[Deschler's Precedents, Volume 1]
[Chapter 6.  Officers, Officials, and Employees]
[B. Speaker Pro Tempore]
[§ 14. Election of Speaker Pro Tempore]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office, www.gpo.gov]


[Page 562-573]
 
                               CHAPTER 6
 
                   Officers, Officials, and Employees
 
                         B. SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE
 
Sec. 14. Election of Speaker Pro Tempore

    A House rule(13) provides for the election of a Speaker 
pro tempore when The Speaker is absent and has omitted designating a 
Speaker pro tempore.
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13. Rule I clause 7, House Rules and Manual Sec. 633 (1973).
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    This rule has been rarely invoked. Ordinarily, The Speaker will 
invite the election of a Speaker pro tempore before 
leaving(14) or the House will elect a Speaker pro tempore 
after The Speaker has already designated one.(15)
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14. See Sec. Sec. 14.3-14.5, infra.
15. See Sec. 14. 6, infra.
            Parliamentarian's Note: As the illustrations under 
        Sec. 14.6 indicate, normally the Member designated Speaker pro 
        tempore by the Speaker is the person the House elects. However, 
        the House has the inherent power, and has exercised it, to 
        elect a person other than the Member so designated. See 
        Sec. 14.7, infra.
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    A Speaker pro tempore is elected by formal resolution and the 
President and Senate are notified of his election.(16)
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16. See Sec. Sec. 14.1, 14.2, infra, respectively.
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    When a previously designated Speaker pro tempore is the Member who 
is to be elected Speaker pro tempore, he momentarily designates another 
Speaker pro tempore during the election process.(17)
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17. See Sec. Sec. 14.6, 14.7, infra.
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    An elected Speaker pro tempore is more than a ``stand-in'' Speaker. 
Indicative of this is the requirement that he swear a new oath upon his 
entering the office of Speaker pro tempore.(18)
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18. See Sec. 11, supra.
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    Moreover, an elected Speaker pro tempore assumes a much greater 
scope of authority from The Speaker than a designated Speaker pro 
tempore. Being elected, he does not have to have the

[[Page 563]]

unanimous consent of the House, as does the designated Speaker pro 
tempore, to carry out many of the more sensitive, but normal, duties 
that The Speaker would handle if present.(19) He must, 
however, be authorized by the House to perform certain duties even 
though he has been elected by the House, and not simply designated by 
The Speaker.(20)
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19. See Sec. Sec. 14.8-14.12, infra.
20. See Sec. Sec. 14.13-14.16, infra. See also Sec. 4, supra, wherein 
        it is indicated that the Speaker also must be authorized to 
        sign enrolled bills and joint resolutions during the 
        adjournment of the House.
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    Examples of the kinds of duties, powers, and functions assumed by 
an elected Speaker pro tempore from The Speaker include: administering 
the oath of office to new Members;(1) appointing 
conferees;(2) appointing committees to wait on the President 
and to inform him that the session's work is completed;(3) 
or that a quorum of both Houses is ready to receive his state of the 
Union message;(4) signing enrolled bills and joint 
resolutions during the adjournment of the House;(5) 
declaring recesses during a session;(6) and presiding at a 
joint session of the Congress.(7)
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 1. See Sec. 14.8, infra.
 2. See Sec. Sec. 14.9, 14.10, infra.
 3. See Sec. 14.11, infra.
 4. See Sec. 14.13, infra.
 5. See Sec. 14.14, infra.
 6. See Sec. Sec. 14.15, 14.16, infra.
 7. See Sec. 14.12, infra.                          -------------------
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Election by Resolution

Sec. 14.1 A Speaker pro tempore is elected by formal resolution.

