[Federal Register Volume 59, Number 50 (Tuesday, March 15, 1994)]
[Unknown Section]
[Page 0]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 94-5822]


[[Page Unknown]]

[Federal Register: March 15, 1994]


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Part III





Department of Health and Human Services





_______________________________________________________________________



Administration for Children and Families



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Fiscal Year 1994 National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect 
Discretionary Funds Program; Availability of Funds and Request for 
Applications; Notice
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Administration for Children and Families

 
Fiscal Year 1994 National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect 
Discretionary Funds Program; Availability of Funds and Request for 
Applications

AGENCIES: Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF), 
Administration for Children and Families (ACF), HHS.

ACTION: Announcement of the availability of funds and request for 
applications to conduct child abuse research or demonstration projects 
as authorized by the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, as 
amended.

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SUMMARY: The National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (NCCAN), within 
the Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF), 
Administration for Children and Families (ACF) announces the 
availability of funds for research on the causes, prevention, 
identification, treatment and cultural distinctions of child abuse and 
neglect; appropriate, effective and culturally sensitive investigative, 
administrative and judicial procedures with respect to cases of child 
abuse; and for demonstration or service programs and projects designed 
to prevent, identify, and treat child abuse and neglect. This 
announcement contains forms and instructions for submitting an 
application.

DATES: The closing date for submission of applications is May 31, 1994.

ADDRESSES: Applications receipt point: FY 1994 NCCAN Discretionary 
Funds Program, Department of Health and Human Services, ACF/Division of 
Discretionary Grants, 6th floor, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW., 
Washington, DC 20447, Attn: NCCAN-94-1.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Administration for Children and 
Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, National 
Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, PO Box 1182, Washington, DC 20201. 
Telephone (202) 205-8586. To provide 24-hour coverage, calls to this 
number will be answered by an answering machine.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: If you plan to submit an application, please 
send a post card with the following information: the name, address, and 
telephone number of the contact person; the name of the organization; 
and the priority area(s) in which you may submit an application, within 
two (2) weeks of the receipt of this announcement to: Administration on 
Children, Youth and Families, Operations Center, 3030 Clarendon Blvd., 
suite 240, Arlington, VA 22201.
    This information will be used to determine the number of expert 
reviewers needed and to update the mailing list of persons to whom 
program announcements are sent.
    This program announcement consists of three parts. Part I provides 
information on NCCAN; the statutory funding authority applicable to 
this announcement; and general information on the application 
procedures.
    Part II describes the review process, additional requirements for 
NCCAN grant applicants, the criteria for the review and evaluation of 
applications, and the programmatic priorities under which applications 
are being solicited.
    Part III provides information and instructions for the development 
and submission of applications.
    The forms to be used for submitting an application follow Part III. 
Please copy and use these forms in submitting an application under this 
announcement. No additional application materials are available or 
needed to submit an application.
    Applicants should note that grants to be awarded under this program 
announcement are subject to the availability of funds.

Part I--Introduction

    In 1974, the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (the Act) 
established the NCCAN in the Department of Health and Human Services. 
It is located organizationally within the Administration on Children, 
Youth and Families (ACYF) in the Administration for Children and 
Families (ACF).
    The National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect conducts activities 
designed to assist and enhance national, State and community efforts to 
prevent, identify and treat child abuse and neglect. These activities 
include: Conducting research and demonstrations; supporting service 
improvement projects; gathering, analyzing and disseminating 
information through a national clearinghouse; and providing grants to 
eligible States for developing, strengthening and carrying out child 
abuse and neglect prevention and treatment programs and programs 
relating to the investigation and prosecution of child abuse cases. In 
addition, the legislatively mandated Advisory Board on Child Abuse and 
Neglect and the Inter-Agency Task Force on Child Abuse and Neglect 
produce periodic reports regarding child abuse and neglect activities.
    The Act has been amended several times, and was most recently 
reauthorized and otherwise amended by the Child Abuse, Domestic 
Violence, Adoption, and Family Services Act of 1992 (Pub. L. 102-295, 
May 5, 1992) and by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Act Amendments 
of 1992 (Pub. L. 102-586, November 4, 1992). This announcement reflects 
research and demonstration priorities and solicits applications under 
the authority of the Act (42 USC 5101 et seq.) as amended.
    In the past, ACF has issued a Coordinated Discretionary Funds 
Program (CDP) announcement combining the research, demonstration and 
training initiatives for several ACF programs. This announcement for 
fiscal year (FY) 1994, however, covers only those activities to be 
funded by NCCAN. The priority areas identified in this announcement 
derive from NCCAN's legislative mandates as well as agency and 
Departmental goals and initiatives. The priority areas have been 
developed as the result of literature reviews and findings from 
recently completed studies; information and suggestions received from 
the field including NCCAN-sponsored and co-sponsored symposia and 
workshops; NCCAN Research, Demonstration and State Grants program 
meetings; hearings convened by the Advisory Board on Child Abuse and 
Neglect, other Departmental organizations, and professional 
associations; and additional comments received in response to the 
proposed priority areas. The priority areas seek to focus attention on 
and to encourage research and demonstration efforts to obtain new 
knowledge and improvements in service delivery for the solution of 
particular social problems and to promote the dissemination and 
utilization of the knowledge and model practices developed under these 
priority areas.
    On May 12, 1993, a notice soliciting comments on the National 
Center on Child Abuse and Neglect's (NCCAN) proposed priority areas for 
FY 1993 was published in the Federal Register. A 60-day period was 
provided to allow the public to comment on the proposed areas. After 
review and analyses of these comments, NCCAN is publishing its final 
priority areas.
    At the close of the comment period, NCCAN had received 87 written 
responses from a variety of sources, including the following: The U.S. 
Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect; a member of the House of 
Representatives; State and county departments of social welfare and 
human services; State, regional, and local educational agencies; a 
State department of justice; children's trust and prevention funds 
programs; State protection and advocacy systems; community agencies for 
children and families; national, State, and local associations and non-
profit organizations; universities; hospitals, medical centers, and a 
dental center; mental health services agencies and agencies serving 
children with disabilities; Federal Area and Regional Offices; a State 
Council on Domestic Violence; foundations; and national resource 
centers and clearinghouses. Additionally, the Panel on Research on 
Child Abuse and Neglect of the National Academy of Sciences released 
its prepublication copy of Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect 
(available for purchase in book form from the National Academy Press, 
2101 Constitution Avenue, NW., Box 285, Washington, DC 20055. 
Telephone: 1-800-624-6242) at a Symposium on Research on Child Abuse 
and Neglect sponsored by the National Academy of Science and held on 
July 13 in Washington, DC.
    The largest number of written responses came from national, State, 
and local associations and non-profit organizations, followed closely 
by the responses from State and county departments of social welfare 
and human services. A number of supportive and general comments were 
provided which emphasized the importance of a focus on cultural 
sensitivity and relevance in the design of research and demonstration 
projects on child maltreatment; prevention and parental and community 
empowerment programs; the relationships between child abuse and 
neglect, family violence and community violence; and sound and rigorous 
evaluation components as part of prevention and intervention studies. 
Other comments focused on the application and review process. Comments 
were also submitted on each of the seven research and demonstration 
priority areas, along with recommendations for symposia topics and 
additional priority areas.
    The responses were generally supportive of the seven research and 
demonstration priority areas and the symposia topics included in the 
announcement. The largest group of written comments were in response to 
the two demonstration and service priority areas on model inter-agency 
collaborative approaches to prevent maltreatment of children with 
disabilities (25) and specialized joint training for State and local 
Child Protective Services (CPS) workers and providers of services to 
children with disabilities on the identification, intervention and/or 
treatment of maltreated children with disabilities (22). Some of this 
discussion described research which still needs to be carried out and 
this topic has been added to the priority area on Field Initiated 
Research on Child Abuse and Neglect. Based on the comments received in 
response to the priority area on Research on Risk Assessment Systems, 
one of the major areas of emphasis has been modified. To the extent 
feasible, NCCAN has addressed all public comments in preparing its 
final FY 1994 priority areas. Comments intended to further clarify and 
focus the priorities were incorporated into the revised descriptions. 
Additional resources brought to our attention have been cited in the 
priority descriptions.
    The NCCAN has also reviewed the report of the Panel on Research on 
Child Abuse and Neglect of the National Academy of Sciences for issues 
that can be addressed both in the FY 1994 research and demonstration 
priorities and the FY 1994 procurement plan as well as in the 
development of a coordinated approach and conceptual framework for a 
long-term research agenda for the field. In its summary chapter on 
research priorities, the panel concluded that

    ``* * * a research agenda for child maltreatment studies should 
address four separate objectives. We need knowledge that can:
    (1) Clarify the nature and scope of child maltreatment, guided 
by well-developed research definitions and instrumentation.
    (2) Provide an understanding of the origins and consequences of 
child maltreatment in order to better inform theories regarding its 
etiology and to establish a foundation for improving the quality of 
future policy and program efforts to address this problem.
    (3) Determine the strengths and limitations of existing 
approaches and interventions in preventing and treating child 
maltreatment to guide the development of new and more effective 
interventions; and
    (4) Develop a science policy for child maltreatment research 
that recognizes the importance of developing national leadership, 
human resources, instrumentation, financial resources, and 
appropriate institutional arrangements for child maltreatment 
research.''

    The Panel acknowledged the complexity of child maltreatment, and 
presented

    ``* * * a child-oriented research agenda that emphasizes the 
importance of knowing more about the backgrounds and experiences of 
developing children and their families, with a broader social 
context that includes their friends, neighborhoods, and communities 
* * *. The Panel has adopted an ecological developmental perspective 
to examine the factors in the child, family, or society that can 
exacerbate or mitigate the incidence and destructive consequences of 
child maltreatment.''

    The Panel pointed to the need for more sophisticated models and 
suggests that research must use multivariate models and etiological 
theories to understand causes. Rigorous research and evaluation studies 
of the effectiveness of prevention, intervention and treatment programs 
are needed. The Panel stated that

    ``Our report extends beyond what is, to what could be, in a 
society that fosters healthy development in children and families. 
We cannot simply build a research agenda for the existing system; we 
need to develop one that independently challenges the system to 
adapt to new perspectives, new insights, and new discoveries.'' 
(Panel on Research on Child Abuse and Neglect, Commission on 
Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, National Research 
Council. Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect. Washington DC: 
National Academy Press, 1993.)

    The NCCAN has accepted that challenge and, to the extent feasible, 
has incorporated many of the issues identified in the report related to 
identification, etiology, and prevention into this announcement. The 
NCCAN also acknowledges those common themes in the written comments 
from the field and the report of the Panel. In addition, NCCAN will 
continue to consider the recommendations of the Panel in future 
announcements as well as in planning efforts with other Federal 
agencies through the Inter-Agency Task Force on Child Abuse and Neglect 
and in reaching out to other agencies, organizations and foundations 
for collaborative activities.
    Information on prior research and demonstration projects supported 
by NCCAN as well as on other studies on child maltreatment are 
available through the Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect 
Information, PO Box 1182, Washington, DC 20013, (1-800-FYI-3366). The 
Clearinghouse is also a member of the Consortium of Clearinghouses and 
can provide information on the other Clearinghouses and Resource 
Centers referred to in this announcement.

Part II--The Review Process and Priority Areas

    This Part describes the screening and review process, the criteria 
for the evaluation of applications, and the programmatic priorities 
under which applications are being solicited.

A. Eligible Applicants

    Before applications are reviewed, each application will be screened 
to determine that the applicant organization is an eligible applicant 
as specified under the selected priority area. Applications from 
organizations which do not meet the eligibility requirements for the 
priority area will not be considered or reviewed in the competition, 
and the applicant will be so informed.
    Applications will be screened for categorical appropriateness. If 
NCCAN finds applications inappropriate for the priority area in which 
they were submitted, applicants will be contacted for verbal approval 
of redirection to a more appropriate priority area. Redirection does 
not affect decision-making in the competitive process which follows 
initial screening.
    Each priority area description contains information about the types 
of agencies and organizations which are eligible to apply under that 
priority area. Since eligibility varies among priority areas depending 
on statutory provisions, it is critical that the ``Eligible 
Applicants'' section under each specific priority area be carefully 
considered.
    Only agencies and organizations, not individuals, are eligible to 
apply under any of the priority areas. On all applications developed 
jointly by more than one agency or organization, the application must 
identify only one organization as the lead organization and official 
applicant. The other participating agencies and organizations can be 
included as co-participants, subgrantees, or subcontractors.
    For-profit organizations are eligible to participate as subgrantees 
or subcontractors with eligible non-profit organizations under all of 
the priority areas.
    Any non-profit agency applying for financial assistance under this 
announcement must submit proof of its non-profit status with its grant 
application. Failure to do so will result in rejection of the 
application. The non-profit agency can accomplish this either by making 
reference to its listing in the Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) most 
recent list of tax-exempt organizations or by submitting a copy of its 
letter from the IRS under IRS Code section 501(c)(3). The ACYF cannot 
fund a non-profit applicant without acceptable proof of its non-profit 
status.

B. Review Process and Funding Decisions

    Timely applications from eligible applicants will be accepted for 
screening and review. The formal review process will be established in 
accordance with section 105(e) of the Act and will be conducted in 
Washington, DC. Applications will be reviewed and scored competitively 
against the published evaluation criteria (see Part II C of this 
announcement) by experts in the field, generally persons from outside 
the Federal government. The results of this review are a primary factor 
in making funding decisions.
    The NCCAN and ACYF reserve the option of discussing applications 
with, or referring them to, other Federal or non-Federal funding 
sources when this is determined to be in the best interest of the 
Federal government or the applicant. The NCCAN or ACYF also may solicit 
comments from ACF Regional Office staff, other Federal agencies, 
interested foundations, national organizations, specialists, experts, 
States and the general public. These comments, along with those of the 
expert reviewers, will be considered by NCCAN and ACYF in making 
funding decisions.
    To the greatest extent possible, efforts will be made to ensure 
that funding decisions reflect an equitable distribution of assistance 
among the States and geographical regions of the country, rural and 
urban areas, and ethnic populations. In making these decisions, NCCAN 
and ACYF may also take into account the need to avoid unnecessary 
duplication of effort.

