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Results 51 - 60 of 16569 <Prev   1 . . . 4 5 6 7 8 . . . 1657 Next>    

51.
Government Accountability Office Reports and Comptroller General Decisions. Other Written Product. Wednesday, September 3, 2008.
...In fiscal year 2007, domestic and foreign companies received over $75 billion from the sale of oil and gas produced from federal lands and waters, according to the Department of the Interior (Interior), and these companies paid the federal government about $9 billion in royalties for this oil and gas production. The government also collects other revenues in rents, taxes, and other fees, and the sum of all revenues received is referred to as the "government take." The terms and conditions under which the government collects these revenues are referred to as the "oil and gas fiscal system." This report (1) evaluates government take and the attractiveness for investors of the federal oil and gas fiscal system, (2) evaluates how the absence of flexibility in this system has led to large foregone revenues from oil and gas production on federal lands and waters, and (3) assesses what Interior has done to monitor the performance and appropriateness of the federal oil and gas fiscal system. To address these issues, we reviewed expert studies and interviewed government and industry officials. More Information
52.
Government Accountability Office Reports and Comptroller General Decisions. Other Written Product. Monday, September 1, 2008.
... United States Government Accountability Office GAO Report to Congressional Committees TERRORISM INSURANCE Status of Efforts by Policyholders to Obtain Coverage September 2008 GAO-08-1057 What GAO FoundWhy GAO Did This Study Highlights Accountability Integrity Reliability September 2008 TERRORISM INSURANCE Status of Efforts by Policyholders to... More Information
53.
Government Accountability Office Reports and Comptroller General Decisions. Other Written Product. Monday, September 1, 2008.
... United States Government Accountability Office GAO Report to Congressional Committees DEFENSE BUDGET Independent Review Is Needed to Ensure DOD’s Use of Cost Estimating Tool for Contingency Operations Follows Best Practices September 2008 GAO-08-982 What GAO Found United States Government Accountability Office Why GAO Did This Study Highlights... More Information
54.
Government Accountability Office Reports and Comptroller General Decisions. Other Written Product. Friday, August 29, 2008.
...In 2006, the subcommittee concluded there was a need for increased accountability and transparency for unspent funds in federal programs and agencies, and requested GAO review the status of balances not drawn down by grantees by the time the grants' period of availability had ended. GAO was asked to answer these questions: (1) to what extent are there undisbursed grant balances in expired grant accounts and do they share any program characteristics?; and (2) do these expired grants share grant management challenges and how have federal agencies improved grant closeout and diminished undisbursed balances? To do this, GAO analyzed grant balance data from the largest federal grant payment system; reviewed grant management problems and corrective actions from more than 150 audit reports; and reviewed guidance from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Code of Federal Regulations. More Information
55.
Government Accountability Office Reports and Comptroller General Decisions. Comptroller General Decision. Thursday, August 28, 2008.
...Protest of firm's elimination from competition due to perceived organizational conflict of interest (OCI) is sustained where agency failed to evaluate protester's proposed mitigation plan, failed to consider whether protester would actually be in a position to evaluate its own products, and did not give protester notice of and an opportunity to respond to OCI findings prior to firm's disqualification. More Information
56.
Government Accountability Office Reports and Comptroller General Decisions. Other Written Product. Thursday, August 28, 2008.
...Increasingly, U.S. consumers are recycling their old electronics to prevent the environmental harm that can come from disposal. Concerns have grown, however, that some U.S. companies are exporting these items to developing countries, where unsafe recycling practices can cause health and environmental problems. Items with cathode-ray tubes (CRT) are particularly harmful because they can contain 4 pounds of lead, a known toxin. To prevent this practice, since January 2007 EPA began regulating the export of CRTs under its CRT rule, which requires companies to notify EPA before exporting CRTs. In this context, GAO examined (1) the fate of exported used electronics, (2) the effectiveness of regulatory controls over the export of these devices, and (3) options to strengthen federal regulation of exported used electronics. Among other things, GAO reviewed waste management surveys in developing countries, monitored e-commerce Web sites, and posed as foreign buyers of broken CRTs. More Information
57.
Government Accountability Office Reports and Comptroller General Decisions. Comptroller General Decision. Monday, August 25, 2008.
...1. Determination to cancel invitation for bids after bid opening was unobjectionable where all bids exceeded funding allocated for project, notwithstanding protester's challenge to validity of funding estimate and reasonableness of low responsive bid.