    On Apr. 15, 1958,(8) Speaker pro tempore John W. 
McCormack, of Massachusetts, was elected by formal resolution to the 
office of Speaker pro tempore.
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 8. 104 Cong. Rec. 6436, 85th Cong. 2d Sess.
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        The Speaker Pro Tempore: The Chair requests the gentleman from 
    Oklahoma [Mr. (Carl) Albert] to assume the Chair.
        Mr. Albert assumed the chair.
        Mr. [Charles M.] Price [of Illinois]: Mr. Speaker, I offer a 
    resolution which I send to the Clerk's desk.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                              House Resolution 527

            Resolved, etc., That Hon. John W. McCormack, a 
        Representative from the State of Massachusetts, be, and he is 
        hereby, elected Speaker pro tempore during the absence of The 
        Speaker.
            Resolved. That the President and the Senate be notified by 
        the Clerk of the election of Hon. John W. McCormack as Speaker 
        pro tempore during the absence of The Speaker.

        The Speaker Pro Tempore [Mr. Albert]: The question is on the 
    resolution.

[[Page 564]]

        The resolution was agreed to and a motion to reconsider was 
    laid on the table.

Notification of President and Senate

Sec. 14.2 The President and the Senate are notified by the Clerk of the 
    election of a Speaker pro tempore.

    On Apr. 15, 1958,(9) House Resolution 527 was offered to 
elect the Speaker pro tempore John W. McCormack, of Massachusetts, as 
Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker:
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 9. 104 Cong. Rec. 6436, 85th Cong. 2d Sess.
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        Mr. [Charles M.] Price [of Illinois]: Mr. Speaker, I offer a 
    resolution. . . .

            Resolved, That Hon. John W. McCormack, a Representative 
        from the State of Massachusetts, be, and he is hereby, elected 
        Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker.
            Resolved, That the President and the Senate be notified by 
        the Clerk of the election of the Hon. John W. McCormack as 
        Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker.

        The resolution was adopted.

Election by Invitation of Speaker

Sec. 14.3 A Speaker who is ill may, under House practice, invite the 
    election of a Speaker pro tempore to serve during the absence of 
    the Speaker.

    On Apr. 2, 1940,(10) Speaker William B. Bankhead, of 
Alabama, having contracted a case of influenza, invited the election of 
a Speaker pro tempore.
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10. 86 Cong. Rec. 3846, 76th Cong. 3d Sess.
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        The Speaker: The Chair desires to make a brief personal 
    statement to the House.
        I dislike very much to do so, but, unfortunately, a few weeks 
    ago I contracted a very severe case of influenza which seems to be 
    holding on to me with great tenacity. My physician has advised me 
    to take a little rest, and I am sure the Members of the House will 
    be pleased to accord me this privilege.
        Mr. [John W.] McCormack [of Massachusetts]: Mr. Speaker, I 
    offer a resolution and ask for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                              House Resolution 451

            Resolved, That Hon. Sam Rayburn, a Representative from the 
        State of Texas, be, and he is hereby, elected Speaker pro 
        tempore during the absence of the Speaker.
            Resolved, That the President and the Senate be notified by 
        the Clerk of the election of Hon. Sam Rayburn as Speaker pro 
        tempore during the absence of the Speaker.

        The resolution was agreed to, and a motion to reconsider was 
    laid on the table.

Sec. 14.4 A Speaker who is not ill and who has not designated

[[Page 565]]

    a Speaker pro tempore may invite the election of a Speaker pro 
    tempore.

    On Mar. 24, 1944,(11) Speaker Sam Rayburn, of Texas, 
invited the election of a Speaker pro tempore.
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11. 90 Cong. Rec. 3114, 78th Cong. 2d Sess.
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        The Speaker: The Chair desires to make a statement.
        The Chair hopes by next Thursday a concurrent resolution will 
    be passed recessing the Congress over until the 11th or 12th of 
    April. It will be impossible for the present occupant of the chair 
    to be in Washington next week, and therefore he has asked the 
    gentleman from Georgia [Mr. (Robert C. W.) Ramspeck] to offer a 
    resolution.
        Mr. Ramspeck: Mr. Speaker, I offer the following resolution (H. 
    Res. 483) and ask for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

            Resolved, That Hon. John W. McCormack, a Representative 
        from the State of Massachusetts, be, and he is hereby, elected 
        Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker.
            Resolved, That the President and the Senate be notified by 
        the Clerk of the election of Hon. John W. McCormack as Speaker 
        pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker. The resolution 
        was agreed to.