C. Evaluation Criteria

    There are two sets of evaluation criteria: Research applications 
will be evaluated against one set; demonstration and training 
applications will be evaluated against another set. Using the 
appropriate evaluation criteria below (see sections C.1. and C.2.), a 
panel of at least three reviewers will evaluate each application. 
Applicants should ensure that they address each minimum requirement in 
the priority area description under the appropriate section of the 
Program Narrative Statement.
    Reviewers will determine the strengths and weaknesses of each 
proposal in terms of the appropriate evaluation criteria listed below. 
Reviewers also will provide written comments and assign numerical 
scores for each application. The point value following each criterion 
heading indicates the maximum numerical score that each section may be 
given in the review process. These section scores are summed for each 
application to yield a total evaluation score for each application.
1. Criteria for Research Projects
    Applications under research priority areas will be evaluated 
against the following criteria:
    A. Objectives (15 points). The extent to which the application 
concisely states the specific objectives of the project and describes 
what the research project is intended to accomplish. The research 
issue(s) to be addressed or the specific theory driven question(s) to 
be answered and the hypothesis(es) to be tested are well formulated.
    B. Background and Significance (15 points). The extent to which the 
application effectively discusses the current state of knowledge 
relative to the issue or area that is addressed, and provides a review 
of the literature, including previous work of the author(s) of the 
proposal. (A list of references must be included with the application.) 
The results of any pilot tests are described. The application indicates 
how the proposed research will build on the current knowledge base and 
contribute to policy, practice and future research.
    C. Approach (45 points). The extent to which the application 
delineates how the terms used in the study will be defined and 
operationalized, identifies variables and data sources, and discusses 
the selection, adaptation or development of instruments to be used, 
including information on reliability and validity. The application 
outlines the experimental design features and the procedures for data 
collection, processing, analysis and interpretation. As applicable, it 
includes a sampling plan for the selection of site(s) and subjects. The 
sample sizes must be sufficiently large for both statistical power and 
significance.
    The application describes the characteristics of the target 
population, and details recruitment procedures for the study subjects. 
It describes and addresses the rationale for the gender and ethnic 
composition and subject recruitment procedures of the proposed study 
sample. For intervention studies, the theory base, ecological setting, 
and level of intervention are described. The application discusses any 
potential difficulties in the proposed procedures, provides realistic 
estimates of attrition and discusses statistically appropriate ways of 
adjusting the sample.
    The extent to which the application reflects sensitivity to ethical 
issues that may arise, such as potential deception, delayed or 
diminished treatment for control groups placed on waiting lists, 
provision for treatment and removal from the project if a potentially 
dangerous behavior is exhibited, plans for stopping an intervention 
that proves harmful or unsuccessful, or lag in debriefing the subject. 
The extent to which the applicant addresses procedures for the 
protection of human subjects, confidentiality of data and consent 
procedures. A Protection of Human Subjects Assurance must be included 
with the application, in addition to the other required assurances.
    The extent to which the application indicates that the data will be 
collected utilizing approaches, measures, and instruments that are 
culturally sensitive and/or presents thoughtful explanations for using 
those whose cultural sensitivity may not yet have been empirically 
determined.
    The extent to which the application indicates that the data will be 
analyzed utilizing approaches that are appropriate to the scientific 
objectives of the study and how the proposed analyses reflect 
appropriate examinations of gender and ethnic issues.
    The extent to which the application includes plans to prepare data 
sets according to sound data processing and documentation practices to 
ensure the potential of these data sets for subsequent use by other 
researchers. The application provides for these data sets to be made 
available at the conclusion of the project to the National Data Archive 
on Child Abuse and Neglect. The extent to which the application 
indicates that the final report will be prepared in an NCCAN-suggested 
format that ensures its ease for dissemination and utilization and 
proposes strategies for dissemination of findings in a manner that will 
be of use to researchers and practitioners in the field.
    The extent to which the application outlines a sound and workable 
plan of action and details how the proposed work will be accomplished. 
The activities to be carried out are listed in chronological order, 
showing a reasonable schedule of accomplishments and target dates. The 
application includes an adequate staffing plan that lists key staff and 
consultants along with their responsibilities on the project, and that 
allocates a sufficient amount of time for each person to these 
activities. The application delineates how the research team will be 
assembled and the use of any advisory panels. It also lists each 
organization, agency, or other key groups that will work on the 
project, along with a description of their activities and training 
plans. The application indicates the ability to gain access to 
necessary information, data and clients. A sound administrative 
framework for maintaining quality control over the implementation and 
operation of the study is detailed. The author(s) of the application 
and his/her role in the proposed project is/are identified. The 
proposed project costs are reasonable, and the funds are appropriately 
allocated across component areas and are sufficient to accomplish the 
objectives.
    D. Staff background and organization's experience (25 points). The 
extent to which the application describes the background, experience, 
training and qualifications of the key staff and consultants, including 
work on related research and similar projects. It describes the 
personnel resources available for sampling, experimental design, 
statistical analysis and field work. Key personnel have a working 
knowledge of the proposed research and are geographically accessible. 
(The curriculum vitae for each key person must be included with the 
application.) The adequacy of the available facilities and 
organizational experience related to the tasks of the proposed project 
are detailed. (A two page organizational capability statement must be 
included with the application.) Any collaborative efforts with other 
organizations, including the nature of their contribution to the 
project, are described. (Letters of commitment for key staff and for 
collaborative efforts, where appropriate, must be included with the 
application.)
    The extent to which the application demonstrates the ability of the 
staff and organization to effectively and efficiently administer a 
project of the size, complexity and scope proposed. It further reflects 
the capacity to coordinate activities with other agencies for the 
successful accomplishment of project objectives. The application 
describes the relationship between this project and other work planned, 
anticipated or underway by the applicant with Federal assistance.
2. Criteria for Demonstration and Training Projects
    Applications under demonstration and training priority areas will 
be evaluated against the following criteria.
    A. Objectives and need for assistance (20 points). The extent to 
which the application pinpoints any relevant physical, economic, 
social, financial, institutional or other problems requiring a 
solution; demonstrates the need for assistance; states the principal 
and subordinate objectives of the project; provides supporting 
documentation or other testimonies from concerned interests other than 
the applicant; and includes and/or footnotes relevant data based on the 
results of planning studies. The application must identify the precise 
location of the project and area to be served by the proposed project. 
Maps and other graphic aids may be attached.
    B. Results or benefits expected (20 points). The extent to which 
the application identifies the results and benefits to be derived, the 
extent to which they are consistent with the objectives of the 
proposal, and the extent to which the application indicates the 
anticipated contributions to policy, practice, theory and/or research. 
The extent to which the proposed project costs are reasonable in view 
of the expected results.
    C. Approach (35 points). The extent to which the application 
outlines a sound and workable plan of action pertaining to the scope of 
the project, and details how the proposed work will be accomplished; 
cites factors which might accelerate or decelerate the work, giving 
acceptable reasons for taking this approach as opposed to others; 
describes and supports any unusual features of the project, such as 
design or technological innovations, reductions in cost or time, or 
extraordinary social and community involvements; and provides for 
projections of the accomplishments to be achieved. It lists the 
activities to be carried out in chronological order, showing a 
reasonable schedule of accomplishments and target dates.
    The extent to which, when applicable, the application identifies 
the kinds of data to be collected and maintained, and discusses the 
criteria to be used to evaluate the results and successes of the 
project. The extent to which the application describes the evaluation 
methodology that will be used to determine if the needs identified and 
discussed are being met and if the results and benefits identified are 
being achieved. The application also lists each organization, agency, 
consultant, or other key individuals or groups who will work on the 
project, along with a description of the activities and nature of their 
effort or contribution.
    The extent to which the application includes plans to prepare data 
sets according to sound data processing and documentation practices to 
ensure the potential of these data sets for subsequent use by other 
researchers. The application provides for these data sets to be made 
available at the conclusion of the project to the National Data Archive 
on Child Abuse and Neglect. The extent to which the application 
indicates that the final report will be prepared in an NCCAN-suggested 
format that ensures its ease for dissemination and utilization and 
proposes strategies for dissemination of findings in a manner that will 
be of use to researchers and practitioners in the field.
    D. Staff background and oganization's experience (25 points). The 
application identifies the background of the project director/principal 
investigator and key project staff (including name, address, training, 
educational background and other qualifying experience) and the 
experience of the organization to demonstrate the applicant's ability 
to effectively and efficiently administer this project. The application 
describes the relationship between this project and other work planned, 
anticipated or underway by the applicant with Federal assistance.

D. Structure of Priority Area Descriptions

    Each priority area description is composed of the following 
sections:
     Eligible applicants: This section specifies the type of 
organization which is eligible to apply under the particular priority 
area. Specific restrictions are also noted, where applicable.
     Purpose: This section presents the basic focus and/or 
broad goal(s) of the priority area.
     Background information: This section briefly discusses the 
legislative background as well as the current state-of-the-art and/or 
current state-of-practice that supports the need for the particular 
priority area activity. Relevant information on projects previously 
funded by ACYF, NCCAN, and/or others, and State models are noted, where 
applicable. Some priority areas specify individuals to contact for more 
information.
     Minimum requirements for project design: This section 
presents the basic set of issues that must be addressed in the 
application. Typically, they relate to project design, evaluation, and 
community involvement. This section also asks for specific information 
on the proposed project. Inclusion and discussion of these items is 
important since they will be used by the reviewers in evaluating the 
applications against the evaluation criteria. Project products, 
continuation of the project effort after the Federal support ceases, 
and dissemination/utilization activities, if appropriate, are also 
addressed.
     Project duration: This section specifies the maximum 
allowable length of time for the project period; it refers to the 
amount of time for which Federal funding is available.
     Federal share of project costs: This section specifies the 
maximum amount of Federal support for the project.
     Matching requirement: This section specifies the minimum 
non-Federal contribution, where applicable, either through cash or in-
kind match, that is required in relation to the maximum Federal funds 
requested for the project.
     Anticipated number of projects to be funded: This section 
specifies the number of projects that ACYF anticipates it will fund in 
the priority area.
    Please note that applicants that do not comply with the specific 
priority area requirements in the section on ``Eligible Applicants'' 
will not be included in the review process. Applicants should also note 
that non-responsiveness to the section ``Minimum Requirements for 
Project Design'' will result in a low evaluation score by the panel of 
expert reviewers.
    Applicants must clearly identify the specific priority area under 
which they wish to have their applications considered, and tailor their 
applications accordingly. Previous experience has shown that an 
application which is broader and more general in concept than outlined 
in the priority area description is less likely to score as well as one 
which is more clearly focused on and directly responsive to the 
concerns of that specific priority area.

E. Available Funds

    Approximately $4 million is available for grants for FY 1994. The 
size of the actual awards will vary. Each priority area description 
includes information on the maximum Federal share of the project costs 
and the anticipated number of projects to be funded.
    The term ``budget period'' refers to the interval of time (usually 
12 months) into which a multi-year period of assistance (project 
period) is divided for budgetary and funding purposes. The term 
``project period'' refers to the total time a project is approved for 
support, including any extensions.
    Where appropriate, applicants may propose project periods which are 
shorter than the maximums specified in the various priority areas. Non-
Federal share contributions may exceed the minimums specified in the 
various priority areas when the applicant is able to do so. However, 
applicants should be cautious in proposing non-Federal share 
contributions in excess of the required match since failure to provide 
such match will result in a disallowance of unmatched Federal funds.
    For multi-year projects, applications for continuation funding 
beyond the initial one-year budget period but within the approved 
project will be entertained in subsequent years on a noncompetitive 
basis subject to the availability of funds, satisfactory progress by 
the grantee and determination that continued funding would be in the 
best interest of the government.

F. Grantee Share of Project Costs

    Grantees must provide at least 25 percent of the total cost of the 
project. The total approved cost of the project is the sum of the ACF 
share and the non-Federal share. The non-Federal share may be met by 
cash or in-kind contributions, although applicants are encouraged to 
meet their match requirements through cash contributions. Therefore, a 
project requesting $75,000 in Federal funds (based on an award of 
$100,000), must include a match of at least $25,000 (25 percent total 
project cost). This means that, for every $3 in Federal funds received, 
up to the maximum amount allowable under each priority area, applicants 
must contribute at least $1.
    For example, the cost breakout for a project costing $100,000 to 
implement would be:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Federal request         Non-Federal share           Total cost      
------------------------------------------------------------------------
$75,000................           $25,000                $100,000       
75%....................               25%                    100%       
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    The applicant contribution must always be secured from non-Federal 
sources, except for American Indian Tribes and Native American 
organizations. The non-Federal share of total project costs may be in 
the form of grantee-incurred costs and/or third party in-kind 
contributions. The ACYF strongly encourages applicants to meet their 
match requirements through cash contributions, as opposed to in-kind 
contributions. For further information on in-kind contributions, refer 
to the instructions for completing the SF 424A--Budget Information, in 
Part IV.
    The required amount of non-Federal share to be met by the applicant 
is the amount indicated in the approved application. Grant recipients 
will be required to provide the agreed upon non-Federal share, even if 
this exceeds 25 percent (or other required portion) of the project 
costs. Therefore, an applicant should ensure the availability of any 
amount proposed as match prior to including it in its budget.
    The non-Federal share must be met by a grantee during the life of 
the project. Otherwise, ACYF will disallow any unmatched Federal funds.

G. Closed Captioning for Audiovisual Efforts

    Applicants are encouraged to include ``closed captioning'' in the 
development of any audiovisual products.

H. Additional Requirements for NCCAN Grant Applications

    All successful applicants for both research and demonstration will 
be expected to follow an NCCAN-suggested format in the preparation of 
final program reports in order to achieve broader dissemination and 
successful utilization of findings by policymakers, practitioners, and 
researchers. Applications that are submitted in response to the final 
announcement will be subject to the peer review process outlined in 
section 105 (e) of the Act which entails review of submissions by 
experts in the field of child abuse and neglect or related disciplines.
    All applicants should include plans to prepare data sets according 
to sound data processing and documentation practices to ensure the 
potential of these data sets for subsequent use by other researchers. A 
manual describing such practices, The Preparation of Data Sets for 
Analysis and Dissemination: Technical Standards for Machine-Readable 
Data, can be obtained free of cost from the National Data Archive on 
Child Abuse and Neglect located at Cornell University, Family Life 
Development Center, G20 MVR Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853-4401 
(telephone: 607/255-7794). The NCCAN also encourages the use of common 
data collection instruments across studies where applicable. The 
Consortium for Longitudinal Studies on Child Abuse and Neglect is 
developing common batteries of measures for use with children of 
different age groups. More information can be obtained through the 
Longitudinal Study Coordinating Center located at the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Social Medicine, CB# 7240, 
Wing D, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7240 (telephone: 919/962-
1136). Information can also be obtained from the project on Measurement 
in Child Abuse and Neglect Research located at the Medical University 
of South Carolina, 171 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, South Carolina 29425-
0742 (telephone: 803/792-2945).
    All applicants for research priority areas, including those for 
Graduate Research and Medical Research Fellowships in Child Abuse and 
Neglect, must provide an Assurance of Human Subjects Protection as 
specified in the policy described on the HHS Form 596. All applications 
will be expected to address ethical issues pertaining to the proposed 
projects.
    All applications for demonstration priority areas are expected to 
have an evaluation component, as required by the legislation in section 
106 (a) of the Act. It is recommended that not less than 10 percent of 
the proposed budget be set aside for evaluation efforts. An external 
evaluator may be hired or an internal evaluation may be designed. As 
appropriate to the activities being proposed, either a process or 
outcome/impact evaluation may be designed. Goals and objectives should 
be stated in specific measurable form to document change, improvement, 
or effectiveness.

