[Federal Register Volume 80, Number 168 (Monday, August 31, 2015)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52459-52468]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2015-21533]


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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Applications for New Awards; Juvenile Justice Reentry Education 
Program: Opening Doors to College and Careers Through Career and 
Technical Education

AGENCY: Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE), 
Department of Education.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Overview Information: Juvenile Justice Reentry Education Program: 
Opening Doors to College and Careers through Career and Technical 
Education (JJ Reentry CTE Program) Notice inviting applications for new 
awards in fiscal year (FY) 2016.
    Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.051A.

DATES: Applications Available: August 31, 2015.
    Date of Pre-Application Meeting: September 9, 2015.
    Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: October 30, 2015.
    Deadline for Intergovernmental Review: December 29, 2015.

Full Text of Announcement

I. Funding Opportunity Description

    Purpose of Program: The purpose of this program is to improve 
outcomes for justice-involved youth through the provision of career and 
technical education (CTE) programs, reentry services, and post-release 
CTE and employment training opportunities for juveniles in and exiting 
from juvenile justice confinement.
    Background: On any given day, more than 60,000 young people under 
age 21 are confined in juvenile justice facilities throughout the 
United States.\1\ Youths involved in the juvenile justice system 
typically have a history of poor school attendance, grade retention, or 
disengagement from school due to academic failure and school 
disciplinary issues. These youths also have lower literacy and numeracy 
skills than their peers, and many are eligible for special education 
services.\2\ Less than 20 percent are estimated to have obtained their 
General Educational Development (GED) or high school diploma.\3\
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    \1\ National Report Series Bulletin. Aug. 2014. ``Juveniles in 
Residential Placement, 2011.'' U.S. Department of Justice, Office of 
Justice Programs, Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 
www.ojjdp.gov/pubs/246826.pdf.
    \2\ Leone, Peter, and Lois Weinberg. 2012. ``Addressing the 
Unmet Educational Needs of Children and Youth in the Juvenile 
Justice and Child Welfare Systems.'' Washington, DC: Center for 
Juvenile Justice Reform. pp. 10-11. http://cjjr.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/EducationalNeedsofChildrenandYouth_May2010.pdf">cjjr.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/EducationalNeedsofChildrenandYouth_May2010.pdf.
    \3\ Osgood, D. Wayne, E. Michael Foster, and Mark E. Courtney. 
2010. ``Vulnerable Populations and the Transition to Adulthood.'' 
The Future of Children 20 (1): pp. 209-229.
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    Many justice-involved youths come from families and neighborhoods 
considered high risk for involvement not only in the juvenile justice 
system, but also in the child welfare system. Commonly referred to as 
cross-over youths (defined as youth who often alternate between the 
child welfare and juvenile justice systems), these youths often have 
suffered abuse and neglect. Many also have the additional barriers of 
mental health and substance abuse problems. These issues not only put 
them at a greater risk for offending, but complicate service delivery 
once they enter the juvenile justice system.\4\
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    \4\ Bonnie, Richard J., Robert L. Johnson, Betty M. Chemers, and 
Julie Schuck. 2013. ``Reforming Juvenile Justice: A Developmental 
Approach.'' Washington, DC: National Research Council of the 
National Academies.
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    Youths involved in the juvenile justice system are often ``hidden'' 
from the public educational systems because they may not be enrolled in 
local district schools. As a result, the responsibility for these 
students' education becomes diffused or ignored and the students' 
academic outcomes are no longer a priority. Also, agencies sometimes 
duplicate or fragment services due to various inefficiencies, 
conflicting program implementation requirements, and other issues.\5\
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    \5\ Leone, Peter, and Weinberg, Lois, Addressing the Unmet 
Educational Needs of Children and Youth in the Juvenile Justice and 
Child Welfare Systems, Center for Juvenile Justice Reform, 
Georgetown University, 2012. pp. 2-4. http://cjjr.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/EducationalNeedsofChildrenandYouth_May2010.pdf.
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    The most recent Census of Juveniles in Residential Treatment found 
that approximately 1,470,000 youths were arrested and slightly more 
than 61,000 were confined in 2011. The majority of these youths were 
males between the ages of 15 and 17. Blacks comprised more than half of 
the confined population, followed in descending order by Whites, 
Hispanics, American Indians, Asians, and Pacific Islanders.\6\ 
Information on length of stay is not collected at the national level, 
but studies show that length of stay can vary from less than 60 days to 
well over a year.\7\
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    \6\ Sickmund, Melissa T., T.J. Sladky, Wei Kang, and Charles 
Puzzanchera. 2013. Easy Access to the Census of Juveniles in 
Residential Placement. www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/ezacjrp.
    \7\ The Census of Juveniles in Residential Treatment survey 
documented that 49 percent of youths had been confined for 60 days 
or less; 29 percent had been confined for 61 to 180 days; and 7 
percent had been confined for more than a year (Sickmund et al. 
2013).

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[[Page 52460]]