Sec. 14.5 A Speaker pro tempore may be elected for reasons other than 
    the illness of the Speaker.

    On May 21, 1937,(12) Speaker William B. Bankhead, of 
Alabama, desiring to deliver a commencement address at the University 
of Alabama, invited the election of a Speaker pro tempore during that 
period of time when he would be absent.
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12. 81 Cong. Rec. 4898, 75th Cong. 1st Sess.
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        The Speaker: The Chair would like to make a brief statement.
        I have accepted an invitation to deliver the commencement 
    address at the University of Alabama, my alma mater, on Monday 
    next. While I am that far away, very candidly, I will state to you 
    gentlemen that I should like the privilege of remaining at my home 
    for just a few days. Under the rules of the House I could appoint a 
    Speaker pro tempore for three days, but under the circumstances, by 
    the indulgence of the House, I have requested the gentleman from 
    Texas, the majority leader [Sam Rayburn], to introduce a resolution 
    touching on the question.
        Mr. Rayburn: Mr. Speaker, I send to the Clerk's desk a 
    resolution at the request of the Speaker.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                              House Resolution 218

            Resolved, That Hon. Lindsay C. Warren, a Representative 
        from the State of North Carolina, be, and he is hereby, elected 
        Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker.
            Resolved, That the President and the Senate be notified by 
        the Clerk of the election of Hon. Lindsay C.

[[Page 566]]

        Warren as Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the 
        Speaker.

        The resolution was agreed to, and a motion to reconsider was 
    laid on the table.

    On July 1, 1939,(13) Speaker William B. Bankhead, of 
Alabama, invited the election of a Speaker pro tempore while he took a 
period of recreation and rest.
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13. 84 Cong. Rec. 8520, 8521, 76th Cong. 1st Sess.
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        The Speaker: The Speaker desires the indulgence of the House to 
    make a personal statement.
        It is realized that we have been in continuous session now for 
    six months and it has been a rather arduous, strenuous session of 
    the House. Under our system of government, The Speaker of the House 
    cannot make visits of recreation or take a rest, except by the 
    indulgence of the membership. I must confess I am a little bit 
    tired. Next week will not be a tremendously heavy week, so far as 
    our legislative program is concerned, and I have therefore 
    requested the gentleman from North Carolina [Mr. (Robert L.) 
    Doughton] to introduce a resolution which will give me a short 
    leave of absence.
        Mr. Doughton: Mr. Speaker, I submit a resolution and ask for 
    its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution as follows:

                              House Resolution 240

            Resolved, That Hon. Sam Rayburn, a Representative from the 
        State of Texas, be, and he is hereby, elected Speaker pro 
        tempore during the absence of the Speaker.
            Resolved, That the President and the Senate be notified by 
        the Clerk of the election of Hon. Sam Rayburn as Speaker pro 
        tempore during the absence of The Speaker.

        The resolution was agreed to.

    On Aug. 15, 1941,(14) Speaker Sam Rayburn, of Texas, 
invited the election of a Speaker pro tempore when he desired to leave 
for a short vacation beyond 10 days.
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14. 87 Cong. Rec. 7194, 7195, 77th Cong. 1st Sess.
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        The Speaker: The Chair desires at this time to make a short 
    statement. As you all know, for something like three years, and 
    especially the last 19\1/2\ months, the Chair has been very closely 
    tied to Washington. Although I have enjoyed hugely being here with 
    you ladies and gentlemen, I do have the very great desire of for a 
    few days sniffing a different atmosphere.
        I am homesick. I want to go home tomorrow. To all of you who go 
    home--and I hope you do--I trust you will find things fine at home 
    and that you will come back with a renewed vigor, imbued again with 
    the sentiment of your constituents. . . .
        Mr. [John W.] McCormack [of Massachusetts]: Mr. Speaker, in 
    offering the following resolution for the election of a Speaker pro 
    tempore and asking for its immediate consideration I know I state 
    the sentiments of all the Members when I say that I hope that you 
    have a most enjoyable rest in your white house and in future White 
    Houses.
        The Clerk read the resolution (H. Res. 298), as follows:

[[Page 567]]

            Resolved, That Hon. Clifton A. Woodrum, a Representative 
        from the State of Virginia, be, and he is hereby, elected 
        Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker.
            Resolved, That the President and the Senate be notified by 
        the Clerk of the election of Hon. Clifton A. Woodrum as Speaker 
        pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker.