I. NCCAN Priority Areas

    1. Research priorities.
    1.01  Field Initiated Research on Child Abuse and Neglect.
    Eligible applicants: State or local, Tribal, public or private non-
profit agencies, organizations, and institutions of higher learning. 
Collaborative efforts and interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged.
    Purpose: To support new research designed to carry out the 
legislative responsibilities established for the National Center on 
Child Abuse and Neglect (NCCAN) by the Child Abuse Prevention and 
Treatment Act of 1988, as amended. These responsibilities include the 
conduct of research on the causes, prevention, identification, 
treatment and cultural distinctions of child abuse and neglect; and 
appropriate, effective, and culturally sensitive investigative, 
administrative and judicial procedures with respect to cases of child 
abuse and neglect, particularly child sexual abuse and exploitation.
    Background information: The generation of new knowledge that 
promotes an understanding of critical issues in child abuse and neglect 
is essential in order to improve prevention, identification and 
treatment. Research areas to be addressed should expand the current 
knowledge base, build on prior research, contribute to practice and 
provide insights into new approaches to the prevention and treatment of 
child maltreatment. The areas include, but are not limited to, 
mediating factors and mechanisms in the intergenerational transmission 
of family processes that prevent as well as contribute to child 
maltreatment, including emotional maltreatment, and to other forms of 
family and interpersonal dysfunction; the relationship between child 
maltreatment and spousal abuse; the status of siblings of maltreated 
children; how interactions between fathers and children promote or 
buffer the risk of child maltreatment; the role of stress (such as 
stress in the workplace and stress in the public schools), poor 
parenting and family dysfunction in child maltreatment; how 
neighborhood conditions and factors affect family processes in general 
and child maltreatment in particular; poverty and child maltreatment; 
the role of neighborhood safety factors in the etiology and reporting 
of child abuse and neglect and the delivery of investigation and 
treatment services; cultural factors in maltreatment; how the adverse 
consequences of child maltreatment affect subsequent development; how 
children's perceptions of maltreatment and their cognitive styles 
mediate their responses to maltreatment; the development of problem 
behaviors among adolescents maltreated as children; and the 
relationship between maltreatment and specific attributes or disability 
characteristics and subsequent effects.
    Also included are comparative studies on the cost benefits and cost 
effectiveness of home visitation, self-help and other innovative 
prevention and treatment programs for differing types of child 
maltreatment and on the roles and functions of professionals (paid or 
volunteer) and paraprofessionals (paid or volunteer).
    Secondary analyses of existing databases and computer modeling 
strategies may be considered for these studies. Use of multiple 
measures, both quantitative and qualitative, should be considered. 
Studies should examine the relationship among multiple forms of 
maltreatment where such co-occurrences are found.
    Minimum requirements for project design: In order to compete 
successfully under this priority area, the applicant should:
     Describe how the proposed research addresses current and 
emerging issues that have direct application to the field of child 
abuse and neglect within the context of NCCAN's legislative 
responsibilities.
     Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the issues and 
problems associated with child abuse and neglect, and provide an up-to-
date review of the relevant literature.
     Propose an approach that is appropriate to the scientific 
objectives of the study, comprehensive, and culturally responsive to 
the populations included in the study.
     Describe the overall research design that would be 
employed, including as applicable: Sampling procedures, experimental 
design, the kinds of data to be collected, procedures for data 
collection, the instruments and measurements to be utilized, adapted or 
developed and the plans for data analysis.
     Demonstrate an ability to gain access to necessary 
information, data, and clients.
     Describe strategies for the dissemination of the findings 
in a manner that would be of use to other researchers and practitioners 
in the field.
     Provide all required assurances and certifications, 
including Certification of Protection of Human Subjects Assurances, as 
part of the application, as necessary.
     Provide assurances that at least one key staff person 
would attend a three-day annual spring meeting in Washington, DC; that 
the data set would be prepared according to sound data processing and 
documentation practices and be made available to the National Data 
Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect; and that the final report would be 
prepared in an NCCAN-suggested format ensuring its ease for 
dissemination and utilization.
    Project duration: The length of the project must not exceed 36 
months.
    Federal share of project costs: The maximum Federal share of the 
project is not to exceed $200,000 per 12-month budget period. 
Applications for lesser amounts, including those for small grants of 
$25,000 or less, will also be considered under this priority area.
    Matching requirements: There is no matching requirement.
    Anticipated number of projects to be funded: It is anticipated that 
ten projects will be funded at the maximum funding level or more than 
12 if acceptable applications for lesser amounts are funded.
1.02  Graduate Research and Medical Research Fellowships in Child Abuse 
and Neglect.
    Eligible applicants: Institutions of higher education, including 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Native American 
institutions of higher learning and other institutions of higher 
learning with a history of serving Hispanic and Asian populations, on 
behalf of qualified doctoral candidates enrolled in the sponsoring 
institution. To be eligible to administer such a grant on behalf of a 
student, the institution must be fully accredited by one of the 
regional institutional accrediting commissions recognized by the U.S. 
Secretary of Education and the Council on Post-Secondary Accreditation, 
the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education or the Liaison 
Committee for Medical Education, as applicable.
    Purpose: To provide support for graduate students as well as 
medical students, residents, or fellows to conduct research on critical 
issues in child abuse and neglect.
    Background information: The research community has highlighted the 
need to draw new researchers into the field of child abuse and neglect. 
During Fys 1991 and 1992, NCCAN funded a total of 17 graduate research 
fellowships for doctoral candidates to complete dissertations 
addressing critical issues in child abuse and neglect. The NCCAN is 
continuing to provide support for individual fellowships for doctoral 
candidates to complete dissertations addressing critical issues in 
child abuse and neglect as well as expanding the program to include 
graduate students at the pre-dissertation level, and medical students, 
residents, or fellows engaged in empirical research projects.
    The ACYF seeks to expand the research capacity of the field by 
encouraging more students to seek careers in child abuse and neglect 
research through the granting of individual graduate research and 
medical research fellowships.
    Examples of the proposed questions to be addressed and issues to be 
studied for Graduate and Medical Research Fellowships include, but are 
not limited to, the specific topics listed under the priority area on 
Field Initiated Research for Child Abuse and Neglect (see priority area 
#1.01), and research on new medical screening and diagnostic techniques 
or treatments for child abuse and neglect. Applicants may also propose 
secondary analyses of existing databases or conduct additional analyses 
of data within ongoing research programs to address new questions. When 
the proposed study is to be part of an ongoing research project at the 
institution, the study must be clearly distinguished from the other 
research.
    The NCCAN and ACYF are interested in supporting doctoral-level 
candidates as well as medical students, residents or fellows, through 
their sponsoring institutions, who are now conducting or wish to 
conduct research on child abuse and neglect. While an individual is 
considered to be the beneficiary of the grant support, awards will be 
made to eligible institutions on behalf of qualified candidates. 
Doctoral-level candidates in interdisciplinary programs, social work 
programs, nursing schools and related programs, such as special 
education or early childhood education, are also encouraged to apply 
for support through their institutions as are medical students, 
residents or fellows participating in such programs.
    Minimum requirements for project design: In order to compete 
successfully under this priority area, the applicant should:
     Provide evidence that the candidate is enrolled as a 
doctoral candidate or medical student, resident or fellow in the 
sponsoring institution and include information on his/her current 
academic status.
     Provide a resume of the candidate including information on 
education, employment experiences, conference presentations, papers and 
other publications. A letter of support from a sponsoring faculty 
member must also be provided for each candidate seeking a fellowship.
     Propose one or more research questions to be addressed by 
the candidate which would contribute to the body of knowledge about 
child maltreatment.
     Demonstrate the candidate's in-depth understanding of the 
issues and problems associated with child abuse and neglect and provide 
an up-to-date review of the relevant literature.
     Present specific results from any relevant planning 
studies, pilot studies or other preparatory work conducted by the 
candidate.
     Describe the overall research design which would be 
employed, including as applicable: Sampling procedures, experimental 
design, kinds of data to be collected, procedures for data collection, 
the instruments and measurements to be utilized, adapted or developed 
and the plans for data analysis.
     Indicate how the proposed study is distinguished from 
other ongoing research at the university of which it is a part, if 
applicable.
     Demonstrate the candidate's ability to gain access to 
necessary information, data, and clients. Identify any limitations in 
carrying out the research (e.g., obtaining the sample) or potential 
barriers to the completion of the study.
     Provide assurances that the full grant amount would go 
directly to: The graduate or medical student, resident or fellow as a 
stipend; some dependent allowances; any appropriate university fees; 
and major project costs for conducting the proposed research, including 
any necessary travel. No overhead costs (indirect costs) are allowed 
for this program.
     Provide all required assurances and certifications, 
including Certification of Protection of Human Subjects Assurances, as 
part of the application.
     Provide assurances that the candidate would attend a 
three-day annual spring meeting in Washington, DC, and would prepare 
quarterly progress reports and a final project report in an NCCAN-
suggested format ensuring its ease for dissemination and utilization.
    Project duration: The length of the project must not exceed 17 
months.
    Federal share of the project costs: The maximum Federal share of 
the project is not to exceed $10,000.
    Matching requirement: There is no matching requirement.
    Anticipated number of projects to be funded: It is anticipated that 
20 projects will be funded. No more than two awards per institution 
will be made.
1.03  Research on Risk Assessment Systems
    Eligible applicants: State or local, Tribal, public or private non-
profit agencies, organizations, and institutions of higher learning. 
Collaborative efforts and interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged.
    Purpose: To support research studies on risk assessment systems.
    Background information: Risk assessment systems have been in use by 
Child Protective Services (CPS) agencies for the past ten years. 
Several child welfare organizations and nearly all of the State CPS 
agencies have been involved in the development and/or implementation of 
such systems. A few States maintain administrative units that conduct 
research, evaluation and training on risk assessment. At least 14 
States are using Child Abuse and Neglect Basic State Grant funds to 
implement or improve their use of risk assessment systems.
    From 1986 to the present, NCCAN has funded eight studies on risk 
assessment related to such issues as the following: Screening decisions 
in CPS; development of a predictive screening model; improving cultural 
sensitivity in risk assessment; comparative analyses of risk assessment 
systems; the impact of investigations; and a study of high risk child 
abuse and neglect groups. In December 1991, NCCAN sponsored a Symposium 
on Risk Assessment in Child Protective Services to determine the state-
of-the-field and highlight future directions. The extensive background 
papers and the proceedings are available from the Clearinghouse on 
Child Abuse and Neglect Information.
    A recent NCCAN-sponsored analysis of State practices indicates that 
risk assessment is being used mainly as a tool for guiding casework 
practice, for collecting pertinent information about the child and 
family, for classifying existing risk factors, and for service 
planning. About one-third of the States reported that they use risk 
assessment as a predictive tool. The Children's Bureau and NCCAN are 
currently supporting a study on Child Welfare Decision Enhancement that 
is building on research on risk assessment focused primarily on 
decisions to investigate and to open cases for ongoing services, client 
outcomes research, operations research and related research.
    Various risk assessment instruments are being used by CPS agencies 
across the country. Despite this widespread application of risk 
assessment in CPS practice and its potential for prediction of 
maltreatment, further research and development need to be conducted 
before risk assessment can be used with confidence as a comprehensive 
approach to effective CPS practice and administration. Under the 
pressure of high staff turnover, excessive caseloads, and increased 
reporting of more complex types of maltreatment, some agencies have 
sought to use these instruments and systems without the adequate 
preparatory training of staff. Sound protocols and operational 
procedures will help to address these practice problems. Concerns have 
also been expressed over the need for culturally sensitive risk 
assessment systems and the need to include strengths or positive case 
factors in models. Research on risk assessment should also address such 
areas as the validation of variables and outcome measures.
    In this priority area, NCCAN seeks to build upon the current 
knowledge base on decision-making processes and the use of risk 
assessment systems to address the need for practice improvements by 
conducting studies in two areas:
    (1) A study of the effectiveness of the decision-making processes 
and criteria used in CPS operations to determine level of severity of 
single or multiple types of maltreatment and the risk of re-occurrence 
of maltreatment. This study should also address the implications of 
these processes as used by CPS workers for case management, workload 
management and resource allocation, supervision and training, program 
evaluation and use of automation.
    (2) A comparative study of the use and effectiveness of different 
risk assessment models in the decision-making processes of CPS 
operations to determine the level of severity of single and multiple 
types of maltreatment and predict the risk of re-occurrence of 
maltreatment and the implications for practice. This study should also 
examine the reliability and validity of these models with different 
populations across different jurisdictions, the extent to which these 
models are sensitive to family strengths, children with disabilities, 
and cultural differences. Additionally, the study should take into 
consideration the background of and training provided to staff in the 
use of the risk assessment tools for decision-making.
    For this particular priority area, an applicant may apply for a 
grant to conduct either study or apply for two grants to respectively 
address each study.
    Minimum requirements for project design: In order to compete 
successfully under this priority area, the applicant should:
     Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the issues and 
methodological problems, including definitions, associated with 
conducting multi-site and comparative studies of decision-making 
processes and risk assessment systems.
     Provide an up-to-date review of the relevant literature.
     Provide for an 18-month follow-up after the decisions on 
level of severity and risk of re-occurrence have been made.
     Provide an approach that is appropriate to the scientific 
objectives of the study, comprehensive, and culturally responsive to 
the populations included in the study.
     Describe the overall research design that would be 
employed, including as applicable: Sampling procedures, experimental 
design, the kinds of data to be collected, procedures for data 
collection, the instruments and measurements to be utilized, adapted or 
developed and the plans for data analysis.
     Demonstrate an ability to gain access to the necessary 
information, data, and clients.
     Describe strategies for the dissemination of the findings 
in a manner that would be of use to other researchers and practitioners 
in the field.
     Provide all required assurances and certifications, 
including Certification of Protection of Human Subjects Assurances, as 
part of the application, as necessary.
     Provide assurances that at least one key staff person 
would attend a three-day annual spring meeting in Washington, DC; that 
the data set would be prepared according to sound data processing and 
documentation practices and be made available to the National Data 
Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect; and that the final report would be 
prepared in an NCCAN-suggested format ensuring its ease for 
dissemination and utilization.
    Project duration: The length of the project must not exceed 36 
months.
    Federal share of the project costs: The maximum Federal share of 
the project is not to exceed $200,000 per 12-month budget period.
    Matching requirement: There is no matching requirement.
    Anticipated number of projects to be funded: It is anticipated that 
two projects will be funded.