    Once released, many justice-involved youths do not return to 
school. Their juvenile justice placements often create severe 
disruptions in their education, for the following reasons:
     Educational credits from juvenile justice facilities may 
not be accepted at the student's public school when they return.
     Juvenile justice facility schools often do a poor job of 
administering education.
     Records may not transfer promptly from school to facility 
or between facilities.
     Students returning from the juvenile justice system are 
often rerouted into alternative-education programs or treated as 
``troublemakers.''
     Youths returning to school after placement often face a 
host of social challenges and stigmas.\8\
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    \8\ Juvenile Law Center. March 12, 2014. Lessons from ``Kids for 
Cash,'' Part 5: Disruptions in Education Disrupt Lives. www.jlc.org/blog/lessons-kids-cash-part-5-disruptions-education-disrupt-lives.
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    Many youths in the juvenile justice population have had little 
employment experience before confinement. Their employment challenges 
often intensify postrelease, with many struggling to find and keep 
jobs.\9\ This is particularly true if youths' records have not been 
expunged; if they have not been able to earn an educational credential; 
or if they have a disability.\10\ Having been out of the labor force 
for a period of time also puts justice-involved youths at a 
disadvantage. In addition to lacking technical skills and work 
experience, these youths lack critical employability skills, sometimes 
called ``soft skills'' or ``workforce readiness skills,'' which are the 
general skills necessary for success in the labor market, for all 
industries and at all career levels.\11\
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    \9\ Wald, Michael, and Tia Martinez. 2003. ``Connected by 25: 
Improving the Life Chances of the Country's Most Vulnerable 14-24 
Year Olds.'' Stanford, CA: Hewlett Foundation.
    \10\ Waintrup, Miriam G., and Deanne Unrah. 2008. ``Career 
Development Programming Strategies for Transitioning Incarcerated 
Adolescents to the World of Work.'' The Journal of Correctional 
Education 59 (2): pp 127-144.
    \11\ See cte.ed.gov/employabilityskills/index.php/framework/.
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    The lack of transition planning for juveniles makes successful 
reentry and integration into the community extremely difficult. Service 
providers often receive inadequate professional development and 
specialized transition training. Due to a lack of interdisciplinary 
collaboration, service providers often are unprepared to provide 
appropriate transition services.\12\
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    \12\ Leone, Peter, and Weinberg, Lois, Addressing the Unmet 
Educational Needs of Children and Youth in the Juvenile Justice and 
Child Welfare Systems, Center for Juvenile Justice Reform, 
Georgetown University, 2012. pp. 19-22. http://cjjr.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/EducationalNeedsofChildrenandYouth_May2010.pdf.
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    Information on recidivism rates is not collected at the national 
level because States use different definitions of recidivism. However, 
we know that justice-involved youths are at high risk for recidivism. 
The Annie Casey Foundation found that studies of youths released from 
residential corrections programs indicate that 70 to 80 percent of 
those youths are rearrested within 3 years. Studies also find that 38 
to 58 percent of youths released from juvenile corrections facilities 
are found guilty of new offenses (as a juvenile or an adult) within 2 
years and 45 to 72 percent within 3 years.\13\
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    \13\ Mendel, Richard A. 2011. ``No Place for Kids: The Case for 
Reducing Juvenile Incarceration.'' Baltimore, MD: The Annie E. Casey 
Foundation. www.aecf.org/resources/no-place-for-kids-full-report/.
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    It has become clear that no single agency can address the myriad 
needs of justice-involved youth. Justice-involved youths often are 
involved with multiple systems of care and their needs transcend 
professional boundaries and agency mandates. Historically, the juvenile 
justice system has worked in isolation, with inadequate communication 
and collaboration among agencies serving youths both within facilities 
and between facilities and the community. The lack of coordination and 
collaboration among key stakeholders has been a major barrier to 
addressing the poor education, employment, and well-being outcomes for 
justice-involved youths.\14\
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    \14\ Leone, Peter, and Weinberg, Lois, Addressing the Unmet 
Educational Needs of Children and Youth in the Juvenile Justice and 
Child Welfare Systems, Center for Juvenile Justice Reform, 
Georgetown University, 2012. Pp. 18-20 and 47-51. http://
http://cjjr.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/EducationalNeedsofChildrenandYouth_May2010.pdf">cjjr.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/EducationalNeedsofChildrenandYouth_May2010.pdf
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    The past decade has seen increased funding to improve programs, 
services, and outcomes for justice-involved youths. Multiple Federal 
agencies, including the Departments of Justice (Office of Juvenile 
Justice and Delinquency Prevention), Health and Human Services 
(Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National 
Institutes of Health), Labor (Employment and Training Administration), 
and Education (Office for Civil Rights, Office of Elementary and 
Secondary Education), have taken on the issue of juvenile justice 
reform. Significant Federal funding has been dedicated to this issue, 
such as funding under the Second Chance Act and the Workforce 
Investment Act (WIA) (recently reauthorized as the Workforce Innovation 
and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA), 29 U.S.C. 3101 et seq.). Federal 
and State partnerships with the philanthropic community, such as the 
John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation's ``Models for Change'' 
initiative, have also spurred innovation and reform in the juvenile 
justice system.
    Just as juvenile justice reform efforts have intensified in the 
past decade, so too have efforts to improve the effectiveness of 
workforce education and training programs. The career pathways approach 
to workforce development is the most recent expression of efforts to 
meet workforce and industry demands through focused education and 
training.\15\ Career pathways link education, training, and support 
services to enable individuals to secure industry-relevant 
certification, obtain employment within an industry or occupational 
sector, and advance to successively higher levels of education and 
employment in that sector. Advanced education and training are now 
requirements for many jobs and professional careers. This has led to 
shifts in the ways in which public agencies design CTE and workforce 
programs and collaborate with partners across systems.
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    \15\ ``Career Pathways Toolkit: Six Key Elements for Success'' 
(Toolkit), Social Policy Research Associates for the U.S. Department 
of Labor, September 2011, pp 8-9.
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    In this spirit of cross-system collaboration, in recent years, 
Federal agencies and a variety of national, State, and local 
stakeholders have worked together to encourage the development of 
career pathways. At the Federal level, three Federal agencies, the U.S. 
Departments of Education (ED or the Department), Health and Human 
Services, and Labor, have led an interagency effort to advance career 
pathway systems,\16\ which has grown to include the U.S. Departments of 
Agriculture, Commerce, Housing and Urban Development, Transportation, 
and Energy. WIOA also promotes a career pathways approach to workforce 
development, stressing cross-agency workforce, education, and human 
services systems-building, and coordinated service delivery to create 
career pathways.\17\ In addition, section 129 of WIOA, 29 U.S.C. 3164, 
authorizes

[[Page 52461]]