        The resolution was agreed to.
        The Speaker: The gentleman from Virginia [Mr. Woodrum] will 
    present himself at the bar of the House for the purpose of taking 
    the oath.
        Mr. Woodrum of Virginia took the oath of office as Speaker pro 
    tempore.

    On June 9, 1949,(15) Speaker Sam Rayburn, of Texas, 
invited the election of a Speaker pro tempore when he desired to be 
away for two days and where the signing of enrolled bills would be 
necessary.
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15. 95 Cong. Rec. 7509, 81st Cong. 1st Sess.
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        The Speaker: It will not be possible for The Speaker to be here 
    on Monday or Tuesday of next week. For that reason, the Chair 
    recognizes the gentleman from Tennessee [Mr. (Albert A.) Gore].
        Mr. Gore: Mr. Speaker, I offer a resolution (H. Res. 243) and 
    ask for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

            Resolved, That Hon. John W. McCormack, a Representative 
        from the State of Massachusetts, be, and he is hereby, elected 
        Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker.
            Resolved, That the President and the Senate be notified by 
        the Clerk of the election of Hon. John W. McCormack as Speaker 
        pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker.

        The resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
        The Speaker: This action is taken for two reasons: First, The 
    Speaker will not be here Monday and Tuesday, and the immediate 
    necessity is that there might be some enrolled bills that must be 
    signed.
        Mr. McCormack appeared at the bar of the House and took the 
    oath of office.

Member Elected

Sec. 14.6 When the need arises for an elected Speaker pro tempore, the 
    designated Speaker pro tempore normally, but not always, is the 
    person elected.

    On Mar. 15, 1966,(16) Speaker John W. McCormack, of 
Massachusetts, having designated Representative Carl Albert, of 
Oklahoma, as Speaker pro tempore, a resolution was introduced to elect 
Mr. Albert as Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker.
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16. 112 Cong. Rec. 5823, 5824, 89th Cong. 2d Sess.
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        Mr. [Eugene J.] Keogh [of New York]: Mr. Speaker, I offer a 
    privileged resolution and ask for its immediate consideration.

[[Page 568]]

        The Clerk read the resolution as follows:

                                H. Res. 779

            Resolved, That Hon. Carl Albert, a Representative from the 
        State of Oklahoma, be, and he is hereby, elected Speaker pro 
        tempore during the absence of The Speaker.
            Resolved, That the President and the Senate be notified by 
        the Clerk of the election of the Honorable Carl Albert as 
        Speaker pro tempore during the absence of The Speaker.

        Mr. Keogh: Mr. Speaker, I want to mention that this resolution 
    is being offered at the request of the distinguished Speaker of the 
    House of Representatives.
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: (Mr. [Wilbur D.] Mills [of 
    Arkansas]):(17) The question is on the resolution.
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17. Parliamentarian's Note: Mr. Mills was designated as Speaker pro 
        tempore during the election of the Speaker pro tempore Carl 
        Albert.
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        The resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
        Mr. Albert assumed the Chair and the oath of office was 
    administered to him by Mr. [Emanuel] Celler, a Representative from 
    the State of New York.(18)
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18. Parliamentarian's Note: Speaker McCormack left for Boston at 4:30 
        p.m. on Mar. 15, 1966, to address a joint session of the 
        Massachusetts General Court (the legislature) on Mar. 16 and 
        participated in St. Patrick's Day festivities on the 17th. Mr. 
        Albert was elected as Speaker pro tempore so that he could sign 
        the Tax Adjustment Act of 1966 (H.R. 12752), which the 
        President wanted to sign later that day.
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Sec. 14.7 On rare occasions a Member other than the one designated 
    Speaker pro tempore by The Speaker is elected Speaker pro tempore 
    by the House.