2. Demonstration Priorities

2.01  Innovative Approaches To Expand the Use of Volunteers in Child 
Abuse and Neglect Prevention, Intervention and Treatment Programs
    Eligible applicants: State or local, Tribal, public or private non-
profit agencies, organizations, and institutions of higher learning. 
Collaborative efforts and interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged.
    Purpose: To support the development of innovative approaches to 
expand the use of volunteers in child abuse and neglect prevention, 
intervention and treatment programs.
    Background information: Volunteers continue to be a vital community 
resource for the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect. 
They have been used extensively in child protection in such support 
activities as the provision of transportation, clerical assistance, and 
arranging for food and clothing donations. They have also worked 
effectively in public awareness programs, respite care, and substance 
abuse prevention and treatment programs. Several approaches for the 
utilization of volunteers, including those supported by NCCAN, have 
been piloted and fully implemented by the field. Examples include the 
use of volunteers in the now established roles of the court-appointed 
special advocate, guardian ad litem, and parent aide. More recent 
examples of new uses include the Family Mentor Program initiated in 
1991 using Foster Grandparents in family preservation programs through 
a collaborative arrangement between the New York City Department of 
Aging and the Child Welfare Administration; a program sponsored by the 
American Association of Retired Persons using retired teachers and 
administrators to go into the schools to teach peer mediation for 
conflict resolution; and the involvement of Volunteers in Service to 
America (VISTA) in child abuse prevention programs as initiated by the 
Missouri Children's Trust Fund.
    Given the problem of scarce resources facing all levels of 
government and the non-profit sector and the increasing needs of the 
field, NCCAN is interested in promoting the expansion of volunteer 
opportunities to augment and improve prevention, intervention and 
treatment services. The NCCAN intends to support this expansion through 
the development of innovative models which utilize volunteers in 
settings and activities where they have not previously been used and 
the development of new roles for populations who have not previously 
served as volunteers.
    Collaborative and multidisciplinary approaches are encouraged and 
may include public-private partnerships. Examples include 
collaborations with ACTION's Foster Grandparent Program, the Retired 
Senior Volunteer Program, the National Service Corporation's program 
for youth in public service, and businesses' volunteer programs for 
their workers.
    There is also a need to identify, document and disseminate 
information on the most effective practices for the recruitment, 
training, supervision and retention of volunteers in these new settings 
in order to enhance the capacity of other communities to successfully 
develop this valuable resource. The roles, responsibilities, and 
functions of the volunteers should clearly be delineated and 
distinguished from those of paid staff. Volunteers, however, may 
receive some minimal payment or reimbursement for their expenses. 
Proposed demonstration projects should include an evaluation component 
and plans for the dissemination and utilization of these findings 
through new networks, and manuals for the replication of effective 
approaches in new locations.
    Minimum requirements for project design: In order to compete 
successfully under this priority area, the applicant should:
     Describe how the project builds on the existing knowledge 
base and capacity of public and private agencies to collaborate in 
using volunteers.
     Describe the design of the project to be developed and 
implemented including the nature of any collaborative efforts and the 
geographical area to be targeted in terms of its distinctive features 
and the population to be recruited and served.
     Propose an approach that is comprehensive and culturally 
responsive to the populations included in the demonstration.
     Describe how the evaluation would be carried out, 
including the design, kinds of data to be collected on clients and 
services provided, and the outcomes that would be measured.
     Provide a plan for the dissemination of the manual(s) 
through new networks of potential users; and
     Provide assurances that at least one key staff person 
would attend an annual meeting in Washington, DC., and would prepare 
quarterly progress reports and a final project report in an NCCAN-
suggested format ensuring its ease for dissemination and utilization.
    Project duration: The length of the project must not exceed 36 
months.
    Federal share of the project costs: The maximum Federal share of 
the project is not to exceed $150,000 per 12-month budget period or a 
maximum of $450,000 for a 3-year project period.
    Matching requirement: Grantees must provide at least 25 percent of 
the total cost of the project. The total approved cost of the project 
is the sum of the ACF share and the non-Federal share. The non-Federal 
share may be met by cash or in-kind contributions, although applicants 
are encouraged to meet their match requirements through cash 
contributions. Therefore, a project requesting $450,000 in Federal 
funds (based on an award of $150,000 per budget period), must include a 
match of at least $150,000 (25 percent total project cost).
    Anticipated number of projects to be funded: It is anticipated that 
two projects will be funded.
2.02  Model Inter-Agency Collaborative Approaches To Prevent 
Maltreatment of Children With Disabilities
    Eligible applicants: State or local, Tribal, public or private non-
profit agencies, organizations, and institutions of higher learning. 
Collaborative efforts and interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged.
    Purpose: To support the development of model inter-agency 
collaborative approaches to prevent maltreatment of children with 
disabilities.
    Background information: A number of studies have found that 
children with mental and physical disabilities are overly-represented 
in maltreated samples, and preliminary studies have found a high 
incidence of maltreatment among children with disabilities (Ammerman et 
al., 1988 & 1991). Studies also suggest that many children with 
disabilities exhibit behaviors that are similar to those of maltreated 
children who do not have disabilities, indicating that some children 
with disabilities may be at high risk for child abuse and neglect.
    There is a need to identify, develop or adapt model approaches to 
the prevention of maltreatment of children with disabilities. These 
approaches should address the unique needs of children with various 
types of disabilities and their families. Specifically, the approaches 
should be sensitive to the severe behavioral problems that some 
children with disabilities may exhibit. They should also be sensitive 
to the risk factors for potential medical neglect of infants with 
disabilities and life-threatening conditions as well as other factors 
of risk for maltreatment such as disruption in the formation of parent-
child attachments, stress and frustration associated with the raising 
of children with disabilities, and the increased vulnerability of many 
of these children due to communication difficulties in revealing their 
possible maltreatment to others.
    In this priority area, NCCAN intends to support collaborative 
efforts for developing and implementing model programs for the 
prevention of maltreatment of children with disabilities. This would 
include collaboration with the Education and Training component of the 
State Protection and Advocacy System created by the Developmental 
Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 1990, as amended, and 
the State Interagency Coordinating Council for the early intervention 
program under Part H of the Individuals with Disabilities Education 
Act. Examples of products available for use include a training guide 
for Preventing Maltreatment of Children with Handicaps and Programs to 
Support Families of Children with Special Needs for Use in Head Start 
and Public School developed in 1985 and 1986 as a result of an 
Interagency Agreement between the Department of Education's Special 
Education Programs, the Administration on Children, Youth and Families 
and the Administration on Developmental Disabilities. These 
demonstration programs may build on such materials developed or adapted 
from or linked with other community-based programs run by Head Start 
programs, school systems, University Affiliated Programs under the 
Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 1990, 
as amended, Title V funded programs for children with special health 
care needs and Supplemental Security Income outreach efforts, private 
agencies, hospitals, mental health centers, crisis nurseries and 
respite care programs or Child Protective Services agencies.
    An evaluation component should be included and the program must be 
designed, as appropriate, to:
     Create community awareness and sensitivity to the 
prevention and intervention needs of children with disabilities who are 
maltreated through the use of brochures, oral presentations, and the 
media, including television, radio and newspapers; such community 
education programs should be designed to reach all families by using 
closed captioning, large print, audio-tape, and easy reading materials 
and related efforts to ensure access and understanding;
     Mobilize local public and private agencies and resources 
to make provision for the prevention of child maltreatment as part of 
the systematic screening, early identification and referral of children 
with single and/or multiple disabilities and their families for 
appropriate prevention and intervention services;
     Make use of self-instructional training materials for the 
prevention of child maltreatment for use by families and community 
service agencies in the provision of early screening, identification, 
and referral of children with disabilities;
     Adopt a comprehensive and individualized approach to 
prevention in the assessment and a multi-component intervention 
strategy;
     Target various intervention strategies to remediate the 
high risk factors for maltreatment of children with various types of 
disabilities and parental/family stress and need for supportive 
services;
     Network with social, medical, mental health, and legal 
consultants and advocacy groups including State Protection and Advocacy 
Systems;
     Coordinate maltreatment prevention and intervention 
services among community-based agencies to meet the needs of children 
with disabilities and their families including safe and appropriate 
recreational services;
     Recognize the unique transportation needs of children with 
disabilities and ensure their accessibility to sites where preventive 
services are being delivered;
     Recognize the unique needs children with disabilities have 
for access to and accommodation by the legal system;
     Build on the strengths and community-based support system 
networks of the individual child and family (e.g., churches, service 
clubs, extended families, support groups, day programs, respite care, 
and social and recreation facilities); and
     Screen, recruit, train and use volunteers and 
paraprofessionals for home visitation and provision of home-based 
support services.
    These services may be implemented on a multi-county, State or 
regional basis. The proposed demonstrations should include plans for 
the dissemination and utilization of report findings and how-to manuals 
for the replication of effective approaches in other locations through 
the State and local CPS agencies, the State Protection and Advocacy 
Systems and related networks.
    Minimum requirements for project design: In order to compete 
successfully under this priority area, the applicant should:
     Describe the design of the project to be developed and 
implemented.
     Propose an approach that is comprehensive and culturally 
responsive to the populations included in the demonstration.
     Recommend a detailed plan and strategy for further 
dissemination of the products or publications developed in the course 
of this work.
     Describe the evaluation that would be carried out, 
including the kinds of data that would be collected on participants, 
programs, and communities; the outcomes that would be measured; the 
evaluation design that would be employed; and how the data would be 
analyzed.
     Provide assurances that at least one key staff person 
would attend an annual meeting in Washington, DC, and would prepare 
quarterly progress reports and a final project report in an NCCAN-
suggested format ensuring its ease for dissemination and utilization.
    Project duration: The length of the project must not exceed 36 
months.
    Federal share of the project costs: The maximum Federal share of 
the project is not to exceed $200,000 per 12-month budget period or 
$600,000 for a 3-year project period.
    Matching requirement: Grantees must provide at least 25 percent of 
the total cost of the project. The total approved cost of the project 
is the sum of the ACF share and the non-Federal share. The non-Federal 
share may be met by cash or in-kind contributions, although applicants 
are encouraged to meet their match requirements through cash 
contributions. Therefore, a project requesting $600,000 in Federal 
funds (based on an award of $200,000 per budget period), must include a 
match of at least $200,000 (25 percent total project cost).
    Anticipated number of projects to be funded: It is anticipated that 
two projects will be funded.
2.03  Specialized Joint Training for State and Local Child Protective 
Services Workers and Providers of Services to Children With 
Disabilities on the Identification, Intervention and/or Treatment of 
Maltreated Children With Disabilities
    Eligible applicants: State or local, Tribal, public or private non-
profit agencies, organizations, and institutions of higher learning. 
Collaborative efforts and interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged. 
A joint application by the collaborating entities is required; one of 
the entities must be a Child Protective Service (CPS) agency.
    Purpose: To support the development of specialized joint training 
for State and local Child Protective Services workers and providers of 
services to children with disabilities on the identification, 
intervention and/or treatment of maltreated children with disabilities.
    Background information: Infants and children with disabilities are 
particularly vulnerable to abuse and neglect, and many children develop 
disabilities because of abuse and neglect. The quality of program 
development, screening and assessment, diagnosis and referral, 
interagency case management, and services provided to meet the special 
needs of abused and neglected infants and children with disabilities 
and their families depends heavily on collaboration and coordination 
between State and local Child Protective Services (CPS) agencies and 
State and local agencies that primarily serve children with 
disabilities.
    There is a need to increase the knowledge and expertise of CPS 
workers and providers of services to children with disabilities for 
meeting the needs of maltreated infants and children with disabilities. 
The NCCAN is interested in supporting joint training programs in order 
to develop such competence and coordination between agencies in 
addressing the unique needs of this population. The development of 
these training programs requires collaboration by State and local 
agencies in the field of child protection and services to children with 
disabilities. This includes collaboration with the State Protection and 
Advocacy System authorized by the Developmental Disabilities Assistance 
and Bill of Rights Act of 1990, as amended; the State Title V Block 
Grant Program of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau; and related 
networks. Resources also include the National Information Clearinghouse 
for Infants with Disabilities and Life-Threatening Disabilities; the 
National Maternal and Child Health Clearinghouse; and the National 
Resource Center for Crises Nurseries and Respite Care Services. The 
training should focus on techniques for the identification, 
intervention and/or treatment of abuse and neglect, including medical 
neglect of infants and children with disabilities and their families. 
Techniques should include diverse methods of communication and the need 
for the availability of these tools for communication (such as TDD 
phones, sign language, electronic communication boards, and facilitated 
communication) at the time of investigation. The training program 
should also be designed to improve coordination between State or local 
CPS agencies and State agencies and local agencies serving children 
with disabilities and improve the delivery of services to infants and 
children with disabilities and their families as a result of this 
coordination.
    The development of such training programs should be documented and 
include a strong evaluation component. Plans should be included for the 
dissemination and utilization of report findings, training materials, 
and how-to-manuals for the replication of effective training approaches 
through the State and local CPS agencies, the State Protection and 
Advocacy Systems and related networks.
    Minimum requirements for project design: In order to compete 
successfully under this priority area, the applicant should:
     Describe the design of the project to be developed and 
implemented including the nature of collaborative efforts between CPS 
agencies and agencies serving children with disabilities.
     Propose an approach that is comprehensive and culturally 
responsive to the populations being addressed and those being trained.
     Describe the specific content areas to be addressed in 
training, show how these areas are related to the objective of 
improving coordination between State or local CPS agencies and State 
and local agencies serving children with disabilities, and indicate how 
such coordinated training would improve the delivery of services to 
infants and children with disabilities and their families.
     Describe the evaluation that would be carried out, 
including the kinds of data that would be collected on participants and 
the training provided; the outcomes that would be measured; the 
evaluation design that would be employed; and how the data would be 
analyzed.
     Provide assurances that at least one key staff person 
would attend an annual meeting in Washington, DC., and would prepare 
quarterly progress reports and a final project report in an NCCAN-
suggested format ensuring its ease for dissemination and utilization.
    Project duration: The length of the project must not exceed 36 
months.
    Federal share of the project costs: The maximum Federal share of 
the project is not to exceed $150,000 per 12-month budget period or a 
maximum of $450,000 for a three year period.
    Matching requirement: Grantees must provide at least 25 percent of 
the total cost of the project. The total approved cost of the project 
is the sum of the ACF share and the non-Federal share. The non-Federal 
share may be met by cash or in-kind contributions, although applicants 
are encouraged to meet their match requirements through cash 
contributions. Therefore, a project requesting $450,000 in Federal 
funds (based on an award of $150,000 per budget period), must include a 
match of at least $150,000 (25 percent total project cost).
    Anticipated number of projects to be funded: It is anticipated that 
two projects will be funded.
2.04  Model Approaches to Training Professionals on Child Fatality 
Review Teams
    Eligible applicants: State or local, Tribal, public or private non-
profit agencies, organizations, and institutions of higher learning. 
Collaborative efforts and interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged.
    Purpose: To support the development of model approaches to training 
professionals on child fatality review teams.
    Background information: According to the 1992 Annual Fifty State 
Survey conducted by the National Committee to Prevent Child Abuse 
(NCPCA), 1,261 children were registered as fatal victims of child 
maltreatment. The actual annual national total may be much higher. A 
large number of child fatalities are classified as accidents or 
unexplained deaths, rather than as deaths resulting from maltreatment. 
Undercounting and lack of knowledge about the circumstances of these 
deaths misrepresented the relationship between many child fatalities 
and maltreatment. This lack of information also thwarts efforts to 
develop comprehensive training and targeted prevention plans.
    Many agencies are charged with the investigation of a child's death 
and may not recognize the case as suspicious if sufficient information 
is unavailable. If medical personnel are unfamiliar with signs of child 
abuse and neglect, the death may be attributed to natural causes. In 
the absence of an autopsy or an examination by a coroner or medical 
examiner who is trained in forensic techniques, evidence of 
maltreatment may go undetected. Further, lack of coordination and 
sharing of information among agencies and across multiple jurisdictions 
as well as concerns over issues of confidentiality often impede the 
process of correct identification of the causes of child fatalities. A 
growing number of localities and States have begun to take action to 
develop strategies for reviewing child deaths in order to more 
effectively respond to and ultimately prevent child maltreatment 
fatalities. Currently there are State and/or local multi-agency child 
fatality review teams in 34 States and the majority of the remaining 
States have plans underway to establish State or local teams.
    The importance of child fatality review is emphasized in the 1992 
reauthorization of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act 
(CAPTA). Within two years of enactment of the legislation, the Advisory 
Board on Child Abuse and Neglect must provide a report to Congress with 
recommendations for a national policy designed to reduce and prevent 
child maltreatment-related deaths. The Advisory Board has highlighted 
the importance of this issue in recent reports and is holding public 
hearings nationwide on child fatalities. The law also requires that 
NCCAN include information on the number of deaths due to child abuse 
and neglect in its national incidence study and that States, under the 
Basic State Grant Program, include information on special interagency 
child fatality review panels in their State program plans. In addition, 
the purpose of the Children's Justice Act program has been expanded to 
require that State task forces address the handling of cases of 
suspected child maltreatment-related fatalities. Some of the Children's 
Trust Funds and prevention programs are also working collaboratively 
with these child fatality review teams in order to develop public 
awareness and education programs for the prevention of child 
fatalities.
    The Department has initiated other efforts in support of the 
establishment of child fatality review panels. Leadership has been 
provided by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and many of the 
efforts currently in place at State and local levels are led and 
carried out by Title V programs; some of these efforts are supported 
through the use of State Title V Block Grant funds or through MCHB 
Special Programs of Regional and National Significance (SPRANS) 
discretionary grants. One of the Healthy People 2000 National Health 
Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives is ``to extend to at least 
45 States implementation of unexplained child death review systems.''
    Findings from the Child Maltreatment Fatalities Project, a 
collaborative effort of the American Bar Association (ABA) and the 
American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), funded by the Robert Wood Johnson 
Foundation, identified two major models of fatality review committees: 
Intra-agency committees, which may be interdisciplinary, often formed 
for internal review purposes to identify problems and propose solutions 
within a single agency; and inter-agency, multidisciplinary review 
committees with a broader structure and purpose. Reports from the 
project are available from the ABA. The National Center for Prosecution 
of Child Abuse sponsors national conferences, provides basic training, 
and publishes materials on child maltreatment fatalities. In a recent 
issue of Update published by that Center, Dr. Michael Durfee, an 
advocate for multi-agency coordination on suspicious child deaths, 
reports that the core team members should include a prosecuting 
attorney, a coroner or medical examiner, and representatives of law 
enforcement, health and child protective services. Additional members 
may be from a school, preschool, probation, parole, mental health, fire 
department, emergency room, an emergency medical technician and a child 
advocate.
    In this priority area, NCCAN seeks to encourage efficient and 
effective child fatality reviews at the community, county and State 
levels by supporting the development of model approaches to the 
training of professionals who are members of interagency, multi-
disciplinary child fatality review teams. Such training programs should 
include, but not be limited to, the development of curriculum on the 
roles and responsibilities of team members; guidelines and procedures 
for conducting comprehensive investigations, including internal 
requirements and interagency protocols for medical examiners and 
coroners, law enforcement personnel, child protective services workers, 
health and mental health care providers, school and early childhood 
program personnel, and other professionals involved with child fatality 
reviews; case management reviews; use of uniform protocols and data 
collection forms and procedures for appropriate sharing of information; 
and team self-evaluation. These programs should also include a resource 
manual on relevant forensic issues.
    The development of these model approaches should be based on and 
include:
     A review of existing child fatality review training 
programs nationwide and an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of 
these approaches;
     A review and synthesis of materials and reports from 
existing child fatality review team programs and preparation of an 
annotated bibliography;
     A survey and assessment of training needs nationwide for 
community, county and State child fatality review teams;
     Development or adaptation and pilot testing of selected 
approaches to child fatality review teams at each of these levels; and
     Evaluation of the effectiveness of these training 
approaches and identification of program strengths and barriers to 
implementation of these programs.
    Minimum requirements for project design: In order to compete 
successfully under this priority area, the applicant should:
     Describe the design of the project to be developed and 
implemented.
     Propose an approach that is comprehensive and culturally 
responsive to the populations being addressed and those being trained.
     Propose and describe the specific content areas to be 
addressed in the training.
     Describe the evaluation that would be carried out, 
including the kinds of data that would be collected on participants and 
the training provided; the outcomes that would be measured; the 
evaluation design that would be employed; and how the data would be 
analyzed.
     Provide assurances that at least one key staff member 
would attend an annual meeting in Washington, DC, and would prepare 
quarterly progress reports and a final project report in an NCCAN-
suggested format ensuring its ease for dissemination and utilization.
    Project duration: The length of the project must not exceed 36 
months.
    Federal share of the project costs: The maximum Federal share of 
the project is not to exceed $200,000 per 12-month budget period or a 
maximum of $600,000 for a 3-year period.
    Matching requirement: Grantees must provide at least 25 percent of 
the total cost of the project. The total approved cost of the project 
is the sum of the ACF share and the non-Federal share. The non-Federal 
share may be met by cash or in-kind contributions, although applicants 
are encouraged to meet their match requirements through cash 
contributions. Therefore, a project requesting $600,000 in Federal 
funds (based on an award of $200,000 per budget period), must include a 
match of at least $200,000 (25 percent total project cost).
    Anticipated number of projects to be funded: It is anticipated that 
one project will be funded.

