees with the Administration's proposal to terminate the 
program, which provides funds to postsecondary institutions for 
need-based grants of up to $4,000 to undergraduates, with 
priority given to Pell-eligible students who demonstrate 
exceptional financial need. Approximately 65 percent of 
dependent SEOG recipients have annual family incomes under 
$30,000 and nearly 80 percent of independent SEOG recipients 
have annual family incomes under $20,000.
    Institutions must contribute a 25 percent match toward 
their Federal SEOG allocations. Thus, the amount provided in 
the bill will result in nearly $1,000,000,000 in need-based 
student financial aid benefiting more than one million 
students.
    Work-study.--The Committee recommends $980,492,000 for the 
work-study program, $138,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation and the same as the budget request. Funding for 
this program is provided through institutions to students who 
work part-time to meet the cost of education. Approximately 
3,300 colleges and universities receive funding according to a 
statutory formula and may allocate it for job location and job 
development centers. Work-study jobs must pay at least the 
Federal minimum wage and institutions must provide 25 percent 
of student earnings. Thus, the amount provided in the bill will 
result in more than $1,100,000,000 in need-based student aid 
for more than 880,000 undergraduate and graduate students.
    Perkins loans cancellations.--The Committee recommends 
$65,471,000 for Federal Perkins loans cancellations, the same 
as the fiscal year 2007 appropriation. The Committee disagrees 
with the Administration's proposal to terminate funding for 
this program, which reimburses college revolving loan funds for 
loans that are forgiven under Federal law. Perkins loans may be 
forgiven when a student borrower pursues a public service 
career in 1 of 12 statutorily-designated areas, including 
teaching in low-income communities and in shortage subjects, 
Head Start programs, military service in areas of imminent 
danger, Peace Corps and ACTION service, nurses and medical 
technicians providing health care services, and law 
enforcement/corrections. Over one half of Perkins loan 
cancellations are for teachers.
    Leveraging educational assistance partnership (LEAP).--The 
Committee recommends $64,987,000 for the LEAP program, the same 
as the fiscal year 2007 appropriation. The Committee disagrees 
with the Administration's proposal to terminate funding for 
this program, which provides dollar-for-dollar matching funds 
to States for grant and work study assistance to eligible 
postsecondary students who demonstrate financial need. Over 
half of LEAP grants go to students with annual family incomes 
under $20,000. The amount provided in the bill will leverage 
nearly $165,000,000 in need-based aid to nearly 165,000 
students.
    Under LEAP, Federally supported grants and job earnings are 
limited to $5,000 per award year for full-time students. By 
law, each State's allocation is based on its relative share of 
the total national population of students eligible to 
participate in the programs, except that no State is to receive 
less than it received in 1979. If LEAP amounts are below this 
level, each State is allocated an amount proportional to the 
amount of funds it received in 1979. If a State does not use 
all of its allocation, the excess funds are distributed to 
other States in the same proportion as the original 
distribution. States must, at a minimum, match LEAP grants 
dollar for dollar with State funds provided through direct 
State appropriations for this purpose.

                       Student Aid Administration

    The bill includes $708,216,000 for the student aid 
administration account. The Committee recommendation is 
$9,734,000 below the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request. These funds will support the 
Department's student financial aid management expenses. The 
Office of Federal Student Aid and the Office of Postsecondary 
Education have primary responsibility for administering Federal 
student financial assistance programs.
    Latino students attending college as the first members of 
their families seeking a higher education face hurdles 
understanding the college entrance process and accessing 
financial aid with which their parents have little or no 
experience. This is acutely apparent for students from recent 
immigrant families. Surveys and studies also show that the cost 
of completing a four-year college program leading to a bachelor 
degree is a major hurdle for Hispanic high school and junior 
college graduates. The Committee therefore urges the Department 
to launch information campaigns designed to educate Hispanic 
communities about the college application and funding 
processes, as well as provide them with a detailed guide 
describing the financial aid available to them.

                            Higher Education

    The Committee recommends $2,051,533,000 for higher 
education programs, an increase of $107,846,000 above the 
fiscal year 2007 appropriation and $213,796,000 above the 
budget request.
    Strengthening institutions.--The Committee recommends 
$79,535,000 for the regular strengthening institutions program, 
the same as the fiscal year 2007 level and the budget request. 
This program provides general operating subsidies to 
institutions with low average educational and general 
expenditures per student and significant percentages of low-
income students. Awards may be used for faculty and academic 
program development, management, joint use of libraries and 
laboratories, acquisition of equipment, and student services.
    Strengthening Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs).--The 
Committee recommends $99,500,000 for the Hispanic-serving 
institutions program, which is $4,586,000 above the fiscal year 
2007 level and $4,589,000 above the budget request. The HSI 
program provides operating subsidies to schools that serve at 
least 25 percent Hispanic students.
    The Committee is concerned about the acute shortage of 
Hispanics earning advanced degrees. The Committee supports 
legislative efforts in the reauthorization of the Higher 
Education Act to expand graduate opportunities for Hispanic-
serving institutions and encourages the Department to submit a 
budget request for HSI graduate programs in the event that such 
a program is authorized under title V of the Higher Education 
Act.
    Strengthening historically black colleges and 
universities.--The Committee recommends $249,500,000 for 
strengthening historically black colleges and universities 
(HBCUs), which is $11,405,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation and the budget request. This program provides 
operating subsidies to accredited, legally authorized HBCUs 
established prior to 1964 whose principal mission is the 
education of black Americans. Funds may be used to support both 
programs and management and are distributed through a formula 
grant based on the enrollment of Pell Grant recipients, number 
of graduates, and the number of graduates entering graduate or 
professional schools in which blacks are underrepresented. The 
minimum grant is $500,000.
    Strengthening historically black graduate institutions.--
The Committee recommends $57,915,000 for the strengthening 
historically black graduate institutions program, the same as 
the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and the budget request. The 
program provides five-year grants to 18 postsecondary 
institutions that are specified in section 326(e)(1) of the 
Higher Education Act. Awards may be used for building 
endowments as well as the same purposes for which the 
strengthening HBCU grants may be used.
    Strengthening Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving 
institutions.--The Committee recommends $11,785,000 for 
strengthening Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving 
institutions, the same as the fiscal year 2007 appropriation. 
The Administration proposed to terminate this program.
    Strengthening tribally controlled colleges and 
universities.--The Committee recommends $24,475,000 for the 
strengthening tribally controlled colleges and universities 
program, which is $905,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation and $5,905,000 above the budget request. In past 
years, the Committee has supported a competitive grant program 
to assist institutions in addressing long overdue and high-
priority infrastructure and facilities requirements. The 
Committee intends for the funds provided to be used to support 
continuation of existing grants and new planning or 
developmental grants. Any remaining funds shall be available 
for grants for renovation and construction of facilities to 
continue to address urgently needed facilities repair and 
expansion.

