[Federal Register Volume 59, Number 138 (Wednesday, July 20, 1994)]
[Unknown Section]
[Page 0]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 94-17532]


[[Page Unknown]]

[Federal Register: July 20, 1994]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Coast Guard

33 CFR Parts 80, 82, 84, 87, 88, and 90

[CGD 94-011]
RIN 2115-AE72

 

Inland Navigation Rules; Lighting Provisions

AGENCY: Coast Guard, DOT.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking.

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SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to amend certain technical lighting 
provisions and interpretive regulations supplementing the Inland 
Navigation Rules. These proposed changes will bring certain U.S. 
technical rules into conformity with amendments to the International 
Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (72 COLREGS) scheduled to 
become effective in November, 1995. In addition, at the request of the 
Navigation Safety Advisory Council (NAVSAC), the Coast Guard is 
proposing several interpretive regulations to clarify ambiguities in 
the rules.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before September 19, 1994.

ADDRESSES: Comments may be mailed to the Executive Secretary, Marine 
Safety Council (G-LRA/3406) (CGD 94-011), U.S. Coast Guard 
Headquarters, 2100 Second Street SW., Washington, DC 20593-0001, or may 
be delivered to room 3406 at the above address between 8 a.m. and 3 
p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The telephone 
number is (202) 267-1477.

    The Executive Secretary maintains the public docket for this 
rulemaking. Comments will become part of this docket and will be 
available for inspection or copying at room 3406, U.S. Coast Guard 
Headquarters, between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
executive Federal holidays. The telephone number is (202) 267-1477.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Jonathan Epstein, Navigation Rules 
and Information Branch, Office of Navigation Safety and Waterway 
Services, (202) 267-0352 or (202) 267-0357.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Request for Comments

    The Coast Guard encourages interested persons to participate in 
this rulemaking by submitting written data, views, or arguments. 
Persons submitting comments should include their name and address, 
identify this rulemaking (CGD 94-011) and the specific section of this 
proposal to which each comment applies, and give a reason for each 
comment. Please submit two copies of all comments and attachments in an 
unbound format, no larger than 8\1/2\ by 11 inches, suitable for 
copying and electronic filing. Persons wanting acknowledgment of 
receipt of comments should enclose a stamped, self-addressed postcard 
or envelope.
    The Coast Guard will consider all comments received during the 
comment period. It may change this proposal in view of the comments.
    The Coast Guard plans no public hearing. Persons may request a 
public hearing by writing to the Marine Safety Council at the address 
under ADDRESSES. The request should include reasons why a hearing would 
be beneficial. If it determines that the opportunity for oral 
presentations will aid this rulemaking, the Coast Guard will hold a 
public hearing at a time and place announced by a later notice in the 
Federal Register.

Drafting Information

    The principal persons involved in drafting this document are 
Jonathan Epstein, Project Manager, Office of Navigation Safety and 
Waterway Services, and Ms. Helen Boutrous, Project Counsel, Office of 
Chief Counsel.

Background and Purpose

    The Inland Navigation Rules and the International Regulations for 
Preventing Collisions at Sea (72 COLREGS) provide Rules governing all 
vessels on inland waters and on the high seas, respectively. In order 
to maintain consistency between the 72 COLREGS and the Inland 
Navigation Rules, the Coast Guard is proposing to revise certain 
technical rules to conform with amendments to the 72 COLREGS scheduled 
to become effective in November 1995. The Coast Guard anticipates that 
these proposed revisions, if adopted, would also become effective 
November 1995 to coincide with the effective date of the COLREGS 
amendments. In no case would the amendments become effective before 
November, 1995.
    In addition, the Navigation Safety Advisory Council (NAVSAC), a 
congressionally mandated advisory group, has been reviewing the Inland 
Navigation Rules for consistency with the 72 COLREGS. As part of this 
ongoing review, NAVSAC has recommended several regulatory changes to 
clarify ambiguities in practical application of the rules as well as to 
bring the Inland Navigation Rules into closer conformity with the 72 
COLREGS.

