Farmington Public Library

The newest Depository Spotlight is on the Farmington Public Library in northwest New Mexico. Farmington Public Library is one of 12 depository libraries in the state of New Mexico. It serves a city of 45,500 that is the commercial hub of the Four Corners region where Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico meet. Many patrons live outside the city, including some who have to drive as much as two hours to visit the library.

The library occupies a beautiful building opened in 2003. Located within this exciting structure are many flexible spaces with state-of-the-art technology. Computers are located throughout, as well as flat-screen monitors which inform patrons of upcoming programs, local news, and entertainment.

Depository Coordinator Betty Decker describes it as having "an organic feel that allows people to feel like they are outdoors when they are actually indoors. The quiet reading areas, study rooms, and program spaces all combine as an invitation to our patrons to stop by and stay awhile, to enjoy the free services and programs that we offer."

The building’s design leads library patrons to the collections and services housed within.

The Farmington Public Library serves a culturally-diverse community of patrons, and Betty Decker feels that the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) helps the library provide services and support to the varied cultural groups in the region. She points out that the community is also home to a large community of U.S. veterans, who make particular use of depository services and resources.

The Farmington Public Library works hard to connect its patrons with Government information in a variety of formats. The library makes available public access computers which provide Internet access for patrons who either lack other access altogether or for whom Internet connectivity is unreliable in far-flung rural areas.

The U.S. Government Publishing Office salutes the Farmington Public Library and its staff for their efforts to bring U.S Government information to patrons in a large geographic area where access to library resources is scarce.