International education and foreign languages studies

    Domestic programs.--The Committee recommends $100,341,000 
for the domestic activities of the international education and 
foreign languages studies programs, which is $8,800,000 above 
the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and the budget request. The 
title VI programs include national resource centers, foreign 
language and area studies fellowships, undergraduate 
international studies and foreign language programs, 
international research and studies projects, business and 
international education projects, international business 
education centers, language resource centers, American overseas 
research centers, and technological innovation and cooperation 
for foreign information access.
    The Committee places a high priority on restoring over the 
next several years budget cuts to the title VI programs, which 
serve national needs in foreign language training and areas 
studies. The bill includes $3,155,000 to increase the number of 
individuals receiving academic year foreign language and area 
studies fellowships by 100 to 1,026, and summer fellowships by 
70 to 700--approximately a 10 percent increase over last year.
    The bill repeats language permitting up to one percent of 
the title VI/Fulbright-Hays funds provided to the Department to 
be used for program evaluation, national outreach, and 
information dissemination activities. The Committee urges that 
a portion of these funds be used to assist title VI grantees 
develop web portals to improve the dissemination of information 
produced under these programs to the public.
    National Research Council Study.--The Committee notes that 
the National Research Council's recent study of title VI and 
Fulbright-Hays, entitled ``International Education and Foreign 
Languages: Keys to Securing America's Future'' found that these 
programs serve as the foundation for internationalization in 
higher education through research and teaching in a wide 
variety of areas and languages, and that they make a 
significant national contribution to the teaching and learning 
of less commonly taught languages in particular. The National 
Research Council concluded, however, that the Department has 
not made foreign language and cultures a priority. It also 
found a lack of strategic planning and coordination on 
international education and foreign languages within the 
Department and with other federal agencies.
    Accordingly, the Committee urges the Department to 
establish a coordinating group on international education and 
foreign language studies within the Department. The group 
should consist of high-ranking Department personnel as well as 
relevant planning, budget and program staff, and should 
regularly consult with the international education and foreign 
language community. The group should (1) develop a strategic 
vision and master plan for the Department's international 
education and foreign language programs from elementary through 
higher education; (2) develop and implement a plan for 
improving the coordination and articulation among all 
Department programs on international education and foreign 
languages; and (3) consult with other Federal agencies to 
determine and address national needs in international education 
and foreign language studies. In addition, the group should 
improve the International Resource Information System (IRIS) 
data reporting system to ensure that (1) the data collected 
contains performance outputs and outcomes that are relevant to 
program monitoring and improvement; and (2) the data system 
provides greater standardization, allows comparison across 
years and across programs, and provides information to all 
grantees and to the public. In addition, the Committee urges 
the Department to strengthen the title VI and Fulbright-Hays 
program staff and support systems as international education 
programs and responsibilities grow. The Committee directs the 
Department to submit a report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations by February 1, 2008 describing 
steps taken to address these management, program and staffing 
needs.
    Overseas programs.--The Committee recommends $13,610,000 
for the overseas programs in international education and 
foreign language studies authorized under the Mutual 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, popularly known 
as the Fulbright-Hays Act. This amount is $1,000,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2007 level and the budget request. Funding for 
these programs support group projects abroad, faculty research 
abroad, special bilateral projects, and doctoral dissertation 
research abroad. Fulbright-Hays provides an essential overseas 
component for research and training of Americans in foreign 
languages and international studies. Overseas immersion is 
critical to achieving high levels of foreign language 
proficiency. Additional funds are intended to increase the 
number of research and study abroad fellowships and group 
projects abroad in intermediate and advanced language training 
in strategic world areas, as well as expand curriculum 
development and summer seminars abroad for K-12 teachers.
    Institute for international public policy.--The Committee 
recommends $1,700,000 for the Institute for International 
Public Policy. This amount is $100,000 over the fiscal year 
2007 level and the budget request. This program provides a 
grant to an eligible recipient to operate the Institute through 
sub-grantees chosen among minority serving institutions.
    Fund for the improvement of postsecondary education.--The 
Committee recommends $63,264,000 for the fund for the 
improvement of postsecondary education (FIPSE), which is 
$41,275,000 over the fiscal year 2007 level and $41,276,000 
over the budget request. FIPSE awards grants and contracts to a 
variety of postsecondary institutions and other organizations 
to improve the quality and delivery of postsecondary education.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alabama Institute of the Deaf and Blind, Talladega,             $200,000
 AL for the interpreter training program.............
Albany State University, Albany, GA, in partnership              250,000
 with Darton College, for an initiative to increase
 the success of minority males and nontraditional
 students in postsecondary education.................
American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation,                     275,000
 Rockville, MD for its New Century Scholars Program..
Anne Arundel Community College, Arnold, MD for a                 100,000
 health care training initiative, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Armstrong Atlantic State University, Savannah, GA for            200,000
 development of the Bachelor of Arts degree in Cyber
 Security and Investigation Technology...............
Asnuntuck Community College, Enfield, CT for                     250,000
 manufacturing technology training programs, which
 may include equipment and technology................
Azusa Pacific University, San Bernardino, CA for                 400,000
 nursing programs....................................
Bellevue Community College, Bellevue, WA for                     300,000
 development of computer security curriculum.........
Beloit College, Beloit, WI for equipment and                     150,000
 technology..........................................
Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN for equipment              300,000
 for an engineering technology center................
Bennett College for Women, Greensboro, NC for                    300,000
 equipment, technology, and professional development.
Berkshire Community College, Pittsfield, MA for                  100,000
 equipment and technology for distance education
 programs............................................
Bluegrass Community and Technical College,                       300,000
 Winchester, KY for equipment and technology.........
Broward Community College, Broward County, FL for an             200,000
 education and training program in emergency
 preparedness and response...........................
Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA for environmental             200,000
 studies programs and community outreach, which may
 include equipment...................................
Buena Vista University, Storm Lake, IA for curriculum            250,000
 development.........................................
Butler Community College, Andover, KS for a closed               250,000
 captioning training program, including curriculum
 development.........................................
Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute,              100,000
 Hudson, NC for curriculum development...............
California Baptist University, Riverside, CA for                 350,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis                150,000
 Obispo, CA for purchase of equipment................
California State University - Channel Islands,                   150,000
 Camarillo, CA for purchase of equipment.............
California State University - Fullerton, Fullerton,              350,000
 CA for technology upgrades at the Ruby Gerontology
 Center..............................................
Campbell University, Buies Creek, NC for its                     200,000
 Advancement for Underrepresented Minority
 Pharmacists and Pharmaceutical Scientists Program...
Central Arizona College, Coolidge, AZ for nursing                300,000
 programs, including curriculum development..........
Central Florida Community College, Ocala, FL for                 100,000
 curriculum development..............................
Central Methodist University, Fayette, MO for a                  350,000
 science, technology, engineering and math teacher
 training program....................................
Central Piedmont Community College, Charlotte, NC,               100,000
 for curriculum development at the Center for
 Integrated Emergency Response Training..............
Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA for                200,000
 curriculum development..............................
Chemeketa Community College, Salem, OR for equipment             325,000
 and technology for health sciences education and
 training programs...................................
City College of New York, NY for the Charles B.                2,000,000
 Rangel Center for Public Service to prepare
 individuals for careers in public service, which may
 include establishing an endowment, library and
 archives for such center............................
Clark State Community College, Springfield, OH for               300,000
 curriculum development and purchase of equipment....
Clayton College and State University, Morrow, GA for             300,000
 development of a Master of Arts in Archive degree
 program, which may include student scholarships and
 community outreach..................................
Clover Park Technical College, Lakewood, WA for an               150,000
 institute for environmental sustainability in the
 workforce...........................................
College of Lake County, Grayslake, IL for curriculum             250,000
 development.........................................
College of Southern Idaho, Twin Falls, ID for the Pro-           200,000
 Tech program........................................
College of Southern Maryland, LaPlata, MD for nursing            100,000
 education programs..................................
College of the Canyons, Santa Clarita, CA for                    100,000
 creation of the medical lab technician degree
 program, including curriculum development and
 purchase of equipment...............................
College Success Foundation, Issaquah, WA for the                 200,000
 Leadership 1000 Scholarship Program.................
Community College of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, PA            200,000
 for a technical education initiative................
Community College of Beaver County, Monaca, PA for               100,000
 equipment and technology............................
Consensus Organizing Center, San Diego, CA, for its              100,000
 Step Up college preparation initiative..............
Coppin State University, Baltimore, MD for its                    75,000
 nursing education program, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Darton College, Albany, GA for a biotechnology                   250,000
 education and training collaboration with Albany
 State University and Albany Technical College.......
Delaware County Community College, Media, PA for                 150,000
 equipment and instrumentation for science,
 engineering, and technology laboratories............
Des Moines Area Community College, Des Moines, ID for            100,000
 the Jasper County Career Academy, which may include
 equipment...........................................
DeSales University, Center Valley, PA for the Digital            200,000
 Campus Initiative, including purchase of equipment..
Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL for                  150,000
 nursing programs....................................
Eastern Shore Community College Industrial                       250,000
 Maintenance Program, Melfa, VA for curriculum
 development.........................................
Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, FL for purchase of               200,000
 equipment...........................................
Edison College, Charlotte County Campus, Punta Gorda,             75,000
 FL for a nursing education program..................
EI Camino College, Torrance, CA for nursing,                     100,000
 engineering and nontraditional education and
 training programs...................................
Elmira College, Elmira, NY for technology upgrades...            100,000
Florida Campus Compact, Tallahassee, FL for a project            200,000
 to enhance service learning on college campuses
 throughout Florida..................................
Florida Gulf Coast University, Ft. Myers, FL for the             200,000
 Coastal Watershed Institute.........................
Focus: HOPE, Detroit; MI for an experiential learning            175,000
 laboratory and related equipment and technology to
 support undergraduate education and training........
Franklin Pierce College, Rindge, NH for a nursing                150,000
 education program, which may include equipment......
Frontier Community College, Fairfield, IL for                    150,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Ft. Valley State University, Ft. Valley, GA for a                125,000
 teacher preparation program, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Gadsden State Community College, Gadsden, AL for                 250,000
 technology upgrades.................................
Gateway Community and Technical College, Ft.                     200,000
 Mitchell, KY for the Center for Advanced
 Manufacturing Competitiveness, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Gateway Community College, New Haven, CT, for                    100,000
 radiography and radiation therapy training programs,
 which may include equipment.........................