Discussion of Proposed Amendments to Conform to 72 COLREGS Changes

    In November 1995, eight amendments to the 72 COLREGS will become 
effective. NAVSAC has endorsed amending the Inland Navigation Rules 
technical annexes to reflect these changes to the 72 COLREGS. These 
proposed amendments deal primarily with light placement requirements.

Masthead Lights for Vessels Less Than 20 Meters in Length (Sec. 84.05)

    The Coast Guard is proposing to revise 33 CFR 84.05 to allow 
vessels less than 20 meters in length to carry their masthead light as 
far forward as is practicable. This would result in no substantive 
change for mariners because Inland Navigation Rule 23(a) already 
provides that vessels less than 20 meters in length may carry their 
masthead lights as far forward as is practicable. However, this 
proposed change to Sec. 84.05 would maintain parallel language between 
the Inland Navigation Rules and the 72 COLREGS. Although the 72 COLREGS 
amendment was originally based on a U.S. proposal to the International 
Maritime Organization (IMO) to amend Rule 23(a)(i), the IMO 
Subcommittee chose to amend technical Annex I rather than Rule 
23(a)(i). The proposed revision will ease compliance for mariners who 
will be able to refer to parallel language in Annex I of the 72 COLREGS 
and Annex I of the Inland Rules.

Use of Two Lights To Meet Angular Sector Requirements (Sec. 84.17)

    This proposed amendment would allow the pairing of light fixtures 
to ensure all round visibility of navigation lights. This change would 
maintain consistency with the corresponding 72 COLREGS amendment. On a 
vessel with a mast of large diameter, such as a warship or a vessel 
with a combined smoke stack and mast configuration, it is often 
structurally impractical to mount a single all around light at a 
sufficient distance from the mast to meet the 6 deg. angular cutout 
requirements of the Navigation Rules, which prescribe a maximum 6 deg. 
blind zone. This problem can be addressed either through the use of two 
separate lights adequately screened, or two lights close enough 
together that they appear, for all practical purposes, as one light. 
This proposed regulation will specifically allow the use of two lights 
sufficiently screened or placed near enough together that they appear 
as one light at a distance of one mile. Two unscreened all-around 
lights that are 1.28 meters (4.2 feet) apart or less will appear as one 
light to the naked eye at a distance of one mile.

High Speed Craft (Sec. 84.27)

    This proposed amendment would allow modern high speed catamarans 
and other craft of unusually wide design to carry masthead lights at a 
lower level than would otherwise be prescribed by the rules. This 
change will keep the Inland Annex I in conformity with an amendment to 
the 72 COLREGS Annex I. The proposal would create a new provision for 
high speed craft. The proposed definition of high speed craft is the 
same as is used in IMO's ``Draft Code of Safety of High Speed Craft''. 
This change recognizes that existing light placement requirements based 
on traditional ship design are often impractical when dealing with non-
traditional designs such as catamarans and SWATH (Small Waterplane Area 
Twin Hull) craft. The proposed definition of high speed craft includes 
a formula which captures those vessels, such as hydrofoils and 
hovercraft, that can exceed conventional craft hull speed through use 
of dynamically supportable hull designs. The corresponding 72 COLREGS 
amendment was drafted such that modern catamaran and non-displacement 
craft that are unusually wide relative to their length and capable of 
speeds generally in excess of 25 knots, would not be required to carry 
their masthead light at a heights unreasonable for the size of the 
vessel. This new provision would apply to vessels that meet the 
definitional requirements for both high speed craft and have a length 
to breadth ratio of less than three-to-one. The following example 
illustrates the calculations for mast height on a vessel meeting the 
definitional requirements: A high speed catamaran ferry, 59 meters in 
length with a 20 meter beam, may carry its forward masthead light 5.1 
meters above the sidelights, instead of 8 meters above the hull. 
(Sidelights need only be placed above the hull high enough so as not to 
be interfered with by deck lights). The definition of ``high speed 
craft'' is based on a formula that compares displacement to maximum 
speed. Generally hydrofoils, surface effect ships, some light monohulls 
and catamarans will meet this definition, while conventional 
displacement vessels, tankers, fishing vessels and container ships, 
will not. Certain high powered displacement vessels such as frigates or 
destroyers may meet this definition but would not meet the length to 
breadth ratio requirements. Because compliance with the proposed 
provision for high speed craft would be required only in lieu of 
compliance with Sec. 84.03(a)(1), existing vessels need not modify 
their light configurations.
    IMO considered extending the use of the yellow light provided for 
in Rule 23(b) for air-cushioned vessels to all high speed craft. 
However, this light is intended to draw to the attention of other 
vessels the possibility that an air-cushioned vessel may be proceeding 
at a large yaw angle. Thus, the navigation lights may not give an 
accurate indication of the track made good. Therefore, the IMO 
determined that extending the use of the yellow light to all high speed 
craft would be inappropriate.