youth workforce investment activities that support further education 
and employment training for in-school and out-of-school youths, 
including justice-involved youths.
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    \16\ See www.careertech.org/sites/default/files/Joint_Letter_Career_Pathways.pdf.
    \17\ www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-113publ128/pdf/PLAW-113publ128.pdf.
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    OCTAE has led the career pathways interagency effort for ED because 
CTE and career pathways are clearly interrelated. Both CTE and career 
pathways are informed by local labor market trends and designed to meet 
employer needs. For many, secondary CTE programs are the first point of 
entry into a career pathway.
    CTE will be the primary education focus of projects funded under 
this grant competition. Studies of incarcerated adults have suggested 
that participating in CTE may reduce parole violations and recidivism 
rates and increase the likelihood of employment after release, in 
addition to promoting the acquisition of knowledge and skills. While 
similar research for justice-involved youths is limited, CTE 
potentially may offer these benefits to confined juveniles as well as 
adults.\18\
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    \18\ Davis, Lois M., Steele, Jennifer L. et el., ``Effective Is 
Correctional Education, and Where Do We Go from Here? The Results of 
a Comprehensive Evaluation.'' Rand Corporation, 2014. pp 47-50. 
www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR500/RR564/RAND_RR564.pdf.
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    CTE programs, commonly referred to as ``vocational education'' in 
the juvenile justice setting, help students acquire the skills and 
knowledge they need for success in further education and careers. 
Generally, the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 
2006 (Pub. L. 109-270), 20 U.S.C. 2301 et seq. (Perkins IV or Act),\19\ 
defines CTE in section 3(5), 20 U.S.C. 2302(5), as organized 
educational activities that offer a sequence of courses that provides 
individuals with the academic and technical knowledge and skills needed 
to prepare for further education and for careers in current or emerging 
employment sectors. CTE contributes to students' academic knowledge, 
higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, 
general employability skills, technical skills, and occupation-specific 
skills. Competency-based applied learning, work-based learning, and 
comprehensive career development are key components of CTE. Section 
112(a)(2)(A) of the Act, 20 U.S.C. 2322(a)(2)(A), requires each State 
to make available up to one percent of the State's allotment under 
section 111 to serve individuals in State institutions, such as State 
correctional institutions and institutions that serve individuals with 
disabilities. Recognizing the importance of offering effective CTE 
programs to justice-involved youths, during program year 2013-14, more 
than half of the States reported using Perkins IV funds to support CTE 
programming in juvenile justice facilities.\20\ We would expect 
projects funded under this grant competition to build on these ongoing 
efforts.
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    \19\ See www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-109publ270/pdf/PLAW-109publ270.pdf.
    \20\ This information was reported in the States' 2013-2014 
Perkins Consolidated Annual Reports.
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    In 2014, the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice identified 
evidence-based principles and promising practices to assist juvenile 
justice providers in addressing the systemic challenges described at 
the beginning of this Background section. The recently released 
``Guiding Principles for Improving Education Programs in Juvenile 
Justice Secure Care Settings'' (Guiding Principles) \21\ have informed 
the development of this grant opportunity because they provide a 
framework for implementing a comprehensive system of support services 
and educational programming to improve education outcomes for justice-
involved youths in and upon leaving confinement. They underscore the 
need for a strong program infrastructure,\22\ as well as the need for 
cross-agency coordination and collaboration to create systemic reforms 
that will address the myriad needs of justice-involved youths. The five 
Guiding Principles, each followed by specific practices of particular 
relevance to this grant opportunity, are:
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    \21\ www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/correctional-education/index.html.
    \22\ For further guidance on developing and maintaining a strong 
program infrastructure, the following resources are particularly 
important: ``Core Principles for Reducing Recidivism and Improving 
Other Outcomes for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System'' from the 
National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center (NDTAC) for 
Education of Children and Youth who are Neglected, Delinquent, and 
At-Risk (csgjusticecenter.org/youth/publications/juvenile-justice-white-paper/); and ``Transition Toolkit 2.0'' from the NDTAC for 
Education of Children and Youth who are Neglected, Delinquent, and 
At-Risk (www.neglected-delinquent.org/resource/transition-toolkit-20-meeting-educational-needs-youth-exposed-juvenile-justice-system).
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    Principle I. A safe, healthy facility-wide climate that prioritizes 
education, provides the conditions for learning, and encourages the 
necessary behavioral and social support services that address the 
individual needs of all youths, including those with disabilities and 
English learners.
    Juvenile justice facilities should prioritize education, create the 
appropriate conditions for learning, and address individual needs 
through support services. Support services should be comprehensive and 
should align with the educational program. Facilities should: Use 
evidence-based assessments to identify appropriate activities; promote 
active youth engagement; include well-monitored prerelease planning 
that addresses the youths' diverse needs (e.g., mental health, 
substance abuse, family reengagement, and social, emotional, and 
behavioral skills deficits); provide care throughout all phases of 
reentry; and include approaches such as case management and mentoring.
    Principle II. Necessary funding to support educational 
opportunities for all youths within long-term secure care facilities, 
including those with disabilities and English learners, comparable to 
opportunities for peers who are not system-involved.
    Juvenile justice facilities should receive sufficient funding to 
ensure all justice-involved youths receive a quality education compared 
to peers who are not system-involved. Sufficient resources are needed 
to ensure a strong sustainable program infrastructure that supports a 
process for collecting, analyzing, and using data to improve program 
quality.
    Principle III. Recruitment, employment, and retention of qualified 
education staff with skills relevant in juvenile justice settings who 
can positively impact long-term student outcomes through demonstrated 
abilities to create and sustain effective teaching and learning 
environments.
    Juvenile justice facilities should recruit, employ, and retain 
qualified education staff. Staff should be trained on cultural 
competency in working with individuals of different socioeconomic 
status, race, and age. Staff also should learn how to create 
cooperative, supportive learning environments in a juvenile justice 
setting; build positive relationships with students; and help students 
meet program requirements and transition to the larger community.
    Principle IV. Rigorous and relevant curricula aligned with State 
academic and career and technical education standards that utilize 
instructional methods, tools, materials, and practices that promote 
college- and career-readiness.
    Juvenile justice facilities should provide rigorous, relevant 
curricula that is standards-driven and uses appropriate instructional 
practices that prepare students for college and the workforce. 
Education services should: Be tailored to the youths' age, prior 
experiences, and specific developmental needs (e.g., disabilities and 
English language skills); connect to career pathways that incorporate 
students' needs and interests; involve students in

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planning; and include programs such as CTE, youth-centered career 
development services, and work-based learning.
    Principle V. Formal processes and procedures--through statutes, 
memoranda of understanding, and practices--that ensure successful 
navigation across child-serving systems and smooth reentry into 
communities.
    Juvenile justice facilities should implement processes and 
procedures to support the youths' transition from confinement to the 
community. This requires collaborative, well-defined partnerships that 
bridge facility- and community-based providers and systems that serve 
justice-involved youths, as well as other youth-serving systems, such 
as education, child welfare, employment, housing, behavioral health, 
and physical health services. These partnerships should have policies 
and procedures that support communication, youth transitions, data 
sharing, and accountability.
    Projects funded under this grant competition must be implemented in 
partnership with a variety of providers and systems, to garner the 
resources and expertise needed to implement specific practices from the 
Guiding Principles that will address the specific, identified needs of 
youths to be served under the proposed JJ Reentry CTE program, and to 
support their successful transition from confinement to the community. 
We would expect funded projects to use partner resources to provide 
programming and wraparound services that address participating youths' 
broader education and well-being needs and support successful reentry. 
We would expect funded projects to use JJ Reentry CTE Program funds for 
CTE-related programs and services, such as youth-centered career 
development services, effective CTE programs (including work-based 
learning where feasible), and career pathways, that support successful 
transitions from confinement to the community and to further education 
and employment.
    Nearly all youths leave juvenile justice facilities and return to 
their communities. For successful reentry to their communities, youths 
must be prepared to return to school, to access postsecondary education 
or employment training, or to enter employment. Through this 
competition, the Secretary will support the establishment and operation 
of projects that build on existing efforts to improve reentry outcomes 
for justice-involved youths, make CTE the education focus of their 
efforts, and build strong partnerships to implement a comprehensive, 
collaborative approach to improving education, employment, and other 
positive, well-being outcomes for justice-involved youths.
    Priorities: This notice includes three absolute priorities, one 
competitive preference priority, and one invitational priority.
    We are establishing the absolute and competitive preference 
priorities in a FY 2016 grant competition and any subsequent year in 
which we make awards from the list of unfunded applicants from this 
competition, in accordance with section 437(d)(1) of the General 
Education Provisions Act (GEPA), 20 U.S.C. 1232(d)(1). The invitational 
priority is from the Secretary's final supplemental priorities and 
definitions for discretionary grant programs (Supplemental Priorities) 
published in the Federal Register on December 10, 2014 (79 FR 73425).
    Absolute Priorities: The following priorities are absolute 
priorities. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(3) we consider only applications 
that meet all three of these absolute priorities.
    These priorities are:
    Absolute Priority 1: Improving School Climate, Behavioral Supports, 
and Correctional Education.
    To meet this priority, an applicant must propose a project designed 
to improve the quality of CTE programs in juvenile justice facilities 
(such as detention facilities and secure and non-secure placements) and 
support reentry after release, by linking the youths to education, 
wraparound services and youth centered job training programs.
    Absolute Priority 2: Enhancing State or Local Efforts to Improve 
Reentry Outcomes.
    To meet this priority, an applicant must propose a project designed 
to build upon and enhance State or local efforts to improve reentry 
outcomes for justice-involved youth, such as those carried out under 
the Elementary and Secondary Education Act's Title I, Part D, 
Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Youth Who are 
Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk, the Second Chance Act, Perkins IV, 
WIA/WIOA Youth Workforce Investment Activities, the Department of Labor 
Employment Training Administration Reentry Employment Opportunities 
programs, career pathways initiatives, or other Federal, State, local, 
or philanthropy-funded initiatives.
    Absolute Priority 3: Partnerships.
    To meet this priority, an applicant must propose to implement a 
project in partnership with a variety of providers and systems. An 
applicant must--
    (a) Identify required partners which must include at least one of 
each of the following--
    (1) Juvenile justice agency;
    (2) Local educational agency (including representatives 
specializing, for instance, in CTE, special education, and other 
fields);
    (3) Postsecondary institution (including representatives 
specializing, for instance, in postsecondary CTE, workforce 
development, and other fields); and
    (4) Workforce development agency.
    (b) In addition, the applicant may identify other potential 
partners, including--
    (1) Child welfare agencies;
    (2) Workforce investment boards;
    (3) Employers;
    (4) Labor organizations;
    (5) Other social service agencies;
    (6) Community-based organizations; and
    (7) Other entities.
    (c) Include a letter of commitment from each entity with which it 
will partner to implement the proposed project.
    Competitive Preference Priorities: These priorities are competitive 
preference priorities. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), we award up to an 
additional 10 points for each competitive preference priority, 
depending on how well the application meets the priority.
    These priorities are:
    Competitive Preference Priority 1: Coordinating Juvenile Justice 
Reentry Education Programs and Services.
    Projects that are designed to coordinate juvenile justice reentry 
education programs and services to be provided with programs and 
services being provided through subgrants received under Title I, Part 
D, Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Youth Who are 
Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act.
    Competitive Preference Priority 2: Improving Job-Driven Training 
and Employment Outcomes.
    Projects that are designed to improve job-driven training and 
employment outcomes for participating justice-involved youths by 
integrating the education and training to be provided into a career 
pathways program or system that: (1) Aligns education and training 
programs offered by community colleges, other institutions of higher 
education, and other workforce training providers; (2) offers related 
stackable credentials (as defined in this notice); and (3) provides 
support services that enable high-need students (as defined in