Gila County Community College, Globe, AZ for the                 200,000
 registered nursing program, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Grace College, Winona Lake, IN for technology                    200,000
 upgrades............................................
Greenfield Community College, Greenfield, MA for                 125,000
 education and training programs in the arts, which
 may include equipment and student scholarships......
Harcum College, Bryn Mawr, PA for purchase of                    200,000
 equipment...........................................
Harrisburg Area Community College, Harrisburg, PA for            150,000
 curriculum development..............................
Harrisburg University of Science and Technology,                 100,000
 Harrisburg, PA for instructional programs, which may
 include equipment and technology....................
Herkimer County Community College, Herkimer, NY for              100,000
 equipment and technology for science laboratories...
Hiwassee College, Madisonville, TN for a dental                  260,000
 hygiene program, including curriculum development...
Holy Family University, Philadelphia, PA for nurse               150,000
 education programs..................................
Huntington Junior College, WV for an initiative to               120,000
 recruit and train students in closed captioning.....
Huston-Tillotson University, Austin, TX for a math               250,000
 and science education initiative, which may include
 equipment...........................................
Institute for Advanced Learning and Research,                    200,000
 Danville, VA for professional development for
 teachers in the field of nanotechnology.............
Ivy Tech Community College, Evansville, IN for                    75,000
 equipment and technology............................
Jackson State University, Jackson, MS for                        400,000
 establishment of an osteopathic medical school......
James Rumsey Technical Institute, Martinsburg, WV for            100,000
 the Automotive Technology Program, including
 purchase of equipment...............................
Kent State University, New Philadelphia, OH for                  150,000
 equipment and technology for its Tuscarawas County
 campus..............................................
King's College, Wilkes-Barre, PA to provide                      200,000
 educational opportunities for students through civic
 engagement and service learning.....................
La Sierra University, Riverside, CA..................            200,000
Lackawanna College, Scranton, PA for equipment,                  150,000
 furnishings and operating expenses for an extension
 center in Susquehanna County........................
Lake City Community College, Lake City, FL for a math            100,000
 skills initiative...................................
Latino Institute, Inc., Newark, NJ for its Latino                100,000
 Scholars Program....................................
Lewis and Clark Community College, Godfrey, IL, for              250,000
 its National Great Rivers Research and Education
 Center..............................................
Lincoln College, Lincoln, IL for training, material              100,000
 acquisition and purchase of equipment...............
Lincoln Memorial University College of Osteopathic               410,000
 Medicine, Harrogate, TN for curriculum development..
Linn-Benton Community College, Albany, OR for science            300,000
 and health equipment and technology.................
Lorain County Community College, Elyria, OH for its              300,000
 library and community resource center, which may
 include equipment and technology....................
Los Angeles Valley College, Valley Glen, CA for its              200,000
 Solving the Math Achievement Gap program............
Lyon College, Batesville, AR, to purchase and install             75,000
 equipment...........................................
MacMurray College, Jacksonville, IL for technology               250,000
 upgrades............................................
Madonna University, Livonia, MI for curriculum                   270,000
 development for a disaster relief and recovery
 program.............................................
Maricopa County Community College, Tempe, AZ for the             300,000
 Bilingual Nursing Program at Gateway Community
 College in Phoenix, AZ..............................
Marymount Manhattan College, New York, NY for a                  250,000
 minority teacher preparation initiative.............
McNeese State University, Lake Charles, LA for the               150,000
 Louisiana Academy for Innovative Teaching and
 Learning............................................
Mesa Community College, Mesa, AZ for an online                   100,000
 registered nurse recertification program............
Mesa Community College, Mesa, AZ for the Enfermeras              175,000
 En Escalera program to address a shortage of nurses.
Metropolitan State University, St. Paul, MN for                  500,000
 nursing education programs..........................
Midland College, Midland, TX for purchase of                     150,000
 equipment at the Advanced Technology Center.........
Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy,               100,000
 Downers Grove, IL for the Advanced Career Explorers
 Program.............................................
Minnesota State Colleges and Universities, Office of             300,000
 the Chancellor, St. Paul, MN for a statewide
 veterans re-entry education program.................
Mira Costa Community College District, Oceanside, CA             350,000
 for a nursing education program, including purchase
 of equipment........................................
Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, Gautier, MS            200,000
 for equipment and furnishings for a marine
 technology center and estuarine education center....
Missouri State University-West Plains, West Plains,              200,000
 MO for technology upgrades and programming at the
 Academic Support Center.............................
Monroe Community College, Rochester, NY for a special            300,000
 needs preparedness training program.................
Montgomery County Community College, Blue Bell, PA               250,000
 for curricula, equipment and technology, faculty,
 and outreach for its advanced technologies
 initiative..........................................
Mount Ida College, Newton, MA, for a veterinary                  150,000
 technology program, which may include equipment.....
Murray State University, Hopkinsville, KY for                    200,000
 purchase of equipment at the Veterinary Center......
Nevada State College, Henderson, NV for the                      300,000
 accelerated nursing program.........................
New College of Florida, Sarasota, FL for equipment at            100,000
 the Jane Bancroft Cook Library......................
New College of Florida, Sarasota, FL for the Public              225,000
 Archaeology Laboratory, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
New College of Florida, Sarasota, FL for the                     250,000
 Strategic Languages Resource Center, including
 purchase of equipment...............................
New Hampshire Community Technical College-Manchester,            150,000
 Manchester, NH for equipment for nursing and allied
 health education and training programs..............
Niagara County Community College, Sanborn, NY for                200,000
 equipment...........................................
North Arkansas College, Harrison, AR for technology              215,000
 upgrades............................................
North Carolina Center for Engineering Technologies,              150,000
 Hickory, NC for purchase of equipment at the Center
 for Engineering Technologies........................
North Dakota State College of Science, Wahpeton, ND              200,000
 for a Center for Nanoscience Technology Training....
Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL for its                 125,000
 College of Engineering and Engineering Technology...
Northern Kentucky University Research Foundation,                100,000
 Highland Heights, KY for the METS Center, including
 purchase of equipment...............................
Northwest Shoals Community College, Phil Campbell, AL            250,000
 for technology upgrades.............................
Norwich University, Northfield, VT for equipment and             200,000
 technology for a nursing program....................
Oakland Community College, Bloomfield Hills, MI for              200,000
 international education programs....................
Oklahoma Panhandle State University, Goodwell, OK for            100,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Onondaga Community College, Syracuse, NY for purchase            200,000
 of equipment........................................
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR               200,000
 for academic programs in the OGI School of Science
 and Engineering.....................................
Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR for            350,000
 development of associate's and bachelor's degree
 programs in the health professions..................
Owens Community College, Toledo, OH for a first                  150,000
 responder training initiative, including curriculum
 development.........................................
Palm Beach Community College, Lake Worth, FL for                 300,000
 equipment and technology............................
Paula and Anthony Rich Center for the Study and                  440,000
 Treatment of Autism, Youngstown, OH for distance
 learning technology and programs....................
Philadelphia School District, Philadelphia, PA for               475,000
 the CORE Philly Scholarship Program.................
Pierce College, Tacoma, WA for the Center of                     100,000
 Excellence for Homeland Security, including
 curriculum development and training.................
Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS for                    250,000
 equipment for its Kansas Technology Center..........
Polk Community College, Winter Haven, FL for advanced            200,000
 manufacturing training programs.....................
Portland State University, Portland, OR for equipment            125,000
 and technology for its science research and teaching
 center..............................................
Prince George's Community College, Largo, MD for                 150,000
 equipment and technology to upgrade a management
 information system..................................
Purchase College, State of University of New York,               200,000
 Purchase, NY, for science and math education
 programs, including teacher preparation programs....
Radford University, Radford, VA for a study of the               250,000
 feasibility of establishing a graduate school in the
 medical sciences....................................
Rhode Island College, Providence, RI for development             100,000
 of a Portuguese and Lusophone Studies Program.......
Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ               350,000
 for curriculum development..........................
Richland Community College, Decatur, IL for                      200,000
 development of an alternative fuels education and
 training program....................................
Richmond Community College, Hamlet, NC for equipment             150,000
 and programs at the Industrial Training Center......
Rockford College, Rockford, IL for technology                    200,000
 upgrades and other equipment........................
Round Rock Higher Education Center, Round Rock, TX               300,000
 for nursing programs, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Rutgers University School of Law - Camden, NJ for                400,000
 student scholarships and loan repayment, internships
 and public interest programming.....................
San Jacinto College, Pasadena, TX for a health care              225,000
 education and training initiative, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA for                      500,000
 equipment, technology, and training for its library
 and information commons initiative..................
Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ for equipment            375,000
 and technology for its science and technology center
Siena Heights University, Adrian, MI for nursing                 100,000
 programs............................................
Silver Lake College, Manitowoc, WI for nursing                   185,000
 programs, including curriculum development..........
Simpson College, Indianola, IA for purchase of                   250,000
 equipment...........................................
Sparks College, Shelbyville, IL for a closed                     200,000
 captioner training program..........................
St. Bonaventure University, St. Bonaventure, NY for              200,000
 equipment at the science facility...................
St. Bonaventure University, St. Bonaventure, NY for              200,000
 technology upgrades.................................
St. Clair County Community College, Port Huron, MI               150,000
 for purchase of equipment...........................
St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY for equipment and              500,000
 technology to support its science, technology,
 engineering and math initiative.....................
St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, FL for a                 200,000
 distance learning program, including technology
 upgrades and purchase of equipment..................
State University of New York at Potsdam, Potsdam, NY             100,000
 for teacher training initiatives....................
Sweetwater Education Foundation, Chula Vista, CA, for            300,000
 its Compact for Success program, which may include
 student scholarships................................
Texas Chiropractic College, Pasadena, TX for health              100,000
 professions training................................
Texas State Technical College, Waco, TX, for                     150,000
 equipment for education and training programs.......
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX for the Center for            150,000
 the Study of Addiction and Recovery.................
Tohono O'odham Community College, Sells, AZ for                  100,000
 computer, science and mathematics equipment,
 technology and instructional materials..............
Tri-County Community College, Murphy, NC for                      50,000
 equipment and technology............................
Trident Technical College, Charleston, SC for nursing            200,000
 curriculum development..............................
Trinity University, San Antonio, TX for purchase of              150,000
 equipment...........................................
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ for development of             250,000
 a pilot project to provide instructional and support
 services to ensure the academic success of disabled
