[Federal Register Volume 64, Number 181 (Monday, September 20, 1999)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 50764-50768]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 99-24261]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Part 62

[NV 015-MSWa; FRL-6440-4]


Approval and Promulgation of State Plans for Designated 
Facilities and Pollutants: Nevada

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Direct final rule.

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SUMMARY: EPA is approving the Nevada State Plan for implementing the 
emissions guidelines (EG) applicable to existing municipal solid waste 
(MSW) landfills. The Plan was submitted by the Nevada Division of 
Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the State of Nevada to satisfy 
requirements of section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act (the Act).

DATES: This direct final rule is effective on November 19, 1999 without 
further notice, unless EPA receives relevant adverse comments by 
October 20, 1999. If EPA receives such comments, then it will publish a 
timely withdrawal in the Federal Register informing the public that 
this rule will not take effect.

ADDRESSES: Comments must be submitted to Andrew Steckel at the Region 
IX office listed below. Copies of the submitted Plan and EPA's 
evaluation report are available for public inspection at EPA's Region 
IX

[[Page 50765]]

office during normal business hours. Copies of the submitted Plan are 
available for inspection at the following locations:

Rulemaking Office (AIR-4), Air Division, U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency, Region IX, 75 Hawthorne Street, San Francisco, CA 
94105
Bureau of Air Quality, Division of Environmental Protection, 
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 333 W. Nye Lane, 
Carson City, Nevada 89706-0851.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patricia A. Bowlin, (AIR-4), Air 
Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region IX, 75 Hawthorne 
Street, San Francisco, CA 94105-3901, Telephone: (415) 744-1188.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

    Under section 111(d) of the Act, EPA has established procedures 
whereby States submit plans to control certain existing sources of 
``designated pollutants.'' Designated pollutants are defined as 
pollutants for which a standard of performance for new sources applies 
under section 111 but which are not ``criteria pollutants'' (i.e., 
pollutants for which National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) are 
set pursuant to sections 108 and 109 of the Act) or hazardous air 
pollutants (HAPs) regulated under section 112 of the Act. As required 
by section 111(d) of the Act, EPA established a process at 40 CFR part 
60, subpart B, which States must follow in adopting and submitting a 
section 111(d) plan. Whenever EPA promulgates new source performance 
standards (NSPS) that control a designated pollutant, EPA establishes 
EG in accordance with 40 CFR 60.22 which contain information pertinent 
to the control of the designated pollutant from that NSPS source 
category (i.e., the ``designated facility'' as defined at 40 CFR 
60.21(b)). Thus, a State's section 111(d) plan for a designated 
facility must comply with the EG for that source category as well as 40 
CFR part 60, subpart B (40 CFR 60.23 through 60.26).
    On March 12, 1996, EPA promulgated NSPS for new MSW landfills at 40 
CFR part 60, subpart WWW (Standards of Performance for Municipal Solid 
Waste Landfills) and EG for existing MSW landfills at 40 CFR part 60, 
subpart Cc (Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Municipal 
Solid Waste Landfills) (see 61 FR 9905). The pollutants regulated by 
the NSPS and EG are MSW landfill emissions, which contain a mixture of 
volatile organic compounds (VOC), other organic compounds, methane, and 
HAPs. VOC emissions contribute to ozone formation which can result in 
adverse effects to human health and vegetation. The health effects of 
HAPs include cancer, respiratory irritation, and damage to the nervous 
system. Methane emissions contribute to global climate change and can 
result in fires or explosions when they accumulate in structures on or 
off the landfill site. To determine whether control is required, 
nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC) are measured as a surrogate for MSW 
landfill emissions. Thus, NMOC is considered the designated pollutant. 
The designated facility which is subject to the EG is each existing MSW 
landfill (as defined in 40 CFR 60.32c) for which construction, 
reconstruction or modification was commenced before May 30, 1991.
    Pursuant to 40 CFR 60.23(a), States were required within nine 
months after promulgation of subpart Cc (by December 12, 1996) to 
submit either a plan to implement and enforce the EG or, if there are 
no existing MSW landfills subject to the EG in the State, a negative 
declaration letter.
    EPA published a direct final rulemaking on June 16, 1998, in which 
EPA amended 40 CFR part 60, subpart Cc (and subpart WWW), to add 
clarifying language, make editorial amendments, and to correct 
typographical errors (see 63 FR 32743). EPA published additional 
technical amendments and corrections on February 24, 1999 (see 64 FR 
9258). These amendments did not change the submittal date or the 
requirements for State plans for existing MSW landfills.
    On June 3, 1998, NDEP submitted to EPA the Nevada State Plan for 
implementing the MSW landfill EG. NDEP submitted a technical revision 
to the Nevada State Plan on May 21, 1999.
    The Nevada State Plan does not apply to landfills in the two 
counties that are not under the jurisdiction of the NDEP: Clark and 
Washoe. Washoe County submitted a negative declaration letter on May 7, 
1997 certifying that there are no existing MSW landfills that are 
subject to the control requirements of the emission guidelines within 
the County. Clark County has affected existing landfills but has not 
submitted its portion of the Nevada State Plan. Existing landfills in 
Clark County will be subject to the requirements of the Federal Plan 
upon its promulgation until EPA receives and approves Clark County's 
portion of the Nevada State Plan.
    The following provides a brief discussion of the requirements for 
an approvable State plan for existing MSW landfills and EPA's review of 
the Nevada State Plan with respect to those requirements. A detailed 
discussion of the State Plan and EPA's evaluation can be found in the 
Technical Support Document for the Nevada Plan (8/99).