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this notice) to obtain industry-recognized credentials and obtain 
employment within an occupational area with the potential to advance to 
higher levels of education and employment in that area.
    Under this competition we are particularly interested in 
applications that address the following priority.
    Invitational Priority: For FY 2015 and any subsequent year in which 
we make awards from the list of unfunded applicants from this 
competition, this priority is an invitational priority. Under 34 CFR 
75.105(c)(1) we do not give an application that meets this invitational 
priority a competitive or absolute preference over other applications.
    This priority is:
    Invitational Priority: Leveraging Technology To Support 
Instructional Practice and Professional Development.
    Projects that are designed to leverage technology through 
implementing high-quality accessible digital tools, assessments, and 
materials that are aligned with rigorous college- and career-ready 
standards.
Application Requirements
    The application requirements are:
    (a) Applicants must propose to serve the residents of at least one 
residential juvenile justice facility.
    (b) Applicants must--
    (1) Identify specific practices from the ``Guiding Principles for 
Improving Education Programs in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Settings'' 
that are based on strong theory (as defined in this notice) and that 
they will implement and describe how those practices will address the 
specific, identified needs of youths to be served.
    (2) Describe each partner's role in implementing the specific 
practices identified under Application Requirement (b)(1); and
    (3) Describe each partner's relevant experience, including 
experience working with justice-involved youths.
    (c) Applicants must describe how the CTE programs to be offered 
under the JJ Reentry CTE Program will--
    (1) Be supported by current labor market information;
    (2) Respond to employer needs;
    (3) Integrate general employability skills with career and 
technical instruction;
    (4) Provide career exploration, guidance, and planning; and
    (5) Lead to industry-recognized credentials that align with 
secondary and postsecondary CTE programs and/or other workforce 
training and employment opportunities post-release.
    (d) Applicants must describe how professional development needs 
will be identified and addressed in the project in order to address the 
needs of participating justice-involved youths and to deliver high-
quality CTE services.
    (e) Applicants must submit a detailed project plan, for the entire 
project period. The plan must include a timeline of specific activities 
to be carried out in each year of the project.
    (f) Applicants must--
    (1) Include a plan for annual project evaluations that will assess 
the project's progress in meeting its goals and objectives, provide 
feedback for the project partners on the effectiveness of key project 
components, and identify areas needing improvement; and
    (2) Describe current capacity to share participant data collected 
by the different project partners and a plan to improve that capacity 
if necessary, for the purpose of meeting participant needs and 
reporting valid and reliable data on the required performance measures.
Definitions
    The definitions of ``regular high school diploma'' and ``stackable 
credentials'' are from the Supplemental Priorities. The definition of 
``high-need students'' is based on the Supplemental Priorities. The 
definitions of ``logic model'' and ``strong theory'' are from the 
Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) at 34 
CFR 77.1(c).
    High-need students means students who are at risk of educational 
failure or otherwise in need of special assistance and support, such as 
students who are living in poverty, who attend high-minority schools, 
who are far below grade level, who have left school before receiving a 
regular high school diploma, who are at risk of not graduating with a 
diploma on time, who are homeless, who are in foster care, who have 
been incarcerated, who have disabilities, or who are English learners.
    Logic model (also referred to as theory of action) means a well-
specified conceptual framework that identifies key components of the 
proposed process, product, strategy, or practice (i.e., the active 
``ingredients'' that are hypothesized to be critical to achieving the 
relevant outcomes) and describes the relationships among the key 
components and outcomes, theoretically and operationally.
    Regular high school diploma means the standard high school diploma 
that is awarded to students in the State and that is fully aligned with 
the State's academic content standards or a higher diploma and does not 
include a General Education Development (GED) credential, certificate 
of attendance, or any alternative award.
    Stackable credentials means credentials that are part of a sequence 
of credentials that can be accumulated over time to increase an 
individual's qualifications and help him or her to advance along a 
career pathway to different and potentially higher-paying jobs.
    Strong theory means a rationale for the proposed process, product, 
strategy, or practice that includes a logic model.
    Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking: Under the Administrative Procedure 
Act, 5 U.S.C. 553, the Department generally offers interested parties 
the opportunity to comment on proposed priorities, definitions and 
other requirements. Section 437(d)(1) of GEPA, however, allows the 
Secretary to exempt from rulemaking requirements regulations governing 
the first grant competition under a new or substantially revised 
program authority. This is the first grant competition for this program 
under section 114(c)(1) of the Perkins IV (20 U.S.C. 2324(c)(1)) and 
therefore qualifies for this exemption. In order to ensure timely grant 
awards, the Secretary has decided to forgo public comment on the 
priorities, definitions, and other requirements under section 437(d)(1) 
of GEPA. These priorities, definitions, and other requirements will 
apply to the FY 2016 grant competition and any subsequent year in which 
we make awards from the list of unfunded applicants from this 
competition.