 veterans............................................
University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA               700,000
 for the Matsui Center for Politics and Public
 Service, which may include establishing an
 endowment, and for cataloguing the papers of
 Congressman Robert Matsui...........................
University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR, for a                200,000
 technology training and instruction initiative,
 which may include equipment.........................
University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL for the               250,000
 Lou Frey Institute of Politics......................
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL for purchase              200,000
 of equipment at the College of Education............
University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA for                300,000
 technology upgrades at the College of Pharmacy......
University of Michigan Depression Center, Ann Arbor,             200,000
 MI for the Postsecondary Education Campus Support
 project.............................................
University of Montevallo, Montevallo, AL for the                 200,000
 Teacher Leadership Initiative for School Improvement
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM for the                200,000
 American Indian Language Policy Research and Teacher
 Training Center.....................................
University of North Carolina at Wilmington,                      250,000
 Wilmington, NC for development of an assistive
 technology center, which may include equipment......
University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL for the            200,000
 Virtual School Readiness Incubator..................
University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler, TX for a                    150,000
 science, technology, engineering and mathematics
 program, including teacher training.................
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston,                 150,000
 Galveston, TX for nursing programs..................
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston,                 100,000
 Galveston, TX for the Centralized Clinical Placement
 system, including purchase of equipment.............
University of Virginia Center for Politics,                      280,000
 Charlottesville, VA for the Youth Leadership
 Initiative..........................................
University of Washington at Bothell, WA for an                   200,000
 initiative to train nursing faculty in partnership
 with a consortium of colleges.......................
University of Wisconsin-Marshfield, Marshfield, WI               200,000
 for equipment and technology for science
 laboratories........................................
Utah Valley State College, Orem, UT for a civic                  200,000
 education program, including purchase of equipment..
Vanguard University Nursing Center, Costa Mesa, CA               150,000
 for teacher and nurse training programs.............
Waldorf College, Forest City, IA for purchase of                 120,000
 equipment...........................................
Weber State University, Ogden, UT for the TAPT                   150,000
 program to recruit additional teachers..............
West Central Technical College, Waco, GA for purchase            150,000
 of equipment........................................
West Chester University, West Chester, PA for nursing            200,000
 program development.................................
Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and                175,000
 Universities, Madison, WI for continued
 implementation of the WAICU Collaboration Project...
Wittenberg University, Springfield OH for a teacher              200,000
 training initiative.................................
York College, City University of New York, Jamaica,              200,000
 NY for activities to prepare students for careers in
 aviation management.................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Minority science and engineering improvement.--The 
Committee recommends $8,730,000 for the minority science and 
engineering improvement program (MSEIP), the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 appropriation and the budget request. The MSEIP 
program awards grants to improve mathematics, science, and 
engineering programs at institutions serving primarily minority 
students and to increase the number of minority students who 
pursue advanced degrees and careers in those fields.
    TRIO.--The Committee recommends $868,178,000 for the TRIO 
programs, which is $40,000,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation and the budget request. The TRIO programs provide 
a variety of outreach and support services to encourage low-
income, potential first-generation college students to enter 
and complete college. Discretionary grants of up to four or 
five years are awarded competitively to institutions of higher 
education and other agencies. At least two-thirds of the 
eligible participants in TRIO must be low-income, first-
generation college students. Under the Committee 
recommendation, over 850,000 students will receive TRIO 
services.
    The Committee includes $10,000,000 to be used for a TRIO 
college completion initiative, providing supplemental awards 
under the student support services program to provide grant aid 
to students participating in the program, particularly to those 
at high risk of dropping out of college due to financial need. 
The Committee intends that student support services projects 
receiving supplemental awards shall provide matching funds 
equal to 33 percent of the total award; thus leveraging an 
additional $3,300,000 in need-based student aid. In total, this 
additional student financial assistance will benefit 
approximately 14,000 students.
    The remaining increase over the fiscal year 2007 level 
shall be used to provide inflationary adjustments to existing 
TRIO projects in order to partially offset a loss in purchasing 
power since 2003.
    The Committee is concerned about the reduced level of 
participation of Hispanic students in the TRIO Talent Search 
program, and encourages the Secretary of Education to enhance 
program outreach efforts to Hispanics with the goal of 
increasing the participation rates of Hispanic students in 
Talent Search.
    GEAR UP.--The Committee recommends $323,423,000 for the 
GEAR UP program, which is $20,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2007 level and the budget request. GEAR UP provides grants to 
States and partnerships of low-income middle and high schools, 
institutions of higher education and community organizations to 
target entire grades of students and give them the skills and 
encouragement to successfully pursue postsecondary education.
    The Committee believes that the GEAR UP program is 
successful and should be expanded. The Department of Education 
has indicated that findings of the early effects of GEAR UP 
show that it has positive impacts through the 8th grade, has a 
positive impact on student achievement on standardized tests, 
and has achieved its early performance goals. Nevertheless, 
only 13 percent of all applications could be supported in the 
2006 grant competition. Under the Committee recommendation, 
approximately 785,000 students--nearly 46,000 more than last 
year--will benefit from early invention services and financial 
assistance for college in fiscal year 2008. The Committee 
intends that $6,600,000 of the increase over fiscal year 2007 
be used for State grants, of which 50 percent must be used to 
provide student scholarships, and $13,400,000 be used for 
partnership grants. The Committee encourages the Department to 
give favorable consideration in any competitions for GEAR UP 
funding to partnerships that, in addition to providing early 
intervention services, guarantee college scholarships to GEAR 
UP students.
    Byrd scholarships.--The bill includes $40,590,000 for Byrd 
scholarships, the same as the fiscal year 2007 level. The 
President did not propose funding for this program. The Byrd 
scholarship program provides formula grants to States to award 
$1,500 scholarships for up to four years of higher education to 
students who demonstrate academic excellence in high school. 
Under the Committee bill, approximately 27,000 students will 
receive merit scholarships in fiscal year 2008.
    Javits fellowships.--The Committee recommends $9,699,000 
for the Javits fellowship program, the same as fiscal year 2007 
and $98,000 below the budget request. Under the Javits program, 
institutions receive Federal support to make fellowship awards 
to students pursuing doctoral study in the arts, humanities, 
and social sciences. The Committee recommendation will support 
approximately 226 fellowship awards in the 2009-2010 academic 
year.
    Graduate assistance in areas of national need program.--The 
Committee recommends $30,067,000 for the graduate assistance in 
areas of national need (GAANN) program, $3,000 more than the 
budget request and the same as the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation. The GAANN program awards grants to institutions 
of higher education to provide fellowships to economically 
disadvantaged students who have demonstrated academic 
excellence and who are pursuing graduate education in 
designated areas of national need, such as the sciences, 
mathematics, engineering, and nursing. The Committee 
recommendation will support fellowships for approximately 700 
students in fiscal year 2008.
    Teacher quality enhancement grants.--The Committee 
recommends $40,000,000 for teacher quality enhancement grants, 
which is $19,895,000 below the fiscal year 2007 appropriation. 
The Administration proposed to terminate this program. Teacher 
quality enhancement grants are designed to improve teacher 
recruitment, preparation, and licensure to ensure that current 
and future teachers have the necessary teaching skills and 
academic content knowledge to teach effectively. The program 
has three components that are mandated by the Higher Education 
Act: state grants, partnership grants and recruitment grants. 
By statute, state and partnership grants each receive 45 
percent of the appropriation and recruitment grants receive 10 
percent. The Committee bill includes language that permits the 
Department to allocate funds among these three components at 
its discretion in order to make the most effective use of these 
resources.
    Within the total, approximately $28,500,000 will be for 
continuing awards and $11,500,000 will be available for new 
awards. The Committee intends that funds for new awards be used 
only for partnership grants to institutions of higher 
education, schools of arts and sciences, and high-need school 
districts in order to focus program resources on the critical 
need to improve teacher pre-service preparation. This amount in 
the bill will provide a 33 percent increase over fiscal year 
2007 for these partnerships. The other components of this 
program are addressed through the $300,000,000 increase 
provided for the improving teacher quality State grants 
program.
    Child care access means parents in school.--The Committee 
recommends $17,810,000 for child care access means parents in 
school program, $2,000,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation and the budget request. This program helps to 
ensure that low-income student parents have access to 
postsecondary education and affordable and convenient child 
care. Colleges and universities may receive discretionary 
grants of up to four years to support or establish a campus-
based childcare program primarily serving the needs of low-
income students enrolled at the institution. Priority is given 
to childcare programs that leverage significant local or 
institutional resources and utilize a sliding fee scale. Grants 
can only be used to supplement childcare services or start new 
programs.
    The Committee's recommendation includes the $2,000,000 
increase as part of its initiative to help reduce the number of 
abortions in America by alleviating the economic pressures and 
other real life conditions that can sometimes cause women to 
decide not to carry their pregnancies to term. With this 
increase, the number of college campuses receiving assistance 
for campus-based childcare will increase by nearly 13 percent 
to 196 campuses.
    Advancing America through foreign language partnerships.--
The Committee recommends no funding for the advancing America 
through foreign language partnerships program, for which 
$24,000,000 was proposed in the budget request. The Committee 
believes that existing authority under the foreign language 
assistance program can be used to address the identified 
foreign language needs and has provided $3,000,000 for new 
pilots for this purpose.
    Demonstration projects to ensure quality higher education 
for students with disabilities.--The Committee recommends 
$6,875,000 for demonstration projects in disabilities, the same 
as the fiscal year 2007 appropriation. The Administration 
proposed to terminate this activity. This program provides 
discretionary grants for three years to support model 
demonstration projects that provide technical assistance and 
professional development activities for faculty and 
administrators in institutions of higher education in order to 
provide students with disabilities a high-quality postsecondary 
education.
    Underground railroad program.--The Committee does not 
recommend funding for the underground railroad program, as 
proposed by the Administration. This program, which provides 
grants to non-profit institutions to research, display, 
interpret and collect artifacts relating to the history of the 
underground railroad, received $17,871,000 between fiscal years 
1999 and 2007.
    GPRA data/HEA program evaluation.--The Committee recommends 
$620,000 for program evaluation and development of data 
required under the Government Performance and Results Act for 
Higher Education programs administered by the Department. This 
amount is $350,000 below the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and 
the budget request.
    B.J. Stupak Olympic scholarships.--The bill includes 
$970,000 for B.J. Stupak Olympic scholarships, the same as the 
fiscal year 2007 level. The Administration proposed to 
terminate this activity, which provides financial assistance to 
Olympic athletes who are pursuing a postsecondary education. 
The Committee recommendation will provide scholarships to 
approximately 149 student athletes.
    Thurgood Marshall legal education opportunity program.--The 
bill includes $2,946,000 for the Thurgood Marshall legal 
education opportunity program, the same as in fiscal year 2007. 
The Administration proposed to terminate this activity, which 
provides low-income, minority and disadvantaged college 
students with the information, preparation and financial 
assistance needed to gain access to and complete law school 
study. The Committee recommendation will provide financial 
assistance of up to $10,000 for 150 fellows and support 
educational activities for more than 1,000 students to improve 
retention, graduation and bar passage rates.