Part III--Instructions for the Development and Submission of 
Applications

    This Part contains information and instructions for submitting 
applications in response to this announcement. Application forms are 
provided along with a checklist for assembling an application package. 
Please copy and use these forms in submitting an application.
    Potential applicants should read this section carefully in 
conjunction with the information contained within the specific priority 
area under which the application is to be submitted. The priority area 
descriptions are in Part II.

A. Required notification of the State single point of contact

    All applications for research or demonstration projects submitted 
to NCCAN are covered under Executive Order (E.O.) 12372, 
Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs, and title 45 Code of 
Federal Regulations (CFR) part 100, Intergovernmental Review of 
Department of Health and Human Services Programs and Activities. Under 
the Order, States may design their own processes for reviewing and 
commenting on proposed Federal assistance under covered programs. 
Therefore, the applicant should contact his or her State Single Point 
of Contact (SPOC) directly to determine what materials, if any, the 
SPOC requires. Contact information for each State's SPOC is found at 
the end of this Part.
    All States and territories, except Alabama, Alaska, Connecticut, 
Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, 
Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Virginia, Washington, American Samoa 
and Palau, have elected to participate in the Executive Order process 
and have established a State Single Point of Contact (SPOC). Applicants 
from these 17 jurisdictions need take no action regarding E.O. 12372. 
Applications for projects to be administered by federally recognized 
Indian Tribes are also exempt from the requirements of E.O. 12372.
    It is imperative that the applicant submit all required materials 
to the SPOC as soon as possible and indicate the date of this submittal 
(or the date of contact, if no submittal is required) on the Standard 
Form (SF) 424, item 16a. Under 45 CFR 100.8(a)(2), SPOCs have 60 days 
from the grant application deadline to comment on applications for 
financial assistance under this program. These comments are reviewed as 
part of the award process. Failure to notify the SPOC can result in a 
delay in grant award.
    The SPOCs are encouraged to eliminate the submission of routine 
endorsements as official recommendations. Additionally, SPOCs are 
requested to clearly differentiate between mere advisory comments and 
those official State process recommendations which may trigger the 
``accommodate or explain'' rule. It is helpful in tracking SPOC 
comments if the SPOC will clearly indicate the applicant organization 
as it appears on the application SF 424. When comments are submitted 
directly to ACF, they should be addressed to the application mailing 
address located in the front section of this announcement.

B. Deadline for submittal of applications

    Closing date: The closing date for submission of applications is 
May 31, 1994.
    Deadline: Applications shall be considered as meeting the announced 
deadline if they are either:
    1. Received on or before the deadline date at the place specified 
in this program announcement, or
    2. Sent on or before the deadline date and received by the granting 
agency in time for the independent review under DHHS GAM Chapter 1-62. 
(Applicants are cautioned to request a legibly dated U.S. Postal 
Service postmark or to obtain a legibly dated receipt from a commercial 
carrier or U.S. Postal Service. Private Metered postmarks shall not be 
acceptable as proof of timely mailing.)
    Late applications: Applications which do not meet the above 
criteria stated above are considered late applications. The granting 
agency shall notify each late applicant that its application will not 
be considered in the current competition.
    Extension of deadlines: The granting agency may extend the deadline 
for all applicants because of acts of God such as floods, hurricanes, 
etc., or when there is a widespread disruption of the mails. However, 
if the granting agency does not extend the deadline for all applicants, 
it may not waive or extend the deadline for any applicants.

C. Instructions for preparing the application and completing 
application forms

    The SF 424, 424A, 424B, and certifications have been reprinted for 
your convenience in preparing the application. You should reproduce 
single-sided copies of these forms from the reprinted forms in the 
announcement, typing your information onto the copies. Please do not 
use forms directly from the Federal Register announcement, as they are 
printed on both sides of the page.
    In order to assist applicants in correctly completing the SF 424 
and SF 424A, a sample of completed forms has been included at the end 
of Part III of this announcement. This sample is to be used only as a 
guide for submitting your application.
    Where specific information is not required under this program, NA 
(not applicable) has been preprinted on the form.
    Please prepare your application in accordance with the following 
instructions:
1. SF 424 Page 1, Application Cover Sheet
    Please read the following instructions before completing the 
application cover sheet. An explanation of each item is included. 
Complete only the items specified.
    Top of Page. Enter the single priority area number under which the 
application is being submitted. An application should be submitted 
under only one priority area.

Item 1.
    ``Type of Submission''--Preprinted on the form.
Item 2.
    ``Date Submitted'' and ``Applicant Identifier''--Date application 
is submitted to ACF and applicant's own internal control number, if 
applicable.
Item 3.
    ``Date Received By State''--State use only (if applicable).
Item 4.
     ``Date Received by Federal Agency''--Leave blank.
Item 5.
     ``Applicant Information''
    ``Legal Name''--Enter the legal name of the applicant organization. 
For applications developed jointly, enter the name of the lead 
organization only. There must be a single applicant for each 
application.
    ``Organizational Unit''--Enter the name of the primary unit within 
the applicant organization which will actually carry out the project 
activity. Do not use the name of an individual as the applicant. If 
this is the same as the applicant organization, leave the 
organizational unit blank.
    ``Address''--Enter the complete address that the organization 
actually uses to receive mail, since this is the address to which all 
correspondence will be sent. Do not include both street address and 
P.O. box number unless both must be used in mailing.
    ``Name and telephone number of the person to be contacted on 
matters involving this application (give area code)''--Enter the full 
name (including academic degree, if applicable) and telephone number of 
a person who can respond to questions about the application. This 
person should be accessible at the address given here and will receive 
all correspondence regarding the application.
Item 6.
    ``Employer Identification Number (EIN)''--Enter the employer 
identification number of the applicant organization, as assigned by the 
Internal Revenue Service, including, if known, the Central Registry 
System suffix.
Item 7.
    ``Type of Applicant''--Self-explanatory.
Item 8.
    ``Type of Application''--Preprinted on the form.
Item 9.
    ``Name of Federal Agency''--Preprinted on the form.
Item 10.
    ``Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number and Title''--Enter 
the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number 93.670 which 
is assigned to the program under which assistance is requested and its 
title, Child Abuse, Prevention and Treatment Act, as amended.
Item 11.
    ``Descriptive Title of Applicant's Project''--Enter the project 
title. The title is generally short and is descriptive of the project, 
not the priority area title.
Item 12.
    ``Areas Affected by Project''--Enter the governmental unit where 
significant and meaningful impact could be observed. List only the 
largest unit or units affected, such as State, county, or city. If an 
entire unit is affected, list it rather than subunits.
Item 13.
    ``Proposed Project''--Enter the desired start date for the project 
and projected completion date.
Item 14.
    ``Congressional District of Applicant/Project''--Enter the number 
of the Congressional district where the applicant's principal office is 
located and the number of the Congressional district(s) where the 
project will be located. If statewide, a multi-State effort, or 
nationwide, enter ``00.''
Items 15.
    Estimated Funding Levels--In completing 15a through 15f, the dollar 
amounts entered should reflect, for a 17 month or less project period, 
the total amount requested. If the proposed project period exceeds 17 
months, enter only those dollar amounts needed for the first 12 months 
of the proposed project.
Item 15a.
    Enter the amount of Federal funds requested in accordance with the 
preceding paragraph. This amount should be no greater than the maximum 
amount specified in the priority area description.
Items 15b-e
    Enter the amount(s) of funds from non-Federal sources that will be 
contributed to the proposed project. Items b-e are considered cost-
sharing or ``matching funds.'' The value of third party in-kind 
contributions should be included on appropriate lines as applicable. 
For more information regarding funding as well as exceptions to these 
rules, see part II, sections E and F, and the specific priority area 
description.
Item 15f.
    Enter the estimated amount of income, if any, expected to be 
generated from the proposed project. Do not add or subtract this amount 
from the total project amount entered under item 15g. Describe the 
nature, source and anticipated use of this income in the Project 
Narrative Statement.
Item 15g.
    Enter the sum of items 15a-15e.
Item 16a.
    ``Is Application Subject to Review By State Executive Order 12372 
Process? Yes.''--Enter the date the applicant contacted the SPOC 
regarding this application. Select the appropriate SPOC from the 
listing provided at the end of part III. The review of the application 
is at the discretion of the SPOC. The SPOC will verify the date noted 
on the application. If there is a discrepancy in dates, the SPOC may 
request that the Federal agency delay any proposed funding until 
September 10, 1994.
Item 16b.
    ``Is Application Subject to Review By State Executive Order 12372 
Process? No.''--Check the appropriate box if the application is not 
covered by E.O. 12372 or if the program has not been selected by the 
State for review.
Item 17.
    ``Is the Applicant Delinquent on any Federal Debt?''--Check the 
appropriate box. This question applies to the applicant organization, 
not the person who signs as the authorized representative. Categories 
of debt include audit disallowances, loans and taxes.
Item 18.
    ``To the best of my knowledge and belief, all data in this 
application/preapplication are true and correct. The document has been 
duly authorized by the governing body of the applicant and the 
applicant will comply with the attached assurances if the assistance is 
awarded.''--To be signed by the authorized representative of the 
applicant. A copy of the governing body's authorization for signature 
of this application by this individual as the official representative 
must be on file in the applicant's office, and may be requested from 
the applicant.
Item 18a-c.
    ``Typed Name of Authorized Representative, Title, Telephone 
Number''--Enter the name, title and telephone number of the authorized 
representative of the applicant organization.
Item 18d.
    ``Signature of Authorized Representative''--Signature of the 
authorized representative named in Item 18a. At least one copy of the 
application must have an original signature. Use colored ink (not 
black) so that the original signature is easily identified.
Item 18e.
    ``Date Signed''--Enter the date the application was signed by the 
authorized representative.
2. SF 424A--Budget Information--Non-Construction Programs
    This is a form used by many Federal agencies. For this application, 
sections A, B, C, E and F are to be completed. Section D does not need 
to be completed.
    Sections A and B should include the Federal as well as the non-
Federal funding for the proposed project covering (1) the total project 
period of 17 months or less or (2) the first year budget period, if the 
proposed project period exceeds 17 months.
    Section A--Budget Summary. This section includes a summary of the 
budget. On line 5, enter total Federal costs in column (e) and total 
non-Federal costs, including third party in-kind contributions, but not 
program income, in column (f). Enter the total of (e) and (f) in column 
(g).
    Section B--Budget Categories. This budget, which includes the 
Federal as well as non-Federal funding for the proposed project, covers 
(1) the total project period of 17 months or less or (2) the first year 
budget period if the proposed project period exceeds 17 months. It 
should relate to item 15g, total funding, on the SF 424. Under column 
(5), enter the total requirements for funds (Federal and non-Federal) 
by object class category.
    A separate itemized budget justification for each line item is 
required. The types of information to be included in the justification 
are indicated under each category. For multiple year projects, it is 
desirable to provide this information for each year of the project. The 
budget justification should immediately follow the second page of the 
SF 424A.
    Personnel--Line 6a. Enter the total costs of salaries and wages of 
applicant/grantee staff. Do not include the costs of consultants, which 
should be included on line 6h, ``Other.''
    Justification: Identify the principal investigator or project 
director, if known. Specify by title or name the percentage of time 
allocated to the project, the individual annual salaries, and the cost 
to the project (both Federal and non-Federal) of the organization's 
staff who will be working on the project.
    Fringe Benefits--Line 6b. Enter the total costs of fringe benefits, 
unless treated as part of an approved indirect cost rate.
    Justification: Provide a break-down of amounts and percentages that 
comprise fringe benefit costs, such as health insurance, FICA, 
retirement insurance, etc.
    Travel--6c. Enter total costs of out-of-town travel (travel 
requiring per diem) for staff of the project. Do not enter costs for 
consultant's travel or local transportation, which should be included 
on Line 6h, ``Other.''
    Justification: Include the name(s) of traveler(s), total number of 
trips, destinations, length of stay, transportation costs and 
subsistence allowances.
    Equipment--Line 6d. Enter the total costs of all equipment to be 
acquired by the project. Equipment is non-expendable tangible personal 
property having a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition 
cost of $5,000 or more per unit.
    Justification: Equipment to be purchased with Federal funds must be 
justified. The equipment must be required to conduct the project, and 
the applicant organization or its subgrantees must not have the 
equipment or a reasonable facsimile available to the project. The 
justification also must contain plans for future use or disposal of the 
equipment after the project ends.
    Supplies--Line 6e. Enter the total costs of all tangible expendable 
personal property (supplies) other than those included on Line 6d.
    Justification: Specify general categories of supplies and their 
costs.
    Contractual--Line 6f. Enter the total costs of all contracts, 
including (1) procurement contracts (except those which belong on other 
lines such as equipment, supplies, etc.) and (2) contracts with 
secondary recipient organizations, including delegate agencies. Also 
include any contracts with organizations for the provision of technical 
assistance. Do not include payments to individuals on this line. If the 
name of the contractor, scope of work, and estimated total costs are 
not available or have not been negotiated, include on Line 6h, 
``Other.''
    Justification: Attach a list of contractors, indicating the names 
of the organizations, the purposes of the contracts, and the estimated 
dollar amounts of the awards as part of the budget justification. 
Whenever the applicant/grantee intends to delegate part or all of the 
program to another agency, the applicant/grantee must complete this 
section (Section 8, Budget Categories) for each delegate agency by 
agency title, along with the supporting information. The total cost of 
all such agencies will be part of the amount shown on Line 6f. Provide 
backup documentation identifying the name of contractor, purpose of 
contract, and major cost elements. Applicants who anticipate 
procurements that will exceed $25,000 and are requesting an award 
without competition should include sole source justification in the 
proposal which at a minimum should include the basis for contractor's 
selection, justification for lack of competition when competitive bids 
or offers are not obtained and basis for award cost or price. (Note: 
Previous or past experience with a contractor is not sufficient 
justification for sole source.)
    Construction--Line 6g. Not applicable. New construction is not 
allowable.
    Other--Line 6h. Enter the total of all other costs. Where 
applicable, such costs may include, but are not limited to: insurance; 
medical and dental costs; noncontractual fees and travel paid directly 
to individual consultants; local transportation (all travel which does 
not require per diem is considered local travel); space and equipment 
rentals; printing and publication; computer use; training costs, 
including tuition and stipends; training service costs, including wage 
payments to individuals and supportive service payments; and staff 
development costs. Note that costs identified as ``miscellaneous'' and 
``honoraria'' are not allowable.
    Justification: Specify the costs included.
    Total Direct Charges--Line 6i. Enter the total of Lines 6a through 
6h.
    Indirect Charges--6j. Enter the total amount of indirect charges 
(costs). If no indirect costs are requested, enter ``None.'' Generally, 
this line should be used when the applicant (except local governments) 
has a current indirect cost rate agreement approved by the Department 
of Health and Human Services or another Federal agency.
    Local and State governments should enter the amount of indirect 
costs determined in accordance with HHS requirements. When an indirect 
cost rate is requested, these costs are included in the indirect cost 
pool and should not be charged again as direct costs to the grant. In 
the case of training grants to other than State or local governments 
(as defined in title 45, Code of Federal Regulations, part 74), the 
Federal reimbursement of indirect costs will be limited to the lesser 
of the negotiated (or actual) indirect cost rate or 8 percent of the 
amount allowed for direct costs, exclusive of any equipment charges, 
rental of space, tuition and fees, post-doctoral training allowances, 
contractual items, and alterations and renovations.
    For training grant applications, the entry under line 6j should be 
the total indirect costs being charged to the project. The Federal 
share of indirect costs is calculated as shown above. The applicant's 
share is calculated as follows:
    (a) Calculate total project indirect costs (a*) by applying the 
applicant's approved indirect cost rate to the total project (Federal 
and non-Federal) direct costs.
    (b) Calculate the Federal share of indirect costs (b*) at 8 percent 
of the amount allowed for total project (Federal and non-Federal) 
direct costs exclusive of any equipment charges, rental of space, 
tuition and fees, post-doctoral training allowances, contractual items, 
and alterations and renovations.
    (c) Subtract (b*) from (a*). The remainder is what the applicant 
can claim as part of its matching cost contribution.
    Justification: Enclose a copy of the indirect cost rate agreement. 
Applicants subject to the limitation on the Federal reimbursement of 
indirect costs for training grants should specify this.
    Total--Line 6k. Enter the total amounts of lines 6i and 6j.
    Program Income--Line 7. Enter the estimated amount of income, if 
any, expected to be generated from this project. Do not add or subtract 
this amount from the total project amount.
    Justification: Describe the nature, source, and anticipated use of 
program income in the Program Narrative Statement.
    Section C--Non-Federal Resources. This section summarizes the 
amounts of non-Federal resources that will be applied to the grant. 
Enter this information on line 12 entitled ``Totals.'' In-kind 
contributions are defined in 45 CFR Part 74.51 and 45 CFR Part 92.3, as 
``property or services which benefit a grant-supported project or 
program and which are contributed by non-Federal third parties without 
charge to the grantee, the subgrantee, or a cost-type contractor under 
the grant or subgrant.''
    Justification: Describe third party in-kind contributions, if 
included.
    Section D--Forecasted Cash Needs. Not applicable.
    Section E--Budget Estimate of Federal Funds Needed For Balance of 
the Project. This section should only be completed if the total project 
period exceeds 17 months.
    Totals--Line 20. For projects that will have more than one budget 
period, enter the estimated required Federal funds for the second 
budget period (months 13 through 24) under column ``(b) First.'' If a 
third budget period will be necessary, enter the Federal funds needed 
for months 25 through 36 under ``(c) Second.'' Columns (d) and (e) are 
not applicable in most instances, since ACF funding is almost always 
limited to a three-year maximum project period. They should remain 
blank.
    Section F--Other Budget Information.
    Direct Charges--Line 21. Not applicable.
    Indirect Charges--Line 22. Enter the type of indirect rate 
(provisional, predetermined, final or fixed) that will be in effect 
during the funding period, the estimated amount of the base to which 
the rate is applied, and the total indirect expense.
    Remarks--Line 23. If the total project period exceeds 17 months, 
you must enter your proposed non-Federal share of the project budget 
for each of the remaining years of the project.