    On Aug. 31, 1961,(19) the House was called to order by 
Speaker pro tempore Carl Albert, of Oklahoma, who laid before the House 
a letter from Speaker Sam Rayburn, of Texas. The proceedings were as 
follows:
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19. 107 Cong. Rec. 17765, 17766, 87th Cong. 1st Sess.
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        The Speaker Pro Tempore: The Chair lays before the House a 
    communication [from Speaker Rayburn] which the Clerk will read.
        The Clerk read as follows:
        The Speaker's Rooms,
        U.S. House of Representatives,
        Washington, D.C.

            I hereby designate the Hon. Carl Albert to act as Speaker 
        pro tempore today.
                                                    Sam Rayburn,
                                                          Speaker.
                               * * * * *

        Mr. [Francis E.] Walter [of Pennsylvania]: Mr. Speaker, I send 
    to the Speaker's table a resolution (H. Res. 445) and ask for its 
    immediate consideration.

    The resolution called for the election of Representative John W. 
McCormack, of Massachusetts,

[[Page 569]]

as Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker. The 
resolution was agreed to.
    Mr. McCormack assumed the Chair and the oath of office was 
administered to him.(20)
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20. Parliamentarian's Note: Speaker Rayburn last presided over the 
        House on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 1961, during a call of Calendar 
        Wednesday business. Because of illness, he departed for his 
        home in Bonham, Tex., on the morning of Aug. 31. Speaker 
        Rayburn died there on Nov. 16, 1961.
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Duties, Powers, Functions

Sec. 14.8 In the absence of the Speaker, an elected Speaker pro tempore 
    administers the oath of office to new Members, without the 
    requirement of unanimous consent of the House.

    On Jan. 10, 1966,(1) elected Speaker pro tempore Carl 
Albert, of Oklahoma, administered the oath of office to new Members 
without the requirement of unanimous consent of the 
House.(2)
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 1. 112 Cong. Rec. 6, 89th Cong. 2d Sess.
 2. Parliamentarian's Note: The Congressional Record does not 
        explicitly refer to the administration of the oath of office to 
        the new Members by the elected Speaker pro tempore, but such in 
        fact did take place.
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Sec. 14.9 An elected Speaker pro tempore appoints conferees without the 
    requirement of the unanimous consent of the House.

    On Sept. 20, 1961,(3) elected Speaker pro tempore John 
W. McCormack, of Massachusetts, appointed conferees for the House 
without requesting the unanimous consent of the House to make such 
appointments.
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 3. 107 Cong. Rec.. 20491, 87th Cong. 1st Sess.
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        Mr. [John L.] McMillan [of South Carolina]: Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the gentleman from Mississippi [Mr. 
    Abernethy] be excused as a conferee on the bill H.R. 5968, and that 
    another Member be designated as a conferee in his place.
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from South Carolina?
        There was no objection.
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: The Chair appoints to the committee of 
    conference the gentleman from Alabama [Mr. Huddleston] vice the 
    gentleman from Mississippi [Mr. Abernethy].
        The Clerk will notify the Senate of the appointment by the 
    Speaker pro tempore.

Sec. 14.10 An elected Speaker pro tempore appoints successor conferees 
    without the requirement of unanimous consent of the House.

    On Sept. 5, 1961,(4) elected Speaker pro tempore John W.

[[Page 570]]

McCormack, of Massachusetts, appointed a successor conferee to replace 
a Member who was resigning as a conferee. He laid before the House the 
Member's letter of resignation, saying:
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 4. 107 Cong. Rec. 18183, 87th Cong. 1st Sess.
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        The Chair appoints the gentleman from Michigan, Mr. Meader, as 
    a manager on the part of the House at the conference on S. 1653, 
    vice the gentleman from New York, Mr. Miller, who has been excused; 
    and the Clerk will notify the Senate thereof.

Sec. 14.11 An elected Speaker pro tempore appoints a committee to wait 
    on the President and inform him that the House has completed the 
    business of the session and is ready to adjourn.