                           HOWARD UNIVERSITY

    The Committee recommends $237,392,000 for Howard 
University, which is $3,526,000 above the budget request and 
the same as the fiscal year 2007 appropriation. The bill 
includes a minimum of $3,526,000 for the endowment, which is 
the same as the current level.
    Howard University is a ``Research I'' university located in 
the District of Columbia. Direct appropriations for Howard 
University are authorized by 20 U.S.C. 123, originally enacted 
in 1867. Howard University provides undergraduate liberal arts, 
graduate and professional instruction to approximately 11,000 
students from all 50 States. Masters degrees are offered in 
over 55 fields and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in 26 fields.

         COLLEGE HOUSING AND ACADEMIC FACILITIES LOANS PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $481,000 for the Federal 
administration of the college housing and academic facilities 
loan (CHAFL) program, the Higher Educational Facilities Loans 
program and the College Housing Loans program, the same as the 
budget request and $90,000 below the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation.

HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY CAPITAL AND FINANCING PROGRAM

    Federal administration.--The Committee recommends $188,000 
for the administration of the historically black college and 
university capital financing program authorized under part D of 
title III of the Higher Education Act, the same as the budget 
request and $21,000 below the fiscal year 2007 appropriation. 
The program is intended to make capital available for repair 
and renovation of facilities at historically black colleges and 
universities. In exceptional circumstances, capital provided 
under the program can be used for construction or acquisition 
of facilities.
    Bond subsidies.--The Committee bill does not include bill 
language carried in prior years limiting the total amount of 
outstanding bonds insured under the HBCU capital program, as 
proposed by the Administration. The Department projects that 
the program will surpass the statutory loan cap in 2007, and 
does not propose to make additional loan guarantees in fiscal 
year 2008. Under the HBCU capital program, a private, for-
profit ``designated bonding authority'' issues construction 
bonds to raise capital for loans to historically black colleges 
and universities for construction projects. The Department 
provides insurance for these bonds, guaranteeing full payment 
of principal and interest to bond holders. The letter of credit 
limitation establishes the total amount of bonds which can be 
issued by the designated bonding authority. The credit 
limitation and expected program subsidy must be explicitly 
stated in an appropriation Act according to the Federal Credit 
Reform Act of 1990.

                    INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION SCIENCES

    The Committee recommends $535,103,000 for the Institute of 
Education Sciences (IES). This amount is $59,159,000 less than 
the budget request and $17,618,000 more than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level. This account supports education research, 
statistics, and assessment activities.

Research, development, and dissemination

    This Committee recommends $157,552,000 for educational 
research, which is $5,000,000 less than fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $4,983,000 less than the budget request. IES 
supports research, development, and national dissemination 
activities that are aimed at expanding fundamental knowledge of 
education and promoting the use of research and development 
findings in the design of efforts to improve education.
    The Committee's recommendation reflects its support for the 
Department's efforts to carry out congressionally authorized 
evaluations of Federal education programs using rigorous 
methodologies, particularly random assignment, that are capable 
of producing scientifically valid knowledge regarding which 
program activities are effective. To ensure that authorized 
evaluations are conducted in a rigorous manner, are independent 
of the program offices, and include scientific peer review, the 
Committee believes that IES should be the lead agency for the 
design and implementation of these evaluations. The Committee 
believes further that it is appropriate for program offices to 
work collaboratively with IES to include an option in program 
solicitations for grantee participation in such evaluations, 
including random assignment, to the extent IES deems 
appropriate and where not specifically prohibited by law.
    With the renewed focus on science, technology, engineering 
and mathematics (STEM) education, the Committee notes with 
concern the severe under-representation of Hispanics, African 
Americans, and Native Americans in the STEM fields. In 
particular, the Center for the Advancement of Hispanics in 
Science and Engineering Education (CAHSEE) notes that Hispanic 
Americans constitute 12 percent of the population in the United 
States, and yet represent less than 3 percent of the 
engineering and scientific community nationwide. With the goal 
of increasing the percentage of Hispanic Americans and all 
minority subgroups that contribute to the STEM fields, the 
Committee requests that the Department investigate the reasons 
for this disparity and issue a report within one year with the 
findings of that investigation, including suggested remedies to 
bridge the divide.
    The Committee's recommendation includes $5,000,000 for the 
``what works clearinghouse''. The goal of the clearinghouse is 
to provide educators, policymakers, researchers, and the public 
with reviews of the effectiveness of specific interventions to 
improve student outcomes, including the best scientific 
evidence upon which those judgments are based. The Committee 
notes that, since fiscal year 2002, the Department has invested 
approximately $36,000,000 in the ``what works clearinghouse'', 
which has yet to produce a user-friendly database. The 
Committee also notes that the Department has provided 
$5,000,000 for the ``doing what works clearinghouse'', which is 
funded within Department administration and which is designed 
to carry out the same purpose as the ``what works 
clearinghouse''. The Committee supports the goal of enabling 
practitioners to make sound choices by giving them easy access 
to the scientific evidence supporting specific programs and 
projects. Nevertheless, the Committee believes that the 
Department's efforts in this regard have been too costly, 
uncoordinated, and ineffective. The Committee provides 
sufficient funds to continue the ``what works clearinghouse'' 
but at a reduced level so that the Department will produce a 
coordinated plan to disseminate best practices quickly, 
efficiently, and in a user-friendly manner.

Statistics

    This bill includes $96,022,000 for the activities of the 
National Center for Education Statistics, exclusive of the 
national assessment of educational progress. This amount is 
$23,000,000 less than the budget request and $6,000,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2007 funding level. A portion of the 
funding increase will support a new secondary longitudinal 
study beginning with an eighth grade cohort. This study will 
provide important information about dropout rates.
    Statistics activities are authorized under title I of the 
Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002. The Center collects, 
analyzes, and reports statistics on all levels of education in 
the United States. Activities are carried out directly and 
through grants and contracts and include projections of 
enrollments, teacher supply and demand, and educational 
expenditures. IES also provides technical assistance to State 
and local education agencies and postsecondary institutions.
    For arts in education, the Committee directs that within 
the total $2,200,000 is for the fast response survey system to 
collect data for the report of arts education in public 
elementary and secondary schools during the 2008-2009 school 
year. The Committee expects this survey to be administered by 
the National Center for Education Statistics. The survey should 
have the comprehensive quality of the 2002 report and should 
include national samples of elementary and secondary school 
principals, as well as surveys of elementary and secondary 
classroom teachers and arts specialists.
    The Committee recommendation does not include the 
Administration's request of $25,000,000 for a pilot study to 
develop a student unit record data system. The Department has 
not made a convincing case that the benefits of a national 
database containing individual student records outweigh the 
costs of establishing and maintaining such a system. Further, 
the Department has not adequately addressed privacy concerns.

Regional educational laboratories

    The Committee has included $65,470,000 for the regional 
educational laboratories, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 level and $6,000 more than the budget request. The 
regional educational laboratories help States and education 
practitioners implement the requirements contained in the NCLB. 
This assistance, includes product development, applied 
research, technical assistance, and professional development.

Research in special education

    The Committee recommendation includes $71,840,000 for 
research in special education, the same as the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and $11,000 more than the budget request. This 
program supports competitive awards to produce and advance the 
use of knowledge to improve services and results for children 
with disabilities. The program focuses on producing new 
knowledge, integrating research and practice and improving the 
use of knowledge.

Special education studies and evaluations

    The Committee recommendation includes $9,900,000 for 
special education studies and evaluations, the same as the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $272,000 more than the 
President's request. This program awards competitive grants, 
contracts and cooperative agreements to assess the 
implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education 
Act and the effectiveness of state and local efforts to provide 
special education and early intervention programs and services 
to infants, toddlers, and children with disabilities.

Statewide data systems

    The Committee recommendation includes $37,508,000 for 
statewide data systems development, $12,956,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $11,644,000 less than the 
budget request. This program awards grants, on a competitive 
basis, to state educational agencies to enable such agencies to 
design, develop, and implement statewide, longitudinal data 
systems. Such data systems help States to efficiently and 
accurately manage, analyze, disaggregate, and use individual 
student data consistent with the No Child Left Behind Act.

Assessment

    The Committee recommendation includes $96,811,000 for the 
National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), $19,821,000 
less than the budget request, and $3,662,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level. The Assessment is authorized 
under section 303 of the NAEP Authorization Act. It is the only 
nationally representative and continuing survey of educational 
ability and achievement of American students. The primary goal 
of the Assessment is to determine and report the status and 
trends of the knowledge and skills of students, subject by 
subject. Subject areas assessed in the past have included 
reading, writing, mathematics, science, and history, as well as 
citizenship, literature, art, and music. The Assessment is 
operated by contractors through competitive awards made by the 
National Center for Education Statistics. A National Assessment 
Governing Board formulates the policy guidelines for the 
program.
    Within the amounts provided, $5,716,000 is for the National 
Assessment Governing Board, which is $321,000 less than the 
budget request and $662,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level. The Committee recommendation also provides, 
$91,095,000 is for the NAEP program. The Committee's 
recommendation does not include funds for 12th grade reading 
and mathematics assessments.
    The recommendation does include $3,000,000 to expand from 
10 to 16 the number of urban districts that participate in the 
trial urban district assessment. The Committee expects the 
National Assessment Governing Board to use its existing 
criteria in determining the districts to be added to the 
assessment.
    The Committee looks forward to the completion of the 8th 
grade arts assessment--the first fine arts assessment since 
1997.

                        DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommendation includes $541,497,000 for 
departmental management (salaries and expenses) at the 
Department of Education. This amount is $18,561,000 less than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $52,447,000 less than 
the budget request. These activities are authorized by the 
Department of Education Organization Act, P.L. 96-88, and 
include costs associated with the management and operations of 
the Department as well as separate costs associated with the 
Office for Civil Rights and the Office of the Inspector 
General.