2. After cancellation of solicitation, agency decision to lease storage containers under Economy Act, without conducting a new competition, was unobjectionable where lease was consistent with requirements of act and applicable regulations require that agency use pre-existing contract for all such leases. More Information

58.
Government Accountability Office Reports and Comptroller General Decisions. Correspondence. Monday, August 25, 2008.
...In 2005, as a result of Hurricane Katrina, more than 1,600 people lost their lives and more than a million were driven from their homes on the Gulf Coast. Tens of thousands of homes in New Orleans were flooded, many requiring either demolition or gutting before reconstruction. Nearly 3 years later, the New Orleans area still faces significant debris management issues and challenges. For example, the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) stated that while the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) estimated in July 2008 that it had funded about 16,900 home demolitions, an estimated 6,100 homes remained to be demolished around the New Orleans area. The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act) establishes programs and processes for the federal government to provide major disaster and emergency assistance to states, local governments, tribal nations, and others. FEMA has the responsibility for administering the provisions of the Stafford Act, including approving and funding the assistance provided under it. This assistance has been provided to the Gulf Coast under the Department of Homeland Security's National Response Framework (formerly called the National Response Plan). In New Orleans, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps of Engineers) was the primary federal agency responsible for providing debris removal and disposal until it concluded its response activities in September 2007. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the coordinator of federal emergency support for oil and hazardous materials releases, also assisted the Corps of Engineers and LDEQ with debris removal and disposal and continues to undertake Katrina response activities, such as monitoring landfill operations. The federal law addressing the management of hazardous and other solid wastes--the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act--addresses nonhazardous solid wastes under subtitle D. The act prohibits "open dumping"--the disposal of solid waste in landfills failing to meet the relevant criteria--and requires state plans to prohibit the establishment of open dumps. RCRA provides EPA with limited authority to address environmental problems at solid waste landfills. The Water Resources Development Act of 2007 directed GAO to address certain activities related to debris management in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. We briefed relevant committee staff on the results of our work on March 6, 2008, and held subsequent discussions with them in March and April 2008. We are following up with this report, which provides more detail on the topics covered in the briefing. This report describes (1) key plans and practices federal and state agencies are currently using to oversee debris removal and disposal in response to Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, (2) enforcement actions state and federal agencies have taken related to Katrina debris removal and disposal, and (3) actions by LDEQ and EPA in response to potential environmental issues at the Gentilly Landfill in New Orleans. More Information
59.
Government Accountability Office Reports and Comptroller General Decisions. Comptroller General Decision. Monday, August 25, 2008.
...Protest challenging contracting officer's affirmative determination of responsibility regarding the awardee is dismissed where the assertion on which the protest is based--failure to consider allegedly poor business performance by principal members of the awardee during their association with a previous firm--does not constitute the type of information that, by its nature, would be expected to have a strong bearing on whether the awardee should be found responsible, as required under Government Accountability Office (GAO) Bid Protest Regulations for GAO review of such a protest. More Information
60.
Government Accountability Office Reports and Comptroller General Decisions. Correspondence. Friday, August 22, 2008.
...The principal role of the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) is to investigate accidental releases of regulated or extremely hazardous substances to determine the conditions and circumstances that led to the accident and to identify the cause or causes so that similar accidents might be prevented. Accidental releases of these toxic and hazardous chemicals occur frequently and often have serious consequences. CSB reported to Congress that the agency received notification of approximately 900 chemical accidents in calendar year 2007, and that 31 of these accidents were serious or even fatal events that warranted the commitment of CSB investigators. CSB began operating in 1998 as an independent agency created under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The act directs CSB to (1) investigate and report on the cause or probable cause of any accidental chemical releases from stationary sources resulting in a fatality, serious injury, or substantial property damages; (2) make recommendations to reduce the likelihood or consequences of accidental chemical releases and propose corrective measures; and (3) establish regulations for reporting accidental releases. The agency publishes investigative reports and issues safety studies and videos to help prevent future accidents. Congress modeled CSB after the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), which has a similar public safety mission. Like NTSB, CSB has no enforcement authority and a limited regulatory role. As outlined in the authorizing statute, CSB is to be managed by a five-member board. Currently the board has one vacancy. CSB received an appropriation of $9.4 million for fiscal year 2008 and had 39 staff as of January 30, 2008. More Information

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