3. Project Summary Description

    Clearly mark this separate page with the applicant name as shown in 
item 5 of the SF 424, the priority area number as shown at the top of 
the SF 424, and the title of the project as shown in item 11 of the SF 
424. The summary description should not exceed 300 words. These 300 
words become part of the computer database on each project.
    Care should be taken to produce a summary description which 
accurately and concisely reflects the proposal. It should describe the 
objectives of the project, the approaches to be used and the outcomes 
expected. The description should also include a list of major products 
that will result from the proposed project, such as software packages, 
materials, management procedures, data collection instruments, training 
packages, or videos. (Please note that audiovisuals should be closed 
captioned.) The project summary description, together with the 
information on the SF 424, will constitute the project abstract. It is 
the major source of information about the proposed project and is 
usually the first part of the application that the reviewers read in 
evaluating the application.
    At the bottom of the page, following the summary description, type 
up to 10 key words which best describe the proposed project, the 
service(s) involved and the target population(s) to be covered. The key 
words are to be selected from the list provided at the end of Part III 
of this announcement. These key words will be used for computerized 
information retrieval for specific types of funded projects.

4. Program Narrative Statement

    The Program Narrative Statement is a very important part of an 
application. It should be clear, concise, and address the specific 
requirements mentioned under the priority area description in Part II. 
The narrative should also provide information concerning how the 
application meets the evaluation criteria (see Part II, Section C) 
using the appropriate headings for research or demonstration and 
training applications.
    Research applications should use the following headings:
    (a) Objectives;
    (b) Background and Significance;
    (c) Approach; and
    (d) Staff Background and Organization's Experience.
    Demonstration and Training applications should use the following 
headings:
    (a) Objectives and Need for Assistance;
    (b) Results or Benefits Expected;
    (c) Approach; and
    (d) Staff Background and Organization's Experience.
    The specific information to be included under each of these 
headings is described in Part II, Section C. Evaluation Criteria.
    The narrative should be typed double-spaced on a single-side of an 
8\1/2\'' x 11'' plain white paper, with 1'' margins on all sides. All 
pages of the narrative (including charts, references/footnotes, tables, 
maps, exhibits, etc.) must be sequentially numbered, beginning with 
``Objectives'' or ``Objectives and Need for Assistance'' as page number 
one. Applicants should not submit reproductions of larger size paper, 
reduced to meet the size requirement.

5. Organizational Capability Statement

    The Organizational Capability Statement should consist of a brief 
(two to three pages) background description of how the applicant 
organization (or the unit within the organization that will have 
responsibility for the project) is organized, the types and quantity of 
services it provides, and/or the research and management capabilities 
it possesses. This description should cover capabilities not included 
in the Program Narrative Statement. It may include descriptions of any 
current or previous relevant experience, or describe the competence of 
the project team and its demonstrated ability to produce a final 
product that is readily comprehensible and usable. An organization 
chart showing the relationship of the project to the current 
organization should be included.

6. Assurances/Certifications

    Applicants are required to file an SF 424B, Assurances--Non-
Construction Programs and the Certification Regarding Lobbying. Both 
must be signed and returned with the application. In addition, 
applicants must provide certifications regarding: (1) Drug-Free 
Workplace Requirements; and (2) Debarment and Other Responsibilities. 
These two certifications are self-explanatory. Copies of these 
assurances/certifications are reprinted at the end of this announcement 
and should be reproduced, as necessary. A duly authorized 
representative of the applicant organization must certify that the 
applicant is in compliance with these assurances/certifications. A 
signature on the SF 424 indicates compliance with the Drug Free 
Workplace Requirements, and Debarment and Other Responsibilities 
certifications.
    For research projects on child abuse and neglect, a Protection of 
Human Subjects Assurance is required. If there is a question regarding 
the applicability of this assurance, contact the Office for Research 
Risks of the National Institutes of Health at (301) 496-7041.
    The length of the application, including the application forms and 
items specified as part of a complete application in Section D below 
except for any appendices/attachments, should not exceed 60 pages. 
Staff vita, letters of agreement from participating agencies, 
questionnaires may be attached as appendices and are not included in 
the page limitations, although they should be numbered sequentially. A 
page is a single side of an 8\1/2\ x 11'' sheet of paper. Applicants 
are requested not to send pamphlets, brochures, or other printed 
material along with their applications as these pose xeroxing 
difficulties. These materials, if submitted, will not be included in 
the review process, though they will be kept on file.

D. Checklist for a Complete Application

    The checklist below is for your use to ensure that your application 
package has been properly prepared.

____ One original, signed and dated application, plus two copies. 
Applications for different priority areas should be packaged 
separately;
____ Application is from an organization which is eligible under the 
eligibility requirements defined in the priority area description 
(screening requirement);
____ Application length does not exceed 60 pages, not including any 
appendices/attachments as described above.

    A complete application consists of the following items in this 
order:

____ Application for Federal Assistance (SF 424, REV 4-88);
____ A completed SPOC certification with the date of SPOC contact 
entered in line 16, page 1 of the SF 424 if applicable.
____ Budget Information--Non-Construction Programs (SF 424A, REV 4-88);
____ Budget justification for Section B--Budget Categories;
____ Table of Contents;
____ Letter from the Internal Revenue Service to prove non-profit 
status, if necessary;
____ Copy of the applicant's approved indirect cost rate agreement, if 
appropriate;
____ Project summary description and listing of key words;
____ Program Narrative Statement (See Part III, Section C.4);
____ Organizational capability statement, including an organization 
chart;
____Any appendices/attachments;
____Assurances--Non-Construction Programs (Standard Form 424B, REV 4-
88);
____Certification Regarding Lobbying; and
____Certification of Protection of Human Subjects, if necessary.

E. The Application Package

    Each application package must include an original and two copies of 
the complete application. Each copy should be stapled securely (front 
and back if necessary) in the upper left-hand corner. All pages of the 
narrative (including charts, tables, maps, exhibits, etc.) must be 
sequentially numbered, beginning with page one. In order to facilitate 
handling, please do not use covers, binders or tabs. Do not include 
extraneous materials as attachments, such as agency promotion 
brochures, slides, tapes, film clips, minutes of meetings, or articles 
of incorporation.
    Do not include a self-addressed, stamped acknowledgment card. All 
applicants will be notified automatically about the receipt of their 
application and of the four digit identification number assigned to 
their application. This number and the priority area must be referred 
to in all subsequent communication with NCCAN and ACF concerning the 
application. If acknowledgment of receipt of your application is not 
received within eight weeks after the deadline date, please notify ACF-
DPE by telephone at (202) 205-8297.

(Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number 93.670, Child Abuse 
and Neglect Prevention and Treatment)

    Dated: March 2, 1994.
Olivia A. Golden,
Commissioner, Administration on Children, Youth and Families.

EXECUTIVE ORDER 12372--STATE SINGLE POINTS OF CONTACT

Arizona

Mrs. Janice Dunn, ATTN: Arizona State Clearinghouse, 3800 N. Central 
Avenue, 14th floor, Phoenix, Arizona 85012, telephone (602) 280-1315.

Arkansas

Tracie L. Copeland, Manager, State Clearinghouse, Office of 
Intergovernmental Services, Department of Finance and Administration, 
P.O. Box 3278, Little Rock, Arkansas 72203, telephone (501) 682-1074.

California

Glenn Stober, Grants Coordinator, Office of Planning and Research, 1400 
Tenth Street, Sacramento, California 95814, telephone (916) 323-7480.

Colorado

State Single Point of Contact, State Clearinghouse, Division of Local 
Government, 1313 Sherman Street, Room 520, Denver, Colorado 80203, 
telephone (303) 866-2156.

Delaware

Ms. Francine Booth, State Single Point of Contact, Executive 
Department, Thomas Collins Building, Dover, Delaware 19903, telephone 
(302) 736-3326.

District of Columbia

Rodney T. Hallman, State Single Point of Contact, Office of Grants 
Management and Development, 717 14th Street, NW., suite 500, 
Washington, DC 20005, telephone (202) 727-6551.

Florida

Florida State Clearinghouse, Intergovernmental Affairs Policy Unit, 
Executive Office of the Governor, Office of Planning and Budgeting, The 
Capitol, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0001, telephone (904) 488-8441.

Georgia

Mr. Charles H. Badger, Administrator, Georgia State Clearinghouse, 254 
Washington Street, SW., Atlanta, Georgia 30334, telephone (404) 656-
3855.

Illinois

Steve Klokkenga, State Single Point of Contact, Office of the Governor, 
107 Stratton Building, Springfield, Illinois 62706, telephone (217) 
782-1671.

Indiana

Jean S. Blackwell, Budget Director, State Budget Agency, 212 State 
House, Indianapolis, Indiana 46204, telephone (317) 232-5610.

Iowa

Mr. Steven R. McCann, Division of Community Progress, Iowa Department 
of Economic Development, 200 East Grand Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa 50309, 
telephone (515) 281-3725.

Kentucky

Ronald W. Cook, Office of the Governor, Department of Local Government, 
1024 Capitol Center Drive, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601, telephone (502) 
564-2382.

Maine

Ms. Joyce Benson, State Planning Office, State House Station #38, 
Augusta, Maine 04333, telephone (207) 289-3261.

Maryland

Ms. Mary Abrams, Chief, Maryland State Clearinghouse, Department of 
State Planning, 301 West Preston Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201-
2365, telephone (301) 225-4490.

Massachusetts

Karen Arone, State Clearinghouse, Executive Office of Communities and 
Development, 100 Cambridge Street, room 1803, Boston, Massachusetts 
02202, telephone (617) 727-7001.

Michigan

Richard S. Pastula, Director, Michigan Department of Commerce, Lansing, 
Michigan 48909, telephone (517) 373-7356.