Program administration

    The Committee recommendation includes $391,487,000 for 
program administration. This amount is $25,000,000 less than 
the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $38,144,000 less than 
the budget request. These funds support the staff and other 
costs of administering programs and activities at the 
Department. Items include personnel compensation and health, 
retirement and other benefits as well as travel, rent, 
telephones, utilities, postage fees, data processing, printing, 
equipment, supplies, technology training, consultants and other 
contractual services. The Committee recommendation includes 
language proposed by the Administration making $3,000,000 of 
the total funding provided available until expended for 
building alterations and related expenses for the move of 
Department staff to the Mary E. Switzer building in Washington, 
D.C. This amount is $14,303,000 less than the amount requested 
by the Administration, that amount having been rendered 
unnecessary this year due to delays in the renovation project.
    The Committee requests that the Department of Education 
provide the Committee within 90 days a compilation of all 
adequate yearly progress measurements and standards of each 
State, territory, and the District of Columbia, as well as all 
waivers from the requirements of NCLB sought, denied, and 
granted since the enactment of NCLB.

                        Office for Civil Rights

    The bill includes $93,771,000 for the salaries and expenses 
of the Office for Civil Rights. This amount is $2,566,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. This office is responsible for enforcing laws 
that prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, 
national origin, sex, disability, and age in all programs and 
institutions that receive funds from the Department. These laws 
extend to 50 State educational agencies, 16,000 local 
educational agencies, 3,500 institutions of higher education. 
They also extend to proprietary schools, State rehabilitation 
agencies, libraries, and other institutions receiving Federal 
funds.

                    Office of the Inspector General

    The bill includes $53,239,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General. This amount is $2,973,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This Office has authority to inquire into all program 
and administrative activities of the Department as well as into 
related activities of grant and contract recipients. It 
conducts audits and investigations to determine compliance with 
applicable laws and regulations, to check alleged fraud and 
abuse, efficiency of operations, and effectiveness of results.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 301. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits funds under this Act from being used for the 
transportation of students or teachers in order to overcome 
racial imbalances or to carry out a plan of racial 
desegregation.
    Sec. 302. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits funds under this Act from being used to require the 
transportation of any student to a school other than the school 
which is nearest the student's home in order to comply with 
title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    Sec. 303. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits funds under this Act from being used to prevent the 
implementation of programs of voluntary prayer and meditation 
in public schools.
    Sec. 304. The Committee continues and amends a provision 
that allows up to one percent of any discretionary funds 
appropriated for the Department of Education to be transferred 
between appropriations accounts, provided that no appropriation 
is increased by more than three percent by any such transfer.
    Sec. 305. The Committee includes a new provision that 
prohibits funds under this Act from being used to promulgate, 
implement, or enforce any revision to the regulations in effect 
under section 496 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 on June 
1, 2007, until legislation specifically requiring such revision 
is enacted.
    Sec. 306. In response to findings of serious conflicts of 
interest, bias, and violations of Federal law, the Committee 
has included a new provision to foster integrity and ethical 
values within the Department of Education. The Committee 
believes that it is the Secretary's responsibility to ensure 
that the Department administers its programs, worth over 
$64,000,000,000, with the highest degree of objectivity and 
professionalism. Therefore, the bill requires the Secretary to 
implement procedures to vet conflicts of interest or bias among 
those who administer, or assist in the administration of, the 
Department's programs. The provision also requires the 
Inspector General to certify to the Committee the adequacy of 
such procedures and to conduct at least one audit within one 
year to ensure that the procedures are properly implemented and 
that they have proven to be adequate.

                       TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES


 Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled

    The bill provides $4,994,000 for the Committee for Purchase 
From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. This is 
$342,000 above the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and the same 
as the budget request.
    The Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or 
Severely Disabled was established by the Wagner-O'Day Act of 
1938 as amended. Its primary objective is to increase the 
employment opportunities for people who are blind or have other 
severe disabilities and, whenever possible, to prepare them to 
engage in competitive employment.

             Corporation for National and Community Service

    The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) 
was established by the National and Community Service Trust Act 
of 1993 to enhance opportunities for national and community 
service and provide national service educational awards. The 
Corporation makes grants to States, institutions of higher 
education, public and private nonprofit organizations, and 
others to create service opportunities for a wide variety of 
individuals through full-time national and community service 
programs.
    CNCS administers a variety of volunteer service programs 
with diverse funding mechanisms. The AmeriCorps volunteers in 
service to America program funding is mostly provided for 
direct programming, but a limited number of competitive grants 
are awarded. National senior volunteer corps programs are 
administered through competitive grants and contracts. Most of 
the funding provided for the AmeriCorps State and national 
program is awarded via competitive grants to States and 
nonprofit organizations, but there are also formula grants to 
States and direct programming costs as well. Funding for the 
learn and serve America program is predominantly distributed 
via formula for school-based service-learning programs, but a 
portion of the money is awarded via competition to schools, 
tribes, community-based organizations, and institutions of 
higher education.

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $768,905,000 for the operating 
expenses of the programs administered by the Corporation for 
National and Community Service (CNCS). This is $40,355,000 less 
than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $15,257,000 more 
than the budget request. The Committee concurs with the 
Administration's request to consolidate the domestic volunteer 
service and the national and community service operating 
expenses accounts into one single account. With the exception 
of the funds for the national service trust and service-
learning programs, the Committee provides one year of 
obligation authority for all programs administered by CNCS.

Domestic volunteer services programs

    The Committee recommends $313,054,000 for the domestic 
volunteer service programs administered by CNCS, which is 
$3,500,000 below the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and 
$18,828,000 above the budget request.
    VISTA.--The Committee recommends $95,468,000 for the 
volunteers in service to America (VISTA) program, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and $5,734,000 more 
than the budget request. The VISTA program supports individuals 
who recruit volunteers and organize community volunteer 
activities but who do not provide direct volunteer services.
    National senior volunteer corps.--The Committee recommends 
a total of $217,586,000 for the national senior volunteer 
corps, the same as the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and 
$13,094,000 above the budget request. In addition, the 
Committee continues bill language that prohibits CNCS from 
providing stipends or other monetary incentives to volunteers 
or volunteer coordinators whose incomes exceed 125 percent of 
the national poverty level.

National and community service programs

    The Committee recommends $455,851,000 for national and 
community service programs administered by CNCS, including the 
national service trust. This is $36,855,000 less than the 
fiscal year 2007 funding level and $3,571,000 less than the 
budget request.
    National service trust.--The Committee recommends 
$122,521,000 for the national service trust to be available 
until expended. This is $4,801,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The Committee 
continues bill language that allows CNCS to transfer funds to 
the national service trust from the amount provided for 
AmeriCorps grants after notice of such a transfer is 
transmitted to Congress.
    AmeriCorps grants.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$255,625,000 for AmeriCorps grants, which is $9,200,000 less 
than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. Less funding is required in fiscal year 2008 
due to estimated carryover balances from previous 
appropriations. In addition, the Committee continues bill 
language that caps at not more than $55,000,000 the amount of 
funding available for the national direct awards.
    Innovation, assistance, and other activities.--The 
Committee recommends $13,000,000 for innovation, assistance, 
and other activities, which is $16,771,000 below the fiscal 
year 2007 funding level and $303,000 above the budget request. 
The Committee does not include bill language requested by the 
Administration that would make this funding available for 
obligation for two years. The Committee does continue bill 
language providing that none of the funds made available for 
innovation, assistance, and other activities may used to 
support the salaries and related expenses, including travel, 
attributable to CNCS employees.
    Partnership grants.--The Committee expects that previous 
partnership grantees, such as the Points of Light Foundation 
and America's Promise, will be eligible to compete for funding 
under the innovation, assistance, and other activities funding 
as well as within the AmeriCorps national direct competition.
    National civilian community corps.--The Committee 
recommends $11,620,000 for the national civilian community 
corps, which is $15,169,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 
funding level and the same as the budget request.
    Learn and serve.--The Committee recommends $37,125,000 for 
learn and serve America, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and $5,026,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee includes bill language that funding for learn and 
serve America is to be available until September 30, 2009. 
Funding is not set aside within the amount available for learn 
and serve America programs for a public awareness campaign.
    State commissions.--The Committee recommends $12,000,000 
for State commission administrative grants, which is $516,000 
less than the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and the same as 
the budget request. The Committee continues bill language to 
override the National and Community Service Act of 1990 to set 
aside these funds.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $68,964,000 for salaries and 
expenses associated with the administrative activities of the 
Corporation for National and Community Service. This is 
$1,360,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$556,000 less than the budget request. These funds allow CNCS 
to manage and operate its programs.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $5,512,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General, which is $549,000 more than the fiscal year 
2007 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
Office of Inspector General is authorized by the Inspector 
General Act of 1978. This office provides an independent 
assessment of all CNCS operations and programs, through audits, 
investigations, and other proactive projects.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Sec. 401. The Committee recommendation continues bill 
language regarding qualified student loans eligible for 
education awards.
    Sec. 402. The Committee recommendation continues bill 
language regarding the availability of funds for the placement 
of volunteers with disabilities.
    Sec. 403. The Committee recommendation continues bill 
language directing the inspector general to levy sanctions, in 
accordance with standard inspector general audit resolution 
procedures, which include, but are not limited to, debarment of 
any grantee found to be in violation of AmeriCorps program 
requirements, including using grant or program funds to lobby 
Congress.
    Sec. 404. The Committee recommendation continues bill 
language that requires CNCS to ensure that significant changes 
to program requirements or policy are made only through public 
notice and comment rulemaking.
    Sec. 405. The Committee recommendation includes bill 
language, as requested, permitting professional corps program 
applicants that exceed a statutory living allowance/salary 
amount to apply for funds through State formula.
    Sec. 406. The Committee recommendation includes bill 
language, as requested, that permits CNCS to solicit and accept 
compensated services and commercial services from other 
organizations and individuals (other than participants) to 
assist in programs administered by CNCS.
    Sec. 407. The Committee recommendation continues bill 
language (although the new bill language structure moves this 
language from ``national and community service, operating 
expenses'' to ``administrative provisions'') that permits 
organizations operating projects under the AmeriCorps education 
awards to do so without regard to several administrative 
functions in the underlying statute.
    Sec. 408. The Committee recommendation includes bill 
language, as requested, that combines separate matching 
requirements for AmeriCorps grants.