    Program Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2324; 42 U.S.C. 3797.

    Applicable Regulations: (a) EDGAR in 34 CFR parts 75, 77, 81, 82, 
84, 86, 97, 98, and 99. (b) The Office of Management and Budget 
Guidelines to Agencies on Governmentwide Debarment and Suspension 
(Nonprocurement) in 2 CFR part 180, as adopted and amended as 
regulations of the Department in 2 CFR part 3485. (c) The Uniform 
Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements 
for Federal Awards in 2 CFR part 200, as adopted and amended in 2 CFR 
part 3474. (d) The Supplemental Priorities.

    Note: The regulations in 34 CFR part 86 apply to institutions of 
higher education only.

II. Award Information

    Type of Award: Discretionary grants.
    Estimated Available Funds: $1,900,000 for the first 12 months of 
the project period. Funding for years two and three is subject to the 
availability of funds and to a grantee meeting the requirements of 34 
CFR 75.253.

[[Page 52464]]

    Estimated Range of Awards: $200,000-$400,000.
    Estimated Average Size of Award: $315,000.
    Estimated Number of Awards: 6.

    Note:  The Department is not bound by any estimates in this 
notice.

    Project Period: Up to 36 months. Applicants under this competition 
are required to provide detailed budget information for each of the 3 
years of this project and for the total grant.

III. Eligibility Information

    1. Eligible Applicants: Perkins IV eligible recipients, which are--
    (a) Eligible agencies defined in section 3(12) of the Act, 20 
U.S.C. 2302(12), as a State board designated or created consistent with 
State law as the sole State agency responsible for the administration 
of CTE in the State or for the supervision of the administration of CTE 
in the State; and
    (b) Eligible recipients defined in section 3(14) of the Act, 20 
U.S.C. 2302(14), as--
    (1) A local educational agency (including a public charter school 
that operates as a local educational agency), an area CTE school, an 
educational service agency, or a consortium, eligible to receive 
assistance under section 131 of the Act; or
    (2) An eligible institution or consortium of eligible institutions 
eligible to receive assistance under section 132 of the Act.

    Note: Section 3(13) of the Act, 20 U.S.C. 2302(13), defines 
``eligible institution'' as (a) a public or nonprofit private 
institution of higher education that offers CTE courses that lead to 
technical skill proficiency, an industry-recognized credential, a 
certificate, or a degree; (b) a local educational agency providing 
education at the postsecondary level; (c) an area CTE school 
providing education at the postsecondary level; (d) a postsecondary 
educational institution controlled by the Bureau of Indian Affairs 
or operated by or on behalf of any Indian tribe that is eligible to 
contract with the Secretary of the Interior for the administration 
of programs under the Indian Self-Determination and Education 
Assistance Act (925 U.S.C. 450 et seq.) or the Act of April 16, 1934 
(25 U.S.C. 452 et seq.); (e) an educational service agency; or (f) a 
consortium of two or more of the entities described in (a) through 
(e).

    2. Cost Sharing or Matching: This program does not require cost 
sharing or matching.
    3. Supplement-not-Supplant: This program is subject to supplement-
not-supplant funding requirements. In accordance with section 311(a) of 
the Act, 20 U.S.C. 2391(a), funds under this program may not be used to 
supplant non-Federal funds used to carry out CTE activities. Further, 
the prohibition against supplanting also means that grantees will be 
required to use their negotiated restricted indirect cost rates under 
this program. (34 CFR 75.563)

IV. Application and Submission Information

    1. Address to Request Application Package: You can obtain an 
application package via the Internet or from the Education Publications 
Center (ED Pubs), or from the program office. To obtain a copy via the 
Internet, use the following address: www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/grantapps/index.html. To obtain a copy from ED Pubs, write, fax, or 
call the following: ED Pubs, U.S. Department of Education, P.O. Box 
22207, Alexandria, VA 22304. Telephone, toll free: 1-877-433-7827. FAX: 
(703) 605-6794. If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf 
(TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call, toll free: 1-877-576-7734.
    You can contact ED Pubs at its Web site, also: www.EDPubs.gov or at 
its email address: edpubs@inet.ed.gov.
    If you request an application package from ED Pubs, be sure to 
identify this program or competition as follows: CFDA number 84.051A.
    To obtain a copy from the program office, contact the persons 
listed under For Further Information Contact in section VII of this 
notice.
    Individuals with disabilities can obtain a copy of the application 
package in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, 
or compact disc) by contacting the person or team listed under 
Accessible Format in section VIII of this notice.
    2. a. Content and Form of Application Submission: Requirements 
concerning the content of an application, together with the forms you 
must submit, are in the application package for this competition.
    Page Limit: The application narrative (Part III of the application) 
is where you, the applicant, address the selection criteria that 
reviewers use to evaluate your application. You must limit the 
application narrative to no more than 35 pages, using the following 
standards:
     A ``page'' is 8.5'' x 11'', on one side only, with 1'' 
margins at the top, bottom, and both sides.
     Double space (no more than three lines per vertical inch) 
all text in the application narrative, including titles, headings, 
footnotes, quotations, references, and captions, as well as all text in 
charts, tables, figures, and graphs.
     Use a font that is either 12 point or larger or no smaller 
than 10 pitch (characters per inch).
     Use one of the following fonts: Times New Roman, Courier, 
Courier New, or Arial. An application submitted in any other font 
(including Times Roman or Arial Narrow) will not be accepted.
    The page limit does not apply to Part I, the cover sheet; Part II, 
the budget section, including the narrative budget justification; Part 
IV, the assurances and certifications; the one-page abstract, or the 
resumes, bibliography, letters of support, or other appendices.
    Our reviewers will not read any pages of your application that 
exceed the page limit.
    b. Submission of Proprietary Information:
    Given the types of projects that may be proposed in applications 
for the JJ Reentry CTE Program, your application may include business 
information that the applicant considers proprietary. The Department's 
regulations define ``business information'' in 34 CFR 5.11.
    Because we plan to make successful applications available to the 
public upon request, you may wish to request confidentiality of 
business information. Consistent with Executive Order 12600, please 
designate in your application any information that you feel is exempt 
from disclosure under Exemption 4 of the Freedom of Information Act. In 
the appropriate Appendix section of your application, under ``Other 
Attachments Form,'' please list the page number or numbers on which we 
can find this information. For additional information please see 34 CFR 
5.11(c).
    3. Submission Dates and Times:
    Applications Available: August 31, 2015.
    Date of Pre-Application Meeting: September 9, 2015.
    Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: October 30, 2015.
    Applications for grants under this competition must be submitted 
electronically using the Grants.gov Apply site (Grants.gov). For 
information (including dates and times) about how to submit your 
application electronically, or in paper format by mail or hand delivery 
if you qualify for an exception to the electronic submission 
requirement, please refer to section IV. 7. Other Submission 
Requirements of this notice.
    We do not consider an application that does not comply with the 
deadline requirements.
    Individuals with disabilities who need an accommodation or 
auxiliary aid in connection with the application process should contact 
the person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT in section VII 
of this notice. If the Department provides an