II. Review of the Nevada MSW Landfill Plan

    EPA has reviewed the Nevada section 111(d) plan for existing MSW 
landfills against the requirements of 40 CFR part 60, subparts B and 
Cc, as follows:

A. Identification of Enforceable State Mechanism for Implementing the 
EG

    Subpart B at 40 CFR 60.24(a) requires that the section 111(d) plan 
include emissions standards, defined in 40 CFR 60.21(f) as ``a legally 
enforceable regulation setting forth an allowable rate of emissions 
into the atmosphere, or prescribing equipment specifications for 
control of air pollution emissions.'' The Nevada State Plan uses the 
following State regulation as the enforceable mechanism: Nevada 
Administrative Code (NAC) 445B.383 ``Municipal Solid Waste Landfills,'' 
as amended on April 9, 1999 by the Nevada State Environmental 
Commission (SEC). This State regulation controls air emissions from 
existing MSW landfills in the NDEP's jurisdiction.1 Thus, 
Nevada has met the requirement of 40 CFR 60.24(a) to have legally 
enforceable emission standards.
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    \1\ The Air Quality Bureau of NDEP has jurisdiction over the 
landfills within the State of Nevada, excluding the landfills within 
the counties of Clark and Washoe.
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B. Demonstration of Legal Authority

    Subpart B at 40 CFR 60.26 requires that the section 111(d) plan 
demonstrate that the State has legal authority to adopt and implement 
the emission standards and compliance schedules. The State has 
demonstrated that the Nevada SEC has sufficient legal authority to 
adopt rules governing MSW landfills and that the NDEP has sufficient 
legal authority to enforce these rules and to develop and administer 
this MSW landfill plan. The State statutes providing such authority are 
sections 233B (Nevada Administrative Procedure Act) and 445B (Air 
Pollution) of the Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS).

C. Inventory of Existing MSW Landfills in the State Affected by the 
State Plan

    Subpart B at 40 CFR 60.25(a) requires that the section 111(d) plan 
include a complete source inventory of all designated facilities 
regulated by the EG: existing MSW landfills (i.e., those MSW landfills 
that constructed, reconstructed, or modified prior to May 30, 1991) 
that have accepted waste since

[[Page 50766]]

November 8, 1987 or have additional capacity for future waste 
deposition (see 40 CFR 60.32c(a)(1)). NDEP submitted a list of the 
existing MSW landfills in Nevada as part of the State Plan.

D. Inventory of Emissions From Existing MSW Landfills in the State

    Subpart B at 40 CFR 60.25(a) requires that the 111(d) plan include 
an emissions inventory that estimates emissions of the designated 
pollutant regulated by the EG: NMOC. NDEP has submitted an estimate of 
annual NMOC emissions from the landfills in the source inventory as 
part of the State Plan. NDEP used the procedures in 40 CFR 60.754 to 
estimate the NMOC emissions.

E. Emission Standards for MSW Landfills

    Subpart B at 40 CFR 60.24(c) specifies that the State plan must 
include emission standards that are no less stringent than the EG 
(except as specified in 40 CFR 60.24(f) which allows for less stringent 
emission standards on a case-by-case basis if certain conditions are 
met). The State regulation, NAC 445B.383, contains the emission 
standards that are in subpart Cc. Thus, Nevada's State Plan complies 
with this requirement.