                  Corporation for Public Broadcasting

    The Committee recommends $420,000,000 in advance funding 
for fiscal year 2010 for the Corporation for Public 
Broadcasting (CPB). This amount is $20,000,000 over the fiscal 
year 2009 appropriation. The Administration proposed to 
discontinue funding public broadcasting activities two years in 
advance. CPB's appropriation is allocated according to a 
statutory formula reserving no less than 89 percent of the 
appropriation for grants to stations or program producers, 6 
percent for system support, and no more than 5 percent for CPB 
operations. These funds will partially support the operations 
of over 1,150 public radio and television stations.
    For fiscal year 2008, the Committee does not approve the 
Administration's proposal to rescind $50,000,000 from CPB's 
enacted appropriation. In addition, the Committee recommends 
$29,700,000 for digital transition activities, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2007 level, and $26,750,000 for the 
first installment toward a $75 million replacement of public 
radio's interconnection system, which is $7,900,000 less than 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2007 for the public 
television interconnection system. The funds will be used to 
pay for the development and capital costs of the system by 
which the public radio satellite system distributes programs to 
public radio stations. The Administration proposes that these 
expenses be financed through CPB's base appropriation for 
fiscal year 2008. In addition, the bill includes language 
prohibiting the use of CPB funds to apply any political test or 
qualification in personnel actions.
    The Committee recognizes that a great majority of public 
broadcasting audio, film and video history sits in collections 
that are deteriorating, and in their current format, will not 
be available for use after the digital transition without being 
preserved. In order to prevent further deterioration of these 
materials and to make them available again to the public, the 
Committee encourages CPB to spend a portion of the digital 
conversion funds to develop a digital public broadcasting 
archive pursuant to 47 U.S.C. 396 (g)(2)(D).

               Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service

    The bill provides $44,450,000 for the Federal Mediation and 
Conciliation Service (FMCS), an increase of $1,601,000 above 
the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and an increase of $650,000 
above the budget request.
    The FMCS attempts to prevent and minimize labor-management 
disputes having a significant impact on interstate commerce or 
national defense, except in the railroad and airline 
industries. The agency convenes boards of inquiry appointed by 
the President in emergency disputes and conducts dispute 
mediation, preventive mediation, and arbitration. In addition, 
the Service offers alternative dispute resolution services and 
training to other Federal agencies to reduce litigation costs 
and speed Federal administrative proceedings.
    The bill also includes provisions first enacted in the 
fiscal year 1996 Appropriations Act granting the agency the 
authority to accept gifts and to charge fees for certain 
services.
    The Committee intends that not less than $650,000 of this 
appropriation be used to fund FMCS' Labor-Management Grants 
Program in fiscal year 2008. The Committee rejects the 
administration's proposal to eliminate this program and 
believes it has demonstrated success in improving workplace 
relationships and in instilling effective and efficient 
conflict resolution.

            Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission

    The bill provides $8,096,000 for the Federal Mine Safety 
and Health Review Commission. This is an increase of $318,000 
over the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and is the same as the 
budget request. The Committee is concerned about the 
Commission's increased workload as a result of the MINER Act, 
and has funded the full amount in the request to allow the 
Commission to hire four new law clerks to help process this new 
work.
    The Commission is responsible for reviewing the enforcement 
activities of the Secretary of Labor under the Federal Mine 
Safety and Health Act. The Commission's administrative law 
judges hear and decide cases initiated by the Secretary of 
Labor, mine operators, or miners. The five-member Commission 
hears appeals from administrative law judge decisions, rules on 
petitions for discretionary review, and may direct, of its own 
initiative, review of cases that present unusual questions of 
law.

                Institute of Museum and Library Services

    For the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), 
the Committee recommends $264,812,000. This amount is 
$17,607,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$6,434,000 less than the request. The Institute makes State 
formula grants for library services and discretionary national 
grants for joint library and museum projects.
    For library services, the Committee recommends $167,500,000 
for state grants, $3,638,000 for library services to Native 
Americans and Native Hawaiians, $12,375,000 for national 
leadership grants, and $23,760,000 for the Laura Bush 21st 
century librarian program for the recruitment and education of 
librarians.
    For museum services, the Committee recommends $17,547,000 
for museums for America, $982,000 for 21st Museum 
Professionals, $442,000 for museum assessment, $2,772,000 for 
conservation project support, $807,000 for conservation 
assessment, $7,920,000 for national leadership grants for 
museums, and $911,000 for Native American and Native Hawaiian 
museum services.
    For policy, research, and statistics, the Committee 
recommends $2,000,000. This is the first year that the 
Committee has included funding for these activities. This 
recommendation accommodates the expansion of IMLS' mission to 
include functions that were formerly conducted by the National 
Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS). In 
accord with the President's recommendation, the Committee has 
not provided funding for NCLIS, which will no longer be in 
operation in fiscal year 2008. Instead, the Committee has given 
IMLS the authority and the resources necessary to carryout the 
important mission of NCLIS, which includes advising the 
executive and legislative branches and other public and private 
organizations on national library and information policies and 
plans. The Committee believes that IMLS has produced a 
sufficient plan to incorporate the functions of NCLIS.
    For museum grants for African American history and culture, 
the Committee provides $842,000.
    For program administration, the Committee recommends 
$12,021,000.
    The Committee includes the following projects in the 
following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aerospace Museum of California Foundation, McClellan,           $350,000
 CA for exhibits.....................................
Alabama School of Math and Science, Mobile, AL for               145,000
 purchase of library materials.......................
America's Black Holocaust Museum, Milwaukee, WI for               75,000
 exhibits and education programs, which may include
 acquisition of interactive media center kiosks......
American Airpower Museum, Farmingdale, NY for                    300,000
 exhibits and education programs.....................
American Jazz Museum, Kansas City, MO for exhibits               200,000
 and education programs, and an archival project.....
American West Heritage Center, Wellsville, UT for the            200,000
 Lifelong Learning Initiative........................
Anne Arundel County Trust for Preservation, Inc.,                 50,000
 Annapolis, MD for exhibits and preservation.........
Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, CA for                      50,000
 educational programming.............................
Bandera County, Bandera, TX for library enhancements.            200,000
Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue, WA...................            250,000
Boyle County Public Library, Danville, KY for                    175,000
 educational materials and equipment.................
Burpee Museum, Rockford, IL for educational                      150,000
 programming and exhibits............................
Charlotte County, FL, Port Charlotte, FL for                     300,000
 archiving and equipment.............................
Children's Museum of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN              125,000
 for exhibits and equipment..........................
Children's Museum of Los Angeles, Van Nuys, CA for               200,000
 exhibits and education programs.....................
Cincinnati Museum Center, Cincinnati, OH for a                   150,000
 digital records initiative..........................
City of Chino Hills, Chino Hills, CA for library                 200,000
 facility improvements...............................
College Park Aviation Museum, College Park, MD for               150,000
 exhibits and educational programs...................
Connecticut Historical Society Museum, Hartford, CT              100,000
 for educational programs and interactive school
 programs at the Old State House.....................
Contra Costa County, Martinez, CA for library                     75,000
 services and its Technology for Teens in Transition
 volunteer mentor program at the Juvenile Hall
 Library.............................................
Corporation for Jefferson's Poplar Forest, Forest, VA            200,000
 for expansion of exhibits and outreach..............
County of San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA for                 250,000
 exhibits and programming............................
Discovery Center of Idaho, Boise, 10 for a science               250,000
 center..............................................
Everson Museum of Art of Syracuse, Syracuse, NY for              250,000
 expansion of the Visual Thinking Strategies and Arts
 Education program...................................
Florida Holocaust Museum, S1. Petersburg, FL for                 200,000
 exhibits and programming............................
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, FL to digitize               250,000
 holdings and create an online exhibit...............
George and Eleanor McGovern Library, Dakota Wesleyan              50,000
 University, Mitchell, SD for cataloging, preparing,
 and archiving documents and artifacts relating to
 the public service of Senator Francis Case and
 Senator George McGovern.............................
George C. Marshall Foundation, Lexington, VA for                 150,000
 research activities.................................
George Washington University, Washington, DC for the             355,000
 Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project....................
Heard Museum, Phoenix, A:z for web-based exhibits and            100,000
 educational programming.............................
Heckscher Museum of Art, Huntington, NY for                      100,000
 digitalization of collections and related activities
Historic Hudson Valley, Tarrytown, NY for education               50,000
 programs............................................
Historic Hudson Valley, Tarrytown, NY, for education             225,000
 programs at Philipsburg Manor.......................
History Museum of East Ottertail County, Perham, MN              150,000
 for exhibits and equipment..........................
Impression 5 Science Center, Lansing, MI for exhibits            150,000
Iola Public Library, lola, Kansas for educational                 50,000
 programs, outreach, and materials...................
James A. Michener Art Museum, Doylestown, PA for                 100,000
 equipment, salaries and supplies....................
Jefferson Barracks Heritage Foundation Museum, S1.                50,000
 Louis, MO for exhibits..............................
Kansas Regional Prisons Museum, Lansing, KS for                  100,000
 educational and outreach programs...................
Massie Heritage Center, Savannah, GA for exhibit                 250,000
 upgrades and purchase of equipment..................
Metropolitan Library System, Chicago, IL for                     150,000
 educational programming and materials...............
Monterey Bay Aquarium, Monterey, CA for educational               75,000
 programming and outreach............................
Morris Museum, Morristown, NJ for development of the             250,000
 Interactive Educational Workshop Center Exhibit.....
Museum of Aviation Foundation, Warner Robins, GA for             350,000
 education programs..................................
Museum of Science and Technology, Syracuse, NY for               200,000
 museum exhibits and operations......................
Onondaga County Public Library, Syracuse, NY for                 250,000
 technology upgrades.................................
Overton County Library, Livingston, TN for                       250,000
 collections, technology, and education programs.....
Pennsylvania State Police Historical, Educational and            150,000
 Memorial Museum, Hershey, PA for exhibits and
 educational materials...............................
Pico Rivera Library, Pico Rivera, CA for books and               150,000
 materials, equipment, and furnishings...............
Portfolio Gallery and Education Center, St. Louis, MO             50,000
 for educational programming.........................
Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum, Savannah, GA              50,000
 for exhibits, education programs, and equipment.....
Rust College, Holly Springs, MS to purchase equipment            200,000
 and digitize holdings...............................
Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, State University of New             150,000
 York at New Paltz, NY for exhibits and programs.....
San Gabriel Library, San Gabriel, CA for equipment,              175,000
 furnishings, and materials..........................
Shedd Aquarium, Chicago, IL for exhibits and                     150,000
 community outreach..................................
South Carolina Aquarium, Charleston, SC for exhibits             150,000
 and curriculum......................................
South Florida Science Museum, West Palm Beach, FL for            325,000
 educational and outreach programs...................
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX to digitize                   450,000
 library holdings....................................
Tubman African American Museum, Macon, GA for                     45,000
 exhibits and education programs.....................
Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, MN for the              500,000
 Minnesota Digital Public Media Archive..............
University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA for the James              250,000
 R. Slater Museum of Natural History for collections,
 education programs, and outreach....................
Yolo County Library, Woodland, CA for an after-school            100,000
 assistance and literacy program.....................
Youna At Art Children's Museum, Davie, FL for the                150,000
 Global Villaae Proiect..............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  Medicare Payment Advisory Commission