    On Sept. 27 (legislative day, Sept. 25), 1961,(5) the 
House agreed on a resolution enabling elected Speaker pro tempore John 
W. McCormack, of Massachusetts, to appoint a committee to wait on the 
President to notify him that the two Houses had completed the business 
of the session and were ready to adjourn unless the President had some 
other communication to make to the Congress. After the House had agreed 
to a resolution for the appointment of the committee, the Speaker pro 
tempore declared:
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 5. 107 Cong. Rec. 21518, 21528, 87th Cong. 1st Sess.
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        The Chair appoints the gentleman from Oklahoma [Mr. Albert] and 
    the gentleman from Illinois [Mr. Arends] to wait on the President.

Sec. 14.12 An elected Speaker pro tempore presides at a joint session 
    of Congress to hear an address by the President.

    On June 10, 1952,(6) elected Speaker pro tempore John W. 
McCormack, of Massachusetts, presided at the joint session of the 
Congress to hear an address by President Harry S. Truman on the crisis 
in the steel industry.
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 6. 98 Cong. Rec. 6928-30, 82d Cong. 2d Sess.
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        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker pro tempore at 12 o'clock and 24 minutes p.m. . . .
        The Speaker pro tempore presided.
        . . . [T]he Vice President took the chair at the right of the 
    Speaker pro tempore. . . .
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: On the part of the House the Chair 
    appoints as members of the committee to escort the President of the 
    United States into the Chamber, the gentleman from Tennessee, Mr. 
    Priest; the gentleman from North Carolina, Mr. Doughton; and the 
    gentleman from Massachusetts, Mr. Martin.

        The Vice President [Alben W. Barkley, of Kentucky]: On the part 
    of the Senate, the Chair appoints as members of the committee of 
    escort the Senator from Arizona, Mr. McFarland; the Senator from 
    New Hampshire, Mr. Bridges; and the Senator from South Carolina, 
    Mr. Maybank. . . .

[[Page 571]]

        At 12:30 o'clock p.m. the Doorkeeper announced the President of 
    the United States.
        The President of the United States, escorted by the committee 
    of Senators and Representatives, entered the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives and stood at the Clerk's desk. [Applause, the 
    Members rising.]
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: Members of the Congress, I have the 
    distinguished honor of presenting to you the President of the 
    United States.
        The President: Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, Members of the 
    Congress, I should like to report to the Congress on certain events 
    that have happened in connection with the current dispute in the 
    steel industry since I last communicated with Congress on that 
    subject. . . .
        At 12 o'clock; and 50 minutes p.m., the President, accompanied 
    by the committee of escort, retired from the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives. . . .
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: The Chair declares the joint session 
    of the two Houses now dissolved.
        Thereupon (at 12 o'clock and 52 minutes p.m.) the joint session 
    of the two Houses was dissolved.

Actions Requiring Authorization

Sec. 14.13 Even though the Speaker pro tempore is elected, he must be 
    authorized by resolution to appoint a committee to notify the 
    President that a quorum of each House has assembled and is ready to 
    receive his state of the Union message.

    On Jan. 10, 1966,(7) elected Speaker pro tempore Carl 
Albert, of Oklahoma, pursuant to a resolution authorizing him to do so, 
appointed a committee to notify the President that a quorum of each 
House had assembled and that the Congress was ready to receive any 
communication that he may be pleased to make.
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 7. 112 Cong. Rec. 6, 89th Cong. 2d Sess.
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        Mr. [Hale] Boggs [of Louisiana]: Mr. Speaker, I offer a 
    preferential resolution and ask for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

                                  H. Res. 628

            Resolved, That a committee of three members be appointed by 
        the Speaker pro tempore on the part of the House of 
        Representatives to join with the committee on the part of the 
        Senate, to notify the President of the United States that a 
        quorum of each House is assembled, and Congress is ready to 
        receive any communication that he may be pleased to make.

        The resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: The Chair appoints as members of the 
    committee on the part of the House to join with the committee on 
    the part of the Senate to notify the President of the United States 
    that a quorum of each

[[Page 572]]

    House is assembled and that the Congress is ready to receive any 
    communication he may be pleased to make, the gentleman from 
    Louisiana [Mr. Boggs], the gentleman from New York [Mr. Celler], 
    and the gentleman from Michigan [Mr. Gerald R. Ford].