F. A Process for State Review and Approval of Site-Specific Gas 
Collection and Control System Design Plans

    Subpart Cc at 40 CFR 60.33c(b) requires State plans to include a 
process for State review and approval of site-specific design plans for 
required gas collection and control systems. The process for NDEP 
review and approval of site-specific gas collection and control systems 
is specified in the State Plan. Thus, Nevada's section 111(d) plan 
adequately addresses this requirement.

G. Compliance Schedules

    The State's section 111(d) plan must include a compliance schedule 
that owners and operators of affected MSW landfills must meet in 
complying with the requirements of the plan. Subpart Cc at 40 CFR 
60.36c provides that planning, awarding of contracts, and installation 
of air emission collection and control equipment capable of meeting the 
EG must be accomplished within 30 months of the date on which the NMOC 
emission rate equals or exceeds 50 megagrams per year. The State 
regulation, NAC 445B.383, contains the same compliance schedule as 
subpart Cc.

H. Testing, Monitoring, Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements

    Subpart Cc at 40 CFR 60.34c specifies the testing and monitoring 
provisions that State plans must include (60.34c specifically refers to 
the requirements found in 40 CFR 60.754 to 60.756), and 40 CFR 60.35c 
specifies the reporting and recordkeeping requirements (60.35c refers 
to the requirements found in 40 CFR 60.757 and 60.758). The Nevada 
landfill regulation incorporates by reference the requirements found in 
40 CFR 60.754 to 60.758. Thus, the State Plan satisfies the 
requirements of 40 CFR 60.34c and 60.35c.

I. A Record of Public Hearings on the State Plan

    Subpart B at 40 CFR 60.23 contains the requirements for public 
hearings that must be met by the State in adopting a section 111(d) 
plan. NDEP included documents in its plan submittal demonstrating that 
these requirements, as well as the State's administrative procedures, 
were complied with in adopting the State landfill regulation and in 
developing the State Plan. Therefore, EPA finds that Nevada has met 
this requirement.

J. Submittal of Annual State Progress Reports to EPA

    Subpart B at 40 CFR 60.25(e) and (f) requires States to submit to 
EPA annual reports on the progress of plan enforcement. Nevada 
committed in its section 111(d) plan to submit annual progress reports 
to EPA. The first progress report will be submitted by the State one 
year after EPA approval of the State Plan. Therefore, EPA finds that 
Nevada has adequately met this requirement.
    In summary, EPA finds that the Nevada State Plan meets all of the 
requirements applicable to such plans in 40 CFR part 60, subparts B and 
Cc.

III. Final Action

    Based on the rationale discussed above, EPA is approving the State 
of Nevada section 111(d) plan for the control of landfill gas emissions 
from existing MSW landfills.2 As provided by 40 CFR 
60.28(c), any revisions to the Nevada State Plan or associated 
regulations will not be considered part of the applicable plan until 
submitted by the NDEP in accordance with 40 CFR 60.28(a) or (b), as 
applicable, and until approved by EPA in accordance with 40 CFR part 
60, subpart B.
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    \2\  The State did not submit evidence of authority to regulate 
existing MSW landfills in Indian Country; therefore, EPA is not 
approving this Plan as it relates to those sources.
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    The EPA is publishing this rule without prior proposal because the 
Agency views this as a noncontroversial action and anticipates no 
adverse comments. However, in the proposed rules section of this 
Federal Register publication, EPA is publishing a separate document 
that will serve as the proposal to approve the 111(d) plan should 
relevant adverse or critical comments be filed. This rule will be 
effective November 19, 1999 without further notice unless the Agency 
receives relevant adverse comments by October 20, 1999.
    If EPA receives such comments, then EPA will publish a document 
withdrawing the final rule and informing the public that the rule did 
not take effect. All public comments received will be addressed in a 
subsequent final rule based on the proposed rule. EPA will not 
institute a second comment period on this action. Any parties 
interested in commenting on this action should do so at this time. If 
no such comments are received, the public is advised that this action 
will be effective on November 19, 1999 and no further action will be 
taken on the proposed rule.
    Nothing in this action should be construed as permitting or 
allowing or establishing a precedent for any future request for 
revision to any section 111(d) plan. Each request for revision to the 
section 111(d) plan shall be considered separately in light of specific 
technical, economic, and environmental factors and in relation to 
relevant statutory and regulatory requirements.