Radar Transponders (Sec. 87.1)

    In order to maintain consistency with the 72 COLREGS, this 
rulemaking proposes to add the use of survival craft radar transponders 
to the list of distress signals included in 33 CFR 87.1. The 1988 
amendments to the Safety of Life at Sea Convention (SOLAS), in 
Regulation III/26.1.4, require that cargo and passenger ships subject 
to SOLAS carry Search and Rescue Transponders (SARTS) for use in 
survival craft. A SART is a radar transponder that responds 
automatically to most surface navigation radars allowing rescuers to 
quickly locate a vessel or survival craft. Carriage requirements and 
specifications for SARTS are codified in Federal Communication 
Commission regulations at 47 CFR 80.1095, which are referenced in the 
proposed revision.

Discussion of Other Proposed Regulations

Lights on Moored Barges (Sec. 82.5, 88.13, 90.5)

    These proposed amendments to the Pilot Rules, the interpretive 
rules of the 72 COLREGS and the interpretive rules of the Inland Rules, 
will clarify the responsibilities of vessels moored to mooring buoys or 
other similar devices.
    Rule 30 of the 72 COLREGS and Rule 30 of the Inland Navigation 
Rules provide lighting requirements for vessels at anchor, without 
specifically mentioning vessels moored to mooring buoys. The Coast 
Guard proposes interpretive rules to clarify that the term ``vessels at 
anchor'' in Rule 30 of the 72 COLREGS and the Inland Rules rules is to 
be interpreted to include vessels moored to a mooring buoy.
    Recognizing the need to specify safe lighting procedures for 
vessels moored to a mooring buoys, the Coast Guard presented this issue 
first to the Navigation Safety Advisory Council (NAVSAC), and then, at 
their request, to the Towing Safety Advisory Council (TSAC) and the 
National Boating Safety Advisory Council (BSAC). Although reaching 
different formulations, all three advisory groups agreed that a vessel 
moored to a mooring buoy or other similar device should be lighted as a 
vessel at anchor in accordance with Rule 30.
    The groups also agreed however, that barges should be lighted on 
the corners in a scheme to that provided in 33 CFR 88.13 for barges 
moored to a bank or dock. Information indicates that most barge 
operators already light barges on the corners. Not only does this 
lighting scheme provide better definition of the size and dimensions of 
the barge(s) than a single anchor light, but by placing the lights near 
the sides, it allows a better vertical visibility of small boats. 
Additionally, the Coast Guard has determined that it would be 
appropriate to require such lights on barges to be visible for one 
nautical mile, and to otherwise meet the technical standards for marine 
lights as provided in 33 CFR 84.15 (Annex I to the Inland Navigation 
Rules). Currently, barges moored along banks or docks are required to 
carry two unobstructed white lights of an intensity to be visible for 
at least one mile on a clear dark night (33 CFR 88.13(b)). This 
requirement has led to confusion in the maritime community. In a recent 
allision between a tug and tow and moored barges, the limited 
visibility of the lights on the moored barges was a contributing factor 
in the allision. Barge operators can easily meet the proposed 
requirement. Marine light fixtures meeting this standard are required 
for recreational vessels operating at night. Therefore, these fixtures 
are readily available and inexpensive.
    In consideration of the foregoing, the proposed interpretive rules 
of Sec. 90.5 (Inland) and Sec. 82.5 (COLREGS) provide that a vessel 
moored to a mooring buoy be lighted as a vessel at anchor, in 
accordance with Rule 30, except that barges, unless otherwise 
authorized by the Coast Guard Captain of the Port (COTP), shall be 
lighted in accordance with Sec. 88.13. However, the exception provided 
in Inland and COLREGS Rule 30(e) for vessels less than 7 meters in 
length, and Inland Rule 30(g) for vessels less than 20 meters in length 
in special anchorage areas would also apply to vessels moored to 
mooring buoys.
    The proposed additions to the Pilot Rules at Sec. 88.13 will 
prescribe, unless otherwise authorized by the Coast Guard Captain of 
the Port (COTP), a different lighting scheme for barges (generally, a 
white light on each corner). This scheme is already customary practice 
in many parts of the country. However, in particular circumstances the 
COTP could authorize that a barge be lighted in another manner. For 
example, the COTP could authorize a barge to be lighted as a vessel at 
anchor. This could arise where it would be safer for a barge moored in 
relatively open water to light with fore and aft anchor lights with a 
visibility of three miles in lieu of four lights with a visibility of 
only one mile.
    The Coast Guard, through proposed Sec. 82.5, intends to require 
these lighting schemes for barges on all U.S. navigable waters 
including COLREGS waters, specifically, Alaskan waters, Puget Sound and 
other heavily trafficked U.S. waters which are COLREGS waters for the 
purposes of the Rules. This type of special regulation for U.S. 
navigable waters is within the special rules exception of COLREGS Rule 
1(b).