Mississippi

Ms. Cathy Mallette, Clearinghouse Officer, Office of Federal Grant 
Management and Reporting, 301 West Pearl Street, Jackson, Mississippi 
39203, telephone (601) 960-2174.

Missouri

Ms. Lois Pohl, Federal Assistance Clearinghouse, Office of 
Administration, P.O. Box 809, room 430, Truman Building, Jefferson 
City, Missouri 65102, telephone (314) 751-4834.

Nevada

Department of Administration, State Clearinghouse, Capitol Complex, 
Carson City, Nevada 89710, telephone (702) 687-4065, Attention: Ron 
Sparks, Clearinghouse Coordinator.

New Hampshire

Mr. Jeffrey H. Taylor, Director, New Hampshire Office of State 
Planning, Attn: Intergovernmental Review, Process/James E. Bieber, 2\1/
2\ Beacon Street, Concord, New Hampshire 03301, telephone (603) 271-
2155.

New Jersey

Gregory W. Adkins, Acting Director, Division of Community Resources, 
N.J. Department of Community Affairs, Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0803, 
telephone (609) 292-6613.
Please direct correspondence and questions to: Andrew J. Jaskolka, 
State Review Process, Division of Community Resources, CN 814, room 
609, Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0803, telephone (609) 292-9025.

New Mexico

George Elliott, Deputy Director, State Budget Division, room 190, 
Bataan Memorial Building, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87503, telephone (505) 
827-3640, FAX (505) 827-3006.

New York

New York State Clearinghouse, Division of the Budget, State Capitol, 
Albany, New York 12224, telephone (518) 474-1605.

North Carolina

Mrs. Chrys Baggett, Director, Office of the Secretary of Admin., N.C. 
State Clearinghouse, 116 W. Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina 
27603-8003, telephone (919) 733-7232.

North Dakota

N.D. Single Point of Contact, Office of Intergovernmental Assistance, 
Office of Management and Budget, 600 East Boulevard Avenue, Bismarck, 
North Dakota 58505-0170, telephone (701) 224-2094.

Ohio

Larry Weaver, State Single Point of Contact, State/Federal Funds 
Coordinator, State Clearinghouse, Office of Budget and Management, 30 
East Broad Street, 34th floor, Columbus, Ohio 43266-0411, telephone 
(614) 466-0698.

Rhode Island

Mr. Daniel W. Varin, Associate Director, Statewide Planning Program, 
Department of Administration, Division of Planning, 265 Melrose Street, 
Providence, Rhode Island 02907, telephone (401) 277-2656.
Please direct correspondence and questions to: Review Coordinator, 
Office of Strategic Planning.

South Carolina

Omeagia Burgess, State Single Point of Contact, Grant Services, Office 
of the Governor, 1205 Pendleton Street, room 477, Columbia, South 
Carolina 29201, telephone (803) 734-0494.

South Dakota

Ms. Susan Comer, State Clearinghouse Coordinator, Office of the 
Governor, 500 East Capitol, Pierre, South Dakota 57501, telephone (605) 
773-3212.

Tennessee

Mr. Charles Brown, State Single Point of Contact, State Planning 
Office, 500 Charlotte Avenue, 309 John Sevier Building, Nashville, 
Tennessee 37219, telephone (615) 741-1676.

Texas

Mr. Thomas Adams, Governor's Office of Budget and Planning, P.O. Box 
12428, Austin, Texas 78711, telephone (512) 463-1778.

Utah

Utah State Clearinghouse, Office of Planning and Budget, ATTN: Carolyn 
Wright, room 116 State Capitol, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114, telephone 
(801) 538-1535.

Vermont

Mr. Bernard D. Johnson, Assistant Director, Office of Policy Research & 
Coordination, Pavilion Office Building, 109 State Street, Montpelier, 
Vermont 05602, telephone (802) 828-3326.

West Virginia

Mr. Fred Cutlip, Director, Community Development Division, West 
Virginia Development Office, Building #6, room 553, Charleston, West 
Virginia 25305, telephone (304) 348-4010.

Wisconsin

Mr. William C. Carey, Federal/State Relations, Wisconsin Department of 
Administration, 101 South Webster Street, P.O. Box 7864, Madison, 
Wisconsin 53707, telephone (608) 266-0267.

Wyoming

Sheryl Jeffries, State Single Point of Contact, Herschler Building, 4th 
Floor, East Wing, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002, telephone (307) 777-7574.

Guam

Mr. Michael J. Reidy, Director, Bureau of Budget and Management 
Research, Office of the Governor, P.O. Box 2950, Agana, Guam 96910, 
telephone (671) 472-2285.

Northern Mariana Islands

State Single Point of Contact, Planning and Budget Office, Office of 
the Governor, Saipan, CM, Northern Mariana Islands 96950.

Puerto Rico

Norma Burgos/Jose H. Caro, Chairman/Director, Puerto Rico Planning 
Board, Minillas Government Center, PO Box 41119, San Juan, Puerto Rico 
00940-9985 telephone (809) 727-4444.

Virgin Islands

Jose L. George, Director, Office of Management and Budget, #41 
Norregade Emancipation Garden Station, Second floor, Saint Thomas, 
Virgin Islands 00802.
 Please direct correspondence to: Linda Clarke telephone (809) 774-
0750.

List of Key Words

Abandoned infants/children
Abuse
Abused children/spouse
Abusive children/parents
Accreditation
Achievement
Adjudication
Addicted infants/mothers/fathers
Administration
Adolescent abuse
Adolescent parents
Adolescent perpetrator
Adoption
Adults
Advocacy
Affective behavior
African Americans
Alcohol abuse
Anatomical dolls
Archive
Art therapy
Assessment
Asians
Attitudes
At-risk youth
Audio-visual
Autism
Autopsies
Background investigations
Barrier-free design
Behavior
Behavior therapy
Blacks
Bonding
Caregivers
Caretakers
Case management
Central Registries
Child abuse and neglect
Child abuse reporting
Child advocacy centers
Child care
Child care centers
Child care workers
Child development
Child fatalities
Child fatality review
Child health
Child pornography
Child prostitution
Child protective services
Child rearing
Child welfare
Child witness
Children
Children's Trust Fund
Clearinghouse
Client outcome measures
Clergy
Communication
Coalitions
Cognitive styles
Collaboration
Colleges
Communication
Community
Community-based child abuse and neglect prevention grants
Community college
Comprehensive care
Computer networks
Computers
Conferences
Confidentiality
Conflict
Consumer education
Continuing education
Contracting
Co-occurrence
Cooperative agreement
Coordination
Coordinated services
Coroners and medical examiners
Corporeal punishment
Correctional institutions
Cost benefit
Cost effective
Counseling
Courts
Court appointed special advocates (CASAs)
Crisis intervention
Crisis nurseries
Cross-cultural
Cultural activities
Cultural competency
Cultural factors
Cultural sensitivity
Curricula
Curriculum development
Custody
Cycle of violence
Data collection
Day care programs
Deafness
Decategorization
Decision making
Definitions
Delinquency
Dental clinics
Depression
Developmental disabilities
Diagnosis
Disabilities
Discipline
Dissemination
District attorneys
Doctoral dissertations
Dropouts
Dysfunctional families
Drug abuse
Drug-exposed infants
Economic factors
Education and training
Educational neglect
Effectiveness measures
Elementary school
Emergency services
Emergency shelters
Emotional abuse
Emotional development
Emotional/behavioral disorder
Employer-sponsored programs
Employment
Empowerment
Etiology
Environment
Evaluation
Exploited youth
Families
Families-at-risk
Family counseling
Family day care
Family needs assessment
Family preservation
Family strengths
Family support
Family violence
Fellowships
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
Field initiated
Films
Fiscal management
Follow-up
Food and nutrition
Forensic
Foster care
Foster grandparents
Foundations
Group homes
Group therapy
Guardianship
Guardian-ad-litem
Handbooks
Head Start
Health
Health impairment
Hearing impairment
High risk groups
Higher education
Hispanics
Historically Black Colleges and Universities (use HBCU)
Home-based services
Home visitors
Homeless
Hospitals
Housing
Human services
Identification
Immigrants and refugees
Immunization
Incidence
Income generation
Independent living
Indians
Indian Reservations
Infant care review committees
Infants and toddlers
Information centers
Information and referral
Information transfer
Injuries
Institutional abuse and neglect
Instruments
Intake
Interagency cooperation
Interdisciplinary
Intergenerational
International
Interstate agreements
Intervention
Interviews
Intrafamilial
Investigations
Judicial system
Juvenile justice
Latchkey and school-age children
Law enforcement
Learning disability
Legal
Legal counseling
Legislation and model codes
Liability and legal issues
Linkages
Literacy
Local government
Longitudinal studies
Low-cost alternatives
Low-income
Males
Mainstreaming
Management
Management information systems
Management training
Manuals
Marketing
Materials
Meals
Mediation
Media
Medical
Medical neglect
Medical schools
Mental health
Mental retardation
Mentors
Migrants
Military
Minorities
Missing children
Models
Multiple personality disorder
Multidisciplinary teams
Multiproblem family
National
Native Alaskans
Native Americans
Native Hawaiians
Needs assessment
Neglect
Neighborhood
Networking
Newsletters
Newspapers
Non-offending parent
Nurses
Nutrition counseling
On-the-job training
Orthopedic impairment
Outreach
Pacific Islanders
Paraprofessional training
Parent
Parent aides
Parent-child relations
Parent involvement
Parent education
Parental abduction
Parenting skills
Pediatric AIDS
Peer counseling
Peer relations
Perception
Perpetrator
Permanency planning
Personal safety
Placement prevention
Physical abuse
Physical development
Physical therapy
Physician
Planning
Play therapy
Police
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Poverty
Prenatal substance abuse
Preschools
Prevalence
Prevention
Primary schools
Private sector
Probation
Professional education
Prosecution
Prostitution
Protective services
Protocols
Psychopathology
Public awareness
Public/private partnership
Public schools
Radio
Rating scales
Readiness skills
Recidivism
Recovered memory
Recreation
Recruitment
Referral
Refugees
Relative foster care
Religious institution(s)
Replication
Reporting
Research
Research center
Residential care
Resource allocation
Resource center
Respite care
Retention
Revictimization
Risk
Risk assessment
Ritual abuse
Runaway and homeless youth
Rural
Safety factors
School-age children
Screening
Secondary analyses
Secondary schools
Self-care
Self esteem
Self-help
Self-sufficiency
Seminars
Service integration
Severity
Sexual abuse
Sexual exploitation
Shaken baby
Sibling abuse
Sibling relations
Single parents
Social isolation
Social skills
Social services
Social work
Special education
Special needs adoption
Speech or language impairment
Staff
Standards
States
State laws
Statistical analysis
Status offenders
Stipends
Stress
Substance abuse
Substantiation
Sudden infant death syndrome
Supervision
Support groups
Synthesis
Systems
Target populations
Teachers
Technical assistance
Technology
Technology transfer
Teenage parents
Teenage pregnancy
Telecommunications
Television
Temporary child care
Testimony
Theoretical models
Therapeutic day care
Therapy
Throwaway children
Toddlers
Training
Training of trainers
Transitional Living
Transitioning
Transportation
Traumatic brain injury
Treatment
Tribally Controlled Community Colleges
Unemployed
University
Unsubstantiated
Urban
Urban Indian Centers
Veterans
Victimization
Video
Violence
Visual impairment
Volunteers
Vouchers
Welfare
Witness
Women
Workplace
Workshops
Youth

BILLING CODE 4184-01-P

TN15MR94.000


BILLING CODE 4184-01-C

Instructions for the SF 424

    This is a standard form used by applicants as a required 
facesheet for preapplications and applications submitted for Federal 
assistance. It will be used by Federal agencies to obtain applicant 
certification that States which have established a review and 
comment procedure in response to Executive Order 12372 and have 
selected the program to be included in their process, have been 
given an opportunity to review the applicant's submission.

Item and Entry

    1. Self-explanatory.
    2. Date application submitted to Federal agency (or State if 
applicable) & applicant's control number (if applicable).
    3. State use only (if applicable).
    4. If this application is to continue or revise an existing 
award, enter present Federal identifier number. If for a new 
project, leave blank.
    5. Legal name of applicant, name of primary organizational unit 
which will undertake the assistance activity, complete address of 
the applicant, and name and telephone number of the person to 
contact on matters related to this application.
    6. Enter Employer Identification Number (EIN) as assigned by the 
Internal Revenue Service.
    7. Enter the appropriate letter in the space provided.
    8. Check appropriate box and enter appropriate letter(s) in the 
space(s) provided:

____``New'' means a new assistance award.
____``Continuation'' means an extension for an additional funding/
budget period for a project with a projected completion date.
____``Revision'' means any change in the Federal Government's 
financial obligation or contingent liability from an existing 
obligation.

    9. Name of Federal agency from which assistance is being 
requested with this application.
    10. Use the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance number and 
title of the program under which assistance is requested.
    11. Enter a brief descriptive title of the project. If more than 
one program is involved, you should append an explanation on a 
separate sheet. If appropriate (e.g., construction or real property 
projects), attach a map showing project location. For 
preapplication, use a separate sheet to provide a summary 
description of this project.
    12. List only the largest political entities affected (e.g., 
State, counties, cities).
    13. Self-explanatory.
    14. List the applicant's Congressional District and any 
District(s) affected by the program project.
    15. Amount requested or to be contributed during the first 
funding/budget period by each contributor. Value of in-kind 
contributions should be included on appropriate lines as applicable. 
If the action will result in a dollar change to an existing award, 
indicate only the amount of the change. For decreases, enclose the 
amounts in parentheses. If both basic and supplemental amounts are 
included, show breakdown on an attached sheet. For multiple program 
funding, use totals and show breakdown using same categories as item 
15.
    16. Applicants should contact the State Single Point of Contact 
(SPOC) for Federal Executive Order 12372 to determine whether the 
application is subject to the State intergovernmental review 
process.
    17. This question applies to the applicant organization, not the 
person who signs as the authorized representative. Categories of 
debt include delinquent audit disallowances, loans, and taxes.
    18. To be signed by the authorized representative of the 
applicant. A copy of the governing body's authorization for you to 
sign this application as official representative must be on file in 
the applicant's office. (Certain Federal agencies may require that 
this authorization be submitted as part of the application.)

BILLING CODE 4184-01-P

TN15MR94.001


TN15MR94.002


BILLING CODE 4184-01-C

Instructions for the SF-424A

General Instructions

    This form is designed so that application can be made for funds 
from one or more grant programs. In preparing the budget, adhere to 
any existing Federal grantor agency guidelines which prescribe how 
and whether budgeted amounts should be separately shown for 
different functions or activities within the program. For some 
programs, grantor agencies may require budgets to be separately 
shown by function or activity. For other programs, grantor agencies 
may require a breakdown by function or activity. Sections A, B, C, 
and D should include budget estimates for the whole project except 
when applying for assistance which requires Federal authorization in 
annual or other funding period increments. In the latter case, 
Sections A, B, C, and D should provide the budget for the first 
budget period (usually a year) and Section E should present the need 
for Federal assistance in the subsequent budget periods. All 
applications should contain a breakdown by the object class 
categories shown in Lines a-k of Section B.