IV. Administrative Requirements

A. Executive Order 12866

    The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has exempted this 
regulatory action from review under Executive Order 12866, entitled 
``Regulatory Planning and Review.''

B. Executive Order 12875

    Under Executive Order 12875, EPA may not issue a regulation that is 
not required by statute and that creates a mandate upon a state, local, 
or tribal government, unless the Federal government provides the funds 
necessary to pay the direct compliance costs incurred by those 
governments. If EPA complies by consulting, Executive Order 12875 
requires EPA to provide to the Office of Management and Budget a 
description of the extent of EPA's prior consultation with 
representatives of affected state, local, and tribal governments, the 
nature of their

[[Page 50767]]

concerns, copies of written communications from the governments, and a 
statement supporting the need to issue the regulation. In addition, 
Executive Order 12875 requires EPA to develop an effective process 
permitting elected officials and other representatives of state, local, 
and tribal governments ``to provide meaningful and timely input in the 
development of regulatory proposals containing significant unfunded 
mandates.'' Today's rule does not create a mandate on state, local or 
tribal governments. The rule does not impose any enforceable duties on 
these entities. Accordingly, the requirements of section 1(a) of 
Executive Order 12875 do not apply to this rule.

C. Executive Order 13045

    Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety 
Risks (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997), applies to any rule that: (1) Is 
determined to be ``economically significant'' as defined under 
Executive Order 12866, and (2) concerns an environmental health or 
safety risk that EPA has reason to believe may have a disproportionate 
effect on children. If the regulatory action meets both criteria, the 
Agency must evaluate the environmental health or safety effects of the 
planned rule on children, and explain why the planned regulation is 
preferable to other potentially effective and reasonably feasible 
alternatives considered by the Agency.
    This rule is not subject to Executive Order 13045 because it does 
not involve decisions intended to mitigate environmental health or 
safety risks.

D. Executive Order 13084

    Under Executive Order 13084, EPA may not issue a regulation that is 
not required by statute, that significantly affects or uniquely affects 
the communities of Indian tribal governments, and that imposes 
substantial direct compliance costs on those communities, unless the 
Federal government provides the funds necessary to pay the direct 
compliance costs incurred by the tribal governments. If EPA complies by 
consulting, Executive Order 13084 requires EPA to provide to the Office 
of Management and Budget, in a separately identified section of the 
preamble to the rule, a description of the extent of EPA's prior 
consultation with representatives of affected tribal governments, a 
summary of the nature of their concerns, and a statement supporting the 
need to issue the regulation. In addition, Executive Order 13084 
requires EPA to develop an effective process permitting elected and 
other representatives of Indian tribal governments ``to provide 
meaningful and timely input in the development of regulatory policies 
on matters that significantly or uniquely affect their communities.''
    Today's rule does not significantly or uniquely affect the 
communities of Indian tribal governments. This action does not involve 
or impose any requirements that affect Indian Tribes. Accordingly, the 
requirements of section 3(b) of Executive Order 13084 do not apply to 
this rule.

E. Regulatory Flexibility

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) generally requires an agency 
to conduct a regulatory flexibility analysis of any rule subject to 
notice and comment rulemaking requirements unless the agency certifies 
that the rule will not have a significant economic impact on a 
substantial number of small entities. Small entities include small 
businesses, small not-for-profit enterprises, and small governmental 
jurisdictions. This final rule will not have a significant impact on a 
substantial number of small entities because State Plan approvals under 
section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act do not create any new requirements 
but simply approve requirements that the State is already imposing. 
Therefore, because the Federal State Plan approval does not create any 
new requirements, I certify that this action will not have a 
significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. 
Moreover, due to the nature of the Federal-State relationship under the 
Clean Air Act, preparation of flexibility analysis would constitute 
Federal inquiry into the economic reasonableness of state action. The 
Clean Air Act forbids EPA to base its actions concerning State Plans on 
such grounds. Union Electric Co. v. U.S. EPA, 427 U.S. 246, 255-66 
(1976); 42 U.S.C. 7410(a)(2).