Barge Sidelights (Sec. 82.7, 90.7)

    Improper lighting of barges has been a contributory factor in some 
accidents involving recreational boaters and has been the subject of 
periodic Congressional interest. This interpretative regulation will 
clarify the requirements of Rule 24 of the 72 COLREGS and Rule 24 of 
the Inland Rules for barge sidelights and thereby help to reduce the 
incidence of improper lighting of barges.
    The U.S. delegation to the IMO raised the issue of sidelights on 
unmanned barges with the Subcommittee on Safety of Navigation. It was 
agreed that sidelights powered with existing battery technology could 
not meet the vertical sector requirements for larger vessels under the 
72 COLREGS. It was further agreed that an unmanned barge, unable to 
meet the technical lighting requirements, could meet the requirements 
under COLREGS Rule 24(h). Rule 24(h) allows a vessel or object being 
towed to exhibit alternative lighting where it is impracticable to 
light the vessel as prescribed in paragraphs (e) or (g) of Rule 24. A 
Commandant Instruction to this effect was issued on May 10, 1989. 
(Commandant Instruction 16672.3A International Regulations for 
Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 (72 COLREGS); Lights for Unmanned 
Barges.). The instruction indicates that those lighting unmanned barges 
may avail themselves of the Rules 24(h) exception. This exception 
pertains to the ``vertical sector'' technical requirements only. This 
has been the source of some confusion to mariners who have asserted 
that paragraph (h) exempts them from other provisions of Rule 24 as 
well. The proposed interpretive rules will make clear that in all other 
respects, the sidelights must meet all the technical requirements of 
the Inland Rules for vessels of that size. This would preclude the use 
of known non-marine light fixtures. Failure to comply with Inland Rule 
technical requirements, except the vertical sector requirements under 
Rule 24(h), where appropriate, could subject a mariner to civil 
penalties. Including this interpretation in Secs. 82.7 and 90.7 will 
help to ensure that mariners are aware of the correct interpretation of 
Rule 24 and its exception in paragraph (h).

Corrections to COLREGS Demarcation lines (Sec. 80)

    This proposal also includes corrections to several errors in the 
description of COLREGS demarcation lines in 33 CFR part 80. COLREGS 
demarcation lines are codified boundaries that delineate the 
applicability of either the Inland Navigation Rules or COLREGS. These 
lines are marked on navigational charts. The first correction is to the 
geographic coordinates in Sec. 80.501 and Sec. 80.520. While these 
lines are correctly depicted on navigational charts, their description 
in the Code of Federal Regulations includes inadvertent errors. This 
rule also proposes to correct several errors in Sec. 80.1495, which 
misspells Johnston Island; refers to Canton Island, which was returned 
to the Republic of Kirbati in the late 1970s, as a U.S. Possession; and 
refers to the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands which was 
dissolved in 1987.