[[Page 52465]]

accommodation or auxiliary aid to an individual with a disability in 
connection with the application process, the individual's application 
remains subject to all other requirements and limitations in this 
notice.
    Deadline for Intergovernmental Review: December 29, 2015.
    4. Intergovernmental Review: This program is subject to Executive 
Order 12372 and the regulations in 34 CFR part 79. Information about 
Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs under Executive Order 
12372 is in the application package for this program.
    5. Funding Restrictions: We reference regulations outlining funding 
restrictions in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice.
    6. Data Universal Numbering System Number, Taxpayer Identification 
Number, and System for Award Management: To do business with the 
Department of Education, you must--
    a. Have a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number and a 
Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN);
    b. Register both your DUNS number and TIN with the System for Award 
Management (SAM) (formerly the Central Contractor Registry (CCR)),the 
Government's primary registrant database;
    c. Provide your DUNS number and TIN on your application; and
    d. Maintain an active SAM registration with current information 
while your application is under review by the Department and, if you 
are awarded a grant, during the project period.
    You can obtain a DUNS number from Dun and Bradstreet. A DUNS number 
can be created within one to two business days.
    If you are a corporate entity, agency, institution, or 
organization, you can obtain a TIN from the Internal Revenue Service. 
If you are an individual, you can obtain a TIN from the Internal 
Revenue Service or the Social Security Administration. If you need a 
new TIN, please allow two to five weeks for your TIN to become active.
    The SAM registration process can take approximately seven business 
days, but may take upwards of several weeks, depending on the 
completeness and accuracy of the data entered into the SAM database by 
an entity. Thus, if you think you might want to apply for Federal 
financial assistance under a program administered by the Department, 
please allow sufficient time to obtain and register your DUNS number 
and TIN. We strongly recommend that you register early.

    Note: Once your SAM registration is active, you will need to 
allow 24 to 48 hours for the information to be available in 
Grants.gov and before you can submit an application through 
Grants.gov.

    If you are currently registered with SAM, you may not need to make 
any changes. However, please make certain that the TIN associated with 
your DUNS number is correct. Also note that you will need to update 
your registration annually. This may take three or more business days.
    Information about SAM is available at www.SAM.gov. To further 
assist you with obtaining and registering your DUNS number and TIN in 
SAM or updating your existing SAM account, we have prepared a SAM.gov 
Tip Sheet, which you can find at: www2.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/sam-faqs.html.
    In addition, if you are submitting your application via Grants.gov, 
you must (1) be designated by your organization as an Authorized 
Organization Representative (AOR); and (2) register yourself with 
Grants.gov as an AOR. Details on these steps are outlined at the 
following Grants.gov Web page: www.grants.gov/web/grants/register.html.
    7. Other Submission Requirements: Applications for grants under 
this program must be submitted electronically unless you qualify for an 
exception to this requirement in accordance with the instructions in 
this section.
    a. Electronic Submission of Applications.
    Applications for grants under the JJ Reentry CTE Program 
competition, CFDA number 84.051A, must be submitted electronically 
using the Governmentwide Grants.gov Apply site at www.Grants.gov. 
Through this site, you will be able to download a copy of the 
application package, complete it offline, and then upload and submit 
your application. You may not email an electronic copy of a grant 
application to us.
    We will reject your application if you submit it in paper format 
unless, as described elsewhere in this section, you qualify for one of 
the exceptions to the electronic submission requirement and submit, no 
later than two weeks before the application deadline date, a written 
statement to the Department that you qualify for one of these 
exceptions. Further information regarding calculation of the date that 
is two weeks before the application deadline date is provided later in 
this section under Exception to Electronic Submission Requirement.
    You may access the electronic grant application for the JJ Reentry 
CTE Program at www.Grants.gov. You must search for the downloadable 
application package for this program by the CFDA number. Do not include 
the CFDA number's alpha suffix in your search (e.g., search for 84.051, 
not 84.051A).
    Please note the following:
     When you enter the Grants.gov site, you will find 
information about submitting an application electronically through the 
site, as well as the hours of operation.
     Applications received by Grants.gov are date and time 
stamped. Your application must be fully uploaded and submitted and must 
be date and time stamped by the Grants.gov system no later than 4:30:00 
p.m., Washington, DC time, on the application deadline date.
    Except as otherwise noted in this section, we will not accept your 
application if it is received--that is, date and time stamped by the 
Grants.gov system--after 4:30:00 p.m., Washington, DC time, on the 
application deadline date. We do not consider an application that does 
not comply with the deadline requirements. When we retrieve your 
application from Grants.gov, we will notify you if we are rejecting 
your application because it was date and time stamped by the Grants.gov 
system after 4:30:00 p.m., Washington, DC time, on the application 
deadline date.
     The amount of time it can take to upload an application 
will vary depending on a variety of factors, including the size of the 
application and the speed of your Internet connection. Therefore, we 
strongly recommend that you do not wait until the application deadline 
date to begin the submission process through Grants.gov.
     You should review and follow the Education Submission 
Procedures for submitting an application through Grants.gov that are 
included in the application package for this competition to ensure that 
you submit your application in a timely manner to the Grants.gov 
system. You can also find the Education Submission Procedures 
pertaining to Grants.gov under News and Events on the Department's G5 
system home page at www.G5.gov.
     You will not receive additional point value because you 
submit your application in electronic format, nor will we penalize you 
if you qualify for an exception to the electronic submission 
requirement, as described elsewhere in this section, and submit your 
application in paper format.
     You must submit all documents electronically, including 
all information you typically provide on the following forms: The 
Application for Federal Assistance (SF 424), the Department of 
Education Supplemental Information for SF 424, Budget Information--Non-

[[Page 52466]]

Construction Programs (ED 524), and all necessary assurances and 
certifications.
     You must upload any narrative sections and all other 
attachments to your application as files in a PDF (Portable Document) 
read-only, non-modifiable format. Do not upload an interactive or 
fillable PDF file. If you upload a file type other than a read-only, 
non-modifiable PDF or submit a password-protected file, we will not 
review that material.
     Your electronic application must comply with any page-
limit requirements described in this notice.
     After you electronically submit your application, you will 
receive from Grants.gov an automatic notification of receipt that 
contains a Grants.gov tracking number. (This notification indicates 
receipt by Grants.gov only, not receipt by the Department.) The 
Department then will retrieve your application from Grants.gov and send 
a second notification to you by email. This second notification 
indicates that the Department has received your application and has 
assigned your application a PR/Award number (an ED-specified 
identifying number unique to your application).
     We may request that you provide us original signatures on 
forms at a later date.
    Application Deadline Date Extension in Case of Technical Issues 
with the Grants.gov System: If you are experiencing problems submitting 
your application through Grants.gov, please contact the Grants.gov 
Support Desk, toll free, at 1-800-518-4726. You must obtain a 
Grants.gov Support Desk Case Number and must keep a record of it.
    If you are prevented from electronically submitting your 
application on the application deadline date because of technical 
problems with the Grants.gov system, we will grant you an extension 
until 4:30:00 p.m., Washington, DC time, the following business day to 
enable you to transmit your application electronically or by hand 
delivery. You also may mail your application by following the mailing 
instructions described elsewhere in this notice.
    If you submit an application after 4:30:00 p.m., Washington, DC 
time, on the application deadline date, please contact the person 
listed under For Further Information Contact in section VII of this 
notice and provide an explanation of the technical problem you 
experienced with Grants.gov, along with the Grants.gov Support Desk 
Case Number. We will accept your application if we can confirm that a 
technical problem occurred with the Grants.gov system and that that 
problem affected your ability to submit your application by 4:30:00 
p.m., Washington, DC time, on the application deadline date. The 
Department will contact you after a determination is made on whether 
your application will be accepted.