Sec. 14.14 Even though the Speaker pro tempore is elected, he must be 
    authorized to sign enrolled bills and joint resolutions during an 
    adjournment of the House.

    On July 7, 1958,(8) Speaker Sam Rayburn, of Texas, 
designated John W. McCormack, of Massachusetts, Speaker pro tempore in 
writing. That same day Speaker pro tempore McCormack was elected 
Speaker pro tempore during the absence of the Speaker.
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 8. 104 Cong. Rec. 13061, 85th Cong. 2d Sess.
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    On July 10, 1958,(9) unanimous consent was requested 
that notwithstanding the adjournment of the House Speaker pro tempore 
McCormack be authorized to sign any enrolled bills and joint 
resolutions duly passed by the two Houses.
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 9. 104 Cong. Rec. 13418, 85th Cong. 2d Sess.
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        Mr. [Carl] Albert [of Oklahoma]: Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that notwithstanding the adjournment of the House until 
    Monday next, the clerk be authorized to receive messages from the 
    Senate and that the Speaker pro tempore be authorized to sign any 
    enrolled bills and joint resolutions duly passed by the two Houses 
    and found truly enrolled.
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Oklahoma?
        There was no objection.

    On Sept. 21, 1961,(10) unanimous consent was requested 
that notwithstanding the adjournment of the House, elected Speaker pro 
tempore John W. McCormack, of Massachusetts, be authorized to sign 
enrolled bills and joint resolutions during the adjournment.
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10. 107 Cong Rec. 20572, 87th Cong. 1st Sess.
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        Mr. [Carl] Albert [of Oklahoma]: Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that notwithstanding the adjournment of the House until 
    tomorrow, the Speaker pro tempore [Mr. McCormack] be authorized to 
    sign any enrolled bills and joint resolutions duly passed by the 
    two Houses and found truly enrolled.
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Oklahoma?
        There was no objection.

Sec. 14.15 Even though a Speaker pro tempore is elected, in the absence 
    of the Speaker he must be authorized to declare recesses during a 
    session.

    On Aug. 31, 1961, the Honorable John W. McCormack, of Mas

[[Page 573]]

sachusetts, was elected as Speaker pro tempore in the absence of 
Speaker Sam Rayburn, of Texas, because of illness.
    On Sept. 16, 1961,(11) a unanimous-consent request was 
offered by Representative Carl Albert, of Oklahoma, enabling Speaker 
pro tempore McCormack to declare recesses subject to the call of the 
Chair during the rest of the session.
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11. 107 Cong. Rec. 19800, 87th Cong. 1st Sess.
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        Mr. Albert: And if the gentleman will yield for the purpose, I 
    would like also to ask unanimous consent that any time during the 
    remainder of this session it may be in order for the Speaker pro 
    tempore to declare recesses subject to the call of the Chair. . . .
        Mr. [Charles A.] Halleck [of Indiana]: Mr. Speaker, reserving 
    the right to object, may I say in connection with this request that 
    this matter has been called to my attention. It is standard 
    procedure as we come up to the end of a session. I sincerely hope 
    it is not objected to, because its adoption will very materially 
    expedite the business of the House of Representatives to the 
    objective of sine die adjournment.
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Oklahoma?
        There was no objection

Sec. 14.16 An elected Speaker pro tempore who is authorized to declare 
    recesses at any time during the remainder of a session may declare 
    a recess despite an objection to a unanimous-consent request that 
    the House adjourn.

    On Sept. 23 (legislative day, Sept. 22), 1961,(12) 
unanimous consent was requested to adjourn to meet at an hour other 
than that prescribed as the daily hour of meeting. When objection was 
heard, elected Speaker pro tempore John W. McCormack, of Massachusetts, 
declared a recess.
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12. 107 Cong. Rec. 20854, 20867, 87th Cong. 1st Sess.
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        Mr. [Carl] Albert [of Oklahoma]: Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that when the House adjourns today, it adjourn to meet at 
    10 o'clock a.m. tomorrow.
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Oklahoma?
        Mr. [H. Carl] Andersen of Minnesota: I object. . . .
        The Speaker Pro Tempore: The House will stand in recess until 
    10 o'clock tomorrow morning.

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