Regulatory Evaluation

    This proposal is not a significant regulatory action under section 
3(f) of Executive Order 12866 and does not require an assessment of 
potential costs and benefits under section 6(a)(3) of that order. It 
has not been reviewed by the Office of Management and Budget under that 
order. It is not significant under the regulatory policies and 
procedures of the Department of Transportation (DOT) (44 FR 11040; 
February 26, 1979).
    The Coast Guard expects the economic impact of this proposal to be 
so minimal that a full Regulatory Evaluation under paragraph 10e of the 
regulatory policies and procedures of DOT is unnecessary. The only 
proposed provision involving potential costs to mariners is the 
proposed rule that would require moored barges to display lights in 
accordance with prescribed lighting schemes meeting certain minimum 
standards. This lighting scheme is consistent with existing industry 
practice. The Coast Guard estimates that a relatively small proportion 
of bargetowboat owners are not equipped to light their barges as 
prescribed by this NPRM. For those persons that do not have lights 
meeting appropriate standards, the cost is de minimus. An all-round 
white light fixture costs approximately $12.00. Because most barge 
lights are placed onboard temporarily by fleeting or towboats when 
necessary, and barges fleeted together would be lighted as one unit, it 
is difficult to accurately estimate the number of lights that would be 
required to be purchased by an individual mariner or maritime company. 
However, because of the low unit cost, the impact on any one operator 
will be minimal. The Coast Guard specifically requests comments from 
the industry regarding the expected costs of the proposed rules.

Small Entities

    Under the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.), the 
Coast Guard must consider whether this proposal will have a significant 
economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. ``Small 
entities'' include (1) small not-for-profit organizations that are 
independently owned and operated and are not dominant in their fields 
and (2) governmental jurisdictions with populations of less than 
50,000.
    The only potential economic impact would be cost of marine type 
fixtures. As discussed above, that cost is de minimus. Because it 
expects the impact of this proposal to be minimal, the Coast Guard 
certifies under 5 U.S.C. 605(b) that this proposal, if adopted, will 
not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities.

Collection of Information

    This proposal contains no collection of information requirements 
under the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.).

Federalism

    The Coast Guard has analyzed this rule in accordance with the 
principles and criteria contained in Executive Order 12612 and has 
determined that this proposal does not have sufficient federalism 
implications to warrant the preparation of a Federalism Assessment. 
Under federal law, authority to issue regulations to implement the 
Inland Navigational Rules is vested in the Secretary of transportation 
and delegated to the Coast Guard. Therefore, if this rule become final, 
the Coast Guard intends it to preempt State action addressing this 
subject matter.

Environment

    The Coast Guard considered the environmental impact of this rule 
and concluded that, under section 2.B.2 of Commandant Instruction 
M16475.1B, this rulemaking is categorically excluded from further 
environmental documentation. A Categorical Exclusion Determination is 
available in the docket for inspection or copying where indicated under 
ADDRESSES.

List of Subjects

33 CFR Part 80

    Navigation (water), Treaties Waterways.

33 CFR Part 82

    Navigation (water), Treaties.

33 CFR Part 84

    Navigation (water), Waterways.

33 CFR Part 87

    Navigation (water), Waterways.

33 CFR Part 88

    Navigation (water), Waterways.

33 CFR Part 90

    Navigation (water), Waterways.

    For the reasons set out in the preamble, the Coast Guard proposes 
to amend 33 CFR parts 80, 82, 84, 87, 88 and 90 as follows:

PART 80--COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES

    1. The authority citation for part 80 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 14 U.S.C. 2; 14 U.S.C. 633; 33 U.S.C. 151(a); 49 CFR 
1.46.

    2. In Sec. 80.501, paragraph (d) is revised to read as follows:


Sec. 80.501  Tom's River, NJ to Cape May, NJ.

* * * * *
    (d) A line drawn from the southern most point of Longport at 
latitude 39 deg.18.2' N. longitude 74 deg.33.1' W. to the northeastern-
most point of Ocean City at latitude 39 deg.17.6' N. longitude 
74 deg.33.1'W. across Great Egg Harbor Inlet.
* * * * *
    3. In Sec. 80.520, paragraph (a) is revised to read as follows:


Sec. 80.502  Cape Hatteras, NC to Cape Lookout, NC.