F. Disclaimer Language Approving State Plans in Audit Law States

    Nothing in this action should be construed as making any 
determination or expressing any position regarding Nevada's audit 
privilege and penalty immunity law (NRS Chapter 445C.010-.120) or its 
impact upon any approved State Plan, including the plan at issue here. 
The action taken herein does not express or imply any viewpoint on the 
question of whether there are legal deficiencies in this or any other 
Clean Air Act program resulting from the effect of Nevada's audit 
privilege and immunity law. A state audit privilege and immunity law 
can affect only state enforcement and cannot have any impact on federal 
enforcement authorities. EPA may at any time invoke its authority under 
the Clean Air Act, including, for example, sections 113, 167, 205, 211 
or 213, to enforce the requirements or prohibitions of the State Plan, 
independently of any state enforcement effort. In addition, citizen 
enforcement under section 304 of the Clean Air Act is likewise 
unaffected by a state audit privilege or immunity law.

G. Unfunded Mandates

    Under section 202 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 
(``Unfunded Mandates Act''), signed into law on March 22, 1995, EPA 
must prepare a budgetary impact statement to accompany any proposed or 
final rule that includes a Federal mandate that may result in estimated 
costs to State, local, or tribal governments in the aggregate; or to 
private sector, of $100 million or more. Under section 205, EPA must 
select the most cost-effective and least burdensome alternative that 
achieves the objectives of the rule and is consistent with statutory 
requirements. Section 203 requires EPA to establish a plan for 
informing and advising any small governments that may be significantly 
or uniquely impacted by the rule.
    EPA has determined that the approval action promulgated does not 
include a Federal mandate that may result in estimated costs of $100 
million or more to either State, local, or tribal governments in the 
aggregate, or to the private sector. This Federal action approves pre-
existing requirements under State or local law, and imposes no new 
requirements. Accordingly, no additional costs to State, local, or 
tribal governments, or to the private sector, result from this action.

H. Submission to Congress and the Comptroller General

    The Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C. 801 et seq., as added by the 
Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, generally 
provides that before a rule may take effect, the agency promulgating 
the rule must submit a rule report, which includes a copy of the rule, 
to each House of the Congress and to the Comptroller General of the 
United States. EPA will submit a report containing this rule and other 
required information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of 
Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior 
to publication of the rule in the Federal Register. This rule is not a 
``major rule'' as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2).

[[Page 50768]]

I. Petitions for Judicial Review

    Under section 307(b)(1) of the Clean Air Act, petitions for 
judicial review of this action must be filed in the United States Court 
of Appeals for the appropriate circuit by November 19, 1999. Filing a 
petition for reconsideration by the Administrator of this final rule 
does not affect the finality of this rule for the purposes of judicial 
review nor does it extend the time within which a petition for judicial 
review may be filed, and shall not postpone the effectiveness of such 
rule or action. This action may not be challenged later in proceedings 
to enforce its requirements. (See section 307(b)(2).)

List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 62

    Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedure, 
Air pollution control, Intergovernmental relations, Non-methane organic 
compounds, Methane, Municipal solid waste landfills, Reporting and 
recordkeeping requirements.

    Dated: September 10, 1999.
David P. Howekamp,
Acting Regional Administrator, Region IX.

    40 CFR part 62 is amended as follows:

PART 62--[AMENDED]

    1. The authority citation for part 62 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401-7671q.

    2. Subpart DD is added to part 62 to read as follows:

Subpart DD--Nevada

Landfill Gas Emissions From Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfill

Sec.
62.7100  Identification of plan.
62.7101  Identification of sources.
62.7102  Effective date.

Subpart DD--Nevada

Landfill Gas Emissions From Existing Municipal Solid Waste 
Landfills


Sec. 62.7100  Identification of plan.

    (a) The Washoe County Department of Health submitted on May 7, 1997 
a letter certifying that there are no existing municipal solid waste 
landfills in Washoe County subject to 40 CFR part 60, subpart Cc.
    (b) The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection submitted on 
June 3, 1998 and May 21, 1999 the State of Nevada's Section 111(d) Plan 
for Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills.


Sec. 62.7101  Identification of sources.

    The plan applies to all existing municipal solid waste landfills 
for which construction, reconstruction, or modification was commenced 
before May 30, 1991, as described in 40 CFR part 60, subpart Cc.


Sec. 62.7102  Effective date.

    The effective date of EPA approval of the plan is November 19, 
1999.

[FR Doc. 99-24261 Filed 9-17-99; 8:45 am]
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