    Note:  The extensions to which we refer in this section apply 
only to the unavailability of, or technical problems with, the 
Grants.gov system. We will not grant you an extension if you failed 
to fully register to submit your application to Grants.gov before 
the application deadline date and time or if the technical problem 
you experienced is unrelated to the Grants.gov system.

    Exception to Electronic Submission Requirement: You qualify for an 
exception to the electronic submission requirement, and may submit your 
application in paper format, if you are unable to submit an application 
through the Grants.gov system because--
     You do not have access to the Internet; or
     You do not have the capacity to upload large documents to 
the Grants.gov system;

and

     No later than two weeks before the application deadline 
date (14 calendar days or, if the fourteenth calendar day before the 
application deadline date falls on a Federal holiday, the next business 
day following the Federal holiday), you mail or fax a written statement 
to the Department, explaining which of the two grounds for an exception 
prevents you from using the Internet to submit your application.
    If you mail your written statement to the Department, it must be 
postmarked no later than two weeks before the application deadline 
date. If you fax your written statement to the Department, we must 
receive the faxed statement no later than two weeks before the 
application deadline date.
    Address and mail or fax your statement to: Laura Messenger, U.S. 
Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., PCP, Room 11028, 
Washington, DC 20202-7241. FAX: (202) 245-7170.
    Your paper application must be submitted in accordance with the 
mail or hand delivery instructions described in this notice.
    b. Submission of Paper Applications by Mail.
    If you qualify for an exception to the electronic submission 
requirement, you may mail (through the U.S. Postal Service or a 
commercial carrier) your application to the Department. You must mail 
the original and two copies of your application, on or before the 
application deadline date, to the Department at the following address: 
U.S. Department of Education, Application Control Center, Attention: 
(CFDA Number 84.051A) LBJ Basement Level 1, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., 
Washington, DC 20202-4260.
    You must show proof of mailing consisting of one of the following:
    (1) A legibly dated U.S. Postal Service postmark.
    (2) A legible mail receipt with the date of mailing stamped by the 
U.S. Postal Service.
    (3) A dated shipping label, invoice, or receipt from a commercial 
carrier.
    (4) Any other proof of mailing acceptable to the Secretary of the 
U.S. Department of Education.
    If you mail your application through the U.S. Postal Service, we do 
not accept either of the following as proof of mailing:
    (1) A private metered postmark.
    (2) A mail receipt that is not dated by the U.S. Postal Service. If 
your application is postmarked after the application deadline date, we 
will not consider your application.

    Note: The U.S. Postal Service does not uniformly provide a dated 
postmark. Before relying on this method, you should check with your 
local post office.

    c. Submission of Paper Applications by Hand Delivery.
    If you qualify for an exception to the electronic submission 
requirement, you (or a courier service) may deliver your paper 
application to the Department by hand. You must deliver the original 
and two copies of your application by hand, on or before the 
application deadline date, to the Department at the following address: 
U.S. Department of Education, Application Control Center, Attention: 
(CFDA Number 84.051A) 550 12th Street SW., Room 7039 Potomac Center 
Plaza, Washington, DC 20202-4260.
    The Application Control Center accepts hand deliveries daily 
between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30:00 p.m., Washington, DC time, except 
Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays.

    Note for Mail or Hand Delivery of Paper Applications: If you 
mail or hand deliver your application to the Department--
    (1) You must indicate on the envelope and--if not provided by 
the Department--in Item 11 of the SF 424 the CFDA number, including 
suffix letter, if any, of the competition under which you are 
submitting your application; and
    (2) The Application Control Center will mail to you a 
notification of receipt of your grant application. If you do not 
receive this notification within 15 business days from the 
application deadline date, you should call the U.S. Department of 
Education Application Control Center at (202) 245-6288.


[[Page 52467]]



V. Application Review Information

    1. Selection Criteria: The selection criteria for this program are 
from 34 CFR 75.210 of EDGAR and are listed in the following paragraphs. 
The maximum score for all the selection criteria is 100 points. In 
addressing the criteria, applicants are encouraged to make explicit 
connections to the priorities and application requirements listed 
elsewhere in this notice. The selection criteria are as follows:
    a. Need for project. (up to 15 points) The Secretary considers the 
need for the proposed project. In determining the need for the proposed 
project, the Secretary considers--
    1. The magnitude of the need for the services to be provided or the 
activities to be carried out by the proposed project (up to 5 points); 
and
    2. The extent to which specific gaps or weaknesses in services, 
infrastructure, or opportunities have been identified and will be 
addressed by the proposed project, including the nature and magnitude 
of those gaps or weaknesses (up to 10 points).
    b. Significance. (up to 10 points) The Secretary considers the 
significance of the proposed project. In determining the significance 
of the proposed project, the Secretary considers--
    1. The likelihood that the proposed project will result in system 
change or improvement (up to 5 points); and
    2. The extent to which the proposed project is likely to build 
local capacity to provide, improve, or expand services that address the 
needs of the target population (up to 5 points).
    c. Quality of the project design. (up to 30 points) The Secretary 
considers the quality of the design of the proposed project. In 
determining the quality of the design of the proposed project, the 
Secretary considers--
    1. The extent to which the goals, objectives, and outcomes to be 
achieved by the proposed project are clearly specified and measurable 
(up to 5 points);
    2. The extent to which the design of the proposed project is 
appropriate to, and will successfully address, the needs of the target 
population or other identified needs (up to 5 points);
    3. The extent to which the proposed project is designed to build 
capacity and yield results that will extend beyond the period of 
Federal financial assistance (up to 5 points);
    4. The extent to which the proposed project represents an 
exceptional approach to the priority or priorities established for the 
competition (up to 10 points); and
    5. The extent to which the proposed project is supported by strong 
theory (as defined in 34 CFR 77.1(c)) (up to 5 points).
    d. Quality of the management plan. (up to 15 points) The Secretary 
considers the quality of the management plan for the proposed project. 
In determining the quality of the management plan for the proposed 
project, the Secretary considers--
    1. The adequacy of the management plan to achieve the objectives of 
the proposed project on time and within budget, including clearly 
defined responsibilities, timelines, and milestones for accomplishing 
project tasks (up to 10 points); and
    2. The extent to which the time commitments of the project director 
and principal investigator and other key project personnel are 
appropriate and adequate to meet the objectives of the proposed project 
(up to 5 points).
    e. Adequacy of resources. (up to 15 points) The Secretary considers 
the adequacy of resources for the proposed project. In determining the 
adequacy of resources for the proposed project, the Secretary 
considers--
    1. The relevance and demonstrated commitment of each partner in the 
proposed project to the implementation and success of the project (up 
to 5 points);
    2. The extent to which the costs are reasonable in relation to the 
objectives, design, and potential significance of the proposed project 
(up to 5 points); and
    3. The potential for continued support of the project after Federal 
funding ends, including, as appropriate, the demonstrated commitment of 
appropriate entities to such support (up to 5 points).
    f. Quality of the project evaluation. (up to 15 points) The 
Secretary considers the quality of the evaluation to be conducted of 
the proposed project. In determining the quality of the evaluation, the 
Secretary considers--
    1. The extent to which the methods of evaluation are thorough, 
feasible, and appropriate to the goals, objectives, and outcomes of the 
proposed project (up to 5 points);
    2. The extent to which the methods of evaluation include the use of 
objective performance measures that are clearly related to the intended 
outcomes of the project and will produce quantitative and qualitative 
data to the extent possible (up to 5 points); and
    3. The extent to which the methods of evaluation will provide 
performance feedback and permit periodic assessment of progress toward 
achieving intended outcomes (up to 5 points).
    2. Review and Selection Process: We remind potential applicants 
that in reviewing applications in any discretionary grant competition, 
the Secretary may consider, under 34 CFR 75.217(d)(3), the past 
performance of the applicant in carrying out a previous award, such as 
the applicant's use of funds, achievement of project objectives, and 
compliance with grant conditions. The Secretary may also consider 
whether the applicant failed to submit a timely performance report or 
submitted a report of unacceptable quality.
    In addition, in making a competitive grant award, the Secretary 
also requires various assurances including those applicable to Federal 
civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination in programs or 
activities receiving Federal financial assistance from the Department 
of Education (34 CFR 100.4, 104.5, 106.4, 108.8, and 110.23).
    3. Special Conditions: Under 2 CFR 3474.10, the Secretary may 
impose special conditions and, in appropriate circumstances, high-risk 
conditions on a grant if the applicant or grantee is not financially 
stable; has a history of unsatisfactory performance; has a financial or 
other management system that does not meet the standards in 2 CFR part 
200, subpart D; has not fulfilled the conditions of a prior grant; or 
is otherwise not responsible.