    (a) A line drawn from Hatteras Inlet Lookout Tower at latitude 
35 deg.11.8' N. Longitude 75 deg.44.9' W. 255 deg. true to the eastern 
end of Ocracoke Island.
* * * * *
    4. Section 80.1495 is revised as follows:


Sec. 80.1495  U.S. Pacific Island Possessions.

    The 72 COLREGS shall apply on the bays, harbors, lagoons, and 
waters surrounding the U.S. Pacific Island Possessions of American 
Samoa, and Baker, Howland, Jarvis, Johnston, Palmyra, Swains and Wake 
Islands.

PART 82--72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES

    5. The authority citation for part 82 is revised to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 14 U.S.C. 2, 663; 33 U.S.C. 1602; E.O. 11964; 49 CFR 
1.46(n).

    6. Section 82.5 is added to read as follows:


Sec. 82.5  Lights for moored vessels.

    For the purposes of Rule 30 of the 72 COLREGS, a ``vessel at 
anchor'' includes a vessel made fast to one or more mooring buoys or 
other similar device attached to the bottom. Such a vessel shall be 
lighted as a vessel at anchor in accordance with Rule 30, except that a 
barge, unless otherwise authorized by the cognizant Coast Guard Captain 
of the Port (COTP), shall meet the applicable requirements of 33 CFR 
88.13.
    7. Section 82.7 is added to read as follows:


Sec. 82.7  Sidelights for unmanned barges.

    An unmanned barge complies with Rule 24 of the 72 COLREGS even if 
it is unable to meet the technical vertical sector requirements for 
sidelights as prescribed in Annex I(10) paragraphs (a) and (c) of the 
72 COLREGS, if the sidelights meet all other technical requirements of 
these rules, such as requirements for luminous intensity and arc of 
visibility.

PART 84--ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND 
SHAPES

    8. The authority citation for part 84 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 33 U.S.C. 2071; 49 CFR 1.46.

    9. In Sec. 84.01, redesignate paragraphs (b) through (c) as 
paragraphs (c) through (d) and add a new paragraph (b) to read as to 
read as follows:


Sec. 84.01  Definitions.

* * * * *
    (b) The term high speed craft means a craft capable of maximum 
velocity equal to or exceeding: V=3.7 D0.1667; where: V=velocity 
at displacement (meters/second) and D=maximum permissible displacement 
(meters3).

    Note: The same formula expressed in knots and pounds is: 
V(kts)=1.98D(lbs)D0.1667; where: V=maximum vessel speed in 
knots and D=maximum displacement in pounds.
* * * * *
    10. In Sec. 84.05, revise paragraph (a), redesignate paragraph (b) 
as paragraph (e), redesignate paragraph (c) as paragraph (b), 
redesignate paragraph (d) as paragraph (c) and add a new paragraph (d) 
to read as follows:


Sec. 84.05  Horizontal positioning and spacing of lights.

    (a) Except as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, when two 
masthead lights are prescribed for a power-driven vessel, the 
horizontal distance between them must not be less than one quarter of 
the length of the vessel but need not be more than 50 meters. The 
forward light must be placed not more than one half of the length of 
the vessel from the stem.
* * * * *
    (d) When only one masthead light is prescribed for a power-driven 
vessel, this light must be exhibited forward of amidships; except that 
a vessel of less than 20 meters in length need not exhibit this light 
forward of amidships but must exhibit it as far forward as is 
practicable.
* * * * *
    11. In Sec. 84.17, redesignate paragraph (b) as paragraph (b)(1) 
and add paragraph (b)(2) to read as follows:


Sec. 84.17  Horizontal sectors.

* * * * *
    (b)(1) * * *
    (2) If it is impracticable to comply with paragraph (b)(1) of this 
section by exhibiting only one all-around light, two all-around lights 
shall be used suitably positioned or screened so that they appear, as 
far as practicable, as one light at a distance of one mile. Note: Two 
unscreened all-round lights that are 1.28 meters apart or less will 
appear as one light to the naked eye at a distance of one mile.
    12. Section 84.27 is added to read as follows:


Sec. 84.27  High speed craft.