Section A. Budget Summary
Lines 1-4, Columns (a) and (b)

    For applications pertaining to a single Federal grant program 
(Federal Domestic Assistance Catalog number) and not requiring a 
functional or activity breakdown, enter on Line 1 under Column (a) 
the catalog program title and the catalog number in Column (b).
    For applications pertaining to a single program requiring budget 
amounts by multiple functions or activities, enter the name of each 
activity or function on each line in Column (a), and enter the 
catalog number in Column (b). For applications pertaining to 
multiple programs where none of the programs require a breakdown by 
function or activity, enter the catalog program title on each line 
in Column (a) and the respective catalog number on each line in 
Column (b).
    For applications pertaining to multiple programs where one or 
more programs require a breakdown by function or activity, prepare a 
separate sheet for each program requiring the breakdown. Additional 
sheets should be used when one form does not provide adequate space 
for all breakdown of data required. However, when more than one 
sheet is used, the first page should provide the summary totals by 
programs.

Lines 1-4, Columns (c) through (g.)
    For new applications, leave Columns (c) and (d) blank. For each 
line entry in Columns (a) and (b), enter in Columns (e), (f), and 
(g) the appropriate amounts of funds needed to support the project 
for the first funding period (usually a year).
    For continuing grant program applications, submit these forms 
before the end of each funding period as required by the grantor 
agency. Enter in Columns (c) and (d) the estimated amounts of funds 
which will remain unobligated at the end of the grant funding period 
only if the Federal grantor agency instructions provide for this. 
Otherwise, leave these columns blank. Enter in columns (e) and (f) 
the amounts of funds needed for the upcoming period. The amount(s) 
in Column (g) should be the sum of amounts in Columns (e) and (f).
    For supplemental grants and changes to existing grants, do not 
use Columns (c) and (d). Enter in Column (e) the amount of the 
increase or decrease of Federal funds and enter in Column (f) the 
amount of the increase or decrease of non-Federal funds. In Column 
(g) enter the new total budgeted amount (Federal and non-Federal) 
which includes the total previous authorized budgeted amounts plus 
or minus, as appropriate, the amounts shown in Columns (e) and (f). 
The amount(s) in Column (g) should not equal the sum of amounts in 
Columns (e) and (f).
    Line 5--Show the totals for all columns used.

Section B. Budget Categories

    In the column headings (1) through (4), enter the titles of the 
same programs, functions, and activities shown on Lines 1-4, Column 
(a), Section A. When additional sheets are prepared for Section A, 
provide similar column headings on each sheet. For each program, 
function or activity, fill in the total requirements for funds (both 
Federal and non-Federal) by object class categories.
    Lines 6a-i--Show the totals of Lines 6a to 6h in each column.
    Lines 6j--Show the amount of indirect cost.
    Line 6k--Enter the total of amounts on Lines 6i and 6j. For all 
applications for new grants and continuation grants the total amount 
in column (5), Line 6k, should be the same as the total amount shown 
in Section A, Column (g), Line 5. For supplemental grants and 
changes to grants, the total amount of the increase or decrease as 
shown in Columns (1)-(4), Line 6k should be the same as the sum of 
the amounts in Section A, Columns (e) and (f) on Line 5.
    Line 7--Enter the estimated amount of income, if any, expected 
to be generated from this project. Do not add or subtract this 
amount from the total project amount. Show under the program 
narrative statement the nature and source of income. The estimated 
amount of program income may be considered by the federal grantor 
agency in determining the total amount of the grant.

Section C. Non-Federal-Resources

    Lines 8-11--Enter amounts of non-Federal resources that will be 
used on the grant. If in-kind contributions are included, provide a 
brief explanation on a separate sheet.
    Column (a)--Enter the program titles identical to Column (a), 
Section A. A breakdown by function or activity is not necessary.
    Column (b)--Enter the contribution to be made by the applicant.
    Column (c)--Enter the amount of the State's cash and in-kind 
contribution if the applicant is not a State or State agency. 
Applicants which are a State or State agencies should leave this 
column blank.
    Column (d)--Enter the amount of cash and in-kind contributions 
to be made from all other sources.
    Column (e)--Enter totals of Columns (b), (c), and (d).
    Line 12--Enter the total for each of Columns (b)-(e). The amount 
in Column (e) should be equal to the amount on Line 5, Column (f), 
Section A.

Section D. Forecasted Cash Needs

    Line 13--Enter the amount of cash needed by quarter from the 
grantor agency during the first year.
    Line 14--Enter the amount of cash from all other sources needed 
by quarter during the first year.
    Line 15--Enter the totals of amounts on Lines 13 and 14.

    Section E. Budget Estimates of Federal Funds Needed for Balance 
of the Project

    Lines 16-19--Enter in Column (a) the same grant program titles 
shown in Column (a), Section A. A breakdown by function or activity 
is not necessary. For new applications and continuation grant 
applications, enter in the proper columns amounts of Federal funds 
which will be needed to complete the program or project over the 
succeeding funding periods (usually in years). This section need not 
be completed for revisions (amendments, changes, or supplements) to 
funds for the current year of existing grants.
    If more than four lines are needed to list the program titles, 
submit additional schedules as necessary.
    Line 20--Enter the total for each of the Columns (b)-(e). When 
additional schedules are prepared for this Section, annotate 
accordingly and show the overall totals on this line.

Section F. Other Budget Information

    Line 21--Use this space to explain amounts for individual direct 
object-class cost categories that may appear to be out of the 
ordinary or to explain the details as required by the Federal 
grantor agency.
    Line 22--Enter the type of indirect rate (provisional, 
predetermined, final or fixed) that will be in effect during the 
funding period, the estimated amount of the base to which the rate 
is applied, and the total indirect expense.
    Line 23--Provide any other explanations or comments deemed 
necessary.

Assurances--Non-Construction Programs

    Note: Certain of these assurances may not be applicable to your 
project or program. If you have questions, please contact the 
awarding agency. Further, certain Federal awarding agencies may 
require applicants to certify to additional assurances. If such is 
the case, you will be notified.

    As the duly authorized representative of the applicant I certify 
that the applicant:
    1. Has the legal authority to apply for Federal assistance, and 
the institutional, managerial and financial capability (including 
funds sufficient to pay the non-Federal share of project costs) to 
ensure proper planning, management and completion of the project 
described in this application.
    2. Will give the awarding agency, the Comptroller General of the 
United States, and if appropriate, the State, through any authorized 
representative, access to and the right to examine all records, 
books, papers, or documents related to the award; and will establish 
a proper accounting system in accordance with generally accepted 
accounting standards or agency directives.
    3. Will establish safeguards to prohibit employees from using 
their positions for a purpose that constitutes or presents the 
appearance of personal or organizational conflict of interest, or 
personal gain.
    4. Will initiate and complete the work within the applicable 
time frame after receipt of approval of the awarding agency.
    5. Will comply with the Intergovernmental Personnel Act of 1970 
(42 U.S.C. Secs. 4728-4763) relating to prescribed standards for 
merit systems for programs funded under one of the nineteen statutes 
or regulations specified in appendix A of OPM's Standards for a 
Merit System of Personnel Administration (5 C.F.R. 900, Subpart F).
    6. Will comply with all Federal statutes relating to 
nondiscrimination. These include but are not limited to: (a) Title 
VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (P.L. 88-352) which prohibits 
discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin; (b) 
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended (20 U.S.C. 
Secs. 1681-1683, and 1685-1686), which prohibits discrimination on 
the basis of sex; (c) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 
as amended (29 U.S.C. Sec. 794), which prohibits discrimination on 
the basis of handicaps; (d) the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as 
amended (42 U.S.C. Secs. 6101-6107), which prohibits discrimination 
on the basis of age;
    (e) the Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act of 1972 (P.L. 92-
255), as amended, relating to nondiscrimination on the basis of drug 
abuse; (f) the Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism 
Prevention, Treatment and Rehabilitation Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-616), 
as amended, relating to nondiscrimination on the basis of alcohol 
abuse or alcoholism; (g) Secs. 523 and 527 of the Public Health 
Service Act of 1912 (42 U.S.C. 290 dd-3 and 290 ee-3), as amended, 
relating to confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse patient 
records; (h) Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 
Sec. 3601 et seq.), as amended, relating to nondiscrimination in the 
sale, rental or financing of housing; (i) any other 
nondiscrimination provisions in the specific statute(s) under which 
application for Federal assistance is being made; and (j) the 
requirements of any other nondiscrimination statute(s) which may 
apply to the application.
    7. Will comply, or has already complied, with the requirements 
of Titles II and III of the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real 
Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-646) which 
provide for fair and equitable treatment of persons displaced or 
whose property is acquired as a result of Federal or federally 
assisted programs. These requirements apply to all interests in real 
property acquired for project purposes regardless of Federal 
participation in purchases.
    8. Will comply with the provisions of the Hatch Act (5 U.S.C. 
Secs. 1501-1508 and 7324-7328) which limit the political activities 
of employees whose principal employment activities are funded in 
whole or in part with Federal funds.
    9. Will comply, as applicable, with the provisions, of the 
Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. Secs. 276a to 276a-7), the Copeland Act 
(40 U.S.C. Sec. 276c and 18 U.S.C. Secs. 874), and the Contract Work 
Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. Secs. 327-333), regarding 
labor standards for federally assisted construction subagreements.
    10. Will comply, if applicable, with flood insurance purchase 
requirements of Section 102(a) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act 
of 1973 (P.L. 93-234) which requires recipients in a special flood 
hazard are to participate in the program and to purchase flood 
insurance if the total cost of insurable construction and 
acquisition is $10,000 or more.
    11. Will comply with environmental standards which may be 
prescribed pursuant to the following: (a) institution of 
environmental quality control measures under the National 
Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (P.L. 91-190) and Executive Order 
(EO) 11514; (b) notification of violating facilities pursuant to EO 
11738; (c) protection of wetlands pursuant to EO 11990; (d) 
evaluation of flood hazards in floodplains in accordance with EO 
11988; (e) assurance of project consistency with the approved State 
management program developed under the Coastal Zone Management Act 
of 1972 (16 U.S.C. Secs. 1451 et seq.); (f) conformity of Federal 
actions to State (Clear Air) Implementation Plans under Section 
176(c) of the Clear Air Act of 1955, as amended (42 U.S.C. Sec. 7401 
et seq.); (g) protection of underground sources of drinking water 
under the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as amended, (P.L. 93-
523); and (h) protection of endangered species under the Endangered 
Species Act of 1973, as amended, (P.L. 93-205).
    12. Will comply with the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968 (16 
U.S.C. Secs. 1271 et seq.) related to protecting components or 
potential components of the national wild and scenic rivers system.
    13. Will assist the awarding agency in assuring compliance with 
Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as 
amended (16 U.S.C. 470), EO 11593 (identification and protection of 
historic properties), and the Archaeological and Historic 
Preservation Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. 469a-1 et seq.).
    14. Will comply with P.L. 93-348 regarding the protection of 
human subjects involved in research, development, and related 
activities supported by this award of assistance.
    15. Will comply with the Laboratory Animal Welfare Act of 1966 
(P.L. 89-544, as amended, 7 U.S.C. 2131 et seq.) pertaining to the 
care, handling, and treatment of warm blooded animals held for 
research, teaching, or other activities supported by this award of 
assistance.
    16. Will comply with the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention 
Act (42 U.S.C. Secs. 4801 et seq.) which prohibits the use of lead 
based paint in construction or rehabilitation of residence 
structures.
    17. Will cause to be performed the required financial and 
compliance audits in accordance with the Single Audit Act of 1984.
    18. Will comply with all applicable requirements of all other 
Federal laws, executive orders, regulations and policies governing 
this program.
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Signature of Authorized Certifying Official

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Applicant Organization

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Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, and Other 
Responsibility Matters--Primary Covered Transactions

    By signing and submitting this proposal, the applicant, defined 
as the primary participant in accordance with 45 CFR Part 76, 
certifies to the best of its knowledge and belief that it and its 
principals:
    (a) are not presently debarred, suspended, proposed for 
debarment, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from covered 
transactions by any Federal Department or agency;
    (b) have not within a 3-year period preceding this proposal been 
convicted of or had a civil judgment rendered against them for 
commission of fraud or a criminal offense in connection with 
obtaining, attempting to obtain, or performing a public (Federal, 
State, or local) transaction or contract under a public transaction; 
violation of Federal or State antitrust statutes or commission of 
embezzlement, theft, forgery, bribery, falsification or destruction 
of records, making false statements, or receiving stolen property;
    (c) are not presently indicated or otherwise criminally or 
civilly charged by a governmental entity (Federal, State or local) 
with commission of any of the offenses enumerated in paragraph 
(1)(b) of this certification; and
    (d) have not within a 3-year period preceding this application/
proposal had one or more public transactions (Federal, State, or 
local) terminated for cause or default.
    The inability of a person to provide the certification required 
above will not necessarily result in denial of participation in this 
covered transaction. If necessary, the prospective participant shall 
submit an explanation of why it cannot provide the certification. 
The certification or explanation will be considered in connection 
with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) determination 
whether to enter into this transaction. However, failure of the 
prospective primary participant to furnish a certification or an 
explanation shall disqualify such person from participation in this 
transaction.
    The prospective primary participant agrees that by submitting 
this proposal, it will include the clause entitled ``Certification 
Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility, and Voluntary 
Exclusion--Lower Tier Covered Transaction.'' provided below without 
modification in all lower tier covered transactions and in all 
solicitations for lower tier covered transactions.

Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility and 
Voluntary Exclusion--Lower Tier Covered Transactions (To Be 
Supplied to Lower Tier Participants)

    By signing and submitting this lower tier proposal, the 
prospective lower tier participant, as defined in 45 CFR Part 76, 
certifies to the best of its knowledge and belief that it and its 
principals:
    (a) are not presently debarred, suspended, proposed for 
debarment, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from 
participation in this transaction by any federal department or 
agency.
    (b) where the prospective lower tier participant is unable to 
certify to any of the above, such prospective participant shall 
attach an explanation to this proposal.
    The prospective lower tier participant further agrees by 
submitting this proposal that it will include this clause entitled 
``Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility, and 
Voluntary Exclusion--Lower Tier Covered Transactions.'' without 
modification in all lower tier covered transactions and in all 
solicitations for lower tier covered transactions.

Certification Regarding Lobbying

Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative 
Agreements

    The undersigned certifies, to the best of his or her knowledge 
and belief, that:
    (1) No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be 
paid, by or on behalf of the undersigned, to any person for 
influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any 
agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or 
an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the awarding 
of any Federal contract, the making of any Federal grant, the making 
of any Federal loan, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, 
and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification 
of any Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.
    (2) If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been 
paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to 
influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of 
Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a 
Member of Congress in connection with this Federal contract, grant, 
loan or cooperative agreement, the undersigned shall complete and 
submit Standard Form-LLL, ``Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,'' in 
accordance with its instructions.
    (3) The undersigned shall require that the language of this 
certification be included in the award documents for all subawards 
at all tiers (including subcontracts, subgrants, and contracts under 
grants, loans, and cooperative agreements) and that all 
subrecipients shall certify and disclose accordingly.
    This certification is a material representation of fact upon 
which reliance was placed when this transaction was made or entered 
into. Submission of this certification is a prerequisite for making 
or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, 
U.S. Code. Any person who fails to file the required certification 
shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not 
more than $100,000 for each such failure.

State for Loan Guarantee and Loan Insurance

    The undersigned states, to the best of his or her knowledge and 
belief, that:
    If any funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for 
influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any 
agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or 
an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this 
commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a 
loan, the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form-LLL 
``Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,'' in accordance with its 
instructions.
    Submission of this statement is a prerequisite for making or 
entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, 
U.S. Code. Any person who fails to file the required statement shall 
be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more 
than $100,000 for each such failure.

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Signature

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Title

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Organization

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Date


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[FR Doc. 94-5822 Filed 3-14-94; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4184-01-C