VI. Award Administration Information

    1. Award Notices: If your application is successful, we notify your 
U.S. Representative and U.S. Senators and send you a Grant Award 
Notification (GAN); or we may send you an email containing a link to 
access an electronic version of your GAN. We may notify you informally, 
also. If your application is not evaluated or not selected for funding, 
we notify you.
    2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements: We identify 
administrative and national policy requirements in the application 
package and reference these and other requirements in the Applicable 
Regulations section of this notice.
    We reference the regulations outlining the terms and conditions of 
an award in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice and 
include these and other specific conditions in the GAN. The GAN also 
incorporates your approved application as part of your binding 
commitments under the grant.
    3. Reporting: (a) If you apply for a grant under this competition, 
you must ensure that you have in place the necessary processes and 
systems to comply with the reporting requirements in 2 CFR part 170 
should you receive funding under the competition. This does not apply 
if you have an exception under 2 CFR 170.110(b).

[[Page 52468]]

    (b) At the end of your project period, you must submit a final 
performance report, including financial information, as directed by the 
Secretary. If you receive a multi-year award, you must submit an annual 
performance report that provides the most current performance and 
financial expenditure information as directed by the Secretary under 34 
CFR 75.118. The Secretary may also require more frequent performance 
reports under 34 CFR 75.720(c). For specific requirements on reporting, 
please go to www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/appforms.html.
    4. Performance Measures: Under the Government Performance and 
Results Act, Federal departments and agencies must clearly describe the 
goals and objectives of their programs, identify resources and actions 
needed to accomplish these goals and objectives, develop a means of 
measuring progress made, and regularly report on their achievement. One 
important source of program information is the annual project 
evaluation conducted under individual grants. To determine the overall 
effectiveness of projects funded under this competition, grantees must 
be prepared to measure and report on the following measures of 
effectiveness:
    (a) The number and percentage of youths served by the JJ Reentry 
CTE Program that are enrolled in further education or training, post-
release, such as:
    (1) Secondary education or other State-approved equivalent;
    (2) GED bridge program;
    (3) Postsecondary education; or
    (4) Workforce training program.
    (b) The number and percentage of youths served by the JJ Reentry 
CTE Program that complete secondary education.
    (c) The number and percentage of youths served by the JJ Reentry 
CTE Program that attain an industry-recognized credential, certificate, 
or degree.
    (d) The number and percentage of youths served by the JJ Reentry 
CTE Program that seek and obtain employment after release.
    (e) The number and percentage of youths served by the JJ Reentry 
CTE Program that are adjudicated within one year of release, as 
evidenced by rearrest, conviction for new offenses (as a juvenile or 
adult), and reincarceration.
    In addition to these measures, applicants may establish interim or 
other measures that they think will be useful in measuring positive 
outcomes for participating youths, such as learning gains, continued 
enrollment in CTE courses that support the student's career goals, 
desired changes in behavior, and other measures of positive youth 
gains. Grantees will be responsible for collecting and reporting data 
annually on the required performance measures as well as any other 
performance measures they choose to establish for this JJ Reentry CTE 
Program.
    5. Continuation Awards: In making a continuation award under 34 CFR 
75.253, the Secretary considers, among other things: whether a grantee 
has made substantial progress in achieving the goals and objectives of 
the project; whether the grantee has expended funds in a manner that is 
consistent with its approved application and budget; and, if the 
Secretary has established performance measurement requirements, the 
performance targets in the grantee's approved application. In making a 
continuation grant, the Secretary also considers whether the grantee is 
operating in compliance with the assurances in its approved 
application, including those applicable to Federal civil rights laws 
that prohibit discrimination in programs or activities receiving 
Federal financial assistance from the Department (34 CFR 100.4, 104.5, 
106.4, 108.8, and 110.23).

VII. Agency Contacts

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  Laura Messenger, U.S. Department of 
Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., Room 11028, Washington, DC 20202. 
Telephone: (202)245-7840 or by email: laura.messenger@ed.gov.
    If you use a TDD or TTY, call the FRS, toll free, at 1-800-877-
8339.

VIII. Other Information

    Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this 
document and a copy of the application package in an accessible format 
(e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or compact disc) on request to 
the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT 
in section VII of this notice.
    Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this 
document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free 
Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the 
Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System 
at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well 
as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal 
Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF). To use PDF 
you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free at the 
site.
    You may also access documents of the Department published in the 
Federal Register by using the article search feature at: 
www.federalregister.gov. Specifically, through the advanced search 
feature at this site, you can limit your search to documents published 
by the Department.

    Dated: August 25, 2015.
Johan E. Uvin,
Acting Assistant Secretary for Career, Technical, and Adult Education.
[FR Doc. 2015-21533 Filed 8-28-15; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4000-01-P