    (a) The masthead light of high speed craft with a length to breadth 
ratio of less than 3.0 may be placed at a height related to the breadth 
lower than that prescribed in Sec. 84.03(a)(1), provided that the base 
angle of the isosceles triangle formed by the side lights and masthead 
light when seen in end elevation is not less than 27 degrees as 
determined by the formula in paragraph (b) of this section.
    (b) The minimum height of masthead light above sidelights is to be 
determined by the following formula: Tan 27 deg.=x/y; where Y 
is \1/2\ the horizontal distance between the sidelights and X is the 
height of the forward masthead light.

PART 87--ANNEX IV: DISTRESS SIGNALS

    13. The authority citation for part 87 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 33 U.S.C. 2071; 49 CFR 1.46.

    14. In Sec. 87.1, paragraph (o) is revised as follows:


Sec. 87.1   Need of assistance.

* * * * *
    (o) Signals transmitted by radiocommunication systems, including 
survival craft radar transponders meeting the requirements of 47 CFR 
80.1095.
* * * * *

PART 88--ANNEX V: PILOT RULES

    15. The authority citation for part 88 is continued to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 33 U.S.C. 2071; 49 CFR 1.46.

    16. In Sec. 88.13, revise the heading, revise paragraph (b) and 
(c), redesignate paragraph (d) as paragraph (e) and add a new paragraph 
(d) to read as follows:


Sec. 88.13   Lights on moored barges.

* * * * *
    (b) Barges described in paragraph (a) of this section shall carry 
two unobstructed all-round white lights of an intensity to be visible 
for at least 1 nautical mile and meeting the technical requirements as 
prescribed in Sec. 84.15 of this chapter.
    (c) A barge or group of barges at anchor or made fast to one or 
more mooring buoys or other similar device, unless otherwise authorized 
by the Coast Guard Captain of the Port (COTP), shall carry unobstructed 
all-round white lights of an intensity to be visible for at least 1 
nautical mile that meet the requirements of Sec. 84.15 of this chapter 
and shall be arranged as follows:
    (1) Any barge that projects from a group formation, shall be 
lighted on its outboard corners.
    (2) On a single barge moored in water where other vessels normally 
navigate on both sides of the barge, lights shall be placed to mark the 
corner extremities of the barge.
    (3) On barges moored in group formation, moored in water where 
other vessels normally navigate on both sides of the barge, lights 
shall be placed to mark the corner extremities of the barge.
    (d) The following are exempt from the requirements of this section:
    (1) A barge or group of barges moored in a slip or slough used 
primarily for mooring purposes;
    (2) A barge or group of barges moored behind a pierhead; and
    (3) A barge less than 20 meters in length when moored in a special 
anchorage area designated in accordance with Sec. 109.10 of this 
chapter.
* * * * *

PART 90--INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES

    17. The authority citation for part 90 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 33 U.S.C. 2071; 49 CFR 1.46(n)(14).

    18. Section 90.5 is added to read as follows:


Sec. 90.5   Lights for moored vessels.

    A ``vessel at anchor'' includes a vessel made fast to one or more 
mooring buoys or other similar device attached to the bottom. Such 
vessels shall be lighted as a vessel at anchor, in accordance with Rule 
30, except that barges, unless otherwise authorized by the Coast Guard 
Captain of the Port (COTP), shall show the lights prescribed in 33 CFR 
88.13.
    19. Section 90.7 is added to read as follows:


Sec. 90.7   Sidelights for unmanned barges.

    An unmanned barge complies with Rule 24 of the Inland Rules even if 
it is unable to meet the technical vertical sector requirements for 
sidelights as prescribed in Annex I of the Inland Rules (Sec. 84.19 (a) 
and (c) of this chapter), if the sidelights meet all other technical 
requirements of the Inland Rules, such as requirements for luminous 
intensity and arc of visibility.

    Dated: July 12, 1994.
G.A. Penington,
Rear Admiral, U.S. Coast Guard, Chief, Office of Navigation Safety and 
Waterway Services.
[FR Doc. 94-17532 Filed 7-19-94; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-14-M