    The Committee recommends $10,748,000 for the Medicare 
Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), $1,318,000 less than the 
fiscal year 2007 available funding and the same as the budget 
request. MedPAC advises Congress on payment and other policy 
issues affecting the Medicare program and on implications of 
changes in health care delivery and in the market for health 
care services on the Medicare program.

        National Commission on Libraries and Information Science

    The Committee agrees with the President's budget request 
and does not provide funding for the National Commission on 
Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS) which will no longer 
be in operation in fiscal year 2008.
    The mission of NCLIS, to advise the executive and 
legislative branches and other public and private organizations 
on national library and information policies and plans, will be 
carried out by the Institute of Museum and Library Services 
(IMLS). The Committee has provided adequate funding and the 
authority for IMLS to carry out the functions of NCLIS and 
believes that IMLS has produced a sufficient plan to integrate 
the NCLIS function into IMLS, generating a streamlined, 
combined agency.

                     National Council on Disability

    The bill provides $3,113,000 for the National Council on 
Disability (NCD). This amount is $313,000 below the fiscal year 
2007 appropriation and the same as the budget request. The 
level recommended by the Committee is the same as the fiscal 
year 2007 appropriated level before the addition of one-time 
supplemental funding for homeland security related costs.
    The Council monitors implementation of the Americans with 
Disabilities Act and makes recommendations to the President, 
the Congress, the Rehabilitation Services Administration, and 
the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation 
Research on public policy issues of concern to individuals with 
disabilities.

                     National Labor Relations Board

    The bill provides $256,988,000 for the National Labor 
Relations Board (NLRB), which is $5,481,000 above the fiscal 
year 2007 appropriation and $750,000 above the budget request.
    The NLRB receives, investigates, and prosecutes unfair 
labor practice charges filed by businesses, labor unions, and 
individuals. It also schedules and conducts representation 
elections. The five-member Board considers cases in which an 
administrative law judge decisions are appealed.
    The Committee is very concerned about actions, including 
the reduction of employee training and travel, that the NLRB 
has taken as a result of recent budgetary constraints. The 
Committee has provided additional funds in the bill to restore 
these activities, since their elimination has had a serious 
impact on employee morale at the agency. Of the increase listed 
above, not less than $525,000 is to be used for training, 
including training of new and existing employees, and not less 
than $225,000 is to be used for the field-headquarters detail 
program. In addition, the NLRB should produce a report on the 
use of these additional funds, including the types of training 
provided and numbers of employees supported with the funds, to 
be included in the fiscal year 2009 NLRB budget justification.

                        National Mediation Board

    The bill provides $12,992,000 for the National Mediation 
Board (NMB). This is $1,396,000 above the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation and $750,000 above the budget request.
    The NMB mediates labor disputes between employees and 
railroad and airline carriers subject to the Railway Labor Act. 
The Board also resolves representation disputes involving labor 
organizations seeking to represent railroad or airline 
employees.
    The bill provides an additional $750,000 specifically to 
address the backlog of section 3 arbitration cases at the NMB. 
The Committee is concerned about the length of time it takes 
the NMB to resolve these cases, and the impact that the delay 
has on the individuals served by the NMB. The Committee directs 
the NMB to provide quarterly reports, beginning with the first 
quarter after enactment, describing how these funds are being 
used and their impact on the backlog, to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations.

            Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission

    The bill provides $10,696,000 for the Occupational Safety 
and Health Review Commission, $225,000 above the fiscal year 
2007 appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    The Commission adjudicates contested citations issued by 
the Occupational Safety and Health Administration against 
employers for violations of safety and health standards. The 
Commission's administrative law judges settle and decide cases 
at the initial level of review. The agency's three appointed 
Commissioners also review cases, issue rulings on complicated 
issues, and may direct review of any decision by an 
administrative law judge.

                       Railroad Retirement Board


                         DUAL BENEFITS ACCOUNT

    The bill provides $79,000,000 for dual benefits, a decrease 
of $9,000,000 below the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request.
    These funds are used to pay dual benefits to those retirees 
receiving both railroad retirement and social security 
benefits. The bill includes a provision permitting a portion of 
these funds to be derived from income tax receipts on dual 
benefits as authorized by law. The Railroad Retirement Board 
estimates that approximately $6,000,000 may be derived in this 
manner.

           FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACCOUNT

    The bill provides $150,000 for the interest earned on 
unnegotiated checks, the same as the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation and the budget request.

                      LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATION

    The bill provides a consolidated limitation of $103,694,000 
on the expenditure of railroad retirement and railroad 
unemployment trust funds for administrative expenses of the 
Railroad Retirement Board, the same as the fiscal year 2007 
appropriation and $176,000 more than the budget request.
    The Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) administers 
comprehensive retirement-survivor and unemployment-sickness 
insurance benefit programs for railroad workers and their 
families. This account limits the amount of funds in the 
railroad retirement and railroad unemployment insurance trust 
funds that may be used by the RRB for administrative expenses. 
The Committee prohibits funds from the railroad retirement 
trust fund from being spent on any charges over and above the 
actual cost of administering the trust fund, including 
commercial rental rates.
    The Committee is aware of a proposal to consolidate the 
financial statements and audit of the National Railroad 
Retirement Investment Trust with the financial statements and 
audit of the Railroad Retirement Board. The Committee notes 
that the Railroad Retirement and Survivors' Improvement Act of 
2001 mandates that the Trust functions independently from the 
Railroad Retirement Board. Further, the Act specifically 
requires a separate audit of the Trust by a nongovernmental 
auditor, and requires that the results of this audit be 
included in the Trust's Annual Management Report to Congress. 
The Committee expects that the Trust shall be administered and 
audited solely in conformance with the Act of 2001.

             LIMITATION ON THE OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The bill provides authority to expend $7,606,000 from the 
railroad retirement and railroad unemployment insurance trust 
funds for the Office of Inspector General, an increase of 
$433,000 above the fiscal year 2007 appropriation and the same 
as the budget request. This account provides funding for the 
inspector general to conduct and supervise audits and 
investigations of programs and operations of the Board.

                     Social Security Administration


                PAYMENTS TO SOCIAL SECURITY TRUST FUNDS

    The Committee recommends $28,140,000 for mandatory payments 
necessary to compensate the old age and survivors insurance 
(OASI) trust fund and disability insurance (DI) trust fund for 
special payments to certain uninsured persons (for which no 
payroll tax is received), costs incurred for administration of 
pension reform activities and interest lost on the value of 
benefit checks issued but not negotiated. This is $7,670,000 
more than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the same as 
the budget request. This appropriation restores the trust funds 
to the position they would have been in had they not borne 
these costs properly charged to the general funds.

                  SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $26,948,525,000 for the 
supplemental security income (SSI) program. This is 
$2,122,644,000 less than the fiscal year 2007 funding level and 
$37,525,000 more than the budget request. The Committee also 
provides $14,800,000,000 in advance funding for the first 
quarter of fiscal year 2009 as requested.

Beneficiary services

    In addition to Federal benefits, the Social Security 
Administration (SSA) administers a program of supplementary 
State benefits for those States that choose to participate. The 
funds also are used to reimburse the trust funds for the 
administrative costs of the program. The Committee provides 
$36,000,000 for beneficiary services, the same as the budget 
request. In fiscal year 2007, this program was funded by using 
carryover funding from prior years.

Research and demonstration

    Within the appropriation for SSI, the Committee recommends 
$27,000,000 for research and demonstration activities conducted 
under section 1110 of the Social Security Act. This is the same 
as the fiscal year 2007 funding level and the budget request.

Administration

    Within the appropriation for SSI, the committee recommends 
$3,020,525,000 for payment to the social security trust funds 
for SSI's share of the base administrative expenses of SSA. 
This is $70,356,000 more than the fiscal year 2007 funding 
level and $37,525,000 more than the budget request.

                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends a limitation on administrative 
expenses for SSA of $9,347,953,000 to be funded from the social 
security and Medicare trust funds. This is $170,380,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2007 fu